Gardening

Listen for the latest news and guidance on all things horticultural. For budding gardeners and seasoned green thumbs alike. From audio aired on premium podcasts.

A highlight from Ep. 397 - Grappling with the Hawthorns

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:41 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Ep. 397 - Grappling with the Hawthorns

"Consider buying a copy of my book in defense of plants, an exploration into the wonder of plants, some of our customizable merch or our stickers. They make great stocking stuffers, or just gifts in general for the botany in your life, and it helps keep the show up and running. I couldn't be doing it without everyone that supports the show financially. So thank you to everyone that's done it and consider doing it if you haven't. But today is a very special episode because it's a group of trees that I've been meaning to tackle on this podcast for quite some time and I found the perfect person to do it. We are talking about the hawthorns, the genus critiques, and if you grew up trying to identify plants, you picked up, say, a Peterson's guide, you flip to the hawthorn section, you go, oh, there's not really a treatment in here. They just kind of say, well, they're confusing. And here's some general leaf shapes, but good luck. And then you're just kind of set adrift in a sea of botanical confusion. Well, that did not dissuade botanist Ron Lance from taking a deep dive into this genus. And truly helping us understand the genus critiques a lot better. And in far more detail, as you're going to hear Ron got bitten by the bug early and he hasn't looked back since and he has made major contributions to our understanding of this genus. Ron is the kind of botanist I absolutely love talking with. He's got so many great insights and context to put plants in their place and he's a true believer of Noah plant. You got to grow that plant. But I don't want to steal any more of his thunder. Let's just jump right into it without further ado. Here's my conversation with Ron Lance. I hope you enjoy. All right, Ron

Ron Lance Peterson RON Confusion
A highlight from Episode 245: houseplant botany with Dr Scott Zona

On The Ledge

05:11 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Episode 245: houseplant botany with Dr Scott Zona

"Into the plant kingdom, accompanied by an expert guide. Botanist doctor Scott zona. He's here to reveal some of the secrets of his new book a gardener's guide to botany. And I've got a response about fluvial stratum for the Q&A section. I've always been a great advocate of learning as much as you can about your plants, hence the botany strand of this hair podcast. So I was delighted to get a copy of the new book by doctor Scott zona, called a gardener's guide to botany. And I liked it so much. I did a blurb on the back of the book for him. And he's joining me this week to tell me all about the book, how we all need to venture deeper into the plant kingdom. To understand our plants, but also because it's really super fascinating. And helps us look after our plants better, which is also really vital. My name is Scott zona. And I'm coming to you from hillsborough, North Carolina. Good morning, Scott. Well, it's very morning for you right now. Thank you. For a great talk to me about your new book, which I'm very excited about. It's called a gardener's guide to botany. And this is much needed. I mean, actually, I should say from the outset I'm actually quoted on the back cover. So I decided, and I do say, this is the book I've been waiting for. This is a must read for all gardeners who want to expand their knowledge of understanding the plants they grow. And I stand by that. I think, you know, as anyone who's listened to the show for a while will know, this is one of the things I'm passionate about is educating people about botany. And I learned loads from reading this book. I have to say, so I'm sure listeners will too. Why do you think though, that it's important for us like me and other inadvertent commerce amateur, which I kind of I'm not sure about that word, but hobby growers, why do we need to know about this stuff in the first place? And what kind of things can people expect to learn from your book? Well, I think as with anything in life, knowledge is power. So knowing plants knowing how they grow knowing what they're doing, I think translates into making us better growers. That's at least that's kind of my hope, but it also, I think learning about plants connects us to our plants and I would also hope that it would connect us to the natural world in general, the natural world outside our homes because, you know, we need to care about that. And I also find that learning something is, I don't know, maybe sort of keeps me young. I learn loads while I was doing the research and writing the book. So it satisfies some curiosity. And I think that's a good thing. Absolutely. I mean, as you say, if you can just understand what's going on with your plant and how the basic processes are working, it helps enormously I find. And in the intro to the book, you talk about this idea of going into the plant kingdom. And exploring it. And I love that idea that you could actually kind of imagine yourself heading into this amazing plant filled domain kind of a metaphor, but also kind of literally too. But it's trying to be that for a lot of people this is a mystery domain, a place where we don't necessarily know as much as we should. Have you come across any sort of misconceptions along the way of teaching people about botany about how plants work that have made your eyebrows raise? Oh yeah. Loads. And, you know, for me, it's kind of hard to imagine not being interested in plants. I've been growing plants since I was 6 years old. And but over the years, teaching courses, botany courses, I would be out in usually in the botanical garden, looking at plants, and I'd be talking about it. And students would be, you know, there'd be a dozen students, and they'd all be like 6 feet back. And this was before social distancing, you know? They'd be way back there, and I'd be talking about the smell of the plant. And they, you know, if somebody was telling me about the smell of my nose would be right in there, but you know, there are a couple of students would come forward and smell the plant, but most of them would kind of hang back, and they seemed very, I don't know, maybe fearful of the plants or some sort of, I don't know, out to get them poisonous, delicate, I don't know. And I think for a lot of students, that's, you know, it takes a little effort to kind of overcome this idea that plants are something you look at, but don't touch. And then also, for some people, I think plants are just sort of the green backdrop of life.

Scott Zona Hillsborough North Carolina Scott
A highlight from Ep. 396 - The Secrets of Seagrass Pollination

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:12 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 396 - The Secrets of Seagrass Pollination

"Is your host Matt. Welcome to the show. How is everyone doing this week? Today we're heading into the ocean to talk about marine biology with doctor Vivian solace Weiss. She studies benthic organisms like crustaceans and worms. Why is she on this podcast you might be asking? Well, along with her colleague, they have discovered a unique pollination syndrome going on under the ocean involving seagrass, worms, and other kinds of crustaceans. It's mind-blowing and it's opening up a door to a bunch of diversity and coevolutionary dynamics that no one knew existed up until about a decade ago, but I don't want to steal any of her thunder. This is a fascinating story of how passion drives discovery and open so many new doors into scientific inquiry. So let's just jump right into it without further ado. Here's my conversation with doctor Vivian solace Weiss. I hope you enjoy. All right, doctor Vivian solace Weiss. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast. I can't tell you how excited I am to talk about your research today. But first, let's start off with an introduction. Tell everyone a little bit about who you are and what

Vivian Solace Weiss Matt
A highlight from Episode 244: visiting the National Collection of Hoyas

On The Ledge

07:22 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 244: visiting the National Collection of Hoyas

