Gardening

Listen for the latest news and guidance on all things horticultural. For budding gardeners and seasoned green thumbs alike. From audio aired on premium podcasts.

A highlight from Lichens With Jessica Allen -A Way to Garden With Margaret Roach-November 29, 2021

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:46 min | Last week

A highlight from Lichens With Jessica Allen -A Way to Garden With Margaret Roach-November 29, 2021

"Those two organisms. But there's We a lot can more really think going of on likens in there as than just miniature those ecosystems two organisms. in and of themselves as well. We can really think of likens as miniature ecosystems in and of themselves as well. So in addition to the fungi, the algae, there are other fungi in there. There are tons of bacteria, there are tardigrades, which are water bears and nematodes, these tiny worms, and so really it's kind of a microcosm in and of itself. study to become a botanist a plant biologist why at one point did you not say, oh, this genus of plants or these trees or how did it like and capture your heart? Yeah, that's a great question. It actually started when I was taking introductory biology and we went through for the whole year. We went through all of these chapters in this book, and we talked about all of these different organisms and molecular processes. And then the only chapter that we skipped was the one on fungi. So I went back and read it and I said, these are the coolest organisms and I was lucky enough to be at a university where we actually had a whole quarter while in class on mycology and the professor was wonderful. And I really fell in love with fungi. I think they're fascinating. They are a bit cryptic. So there's a lot of mystery there. There's a lot that we don't understand about them still. And then of all the fungi, I found likens the most beautiful. And I really just fell in love. And so throughout my education and also my research, I've worked on plans. I've studied plants, but really my heart has always been with the lichens. Interesting. I didn't know that that's how it came about. And I think that when I spoke to you in James londoner, your longtime colleague for The New York Times article, you both explained to me that fungi are really overlooked in conservation as well, aren't they? You were just telling a story about how you discovered them and they were almost overlooked in the literature, so to speak, but they're not really recognized in conservation efforts as widely as they should be, are they? Absolutely. For a long time, they've really just been completely excluded from our typical conservation efforts, which tend to focus on larger animals and plants on vascular plants, especially and we can see this when we endangered species act, there are thousands of plants and animals protected by the ESA, but there are only two fungi. Both lichens and they both occur in the southeastern United States. So that's The Rock known lichen and the perforate cladonia lichen in Florida. And there has been some recent actually some really recent positive news on this front, though. Likens and other fungi are gaining a lot of global attention and conservation. The first international fungal conservation organization just formed the fungal conservation committee as part of the international union for the conservation of nature. The IUCN has really been embracing fungi in their documents recently. We have this flora fungi fauna movement going on this is the third of three F's movement, which is really been led by giuliana forci, who's an incredible fungal conservationist. And so there is a movement in this direction. I think we're really seeing some positive outcomes for fungal conservation globally. So in the case of lichens, people might say, well, but it just looks like a piece of chewing gum, the felony ground or a log or some splat of paint on a rock or whatever. So why should I care about those? So what's their role in the bigger picture environmentally and so forth? Where do they doing? Yeah, so likens perform tons of different ecosystem services, they interact with a lot of animals. So many animals eat lichens even large mammals, so like Caribou, eat a lot of lichens. They really fundamentally rely on lichens as one of their major food sources. But even animals like deer and moose use lichens, especially as a winter forage, many birds use them as nesting materials as do smaller mammals, like flying squirrels, both nests as nesting materials and as food. And then if we continue to sort of scale down many invertebrates, use them as camouflage and again as a food source. And then if we sort of scale up to the ecosystem level processes, you know, they're fixing carbon from the air, right? And they're also fixing nitrogen. And they can be in many systems, a really one of the most important nitrogen inputs to the soil in some forested systems. So both on this really large scale of the movement of elements sort of through our through these systems globally and on these smaller scales and these really in all of these interactions with animals. And I know when we did the story together, we talked about, here it was garden clean up time when we were speaking and you know people are raking and they're finding maybe a branch twig with like an on it and you know, but it's not junk. It's as you called it a little packet of fertilizer of potential fertilizer, right?

