Health Care

Listen here for the latest updates on medical procedures, health insurance and managed care. Aired on audio broadcasts from leading radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from Studying Pesticides and Other Risks to Expecting Moms & Babies

Healthcare Triage Podcast

08:29 min | Last week

A highlight from Studying Pesticides and Other Risks to Expecting Moms & Babies

"I hope you might first like we always do talk about. What you do and how you got there. What made you decide you want to be a doctor then into o-b-gyn and from there to get involved in research and in the areas you're interested in researching? Sure. I'd have to. You know, I never really had that sort of lightning bolt moment that said I wanted to be a doctor. It just sort of came to me one day in high school, and I thought, sure, that sounds like a cool thing to do. And it sort of happened that way and everything went well for me. Then during medical school, as I was going through my rotations, as you know, you rotate in all sorts of different specialties. And really it wasn't until the end of my third year and I got to the OB rotation and didn't really have any desire to do it, but it had everything I wanted in medicine. It had some primary care. I love to operate. And then there's just nothing like delivering babies. And so it was exactly what I wanted to do. And when I came home, halfway through the rotation and told my wife, she said, you know, you've been happier and this rotation when you've come home and more excited to talk about your days than you had on any other rotation. And so she sort of figured I was gonna lean that way too. And then went into residency and during residency I just wanted to answer the why questions. There were so many things we didn't know. And so I really got bit by the research bug in that way and trying to answer those questions about why we do things the way we do things and how can we improve outcomes. So what do you like to focus on in those areas? Like, with respect to trying to improve outcomes, I assume it's more for delivering more for babies than it is for gynecology but tell me if I'm wrong. But what specifically are you interested in? Yeah, I am a general o-b-gyn, so I like all of obstetrics and gynecology, but in the research area I am mostly focused in obstetrics. In improving pregnancy outcomes, reducing risks so that we can at the end of the day, everybody's goal is a happy mom and a happy baby. And so if we can achieve that and if we can find ways to help us achieve that for this new family, that's really the goal. So one of the things that has been making the news recently is I've been reading about plastics and concerns about some different kinds of chemicals or exposures and how those would relate to pregnancy. And often I'm never sure if those are overblown or real, but I know you do work in this area specifically something called the heartland study. So I was hoping you could tell us a bit about that and a bit about whether I should be worried about these things. Sure, you know, the heartland study is a new study that we started just about a year ago. We've recruited over a hundred women here at IU so far. The planned recruitment is 2000 women, and we're really trying to expand into the whole state because we want rural women who are pregnant to also be in this cohort as well. And it's really about environmental exposures. It's not necessarily as much plastics, but it is pesticides, really looking at how farmers are waging this war against weeds. And against insects and other pests and what are those chemicals that are helping increase crop yields? What are they doing to our health? And so what we're doing is recruiting a cohort of women that's going to be multiple site across the Midwest and really trying to understand and measure these pesticide levels in pregnant women's urine and then also looking at the pediatric outcomes and following these kids out for several years to look at what kind of developmental impacts the exposures may have. So when we're talking about pesticides and exposure to them, is it that these mothers live near farmland or sort of water runoff or other things are leading to their exposure? Or is it that this just gets on food in general? And no matter where you live, you're going to get exposed. Or is it something else? The short answer is yes, to all of those. We know that these are sprayed on crops and they get into the environment that way, but most of the exposure for women, for instance, in a downtown urban area is going to come from food. We also know some of these environmental exposures happen just in dust particles that travel around. And so there's a lot of different ways that people can get exposures. And that's one of the reasons why we're doing the study and taking really detailed histories of what are you eating and water supply. We've worked with some of our environmental health folks here at IU in the past looking at how can we understand where your water sources or your own well water, are you on city water, and what are the ways that you might be exposed to these things? But we know that exposure is really common. And we want to understand what those concentrations look like for women and for their babies and what potential impacts it could have on the pregnancy outcomes. So are you just doing questionnaires? Are you actually having to travel and test people's food and water and what they're consumer? Right now it's with questionnaires. However, as we get as we move along in the project, we may think about if we've got pockets of participants who are in different areas we may go out and measure those things. We would have to get funding for that. But that is something that's in the back of our minds to do. And when you talk, are you also looking at air quality and things like that or is it for the most part just food at the moment? So most of it is food, however, what we are getting is we're getting addresses for all of these participants. And so we'll be able to go into public ag databases and other air quality databases to look at some of those things based on their location physically. And what kind of outcomes you're looking for? We're looking at the various common outcomes that we look at in pregnancy preterm birth, growth restricted babies, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and then how the babies will grow and develop. That's the phase two component of the project. Are you expecting to find that there are serious problems? I mean, if this is one of those where I'd be horrified to learn that people are consuming chemicals and then there are bad outcomes. Or are these things incredibly rare and you're trying to fix things at the margins? From other work that's been done, we know that a lot of these substances are very prevalent in the urine, particularly in women in Indiana since we are such an agricultural state. And there have been some association studies that have pointed to potential exposures with increased risks of some pregnancy outcomes that are things like growth restricted babies and shorter gestational length. So what we want to do is in a bigger study and a little bit more robust of a study to measure these concentrations to see if it's just any exposure or if there's a dose effect exposure that the higher your concentrations of these chemicals in your urine are that the worse your outcomes might be. And do you envision that the outcomes from this would be telling people to eat or live differently or it would be to change regulations and how we actually use some of these chemicals? It is very possible that some of the information that we are able to gather from this could definitely inform public policy and could inform people's choices. We want to make sure we have good rock solid data and before we start to get into any kind of other public education and advocacy work. But that is part of our funding agency whose funding this project, the heartland health research alliance, they definitely have an I two that next step as to how do we get science translated into society? Is there a lot of variation between how farmers use these chemicals or I mean to the point where you need to know, okay, it's not just that you ate a lot of vegetables, but that you eat a lot of carrots and it's this kind of carrots and that comes from this farm. We aren't capturing which farm these things come from. Although that may be a component we need to look at in the future. However, our dietary questionnaire is pretty detailed about which vegetables and which components and how much of your diet is quote unquote organic