"Well, a very fine day to you all and in this week's show, I'm going to be visiting the national collection of hoyas in Newcastle, curated by the wonderful Felix horne. And I'll answer a question about a languishing lime. Love that a languishing lime. Alliteration, you just can't beat it. Thanks for joining me this week. It's episode two 44. And I do hope this audio is finding you in a reasonable state. Now if you've listened to on the ledge for any length of time, you will probably know that I'm quite keen on hoyas, so no surprises, there are a couple of Hoya episodes coming up in the next few weeks in the first of those is this episode. I traveled to Newcastle to meet Felix horne. Who holds the national collection of the Hoya genus here in the UK. What's a national plant collection? You may ask. Well, this is UK charity that helps to conserve plants by gathering together plants of a particular genus and looking after them. And the people looking after them are a huge range of volunteers who study them, keep great records and generally keep the flame alive for their plant of choice and in the case of Felix horn that happens to be Hoya. So whether you're a Hoya fan or a Hoya disbeliever, I have a feeling that after listening to Felix, you may want a few of these wonderful epiphytic plants. And if you hear a little bit of noise in the background during the interview, most likely it's one of Felix's two cats, one of whom. Got very interested in our chat and joined in delightfully. So a little bit of extra action there for you, cat lovers. My name's Felix horn. I'm the national collection holder for who is. We're here in your house Felix and I'm feeling the whole love here. I mean, how did this come about? I seem to remember seeing the call out from the national collections people saying, we need somebody for Hoya, presumably you just were alerted to that and thought this is for me. Yeah, pretty much. I am very naively. But I could do that. I mean, yeah, so my mom had grown a whole year, which I'm sure lots of people can relate to. That we've had growing in our House when I was little in it, floured all the time and it smelled amazing. And then it's just suddenly stopped flowering and got pushed further and fit in the back in her collection and then kind of forgotten about and then I think probably just before COVID hit I could start collecting them myself and kind of like rediscovered them so when I saw the cool go out she gets to write just magazine and when I saw that Cole go out I was like oh I could do that. And here we are I don't know how long ago that was, but you've got a collection of horrors presumably growing all the time. One of the things I find fascinating about who is just the diversity of this genius there are just so many interesting variations on the theme of the ones that you've got in this particular room. Are there any that are your absolute favorites, you're going to be taking from the house as you go to your desert island? I've got a sunrise off the top of my head I can't remember what its parent plants are but it is a cultivar cross breed and that one I think is really beautiful just with it. So often when joy is have the visible veins there are darker than the rest of the leaf in sunrise as the other way around. And it has this really beautiful flowers that smell amazing as well. And probably lacking those there is always a really safe back that flower is really pretty profusely and has gorgeous flowers. The centered flowers as well. But then I think we're probably most favorite one in here is also the most pathetic one. But it's the one that has its most actively been trying to die on me for three years and that is my Hoya Archibald Yana. I got that as a two leaf cutting that one of the leaves then died and then I spent two years trying to stop the rest of it from dying and then this year it finally rewarded me by growing ten years and all that time. And it's not like it has a grand total of three leaves. With who is it's kind of like it's one of these things where when you have hear those stories, people who don't grow hoyas are like, I mean, why are you getting so excited? But when you've grown boys and you know how that pain. Yeah, that was the one that I always wanted the most and I have no idea why it always really cool to me like it's fine it looks fine. But I don't know why just the fact that it just wanted to text so bad and I stopped it and it seems to be quite happy now. I'm never going to get flowers from it. I'll be lucky if I get like 5 years of it. And I've got other like other hoys in here that are just like huge and super prolific. I like to feel kind of bad for them. It's really poised out competing a lot of them. One of the things you were telling me before I started recording was about growing for the national collection and how you try to as far as you can emulate what listeners rooms might be like rather than growing them into a rarefied environment where you're sort of tweaking humidity and stuff. These are in a regular room and as are the vast majority of your collection. Why is that that you want to kind of promote that kind of growing? Well, I mean, I don't know if it's standard for national collection holders, but I feel like part of what your role is is growing plants for the nation, like that the nation could grow. So one of the things I do is I don't import plants from outside the UK because that seems to be outside of my remit, but also what's the point of having all of these plants if I'm the only person that can grow them, you know, and so I've got a few more specialists areas that are like quote unquote ideal settings for a plant to grow and be I'll also have copies of that plant growing in say like your bathroom or somewhere else to see if they can grow in normal household conditions because you know it's expensive to do the specialist stuff and it's something that not a lot of people are going to have access to and I think that that shouldn't be a barrier for people to enjoy these really amazing plants. They're like, yeah, they should be for everybody. Yeah, but I think that's a really good point. I mean, you have got an Ikea cabinet here or some kind of cabinet of his Ikea ones.

Felix Horne Felix Horn Hoya Felix National Collection Of Hoyas Newcastle Hoyas UK Hoya Archibald Yana Cole Ikea
A highlight from 086  Poinsettia Stories Jim Faust

The Garden Question

04:25 min | 3 hrs ago

A highlight from 086 Poinsettia Stories Jim Faust

"One story involves searching out while poinsettias in the middle of two drug cartel control territories. Jump is a Professor of floriculture, physiology at Clemson university in South Carolina. He does research on greenhouse production of various flowering crops, teaches hydroponics and greenhouse production courses. He grew his first point city a crop in 1986. I invite you to see the many unique images that Jim talks about in this episode, so search out the garden question podcast episode 86. During body to engage with us on Instagram at the garden question podcast. If you'd like to email me directly, the address is questioned at the garden question dot com. Best question at the garden question dot com. Please remember your writings and reviews are always appreciated. Jim, the point shouter has taken an intriguing and dramatic trip to become today's Christmas flower. Where did that trip start? A lot of people would say it started in 1828 when Joel poinsett, who was a South Carolina politician, sent the first living poinsettias out of Mexico to the United States. You could go back further and say the domestication of the poinsettia is most likely to have started in the 1500s under the direction of montezuma in Mexico is the political leader of the Aztecs and is known to had the first botanical gardens in the world and had collected a lot of plants for use in medicine and as ornamentals Aztecs are known to have developed quite a number of our important ornamental species. The evidence points pretty clearly that Joel points set was not a botanist that would go out into the Mexican forest and collect wild plants. We think of botanists as purely interested in plants for their own sake and will collect all sorts of novelties. In that era, the late 1700s, early 1800s, there were quite a number of botanists, traipsing around Mexico, collecting herbarium specimens, taking these specimens and shipping them back to Europe and having botanists there give them botanical names. Poinsett was not that type of person. He really was a horticulturist, not a botanist. And the distinction there is that horticulturists really are interested in plants for what benefit they may bring to society, economically, or as a food crop or an ornamental. When set was not going out into the wilderness and collecting unusual species, he didn't collect anything himself at all. He had people that he was guiding that would collect plants in the marketplace and ship them to the U.S. similarly developed these relationships with nurserymen, particularly in the northeast United States. This is 1820s. He would ask those nurserymen to send him plants from the U.S. to Mexico and return he was sending plants from Mexico to the U.S., looking to see how any of these plants could bring some economic value to a new climate at that time plants hadn't been transferred between the South America, Central America and into the U.S.. So all the species that people were coming across in the new world were unique and especially to the Europeans, they were all new and different and kind of exciting. We hadn't grown them in multiple locations before. So it's like, well, let's take this plant and grow it someplace else and see how well it does if people want to buy it if it produces a useful food crop. That's kind of what point set did. They collect the plants in the marketplace, ship them in the northeast and salt what would happen. Most of the plants were seeds or cuttings, grow them in some other climate and see if they had some value. For example, there are a list of plants that were shipped, things like avocados, rice, and wheat, quite a number of ornamentals that had no name at all. They would have packing slips for these big boxes of plants that would be shipped. They would just be described as a red flowering perennial, or an ornamental tree, actually avocado was called an alligator pear. We think that the Aztecs had already improved the poinsettia is because the very first poinsettias that were sent to the U.S. quickly made their way to Europe and quickly made their way into botanical magazines, where artists would draw beautiful botanical images of these new world plants and publish them in Europe, a journal called Curtis, botanicals, died something like that.