James Londoner Iucn First International Fungal Con Fungal Conservation Committee Giuliana Forci Likens The New York Times Florida United States
A highlight from Ep. 345 - Reconstructing Two Centuries of Midwest Prairie Fire History

In Defense of Plants Podcast

00:54 sec | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 345 - Reconstructing Two Centuries of Midwest Prairie Fire History

"How's everyone doing this week? I know I'm doing great because I have a better understanding of the role of fire in Midwestern Prairie ecosystems, and that's all thanks to my guest today, doctor Greg spirius. Gregg's been on the podcast before many, many years ago, but he's back today to talk about an incredible research project he's been on that looked at historic fire regimes in the Midwest, dating back to the 1600s. There's a lot of cultural context that needs to be factored in here, and it helps people trying to understand how to move forward in this chaotic world that we live in. But I'm gonna let Greg do all the talking. So let's just jump right into it without further ado. Here's my conversation with doctor Greg spirius. I hope you enjoy. All

Greg Spirius Gregg Midwest Greg
A highlight from Episode 204: thrips

On The Ledge

05:43 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 204: thrips

"This week's show is dedicated to the topic of brace yourself thrips yes that pest which we've all come to fear comes under the BDI of on the ledge this week. So get your hand lenses at the ready, this one is not for the faint hearted. Plus, I answer a question whether a plant can recover from cat related damage, oh dear, pussy's got her claws out. Hello, I'm William Kirk. I'm a Professor of applied entomology at keele university in the UK and I've been studying the biology of thrips for exactly 40 years this year. Now, there is no such thing as a threat. That's right. You'll see lots of people mentioning it, but it's a sort of faults assumption that the singular thrip whereas in fact the it's from a Greek word, which ends in the letter psi, which is a sound. So we're stuck unfortunately with the singular of thrips being thrips. So it does seem a bit strange when if you talk about one thrips or a thrips, I've seen a thrips, but that is strictly correct. Yeah, it's a bit like data, isn't it? I think that's another word that scientists always always have to have to struggle with. I think that this is going to probably trip me up. So I apologize in advance if I say thrip, but I'm going to try to say thrips throughout. Now, this is a pest of house plants that is present everywhere in the world as far as I know. Are we dealing with one species or lots of different species on our House plants? We're dealing with lots of species. In fact, in the world, there are known 6000 species, although most of those just live in leaf litter on forest floors and don't really concern grows a plant. Then you get down to about a hundred species that are pests of crops around the world, but on house plants you're probably talking only about 1214 species that are significant pests that people are likely to encounter. And of those that are perhaps two or three that are the main pests because they feed on so many things, some threat species are very specific. We've just feed on just a few species, and then there are other ones that feed on lots of different species. And you shouldn't take any notice of the name. When it has a name, something like onion thrips, well okay, so pest on onions, but it's also pested on lots of other things. So the names can be a bit misleading. But about a dozen species are the ones that you'd encounter on houseplants. And presumably, you know, this is another reason to be careful with importing plants from other countries because this is how they're spreading coming in on plants and spreading to parts of the world that one species wasn't in before. They've arrived. That's right. We have quite a lot of invasive species of thrips, something like, for example, the western flower thrips, which is perhaps one of the major threat pests at the moment, was originally limited to just the western part of the USA. That's where the western came from. But since about the 1970s, it spread world wide, and once the insect, the thrip species becomes kind of resistant to insecticides, then it's very difficult to stop it and horticultural trade brings plants all around the world. So, you know, you have flowers coming in from Colombia to the UK then propagation material coming into the Amsterdam flour markets and the next day there can be in 400 garden centers all across the UK. So because the threats are so small and easily overlooked, they get spread really frequently and easily by human trade. Yeah, this is a big problem. And as you said, they are rather small and not the easiest thing to spot. I mean, I'm always going on about hand lenses on the show, but as soon as you get a hand lens on one and gets a magnification, you start to see that there's probably more than you thought. What are they actually getting up to on our plants? And what are they doing in terms of damage? They feed by piercing and sucking. So they have a mouth parts a bit like a drinking straw, but they poke into the piers a whole in a cells in the plant or in pollen grains or cells on the leaves or cells in the flowers. Pierce that and then suck out the contents. So you'll sometimes hear people saying that they ra for a scrape. That's not true. They actually pierce and suck. So by piercing and sucking they suck out the contents, and that's how one of a sip common symptoms of thrips feeding is that you get this silvering pattern. So what's happened is that the pigmented the green chlorophyll or the pigment of the petal has been sucked out of cells, and you're left instead with a kind of empty cell full of air. And that gives that kind of reflective silvery look as a result of the feeding. So they move along, sucking out cells in turn and building up a sort of silvery area of the damage. So the main thing they do on the house plants, one plants in general is feeding. So the larvae, the young stages are continually feeding, and then when they get to the adult stage, the adults are also feeding. So it's the feeding damage that's the real problem. In house plants, outside in crops, cause thrips can also be vectors of plant viruses. And that can be very damaging in greenhouses or sometimes an outdoor crops. But I suppose in small collections of house plants, you're probably not likely to have virus as a problem. It will be the thrips that doing the feeding that's causing the problem.