Midwest Preeclampsia Gestational Diabetes Heartland Health Research Alli Indiana
A highlight from Health Disparities Cause More Health Issues (with Dr/ Howard)

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:41 min | Last week

A highlight from Health Disparities Cause More Health Issues (with Dr/ Howard)

"Think of us as your caregiver, best friend. When I learned that despite eating as healthy as possible, we can still have undernourished brains, I was frustrated. I also live in a farming community, so I'm aware that our food isn't grown as well as we need. Learning about neuro reserves relevant and how its formulated to fix this problem convinced me to give them a try. Now I know many of you are skeptical as was I. However, I know it's working because of one simple change. My sweet tooth is gone. I didn't expect that and it's not something other users have commented on, but here's some truth. My brain always wanted something sweet. Now, fruit usually did the trick, but not always. One bad night's sleep would fire up my sugar craving so much, they were almost impossible to ignore. You ever have your brain screaming for a donut? Well, for me, those days are gone. It's been about 6 months since I started taking the supplement and I have no regrets. I believe in my results so much that I'm passing on my 15% discount to you. Try it for two or three months and see if you have a miraculous sweet tooth cure, or maybe just better focus and clarity. It's definitely worth a try. Their link is in my show notes. The COVID pandemic didn't shine the brightest light on the consequences of our health disparities in this country. Well, I don't know what will. By favorite resident podcast neuropsychologist, doctor Christopher Howard wanted to talk about why African Americans don't like to go to the doctor. I know why I don't like to go, but it is not the same at all. This is a very informative conversation, we started on the healthcare disparities, moved on to other topics and then came back to healthcare. I think you're going to find doctor Christopher Howard's insights, wonderful, informative, and I hope it gives us some enlightenment into other areas we need to focus on helping improve or just understanding so that all of us can get the best healthcare to allow us to age gracefully and as well as possible. Back with us today is our favorite neuropsychologist, doctor Christopher Howard, and we are going to be talking a little bit off of the normal topics today, but we're going to be talking about why African Americans don't like to go to the doctor. Hopefully we can make some suggestions on how to change that. So thanks for joining me again, Christopher. Absolutely. Thank you for having me. You're welcome. So I know why I don't like to go to the doctor 'cause it's just not real fun. You know, they weigh you, and then they tell you you're overweight and then, you know, and you're already don't feel good. That's my excuse. But you brought up this topic so why do African Americans not like to go to the doctor? Yeah. Well, once again, thank you for having me on your show. I think we always have great conversations. And you know, I should have seen symptoms like sometimes like when I go to the doctors like I always joke with the nurse or whoever is like putting into the background. It's like being the worst part is spending on the scale and finding how much you weigh. Because it's like no matter what you do, it's always like, you know, I can't make it go the other way. It's always going up. But, you know, this is an interesting topic because one of the things that it's like doing different pieces of the puzzle. Together so that we can understand what's going on. So one of the first pieces of puzzle that we can look at is we recognize health disparities. We look at we say African Americans over the age of 20, 44% of demand for each women has some very form of cardiovascular disease, African Americans have developed Alzheimer's that are two to three times white individuals. The birth complications during pregnancy African American women are three times as high compared to other groups of people, but then a society like, okay, well, all these disparities persist, then it should all be like us rushing down to get to but that's not necessarily the case. And a lot of times people talk about, well, tuskegee to the sticky. But I think that mister Sessions tuskegee and for the individuals who are underwear tuskegee essentially what happened for almost 70 years individuals had syphilis and rather than receiving care for simplest, they were just given a placebo because American government wanted to see what would that be like if syphilis remain untreated. And what it did was not only to create distrust with the medical system and the government or whatever the case might be. But it also substantiated beliefs that doctors are not good for people. And sometimes what we kind of are good for African Americans. And so sometimes which would kind of run into it's like availability heuristics, right? Where, okay, the neighbor down the street or remember the church or whomever they went to the doctor and it never came back right, right? So people started saying like, hey, you know, if you go to the doctor, you know, you're not going to come back normal stuff like that. So that's one of the things that kind of perpetuated this whole notion of not going to the doctors. But also sometimes what you can have to look at also is just like a certain communities, right? Because America is still segregated. And due to redlining. So I was reading the article most kind of interesting because what I was looking at was that the elf so before I go from another tanger, the red line is when individuals