Mexico Joel Poinsett U.S. South Carolina JIM Clemson University Poinsett Joel Europe Central America South America Curtis
A highlight from 085  Real Christmas Tree Stories - Dr. Mel Koelling

The Garden Question

05:29 min | Last week

A highlight from 085 Real Christmas Tree Stories - Dr. Mel Koelling

"Your writings and reviews are always appreciated. Doctor kelling, what did the first Christmas tree come about? And how did it spread across the world? The use of greenery that is particularly Conifer, stock, the various species of conifers, which include pines and spruces and hemlocks and cypress and a number of others have always been somewhat attractive to individuals because in the winter they kind of defied the natural processes that were going on. That is when every other hardwood tree lost its foliage naturally, there was still these evergreen trees, hence the name that implies their green throughout the year, winter summer fall and spring. They were perceived by ancient cultures as having somewhat of a unique attribute and maybe some spirit components that were involved with that. There's history, historical events and accounts of Egyptians using palm branches and other evergreen foliage prior to the time of Christ. The earlier part of the current 80s series of centuries, palm branches were used and evergreen branches were used in somewhat mystical celebrations not so much for Christmas. In fact, I should say, not at all for Christmas, but for observance of the winter solstice, that was the darkest, shortest day of the year, and the beginning of winter, really. Here was a celebration that indicated after that things were going to be cold, and yet we still had these evergreen bowels that were going to be alive. It always had some mysticism and some history that was associated with the fact that it was an evergreen and a very dark time of the year. The origins of Christmas trees are a little bit varied on this, again, whether one has a secular point of view or perhaps a religious point of view, but Christmas matter of fact, very frankly, originally it was a Christian holiday, and it still is in the minds of many of us. It celebrates the birth of Christ, some of the tenets of what Christianity is all about. And one of the first observances of Christmas as a celebratory and use of Christmas trees is attributed to Martin Luther, Martin Luther was active in the 1500s, of course known for his 95 theses on the church door at wittenberg, also known for many of the hymns that we sang, including Luther's cradle hymn, which is a way in a manger. It is alleged that as a monk and a monastery in Germany, that in the winter, he used to stroll out in the countryside a little bit on the grounds around the monastery. And on one occasion on a winter night close to Christmas, he saw an evergreen tree, most likely a fir tree, the genus ABC, and it was adorned with small amounts of snow and the moon was out and it sparkled, and again he was made aware of the fact that here is a living tree in the midst of a dead winter scene, otherwise then because of nothing growing at that time of the year. He cut a tree, brought it inside and decorated it because it reminded him of one of the fundamental tenets of Christianity, which is eternal life, regardless of what the winter conditions are. There is an eternal life associated with Christmas. Was a tree that Martin Luther brought into a monastery originally, but it gained acceptance in that community and elsewhere among German inhabitants, German residents, and spread through other parts of Germany. It was adopted quite easily because it seemed to be so fitting for the occasion that they were celebrating. It came to the U.S. during the Revolutionary War with hessian soldiers who were fighting as mercenaries on the side of the British against the American colonists in the winter, the mercenaries, it is alleged, the sight of that it was Christmas. They were from Germany. It was time to cut it for a tree. They were in New England. They probably cut a balsam fur, adorned it with some ornaments of sort, makeshift, I'm sure, and celebrated Christmas. Since there were German immigration numbers that were quite impressive in the late 1700s and earlier on in the 1800s, the others who came into eventually United States utilize the Christmas season and started that with the Christmas tree. Stayed kind of as a quaint folksy image among German immigrants for quite a while. Eventually in the 1850s the president, who I think at that point was the first to do this, put a Christmas tree in The White House. That gained popularity. After that it moved out of New England into Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania Dutch, so to speak, and it was widely practiced there after the tree was displayed in The White House and there began to be a commercial market for natural Christmas trees. There are some accounts of trees being cut in the catskill mountains of New York and were transported down to Manhattan and what later became all of New York City. Those were for sale. Picked up as other immigrants came across and was adopted and finally became an American tradition, but it owed it origin back to the German mercenaries who fought on behalf of the British, they brought it to the United States and it has spread since that point.

Doctor Kelling Martin Luther Germany Luther ABC New England United States White House Pennsylvania Catskill Mountains Manhattan New York City New York
A highlight from 084 - Pearce Butcher - Designing Beautiful Functional Outdoor Living Spaces

The Garden Question

04:28 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 084 - Pearce Butcher - Designing Beautiful Functional Outdoor Living Spaces

"Space that's is to going to make make that them want to space spend more an time out inviting there. We've gone through space a great adventure that's going over to the last couple make of them want to years. spend more Have you time out seen there. We've gone through a great adventure over the last couple of years. Have you seen a lot of changes in the outdoor spaces? Definitely, I've seen a lot more pools. I feel like at least in my area, there are a lot of people wanting to put pools in their backyard and these pool companies have been backed up for months since they weren't traveling. They wanted to create more of that outdoor oasis in their own backyard because they weren't allowed to go anywhere. And I feel like it truly bumped up our design work on hyperdrive because they weren't spending money on vacations. If they still had their job, they had money to spare. And so everyone was wanting to invest in their outdoor spaces during the pandemic. Told us that when you talk with a client that you ask them, how do they want to use their spice? Could you walk us through what you follow that up with and in how you develop the design from now? Yeah, absolutely. So for example, I had a client who lived in a fairly new home. The first thing they said to me was they wanted to put a pool in the backyard. So we met in their backyard. I asked them, what else would you like to have back here? And they mentioned they wanted to shed. They wanted some covered face because they didn't have any covered patio space outside, wanted a fire pit and an outdoor kitchen. And then they wanted a bathroom. So that's a lot of different elements to add in one small ish space. It wasn't a very large backyard and they had two very active dogs, so we needed to leave some loan for those dogs. So my first goal is to figure out the scale of each of those spaces, like how big they need to be for how many people are going to be using them, and then how best those spaces fit in that backyard, and then all tied together. Where's the gate in the backyard? Where's the views from the most used spaces inside when you're standing in that space? What are you looking at? How many other houses around me are looking down into that space? And how can we best position each of those different elements together and then in that backyard so that they all flow together? One of my main goals too is to keep the main traffic flow open and not create any bottlenecks or pitch points in that landscape and really make it flow together nicely. Could you tell us how you discover the big idea for a client? After I get all that information from the client with all the different elements they'd like to see in their dream backyard. I like to start big. Maybe we need to drop the grade down here and create a berm here to help with privacy. Maybe we need to create a much bigger pool pavilion so that we can fit a kitchen and a seating area out there. I really like to play with the grade in the backyard. If there is a grade change to make that grade work for the landscape and make it help to find those spaces instead of it being an afterthought of coming in and be like, oh shoot, well now we have 12 inch drop and how are we going to make this landscape work but actually using that grade to our advantage to really help either create privacy or define the different outdoor rooms back there? A lot of times that's when I'll bring in a contractor and be like, okay, this is my big idea. Do you think this is possible? Is there something that you can see during the construction process that I might not be able to see is just the designer. Remember, there was one property in the north main area of Greenville, which is this really beautiful historic area north of downtown. It was one of those older homes that had been renovated all throughout the probably hundred years since it had been built, and their driveway went up and there was a retaining wall up against their screen porch. I brought the contractor in. I'm like, okay, what if we actually drop this driveway down and move this retaining wall over to the property line so that we're opening up that Supreme Court and it truly changed the whole space. He came and he was like, yep, let's do it. I just gotta pull this one permit. They even had to move some power lines in order to make it happen. Really did change the space to drop that grade out the back of the house and create this much more livable and usable space around the house. Things like that, bringing in the contractor to say, okay, here's my big idea. Is it possible? And getting their feedback on things like that. These are all way before you choose any plants to go in there. Yeah, absolutely. I like to make the analogy of, if I'm going to build a house, I'm not going to go pick out throw pillows first. I'm going to really decide who's going to be using this house. How many people wear in your family? What's your floor plan? Before you ever pick up paint colors or your kitchen countertops, you're going to nail down exactly what floor plan you want for your house.

Greenville Supreme Court
How Do I Know When to Bring in Pots This Fall?

Your Gardening Questions

02:05 min | 1 year ago

How Do I Know When to Bring in Pots This Fall?

"Denise send us an email to read at plan talk radio dot com and denise says hi fred. This is my first year gardening. So congratulations to you. And i was wondering how do i know which potted plants to bring indoors when the temperatures start to drop or do i just leave them out over the winter. I'm in zone seven. Thank you okay. No her circumstances are different. I'm going to guess she's probably from Well darn close or even south of the ohio river etc and this gives her different options. We would have here at central. Ohio are certainly north except for people that are having a wonderful display from there Mimosa tree right now that that's just Uncommon good luck or he's being extremely careful but anyhow as to denise. I hope she kept the tags. I hope the tags would have indicated whether these are tropicals or not for example. We made mention his hibiscus again. This this time There is a tropical hibiscus. That's absolutely magnificent. Ina pot indoors in the wintertime. now it's can be out all summer. They're they're full of glorious flower colors. There are many many of them. However here you would have to take that plant in For the winter because the top and the root zone in the container probably would freeze So she might be able to keep a high viscous of the tropical nature outdoors over winter. I would say it's it's pretty if it because where she's zone seven zero to ten above and anything Anything of a tropical nature is not going to like it. Below twenty-eight a book yeah now the reason i say twenty eight is. There's there's some latitude on some plants to live through freezing if it's a light freezing.

Denise Ohio River Ohio INA
The Study of Horticultural Taxonomy

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:07 min | 1 year ago

The Study of Horticultural Taxonomy

"All right. Matthew reese it's great to have you on the podcast. It's an honor to be here but before we begin. Let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Hi everybody thinks so. Much on the podcasts. Listening for years now a huge fence. Thanks kudos the a setting this up in keeping it going so long. Yes oh my. Name's matthew reese on the ball tennis and i worked for the royals cultural society. Which is your chess. Shoot all the largest. Uk charity dedicated to gardening. We have about five and a half million members across the country. So yeah that's quite a big number. And so i work in the hold cultural taxonomy team in the science department and i spit raw between plant authentications research on ecosystem services of cultivated plants awesome. I'm really excited to talk to you about your work today but before we jump into the meat of it. What got you interested in. Plants is something you've always had in your life or did you kind of come to it later on through some sort of gardening experience or educational career kind of thing. Yeah it was. I will always love being outside in spending time in nature. I was a kid. We used to spend a lot of time in my grands like area Forest which is actually a site of special scientific interests of only learned that recently back then now makes sense. Spending a lot of time in the forest was was amazing. I'm not really gifted in terms of the actually dropped out of school quite early on no sentencing before finishing my back. More at at this point may specify the native english. I spend most of my life confronts My parents are english. I've been brought up in greenwich in france for about twenty five years. We'll say. But yes. I said so. I kind of dropped out of school. Early wasn't really sure what. I was going to do with my life and ended up traveling to costa rica. Actually where i spent months. And that's why i volunteered. For attorney golden

Matthew Reese Royals Cultural Society Chess Tennis UK Greenwich France Rica Costa
What's Wrong With My Tomato Plants?

Your Gardening Questions

02:06 min | 1 year ago

What's Wrong With My Tomato Plants?

"David is having some real trouble with tomatoes. He says his tomato leaves are wilting. At the very top of the leaf and then a few days later they start turning a botchy blotchy black and then about a week after that. They start dying altogether. He's lost forty tomato plants this way and he wants to know what you think he can do about it now. His problem and mine are very different. And i i laugh only because the difference mine were just flat out eating. They were perfectly healthy. Not a spot on them now. David's problem is very different and it sounds like he may have a problem with them. Called sectorial league spot I kind of wish. I could talk to david at this point but at the same time. I have to make some assumptions. I'm going to guess that in that you have to deal with prophylactic in in considering containing many many diseases you have to prevent it. That's the big word. Prevention starts by buying plants. That have been what's called indexed for v f and that's virus cerium wilt and nematodes and that on top of those three comes one called sectorial leaf spot. And it's a plant where i'm going to bet. David got a busy Started his seedlings either indoors or planted. The seeds early they grew like topsy. We had plenty of moisture in sunshine. This spring for them to just have really rebelled. Now then that makes for a plant has softer skin so to speak which is good in many ways however it allows or organic disease germs. If you will to jump onto them start to grow enter through the softer skin or or flashier leaf if you will and away. They go when he lost that many. I'm going to bet he's using the same spot in the garden for them. More than one year that could leave toria spores right there waiting to get into a new plant each year.

David
Baked Pears, Listener Calls, Harvesting Garlic, and Chestnuts

In the Garden

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Baked Pears, Listener Calls, Harvesting Garlic, and Chestnuts

"Hey joel hello. It's a beauty out there today. Very nice yeah. And i hope to get up and spend a little time in the garden this afternoon myself. So interesting experience The my son. Jake and his wife nikki where the place we rented has a bunch of Pear trees and we noticed that the pears were dropping. You know it's sort of like apples. Early ones drop and the friday night. I came home to dinner. They had made. And one of the things they made was baked pairs. And these were the dropped pairs. It came down and they weren't more than maybe two inches or maybe three and i was so surprised. I sorta figured well. They were hard and and really unusable but they had they had cut them down through the stem and the seeds. The long way opened them up. They put him in a in a big baking pan and put on now. Oh butter and some honey and put them in the oven. Three fifty for about I think they figured it was about forty minutes and all because they kept baking them and they were absolutely fantastic. They were you know big pairs and i would never have thought. Those little hard pairs would would be edible at all but they turned out to be absolutely delicious and they topped it off. with maple syrup and a little brown sugar of course and that helped but they were absolutely delicious terrific. I did that one year. And i actually could do it again. Now because tapani. The place. Where i where i lived. I mean literally off the huge development behind me and all around me and all that but it used to be an orchard out there and yell it's bay and so there are a lot of very old and Vestigial i guess is apple trees and a lot of them look like a cross between crab apple something else. Small hard little apples long story short. Exactly what you said you know bake them in butter a lot of people sarah sugar and they're delicious

Joel Hello Nikki Jake Tapani Apple Sarah Sugar
Behind the Scenes at Prairie Moon Nursery

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Behind the Scenes at Prairie Moon Nursery

"All right. Caitlin o'connor it's great to have you on the podcast. I'm really excited to talk to you today. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do for sure. I'm a huge fan of the podcast. So it's very exciting to be with you here today. My name is caitlin. And i am the education outreach specialist here at prairie moon nursery and winona minnesota yes So i've been with moon for a little over five years now And i came to curry moon. Because i'm actually a resident of wis- koi valley community land co-op where was started So i was going to college in the winona area winona state university And had gotten my degree in environmental science and my capstone research project at winona state. was with native plants and so i got familiar with Moon at that point in time. And so you know. After a brief stint of going to the big city and doing doing some nonprofit environmental work up there. I came back to the more rural winona county and landed up as the moon. So it's really great to be here.

Caitlin O'connor Prairie Moon Nursery Winona Koi Valley Community Land Co Winona Area Winona State Unive Caitlin Minnesota Winona County
A Rallying Cry for Restoration

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

A Rallying Cry for Restoration

"All right. Tim christoffersen it is an honor to have you on the podcast. Welcome but before we jump into what you came on to talk about today. Let's start off by introducing yourself. Let's tell everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Thank you very much matt. And it's a great pleasure to be on this podcast in defense plants. That's great title. So i'm tim. Christopher i'm the father of two wonderful children happily married and i'm working for the united nations to make a difference for my kids. That basically sums it up. I'm a forest by training. Though i've left being an active forester in the field about twenty years ago to work at the national and international policy level. Because i felt that they were changes that we need most stem than those you can achieve at the ground level. I'm still on that journey and trying to aim for that. Systemic change. well it's wonderful to see someone with an actual background enforced going in the direction of policy. Because you kind of understand it on a level that if you just want the policy route you might not have that on the ground experience but what got you interested in forests and ecosystems. I mean you mentioned your children really being the main motivation about working towards a more sustainable in habitable future on this earth. But what got you interested in the environment in the first place. I think that also goes back to. When i was a child. I was spending a lot of time outdoors and in the forest. My grandfather was also forest. I t took me out a lot on his journeys and on replanting And the that has really shaped me. So i've i've known that i wanted to become a forester ever since i was twelve. Think so it's It's been it's been an interesting journey to leave that behind. Sometimes i wish i was still working directly with plans. I try to make up for it in by having bought a little farm that i'm trying to restore and my spat time so that i don't really talk about restoration but also also do it myself. otherwise you can lose that connection that you just described right in what is real and works on the ground and what other policy changes that we need.