Christopher Howard Alzheimer's Syphilis Christopher Cardiovascular Disease American Government America
A highlight from Health Disparities Cause More Health Issues (with Dr/ Howard)

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:41 min | Last week

A highlight from Health Disparities Cause More Health Issues (with Dr/ Howard)

"Think of us as your caregiver, best friend. When I learned that despite eating as healthy as possible, we can still have undernourished brains, I was frustrated. I also live in a farming community, so I'm aware that our food isn't grown as well as we need. Learning about neuro reserves relevant and how its formulated to fix this problem convinced me to give them a try. Now I know many of you are skeptical as was I. However, I know it's working because of one simple change. My sweet tooth is gone. I didn't expect that and it's not something other users have commented on, but here's some truth. My brain always wanted something sweet. Now, fruit usually did the trick, but not always. One bad night's sleep would fire up my sugar craving so much, they were almost impossible to ignore. You ever have your brain screaming for a donut? Well, for me, those days are gone. It's been about 6 months since I started taking the supplement and I have no regrets. I believe in my results so much that I'm passing on my 15% discount to you. Try it for two or three months and see if you have a miraculous sweet tooth cure, or maybe just better focus and clarity. It's definitely worth a try. Their link is in my show notes. The COVID pandemic didn't shine the brightest light on the consequences of our health disparities in this country. Well, I don't know what will. By favorite resident podcast neuropsychologist, doctor Christopher Howard wanted to talk about why African Americans don't like to go to the doctor. I know why I don't like to go, but it is not the same at all. This is a very informative conversation, we started on the healthcare disparities, moved on to other topics and then came back to healthcare. I think you're going to find doctor Christopher Howard's insights, wonderful, informative, and I hope it gives us some enlightenment into other areas we need to focus on helping improve or just understanding so that all of us can get the best healthcare to allow us to age gracefully and as well as possible. Back with us today is our favorite neuropsychologist, doctor Christopher Howard, and we are going to be talking a little bit off of the normal topics today, but we're going to be talking about why African Americans don't like to go to the doctor. Hopefully we can make some suggestions on how to change that. So thanks for joining me again, Christopher. Absolutely. Thank you for having me. You're welcome. So I know why I don't like to go to the doctor 'cause it's just not real fun. You know, they weigh you, and then they tell you you're overweight and then, you know, and you're already don't feel good. That's my excuse. But you brought up this topic so why do African Americans not like to go to the doctor? Yeah. Well, once again, thank you for having me on your show. I think we always have great conversations. And you know, I should have seen symptoms like sometimes like when I go to the doctors like I always joke with the nurse or whoever is like putting into the background. It's like being the worst part is spending on the scale and finding how much you weigh. Because it's like no matter what you do, it's always like, you know, I can't make it go the other way. It's always going up. But, you know, this is an interesting topic because one of the things that it's like doing different pieces of the puzzle. Together so that we can understand what's going on. So one of the first pieces of puzzle that we can look at is we recognize health disparities. We look at we say African Americans over the age of 20, 44% of demand for each women has some very form of cardiovascular disease, African Americans have developed Alzheimer's that are two to three times white individuals. The birth complications during pregnancy African American women are three times as high compared to other groups of people, but then a society like, okay, well, all these disparities persist, then it should all be like us rushing down to get to but that's not necessarily the case. And a lot of times people talk about, well, tuskegee to the sticky. But I think that mister Sessions tuskegee and for the individuals who are underwear tuskegee essentially what happened for almost 70 years individuals had syphilis and rather than receiving care for simplest, they were just given a placebo because American government wanted to see what would that be like if syphilis remain untreated. And what it did was not only to create distrust with the medical system and the government or whatever the case might be. But it also substantiated beliefs that doctors are not good for people. And sometimes what we kind of are good for African Americans. And so sometimes which would kind of run into it's like availability heuristics, right? Where, okay, the neighbor down the street or remember the church or whomever they went to the doctor and it never came back right, right? So people started saying like, hey, you know, if you go to the doctor, you know, you're not going to come back normal stuff like that. So that's one of the things that kind of perpetuated this whole notion of not going to the doctors. But also sometimes what you can have to look at also is just like a certain communities, right? Because America is still segregated. And due to redlining. So I was reading the article most kind of interesting because what I was looking at was that the elf so before I go from another tanger, the red line is when individuals