Tim Christoffersen Christopher United Nations Matt TIM
Mint Relatives With Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Mint Relatives With Ken Druse

"You all know kendrew regular visitor to the show and author of twenty garden books and longtime friend. When he's not managing the antics of two troublemaking but gorgeous canines. He manages his extensive garden in new jersey. Hi ken i changed. Your intro. gorgeous canines oak the their handsome. It's true managing left that part out. So i sh- since we're talking men's today which are often aromatic. Let's have a giveaway of your latest book. The central garden about sent and fragrance and so forth with the transcript of the show of runaway to garden dot com. Okay that's lovely okay. Good good So you know when you said it. As i said in the npr's like what. What are we gonna talk about. And then i really it was kind of. And then you and i both got to sort of digging around reading about mints the mid family and so for so tell us a little bit about the breadth of it. Well i could stand in one place. Just turn and look and see. There's oh there's bee bomb and there's a lemon balm and there's some you know there's so many family relatives and you can often recognize them. Not only because many are fragrant when you rub the leaves but also because many have square stems but there are over two hundred and thirty genera- and over seven thousand species of mint relatives plants in the lenny. Ac family

Kendrew KEN New Jersey NPR
Trillium Diversity: A Story of Ants & Seed Dispersal

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Trillium Diversity: A Story of Ants & Seed Dispersal

"Dr chelsea miller. It's awesome to have you on the podcast. I'm really excited to talk to you today. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are in what it is you do. Hi it's a wonderful to be invited. Thank you so much for having me Yeah my name's chelsea miller. I recently graduated with my from the university of tennessee and knoxville in their e department. So i'm an ecologist First and foremost. I'm not a botanist. i'm not an entomologist. Although many people think that. That's what i do. I studied plant. Insect interactions so I'm in both of those worlds but Yeah i definitely don't know all about taxonomy plant or insect Only really the the organisms that i work with but a little bit about background i grew up in northern illinois in the middle of the cornfields so very agricultural not a lot of what i would consider to be nature available to me in my backyard for example and as a child. You don't have the option to pop into your car and drive wherever you wanna go. You know i was. I was really used to playing in the little catches woods by my house and i. It was very safe and comfortable. But i really didn't love growing up there on. Inci went to central arkansas for my undergraduate degree. Permit parents Went to school and they have a really great honors program. There that i got into. I had an awesome time in arkansas. I loved it arken. Fuzzy opposite of illinois there-i wild and natural at least the northern half of it in the ozarks and that's that's where i spent most of my time. I just played in the woods. And i hydroxide and i. You know floated the buffalo Is gorgeous natural scenic rivers. And i just did a ton of feels worth so. That's kind of where. I got my start in biology with dairy on the ground. You know the good old southern boy. Kind of research so yeah. That's how i got started in really wear my My research

Dr Chelsea Miller Chelsea Miller University Of Tennessee Knoxville Inci Illinois Arkansas Ozarks Buffalo
ADVENTUROUS DESIGN and CIVILIZATION BUILDING

Cultivating Place

02:05 min | 1 year ago

ADVENTUROUS DESIGN and CIVILIZATION BUILDING

"Welcome david i am just really happy to speak with you about these things at this exact time and i'm really excited to speak with you. Thank you very much. And you know if i were to ask you your current mission statement at this point in your life at this point in your work for your relationship with plants and planted spaces whether that's personal at home or it's also as manifested by teramoto. What would that mission statement be. David you know. I just did a funny thing last week where i was looking at our office profile on our website and we kind of have a think manifesto is too strong a word but we have kind of a a series of paragraphs that kind of outline what you're asking and i actually listeria and i looked at it and i was like. Oh my gosh this is out of date. And so then. I added in a couple of sentences that kind of explained that this manifesto or a this belief system is allowed to change any ball any point in time. So you your questions. Kind of timely. In that when a so i started teramoto with a turnout is not just mind. A it's it's alan for. Roy is my business partner. Jenny jones house partner in our la office and we have a team of about seventeen people at this point which is really incredible and All incredible humans. And when allen and i started teramoto our of guiding principle is a formally and conceptually adventurous office for landscape architecture. And i would say that that very much still rings true and a stand by that and that's like the tag thing on her instagram. That being said the practice has evolved. We the team has grown and time has passed and we've got to build a lot of work in evatt to learn a lot in all of this

David Jenny Jones ROY Alan LA Allen Evatt
Summer Cocktail Tips, Straight From the Garden

Plantrama

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Summer Cocktail Tips, Straight From the Garden

"I. I'm not going to talk about a specific cocktail today. But i'm going to encourage people to experiment you know ellen. The mo- hito has been so popular of late. Right and there are several mint based cocktails. And they're fine. They're wonderful and all kinds of mintz can be used for them. So that's delicious. But i would encourage people to experiment with other flavors with any traditional cocktail recipe. That calls for meant whether it's a mint julep or mo hito instead of using the mint think about using other flavors in that same recipe and i would encourage you to try basil. That's a wonderful herb to use for flavoring. I would encourage you to try lemon for beena. Which is a little milder and But also plays well very well with anything that has lime in it. Of course and i would also encourage people to try to stir cham's because using minister shem foliage instead of the mint and even minister shem flowers. You put those flowers and foliage in the cocktail shaker and you mix it up and straighten it out and you've got the spiciness of distortion and you can garnish the cocktail with mr shem flour. And it's it's yummy. I wasn't even thinking on long the substitution line. But last year i had an august a in my garden and at the end of the year i was cutting them back and i dried all the foliage and it's got a wonderful sort of half meant have liquorice flavour and i made some of it into a syrup and i've been thinking what could i. How could i use this in a cocktail so going to go back and look at all the classic mint cocktails and see one. This substitution does for just mixing it up a little bit.

Mintz Ellen Mr Shem
For a Different Look in Your Garden, Try Yucca

Your Gardening Questions

02:24 min | 1 year ago

For a Different Look in Your Garden, Try Yucca

"Initially and i'm talking way back in time. I thought that plant doesn't belong here. It looks like the zone plant or new mexico. Plant or whatever i i was. I was a bit of a situation with a class and i turned to the professor to ask question. I must have backed up. Just a touch. I had shorts on at that point in time. And i knew i backed into something. Because the tips of leaves are bordering on being that of a needle. I understand they use the indian people used to indigenous people used to strip the leaves of some of their vantage and so on and use them as wine or minor rope and so on. Yucca is the name of the plant yucca is has been for. I don't know we can have now and going on. It's about i think half over tall boring on four and a half five five and a half feet tall. The leaves are staying at. Oh i don't know need to buy and then up comes this stem gangly looking thing when it first starts up when it starts to flower. It's very different now. Summer white white and beyond that summer kind of a creamy white there is a variegated form. And so i still think the plant belongs in arizona however when it is used here in in all zone five and six it still fits in If it's not just one plant and that one plant can be used in a perennial garden. sticking up background. That's fine but i. I've seen them used wrong or they don't i don't know they don't seem to hold their own visually against we'll call the normal foliage and things around here however i've seen the music groups and a group of yucca. Five plants whatever it might be can be seen. I swear for up to a quarter mile when they're standing tall and saw it. So i put that in there. It's it's the red white and blue time Up up close. The plants are always sending out new flower florence. If you will and and some old dead when so when you're up close you kinda see a mixture but at a distance it's all just a great big four and a half foot stem of white flour. So it's it. It has to be a plan of the week. And since it's about what i call mid bloom period That's it and it does kind of add to our fourth of july red white and

New Mexico Arizona
Palms Through Deep Time

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Palms Through Deep Time

"All right. Dr kelly matsunaga thank you so much. For coming on the podcast. It's an honor to have you here. And i'm really excited to talk to you today. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is. You do all right. Thanks for having on the podcast. My name is as you just said. Kelly matsunaga currently an assistant professor in ecology and evolutionary biology at the university of kansas. And i'm also curator of paleo body in the biodiversity institute which is sort of the collection of natural history museums Here at ku. That's really exciting. Paleo botany to me. Is i have to live vicariously through people like you. Because it's something that was has always interested me but i want a different path with my career. So i'm really excited to pick your brain about this but one of the things that always interests me is how you came to paleo botany in the first place where you a fossil kid a plant kid. Where did the combination of the two really find their way into a fruitful career for you. Yeah so i I would say that. I came to paleo botany through a lot of sort of happy accidents home. I was not a paleo kid. Or a plant kid numb. I got interested in plants when i was in college. I was not a science major. But we all had to take intro. Some kind of intro. Biology works as a general education requirement. And so i took introductory botany in. That's what really got me interested in plants Specifically the the whole evolutionary story of plants that the professor that taught the courses frank shaughnessy at humboldt state university. Who was able to sort of weave through the course of the class.

Dr Kelly Matsunaga Kelly Matsunaga University Of Kansas Biodiversity Institute Frank Shaughnessy Humboldt State University
Natural Communities With Patrick McMillan

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Natural Communities With Patrick McMillan

"Patrick mcmillan came to herons would last fall from clemson university in south carolina where he ran the south carolina botanical garden and was a professor in the college of agriculture forestry in life sciences he also hosted a pbs series called expeditions with patrick mcmillan and led the development of the botanical gardens natural heritage garden. Which will hear more about so. Hi patrick. I'm so glad to make contact and get to know you a little bit. I margaret. it's it's wonderful to speak with you in wonderful be your. Yeah so i feel like it must have been a bit of like dorothy. Were not in kansas anymore. When you found yourself in the pacific northwest compared to south carolina. it really was. It really still is I've been a little shocked. How quickly of this area has started to just feel like home One of the. I mean herons would as one of the world's great gardens of with some of the best garden people in the world and into the area itself also to me just has this wonderful kind of maternal nece to it Seems to just envelope you and and convince you pretty quick that this is one of the best places on planet earth. Yeah so. I mean it's a distinctively different natural community or habitat from where you were and so besides being shift in zone and so forth. It's a distinguished place in many ways no thousands of different types of plants and so forth but also being i think one of the largest public gardens in the us that's wholly owned by native american tribes does. Did that influence your decision to come there and tell me a little bit about that absolutely You know when i when i was sort of looking around to to sort of slowdown and change and i know you know what that's like to to want to Get away for maybe six job. Titles down to one.

Patrick Mcmillan South Carolina Botanical Garde College Of Agriculture Forestr Botanical Gardens Natural Heri South Carolina Clemson University Pacific Northwest Dorothy Margaret Patrick Kansas United States
Fruits! Berries! Things You Can Grow in Your Garden

In the Garden

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Fruits! Berries! Things You Can Grow in Your Garden

"Well. It's been a lot of interest in in the garden. Ever since and the fruits is a really wonderful thing to grow in the garden. It's it's a little tougher than vegetables on some respects. Some are easier than ground vegetables and but all of them are a challenge in their own way. Just like whether it's a broccoli lettuce they. They all have their own challenges. We have a small patch of blueberries about ten bushes or so and We've last year. We had one heck of a of a harvest. It was a beautiful blueberry year. And this year when when i was Back at the house and looking at the blueberries We've always let the The wild Strawberries grow underneath them. That seemed to be a good mulch and didn't seem to bother anything and they both like an acid soil blueberries and strawberries and This year was the first year. I've seen a just a massive amount of little baby. You know well for fully mature tiny little strawberries. Oh yes. I was surprised i was picking a few and of course the the wonderful thing about those wild strawberries is. They are sweet and they are delicious. There are a lot of work. Well i used to go into by my. When i was a kid used to go into my grandfather's backfield and pick a whole court and i think i covered a half an acre. A court again. My grandmother gave me the the old little wooden strawberry boxes the billboard size once you get as many as you can fill it up to that. I wanted to tell grandma. I and even picking even picking them by putting one in the bathroom. I would come back with a court. But i'd also i'd also defoliate a half acre to do but who else was gonna do it anyway. Right

New Naturalism With Iowa-Based Plantsman, Kelly Norris

Cultivating Place

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

New Naturalism With Iowa-Based Plantsman, Kelly Norris

"Kelly. It is such a pleasure to speak with you. Thank you so much for having me jennifer. So i'm gonna ask you to take us beyond that little resume sheet and described for listeners. If you had a current personal mission statement for your own gardening practice and growth right now in your life what would that personal mission statement. B kelly that personal mission statement for me is to plant the world a more beautiful functional place ecologically functional place that is and that is a course that i have been on for longtime really a of course of some self discovery along the way as well as a sort of marion of various interest in order culture as i have have come to discover them in the course of my career today.

Kelly Jennifer
The Foragers Dilemma with Alexis Nikole Nelson

Bon Appetit Foodcast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

The Foragers Dilemma with Alexis Nikole Nelson

"Wanna ask you about your background. So i know you're not the first generation of of nelson or whatever surname. There is on your maternal side in this in the ohio. You've talked a bit about your mom's relationships with plants and what you learned from her. But i also know it goes even further back than that. So how far back. You want to tell me about how that kind of relationship with the land is part of your family. Oh absolutely so. We're very lucky because not not every person of color especially not every black person in the united states is lucky enough to be able to trace a lot of their familial history back on my mom's side of the family with her father they'd been they've been in the united states since the sixteen hundreds they were farmers in new england after the revolutionary war. And with my mom's mom's side of the family with my my nanna. She was a second generation. Cape verde an immigrant to the cape cod area and with a lot of bigger and immigrant families. A lot of them brought foraging practices with them and i mean my nanna was like working in the cranberry bogs in the nineteen thirties. To help better support her family and bats a whole lot of exposure to plant lice. But you just get to learn about with each passing day while you're out there so tell me more about that. She was picking the cranberries and selling them for a while. Picking the cranberries for a someone else's business which one of many reasons why i think being a forager of colour is very revolutionary as because nine times out of ten historically in even in the present day you're a person of color and are attending the land it is typically for someone else's game and that person tends to be richer and unfortunately often quieter than you and so when you go back far enough has some sort of connection to foraging because none of us would be here wasn't for that action but for the indigenous people who are already here like that. That was food that was eating and then a lot of those indigenous folks in turn taught black people who were enslaved. Those same tips and tricks in about the same kinds of plants because as a black person living on a plantation. You're lucky if you were getting enough to eat to sustain the kind of duress you were putting your body there every day so it was smart to know how to forage. How trap how to fish how to hunt so you could better take care of yourself. Better take care of your family and the rest of your community

United States Nelson Cape Verde Ohio Cape Cod New England
Rue-Production in Thalictrum

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Rue-Production in Thalictrum

"All right. Melody saying it is so great to have you on the podcast. I'm really excited to talk to you today. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are in what it is. You do all right so melody sign and i'm currently a phd student at the university of wisconsin. Madison in the botany department my journey into botany was not the most straightforward at all. Let's yes i always hated. Min- was the person that all plants her boring. A coup cares about plant. Just sit around and do nothing so A win in two undergrad wanting to be dinner. So is the premed person wanting to gone dentistry. I'm also the type of person that really enjoys shoe. Have fun and i like to enjoy my life As a during undergrad Started to not. Enjoy what i was doing so much when i got into like the him i was just like is this i want to do and then i started thinking about you know dennis school like it's just like more ambitious cramming knowledge nutting for ted. That's all it is. And so i let my cell venture into the fact that i really liked reptiles amphibians. So i kind of transitioned in the middle of my undergrad During into my sophomore year into herpetology. Linda thoughts of okay. I think i would like to do

Botany Department University Of Wisconsin Madison MIN Nutting Dennis TED Linda
Fred Highlights a Couple of Plants Everyone Should Consider.