Christopher Howard Alzheimer's Syphilis Christopher Cardiovascular Disease American Government America
US Panel Backs COVID-19 Boosters Only for Seniors, High-Risk

Start Here

02:02 min | 2 months ago

US Panel Backs COVID-19 Boosters Only for Seniors, High-Risk

"September twentieth was supposed to be an important date an approval from the food and drug administration. The cdc's committee of outside experts will be ready to start. These booster's booster program. During the week of september twenty weeks ago. The white house told us that starting september twentieth today americans would likely be able to sign up for a co vaccine. Booster shots visor. Certainly thinks it's vaccine needs a booster. The drug maker itself suggested after six months it's vaccine efficacy could wayne so on friday. Fda advisors met to discuss the idea of boosters but they emerged with a surprise recommendation of their own vote did not have. The majority voted no rather than agreeing with a vaccine maker rather than agreeing with some of the top scientists and the biden administration the fda advisory panel announced. That booster shots should be available soon but only for senior citizens and other select groups some important distinctions. Here let's break it down with. Abc's aimed flaherty who covers federal agencies. And and what is the actual recommendation here like. Who's going to be able to get a booster shot and win right. So i think it's important to remember. The fda actually hasn't decided yet. This is an advisory panel that was looking at the data and they were only looking at data that related to pfizer. So this is the first vaccine that rolled out. It rolled out mostly to nursing homes and health care workers more than nine months ago and what they did was. They looked at a lot of data. That was coming out of israel to determine whether or not people need a booster thaw back. The booster do improved protection by tenfold against confirmed infection and for elderly against superior kobe. Nineteen day said. They don't think boosters for all makes sense they think seniors and people who are at high risk of severe covet those two groups they think should have to go back and get an extra booster and they also said that they support people who are at serious risk because of their job so frontline workers healthcare workers even teachers. They mentioned they think those people might wanna consider getting extra

Food And Drug Administration Biden Administration CDC White House Wayne Flaherty Pfizer Israel
The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:58 min | 3 months ago

The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

"To federal funds established after the attacks of september eleven. Two thousand and one have paid around twelve billion dollars over the years. The money went to first responders. The families of those who died or people have gotten sick as a result of the terrorist carnage. Medical claims have been increasing in recent years. Many from people with cancer marketplace's samantha fields reports on the ongoing health costs connected to that day twenty years ago this weekend. Michael o'connell responded to the world trade center as a firefighter on nine eleven and spent the next few weeks working at ground zero five years later he got sick. I know the exact date. It was december thirty first. Two thousand six new year's eve. He went to bed that night filling healthy but when he woke up the next morning i literally had swollen limbs swollen ankles all my joints were inflamed by body kind of blew up to like twice the size. It was a pulmonologist figured out that he had a rare autoimmune disease called sarcoidosis that was attacking his skin and joints and told him he'd gotten it from breathing in toxins. The material that responders and survivors were exposed to when the towers collapsed was quite toxic. Dr michael crane treats a lot of nine eleven first responders through the world trade center health program clinic at mount sinai so huge huge burning buildings collapsing. Everything inside is burning and it collapses down into a pile and then an enormous. Dust cloud a lot of firefighters. Police officers and others at ground zero started getting sick almost immediately. I with what they called the world trade center cough then. Ptsd and depression. And eventually years later cancers this exposure has a really really long tail anyone who develops any kind of illness linked to nine eleven can get free healthcare through the world trade center health program but michael bearish a lawyer for nine eleven survivors says there are likely a lot of people dealing with nine eleven related health problems. Who don't know they're

Samantha Fields Michael O Connell Dr Michael Crane World Trade Center Health Prog World Trade Center Cancer Sarcoidosis Mount Sinai Ptsd Michael Bearish Depression
Idaho Begins Rationing Health Care as COVID-19 Surge Crushes Hospitals