Your Gardening Questions

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Fred Highlights a Couple of Plants Everyone Should Consider.

"Already had a couple of other plants. You wanted to highlight. I definitely do the one that has been highlighting itself for perhaps up toward two weeks and then again like all other tree families groups and so on. They don't all bloom at one time. Now they gather up at one time. But i have been enjoying immensely my own and then dozens of other japanese tree lilacs. They are technically lilac. They have relatively little fragrance. Unfortunately it's it's not unpleasant but it's just not much there. They are anywhere from a creamy white flour to Well whitish. I don't i don't know about snow-driven but at the same time they're they're very remarkable and you can see them literally if you turn a corner on a city street and they've used as a street tree you can see in three blocks away when you turn the corner. They're they're quite remarkable for a period of roughly two two and a half weeks there quite a sturdy tree. I have seen them now and now being the last x. number of years where they're being known well enough to be used as a retreat. I've seen them from. I'm going to call them saplings. On up to about ten inches in diameter and then i have to tell a quick story about driving the countryside many years ago when i thought i knew what a japanese tree lilac was and hadn't paid any attention. Anyhow i'm trying to get on county roads from one town in northern ohio to another. And i'm i'm i'm kind of beaten it on the road and i came over a rise in his. I looked down there. Were three of them. Yeah that i could see honestly for quarter-mile with up being any attention. I kinda hit the brakes. So i get a better look. I forgot there was a guy behind me. Yeah i don read sign language that remarkable though march they add and their their their finishing up right now but even after the glory of the flower and the little little flower

Ohio
Rapid Changes in Slow-Growing Ecosystems

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Rapid Changes in Slow-Growing Ecosystems

"All right. Dr brian bouma. Thank you so much. For coming on the podcast. It's an honor to have you here. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is. You do short. So i am a plan to disturbance ecologist in particular so i studied things like Communities respond to disturbances like fires in wind and in particular how the edges of those things respond so my interest is in climate adaptation in one important aspect of that is the migration movement of species in response to climate change and things like disturbances and worming ends disasters. Give opportunity for that. So i tend to seek out areas of recent wildfires or windstorms or landslides and then look at how. The community is responding changing right on. Yeah i mean. Unfortunately you read the news. There's no shortage of that and a lot of ways but it also gives you know colleges like yourself a lot of opportunities to understand these dynamics but what brought you to this in the first place i mean. Were you always a plant person or do you just enjoy ecology and understanding the distribution of species. You know where did this all start for you. I was always in exploration person. I always liked wandering around in the woods. I grew up in the northwest northeast. Seattle couple hours north of seattle and spent most of my childhood wandering around the woods. Nice i always found it interesting to figure out what's wearing why maps always fascinated me and so it was a natural jump distributions of species being out in the wilderness in thinking. Well why is a species here and why is it not over there and it's a it's a natural jump into where things are geography and then my interest in forests Because i grew up in biggles forest led me to actually to disturbances because forests are fairly slow. Fairly slow moving on human time scales in many ways. It may respects up until they're not until you have his disturbed and so those quick sort of catalysts for change became an interesting target of investigation because a lot of stuff happens in a very short period of time even in a forest which has trees thousand

Dr Brian Bouma Northwest Northeast Seattle
Dr. Colin Walker on Snake Plants Aka Sansevieria

On The Ledge

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Colin Walker on Snake Plants Aka Sansevieria

"Well hi folks are. I'm calling walker. I'm currently president of the british koch succulent society. But my eight year presidency is just about to come to an end. I have been interesting growing and studying succulents for just over fifty years. I'm now retired. So i can spend more of my time looking after them. Them and writing about them. I have a lodge collection and two greenhouses conservatory on a porch. I currently live in scotland just gloss so the dry conditions are a bit challenging to what i was used to embed fiche. We hate talk about sense of areas and this has been a subject that people have been requesting pretty much since they thought of making this podcast. And we're finally talking about them dating a whole episode to them and these of grown his popularity in the last few years. But i wonder whether you could tell us. Start off by telling us a bit about where and how they grow in the wild and what conditions are like. I'm guessing they have to be tough because they're from a place where the not getting much moisture sons. Fear is a genus of about eighty species distributed in africa Also there's a couple in madagascar then going east daycare innova beer and his fall eastern burma. There's a severe burn money. I've only ever encountered severe is in the wild once we were on a safari in the eastern province of south africa. And there. I encountered what i am believed to be some severe hyacinth. Authorities are about five species native south africa

British Koch Succulent Society Walker Scotland Madagascar Burma Africa South Africa
Growing Gently: Honeysuckle and Hilda, the Floral Work of Claire Bowen

Cultivating Place

01:17 min | 1 year ago

Growing Gently: Honeysuckle and Hilda, the Floral Work of Claire Bowen

"Welcome claire what a pleasure to speak with you jennifer. Thank you so much. I'm so pleased to be talking to you as i said to you. I know off the record already. I'm so flattered to be asked. So thank you for taking the time to talk to me today. I would love to have you describe for listeners. Your own current personal medicine for your flower and gardening practice. What would that be clear. So my my real mission. One one that i think that i said hopefully i'm relatively new to the world of flowers. It was something. I've always wanted to be involved in. But i think i knew from the outset that i think what i would describe it as going gently before i began this. I had done quite a lot of environmental campaigning. And that was something. That was very important to me. And i came to flowers. Maybe five years ago six years ago when it wasn't quite as mainstream Ideas as it is now. And also i think to do it with kindness. I think it's really important to encourage and teach other innoventions. And so i think going gently as a as an Is probably where. I am

Claire Jennifer
Marking Your Territory, Elderberries, and Hydrangea Color

Plantrama

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Marking Your Territory, Elderberries, and Hydrangea Color

"Think we should start out with true or false ellen. It is about peeing in the garden to keep critters away. I have very mixed feelings about this. I have used predator urine in my garden in pennsylvania. I don't know if did a darn bit of good. I really don't but i'll tell you it smelled pretty darn bad. So if i were a bunny or a deer. I would not have gone near that stuff. It's interesting that We're starting with predator urine. Because i have very strong feelings about this and that is i cannot believe that this is collected in a humane way new. And you can't find any. They will not tell you how it's like. Well how it has to be as collected is they have to keep the coyotes or these fox in little pens with wire floors so that when they urinate goes down into a trough or something so it can't possibly be a humane thing so i am not in favor of using predator urine in the garden. Unless you're encouraging the coyotes and the to hang out and peeing your garden. Naturally that i'm all in favor of. I use the fox here in once i started looking into says this can't be good. This cannot be good but there are also people who will. Pd the borders of their garden in hopes of keeping deer and bunnies away. And i've read mixed things about this but well. i think i wouldn't encourage anybody to urinate too close to their vegetable garden or or things that you're going to eat that just kinda makes good sense that you don't want to bring you know harm on yourself in terms of bacteria tetra. That's why we carry waste away both either down into septic systems or sewage treatment plants.