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:04 min | 3 months ago

Idaho Begins Rationing Health Care as COVID-19 Surge Crushes Hospitals

"How the front page today of the times news. In twin falls idaho top story above the fold says quote. Hospital rationing begins northern idaho hospitals under crisis standards of care last night. I mentioned at the top of the show. That idaho has now had to do something no state ever wants to have to. They announced that they are implementing crisis standards of care for ten hospitals and medical centers in north idaho due to the overwhelming cova search. There this is the first time idaho's history that the state has ever had to take stuff like this. Here savvy p. describes what this announcement means in practical terms quote those deemed in most need of care and most likely to benefit from it are put on priority lists for scarce. Resources like icu. Bits others in dire need but with lower chances of surviving will be given comfort care to help keep them pain-free whether they succumb to their businesses or recover other patients with serious but not life. Threatening medical problems will face delays in receiving care until resources are

Idaho North Idaho ICU
U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

the NewsWorthy

01:07 min | 3 months ago

U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

"Drugmaker behind the highly addictive prescription. Painkiller oxycontin is formerly shutting down. We're talking about purdue pharma. Instead of selling opioids the company's resources will be put toward addressing the opioid epidemic mainly with addiction treatment and prevention programs. It will also compensate people and families who have been hurt by purdue products that was just one of the terms laid out in a wide ranging bankruptcy settlement. Judge approved this week. It also says the company's owners the sackler family will have to pay four and a half billion dollars to settle thousands of opioid related lawsuits. Without though this actors will be immune from any more lawsuits about opioids. And they'll still be one of the richest families in the world. They're worth about eleven billion dollars. A lot of states support. This plan saying it's the best way to help pay for a problem. That's only gotten worse. During the pandemic but others like connecticut. In washington planned to appeal saying the settlement shields. The sackler is too much from liability. They say the sackler is downplayed. How addictive opioids are while they aggressively marketed. Those drugs purdue pharma as a company has pleaded guilty twice for that but the sackler is have not been charged with crimes. At least not yet and they say they did nothing illegal or

Purdue Pharma Drugmaker Sackler Connecticut Washington
New York Times Slams Hospital Price Variation After Price Transparency Rule

Clark Howard Show

02:10 min | 3 months ago

New York Times Slams Hospital Price Variation After Price Transparency Rule

"So there's been this deep dive investigative report done by the new york times that i talked about one of the wall street journal back during the early part is summer and now there's this new one from the new york times finding that hospitals are not complying with the law at all like they should on disclosure of prices when you are going to be a patient in the hospital. It is an absolute national scandal. That hospitals have decided. It's better not to comply with the law even if they have to pay the fines then for you to have access to pricing data. Now the crazy thing is this was something that is fully bipartisan. It was originally proposed by the trump administration adopted fully by the biden administration. And there's great support for price transparency on hospital bills and hospital charges from everybody except the hospitals and the nation's health insurance companies. Why because they just flat out don't want you and me as consumers or employers that buy health coverage for their employees to have the information. Well let me tell you the information that the new york times dug up is explosive because they found over and over again that the same procedure could be a completely different price depending on who was paying which ensure was paying or listen to this one. This is crazy. So here's one from a hospital in milwaukee aurora. Saint luke's so an mri. If you have united hmo a thousand dollars and change if you have united's ppo four thousand dollars and change

The New York Times Biden Administration The Wall Street Journal Saint Luke Milwaukee Aurora HMO United
Texas 6-Week Abortion Ban in Effect After Supreme Court Stays Silent

NPR News Now

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

Texas 6-Week Abortion Ban in Effect After Supreme Court Stays Silent

"Texas law banning abortions after six weeks of pregnancy took effect today. The law effectively ends abortion rights in that state long before many women. No they are pregnant. It also allows private citizens to sue abortion providers and anyone who helps a woman enter pregnancy abortion providers had asked the us supreme court to intervene but the justices took no action.

Texas Us Supreme Court
Johnson & Johnson Says Booster Shot of Its COVID-19 Vaccine Increases Immunity

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:59 sec | 3 months ago

Johnson & Johnson Says Booster Shot of Its COVID-19 Vaccine Increases Immunity

"Johnson and Johnson says research shows the second dose of its covid vaccine generates a strong immune response, justifying a booster shot after eight months in a study J and J. Says recipients who got a booster generated virus fighting antibodies nine times higher than those seen about a month after a single dose, CBS News Medical Contributor Dr David Agus. Initially there was slightly less ImmuLogic response to the vaccine. Seeing the Moderna advisor. But what was seen in a small study was that the antibody response did not go down over six months as it had with Pfizer and Moderna. But what they also showed is giving a booster six months later increased significantly almost nine fold The antibody response, which is a surrogate for the overall immunity provided for the vaccine. The study looked at binding antibodies, which tagged the virus for destruction by the immune system. Being looked at J. And J says it's talking with the FDA and other health authorities about recommending a

J. Says Johnson Cbs News Medical Dr David Agus Moderna Immulogic Pfizer FDA
Most Americans Prefer to Work From Home, Survey Says

Red Eye Radio

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Most Americans Prefer to Work From Home, Survey Says

"A new report shows most Americans prefer to work from home. Brian Shook has the details. The survey conducted by background check platform good higher, asked 3500 People ages 21 to 59 about their working preferences. It found that 68% of respondents said they would rather work from home and 45. Percent would be willing to quit or look for a remote job if they were forced to come back into the office. The survey also found that 70% of workers would be willing to give up benefits to keep working from home, including health insurance paid time off and retirement

Brian Shook
Navigating Hormone Replacement Therapy as a Trans Person

Short Wave

01:43 min | 3 months ago

Navigating Hormone Replacement Therapy as a Trans Person

"The us healthcare system can be extremely difficult for trans folks. A lot of transpeople face medical discrimination. A lot of trans people can live in places where they don't have access to affirming providers or might not have insurance. Some trans people might have insurance. But it's might not be able to get procedures covered even if they have quote unquote good insurance. And that's an unfortunate reality. Even finding information about trans healthcare can be a challenge. You know just a lot of reporting on trans stuff. Tends to be by says people and this isn't always the case but a lot of the times that means like from the get go. It's kind of being portrayed in this light. That isn't actually geared towards transpeople. But is really more about centering. Says people that's james factoria a trance journalist who covers queer and trans news culture and health and they recently wrote a piece for vice called a beginner's guide to hormone replacement therapy gender affirming hormone therapy or hormone replacement therapy or each. Rt is basically just when you take hormones by any variety of delivery methods that can mean a shot or like a pill or a gel for example to align what you look like what you sound like to be more aligned with who you already know. You are and More colloquially a lot of trans people refer to it as a second.

James Factoria United States
FDA: Pfizer Vaccine Not for Off-Label Use in Young Kids

WBZ Afternoon News

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

FDA: Pfizer Vaccine Not for Off-Label Use in Young Kids

Overweight Adults Should Be Screened for Diabetes at 35, Experts Say

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Overweight Adults Should Be Screened for Diabetes at 35, Experts Say

"Epidemic in our country, is behind a call for earlier. Screenings. New national guidelines suggest overweight Americans start getting checked for the condition at 35 instead of 40. The government says three out of four U. S. Adults are too heavy, which increases the risk of type two diabetes. 14% of adults aged 18 and older have been diagnosed with it. 33% have been diagnosed with prediabetes. The guidance comes from the U. S Preventive Services Task Force and was published online in the Journal of the American Medalists Medical Association. It is a

U. S Preventive Services Task Diabetes Government Journal Of The American Medali
OxyContin Maker's Lawyer Warns of Long, Expensive Litigation

America's First News

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

OxyContin Maker's Lawyer Warns of Long, Expensive Litigation

"Lawyer for Purdue Pharma says the company's settlement plan is the only way to avoid long and expensive litigation. He made his case Monday to a bankruptcy judge is expected to rule this week on whether to accept OxyContin makers that reorganization plan. It calls for using the company's future profits and more than four billion from members of the Sackler family, who own it to abate the opioid crisis and pay individual victims. Members of the Sackler family would also get protection from lawsuits over opioids. Judge Robert Drain. It will also consider the views he's read in letters from people who lost loved ones to opioid

Purdue Pharma Oxycontin Sackler Judge Robert Drain
Biden: Full FDA Approval of Pfizer Vaccine 'a Key Milestone' in COVID-19 Fight

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Biden: Full FDA Approval of Pfizer Vaccine 'a Key Milestone' in COVID-19 Fight

The FDA Is Reminding Americans They Are Not Livestock

Atlanta's Morning News

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

The FDA Is Reminding Americans They Are Not Livestock

"All We are not livestock. The agency sent out a tweet Saturday, saying Just that, after reports that 70% of recent calls to Mississippi's poison control center came from people who took ivermectin and anti parasite drug for livestock reporter Mark Mayfield says health officials are fighting rumors. It's an effective treatment for Covid. They say the drug can be lethal in large enough doses. Gwinnett County

Mark Mayfield Poison Control Center Mississippi Covid Gwinnett County
Maven Clinic: First U.S. ‘Unicorn’ Dedicated to Women’s and Family Health