Ellen Pennsylvania Coyotes FOX
The Prehistoric Path to Flowering Plants

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:50 min | 1 year ago

The Prehistoric Path to Flowering Plants

"All right sir. Peter crane it is an honor to have you on the podcast. Welcome how about we start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are. And what did you do great. Thanks so much matt. yeah. I'm president of the gun foundation here in up avila virginia and had a long career in botany one way or another starting in the uk and Spending time here in the us and then The few museum for many years and then running role botanic gardens q. In london before coming back to the us and any up here at oak spring in five years ago. That's wonderful and it's a beautiful place for anyone that's never heard of it. I will have all the links available for people but yeah it's really awesome to see some of my favorite botanical institutions early scientific institutions. I realized the field museum does much more than botany. But you yourself are a paleobotanist. And where did that all begin. I mean we're you into fossils as a child or did you just kind of discover your pass along the way through botany and then decided to look towards the past to kind of understand where diversity is today botanically. Yeah so i've I i did grow with an interest in fossils also had a real interesting archaeology actually as a teenager in high school and i was interested. In how archaeologists were able to construct pasta environments mainly through Pollen analysis allow a but also analysis of other plant remains and then that kind of led me to go a little deeper in time with a with an evolutionary perspective rather than necessarily more ecological perspective and so when i was looking at college i chose reading university because they had a long tradition in petty. And that was one of the things that i that i wanted to study.

Peter Crane Gun Foundation Avila Botanic Gardens Matt Virginia United States UK London
Small Trees With Bruce Crawford

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Small Trees With Bruce Crawford

"Hi bruce. I'm so glad we're gonna talk about this today. I've been going out and looking all the trees in my yard margaret. Yes no there's trees are one of those. I think often under appreciated plants in the landscape. Yes and again. Like i said in the introduction. You know suddenly there's a lot of like frau's e looking stuff that's going by the perennial layer and the lilac blooms are gone and whatever and i'm looking to the trees and i'm thinking oh this is going to be nice. And some of them came earlier already came and went but the blooms and so forth but anyway maybe we just start with a little. Like we're when i say garden sized trees or we say small trees. We don't mean like you know bonsai crew. Yeah no i i. Once worked for a gentleman who Was always talking about a small tree and he say dogwood everything was dogwood so i asked him what you want really want all over all over the place and then his wife chimp did and she said no no. That's the only tree that he knows. So you know. He's just looking for a tree that gets up to route twenty feet tall to maybe thirty feet and flowers and so. That's that's what he was looking for. It's it's interesting how you know. There's there's so many trees but again Many of them don't get out for the public to see your to to know that they exist

Frau Bruce
SLOW FLOWERS for SUMMER, With Debra Prinzing

Cultivating Place

01:26 min | 1 year ago

SLOW FLOWERS for SUMMER, With Debra Prinzing

"You know what if you were to tell people that the mission of your work bound up in all of those roles that i just described about you would that mission statement be deborah I think it's all about relationships. And community and sustainability and When i find a subject as a writer. Which is my background. When i find a subject that i am smitten by matt i get swept up by that. I fell down the rabbit hole discovering all of a sudden i it becomes sort of my lifestyle and gardening did that for me for twenty years and Now i guess for the last ten years it's been writing about and trying to learn as much as possible about the people who grow in design flowers in this lower society Universe which is basically noncommercial non factory like but more artisan like so. I've always written about creative people as journalist and them drawn to them. And so i want to live in that create a world. There's no boundary for me. -tween the people i want to spend time with the people. I have invited to be part of this society and the people that i'm writing about. It's just it's

Deborah Matt
Be Careful Not to Water the Verbena Too Much

Your Gardening Questions

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Be Careful Not to Water the Verbena Too Much

"And welcome back and fred You and i were talking a you talked about. How maybe her begonias. We're getting too much water. And they were saying that some plants some of the bloomers. Some of the annuals just can't take too much water. And and one that we talked about was ver- beena verbania is a beautiful little plant. A little it'll get get up into the eight ten inch range and eventually multiple flower heads and and Various colours available even to the extent. Mark and i were talking about one is purple with one little red stem coming. It could be what's called a sport or a mutation it could be a second little seedling sneaking along whatever it may be but it's one of those plants that i have killed three years in a row by by not paying attention to my own concerns. I put it where i wanted it. Not where it wanted to be. Yeah it. I put too low in the bids now. My beds are not high. But they're still water runs from. We'll say the property line in through the bid to the grass line and then carries off. So that i get water off the lawn watered down off the bid and so on to where that's the last area of to dry. It's the first area for the beena. Diane so the best way to tell you is if the bed is slightly elevated then go midway up the hill so to speak or upgrade to put those in they just simply are at least from what i would like. I said i killed three years in a row. I fortunately the third year. Well i welcomed some some reflection where i stopped on time and said those so-and-so's are not gonna make it again so i was still tied to biza manuals and i. I went to the guard center and replaced them but Well i i don't know i should tell you a story like that but still in all Rabin is one of those things. That is quite prolific and flower Sturdy as it can be but not with wet feet. It just it just quits. And that's not good

Beena Verbania Fred Mark Diane Guard Center Rabin
The Evolution of the Seed

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:06 min | 1 year ago

The Evolution of the Seed

"All right. Doctor cecelia d'amato thank you so much. For coming on the podcast. I'm really excited to talk to you about your work today. But first let's tell everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do first of all. Thanks for inviting me. I'm a big fan of indefens- so corner to be here wonderful. Yes thank you. And while i am cecilia suba i grew up in columbia in a tropical country. So i was at saints wfan. Since i was a child i was immersed in this. Amazing diverse is pays. I was always looking at plans. And i was just thinking recently. That a my monae night when he was a child moments in political sciences. But she was all his very sensitive towards nature. Implants used to out collecting seeds all the time so we had nearby my city there was a if four is a pine tree forest and we used to go there just for a day in the woods and a collecting seed cones so it was like the first time that i really got into a. I never thought that was going to be my my job right. Yes and then. Well i was always. I think for me mentors and a having people around me. The have influenced me a lot so i got into college. I went. I did biology and in columbia undergrads five year program so still very beginning. I was a in the botany journal club a reading vapors every week And there was one day that the university hired new professor. Her name is natalia pawan more and she gave a talk on what she did for his phd. Which is development flower development in dave The poppy family.

Cecelia D'amato Cecilia Suba Columbia Saints Botany Journal Club Natalia Pawan Dave
Rescuing Plants With Sarah Gerrard-Jones

On The Ledge

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Rescuing Plants With Sarah Gerrard-Jones

"Just looking at that. I really with these totally about me. It's nice to be in your loving home. And i feel like i've been here with four because sisters. Yeah i feel like we've been separated at birth. Actually i feel like i've been here for seen so many of these plants on instagram raid. Followed your rescue stories very very exciting that we can finally do. Because we've been catch car covid. I know yet we were planning to do this sometimes. Go and now. we're actually getting around to it now. The hopefully things are on the mend. Have your plants been a nice little distraction distraction absolutely but they're gonna to cope when life returns to don't get all this. Tlc time cheese made we realize how much work they take. Yeah when you've got the time to spend them spend all day exactly and i do think anything else. I think this is the message. We need to get out there that you know. It's not necessarily necessary for every forty to have two hundred wants. you know. Sometimes you know how much works involved in rescuing applaud. Let's just talk about that sign of things with. How did that will begin. How did you get into rescuing plants. Is it a lifelong thing. Or is it something scientists trying to say it but i feel like it really chose me. Does that sound weird. I was going at like hanes about five years ago. Local deal why store mentioning names right even mentioned then shave homebase and looking for pain. I noticed there was somebody binning. The orchids