Equity

01:38 min | 3 months ago

Maven Clinic: First U.S. ‘Unicorn’ Dedicated to Women’s and Family Health

"And tasha we are going to start with maven which is around that you're fascinated by a company fascinated by and it's Kind of founded by women and invested in by women. Yeah i mean. It's a women lead company working on women's health that just raised around led by a woman. And it's the first unicorn and the family and children's health space. They work on creating a women's health clinic that sells to employers and kind of embeds in their benefits systems. And the woman can kind of get care anything between preconception to postpartum to even like their kids. Primary care up till ten years old so seeing that billion dollar valuation was a huge win for the women's health space this week. I'm surprised you didn't happen sooner. I mean just thinking about how big the market is that you just described. I mean healthcare in america is worth like forty eight trillion dollars a year and women and children through the asia. Ten is a good chunk of the population. I'm almost shocked that we didn't have the story ten years ago. Yes oh chrissy far. Who reported on the rise of digital health before it was even a beat that we could cover she's now at omar's ventures she hasn't invested in maven but when i talked to her about the round would it compared to when she was covering the company as a reporter. She was saying that she would often hear. Critics say that really horrible line of that women's health tunisia and she feels like it's kind of ironic now to see maven get into a space with new capital where it can actually help navigate through all the fragmented options with women's health. We've gotten to a stage that there are so many point solutions fertility for postpartum depression and now maven is hoping to be the place that brings them together and helps employers. Offer them all at one point. So we've definitely seen like that whole arc happen.

Tasha Chrissy Omar Asia America Tunisia Postpartum Depression
No Booster Shot in Sight for Johnson & Johnson Recipients

Dave Ramsey

00:26 sec | 3 months ago

No Booster Shot in Sight for Johnson & Johnson Recipients

"Peter Seymour Katie Airness, You'll probably have to wait a few more months to get a booster shot if you got the Johnson and Johnson Covid 19 vaccine, and that's even if you're immuno compromised. There's not a recommendation for you to now get another dose of that vaccine or to switch over and get an extra dose of one of the other vaccines. Dr. Melanie Swift leads the Mayo Clinic's vaccination program, She says boosters are only approved for immuno compromised individuals. Who got two shots of the

Peter Seymour Katie Airness Johnson Covid Dr. Melanie Swift Johnson Mayo Clinic
COVID-19 Booster Shots Are Recommended as Immunity Decreases Over Time

AP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 3 months ago

COVID-19 Booster Shots Are Recommended as Immunity Decreases Over Time

"Emergency rooms in parts of the South and west are overloaded again with covid patients as the delta variant surges, health officials say it's time for Americans to get covid booster shots. The AP saga Amangani has this officials say it's clear protection drops over time. At CDC Cheaper show. Wollensky says the plans call for an extra dose eight months after people get their second shot of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine to maximize vaccine induced protection. Those who got the Johnson and Johnson vaccine will likely need a booster too, though officials are waiting for more data.

Wollensky CDC Moderna Pfizer Johnson
U.S. To Begin Offering COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots

Scott Sloan

01:01 min | 3 months ago

U.S. To Begin Offering COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots

"Going to be needed for the covid vaccine with the nine o'clock for pulling up, right, copes breaking now, just remember Simple room rule. Eight months after your second shot. Get a booster shot people who receive the Mader to our fighter shots going to need a third. President Biden says the government's working out plans now to provide boosters FDA approval, The free shots will be made available. As showing reduced protection against mild and moderate covid illness in vaccinated adults over time. I don't know yet if there will be mass vaccination sites in the tri state to give those booster shots like there were when the vaccine first came out. Health experts say it may not be necessary since there are so many different providers locally now administering the vaccine.

President Biden Mader FDA Government
How to Recognise the Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

02:21 min | 4 months ago

How to Recognise the Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

"We start with the, the warning signs of Alzheimer's. What's what's an actual warning sign? And what is actual related to normal aging? Which is actually having this conversation with our friends. Last night, really good friend has a tendency to do about 15 things at once, and can't seem to remember what she's doing. And I think I know for because it hasn't changed in fifteen years that that's just life is and not paying attention. So we're can we start there? Sure. So, you know, there's certainly as we get older and our brain shrinks, we start off some capacity, some cognitive capacity that is, you know, considered the normal aging process, but you know, in today's day and age, we really give very little leeway for that just to remind people, you know, our grandparents, you know, in the 1960s, 70s 80s as they got older, they became senile and that word is really fallen out of favor. So we don't really talk so much about senility as the diagnosis or excuse for having, you know, poor memory or or function. It's not to say that the dog. Not any change that occurs with aging but we really won't get towards. Is there more of a problem. And when we start thinking about dementia, which is the big umbrella term that we think about and, and Alzheimer's disease being the most, common one, there has to be memory loss. So that's a that's, that's a symptom and assigned really, that has to be there. And then there has to be some sort of dysfunction in other what we call spheres of cognition, and probably the easiest one that to talk about is something called executive functioning. So when you go see a neurologist Thursday, we are you know, you're going to be asked questions about who does the who does the bills at home? What are what are the what are the what's the capacity to pay the bills and somebody who may be paid bills forever in their adult life? And all of a sudden now a spouse or a child has to double-check. There's late payments. There's overdrawn on a checking accounts things like that is the ability to sort of have this high-level executive wage. Ocean is a is really a sign that there's something perhaps going on, much more than just. Oh, I can't remember that

Alzheimer's Disease Dementia
Medical Bills Largest Source of U.S. Debt, Study Says

Kentuckiana's Saturday Morning News

01:28 min | 4 months ago

Medical Bills Largest Source of U.S. Debt, Study Says

"Doubt Covid has been in the news and not just covid. But believe it or not, People are getting sick in other ways as well. And it's really hampering most of Americans. I think we've all been down that road where we get that medical bill, and we're like, Are you kidding me? It's like, how am I going to afford this? Well, the cost of getting sick in the U. S. Is now drowning Americans in debt. A recent study says, medical bills or the largest source of debt in the U. S from 2009 to 2000 and 20. It's a big problem. CBS is Anna Warner takes a look. Florida resident Chad Kisses medical debt story began with severe pain from herniated discs in his neck last year. I really couldn't get out of bed for more than a few minutes. Doctors told the 39 year old who runs his own small pest control business, that he would need surgery. So we check to make sure his insurance would cover it. Then went ahead. The pain was excruciating. That was probably the most pain I've ever And through, but afterwards he got stuck with a bill for a facility charge. He says the insurance company refused to pay $145,000. He says the hospital then demanded payments of $1500 a month. Right? Told them that can't happen. Can we go with something lower? And they said No. So I just stopped answering their calls. When he couldn't pay. The hospital sued him. Is this one of those things that it hits you in the gut? And you're like, Oh, boy. You know now, what do I do? Um You know, And why is it happening to me?

Covid Anna Warner Chad Kisses U. CBS Florida
Lindsay Parks: An Osteopathic Family Physician's Perspective on Healthcare

Perspectives on Healthcare

02:57 min | 4 months ago

Lindsay Parks: An Osteopathic Family Physician's Perspective on Healthcare

"What does quality healthcare mean to you. Well that's a great question. and quality initiatives are being studied and enforce by many of the Third party payers They are actually rating their physicians and physicians have to now maintain A number of items of quality or they may not be able to stay with the organization so they base quality mostly on outcomes but along the way towards outcomes. There are many many things that have to be checked. Many boxes that have to be checked To make sure that each patient for each diagnosis is being given the very best medical care that nothing is being missed and that all bases are being covered so quality has taken on a really bigger new meaning over the last ten or fifteen years okay. I'm curious to get your your opinion on this. If quality is based on outcomes sometimes there are. It's not going to be a good outcome. If somebody is diagnosed with a terminal illness the the outcome is obviously going to be there passing on. How can we. What's your opinion on how to judge the quality of healthcare that the person is receiving that when you don't you know when sometimes the outcomes aren't good or that sometimes for example for someone like me who acquired a disability. That's not the desired outcome. You would like to be able to walk into do all those kind of things. How do you judge quality healthcare when it comes to not the most desirable outcomes. That's a great question going into the care of patient There are realistic expectations. That should be set between the physician and the patient and i viewed it that it was always a team. approach that I could never force anything on a patient if they did not want it Certainly in a terminal illness there still are quality of care issues. You wanna make sure that the patient is being cared for socially and emotionally and spiritually as well as physically and in a terminal care case You wanna make sure they get the best care heading into the terminology because every once in a while you have the great joy of seeing it turned around

Third Party
3rd Dose of Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Helps Protect Transplant Patients

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

3rd Dose of Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Helps Protect Transplant Patients

"Drug regulators are set to approve a third dose of coronavirus vaccines. Let's get the latest live with Bloomberg's Renita Young. Good Morning. Renee to Good morning. Karen. A study in the New England Journal shows a third dose of Moderna's vaccine significantly raised antibody levels against the coronavirus in transplant patients. Bloomberg News has learned that the FDA could give clearance as soon as today for both Moderna and Pfizer vaccines that would allow people with compromised immune systems to get a third shot. Now, people with weak immune systems often do not get adequate responses to their first vaccine course. The same group is at the top of the list for getting potential covid 19 boosters. CDC Advisory committee is scheduled to discuss booster shots for immune compromised people tomorrow in New York. I'm rainy day

Renita Young Moderna New England Journal Bloomberg Renee Bloomberg News Karen Pfizer FDA Cdc Advisory Committee New York