William Kirk Keele University UK Colombia Amsterdam USA Pierce
How Do I Know When to Bring in Pots This Fall?

Your Gardening Questions

02:05 min | 4 months ago

How Do I Know When to Bring in Pots This Fall?

"Denise send us an email to read at plan talk radio dot com and denise says hi fred. This is my first year gardening. So congratulations to you. And i was wondering how do i know which potted plants to bring indoors when the temperatures start to drop or do i just leave them out over the winter. I'm in zone seven. Thank you okay. No her circumstances are different. I'm going to guess she's probably from Well darn close or even south of the ohio river etc and this gives her different options. We would have here at central. Ohio are certainly north except for people that are having a wonderful display from there Mimosa tree right now that that's just Uncommon good luck or he's being extremely careful but anyhow as to denise. I hope she kept the tags. I hope the tags would have indicated whether these are tropicals or not for example. We made mention his hibiscus again. This this time There is a tropical hibiscus. That's absolutely magnificent. Ina pot indoors in the wintertime. now it's can be out all summer. They're they're full of glorious flower colors. There are many many of them. However here you would have to take that plant in For the winter because the top and the root zone in the container probably would freeze So she might be able to keep a high viscous of the tropical nature outdoors over winter. I would say it's it's pretty if it because where she's zone seven zero to ten above and anything Anything of a tropical nature is not going to like it. Below twenty-eight a book yeah now the reason i say twenty eight is. There's there's some latitude on some plants to live through freezing if it's a light freezing.

Denise Ohio River Ohio INA
The Study of Horticultural Taxonomy

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:07 min | 4 months ago

The Study of Horticultural Taxonomy

"All right. Matthew reese it's great to have you on the podcast. It's an honor to be here but before we begin. Let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Hi everybody thinks so. Much on the podcasts. Listening for years now a huge fence. Thanks kudos the a setting this up in keeping it going so long. Yes oh my. Name's matthew reese on the ball tennis and i worked for the royals cultural society. Which is your chess. Shoot all the largest. Uk charity dedicated to gardening. We have about five and a half million members across the country. So yeah that's quite a big number. And so i work in the hold cultural taxonomy team in the science department and i spit raw between plant authentications research on ecosystem services of cultivated plants awesome. I'm really excited to talk to you about your work today but before we jump into the meat of it. What got you interested in. Plants is something you've always had in your life or did you kind of come to it later on through some sort of gardening experience or educational career kind of thing. Yeah it was. I will always love being outside in spending time in nature. I was a kid. We used to spend a lot of time in my grands like area Forest which is actually a site of special scientific interests of only learned that recently back then now makes sense. Spending a lot of time in the forest was was amazing. I'm not really gifted in terms of the actually dropped out of school quite early on no sentencing before finishing my back. More at at this point may specify the native english. I spend most of my life confronts My parents are english. I've been brought up in greenwich in france for about twenty five years. We'll say. But yes. I said so. I kind of dropped out of school. Early wasn't really sure what. I was going to do with my life and ended up traveling to costa rica. Actually where i spent months. And that's why i volunteered. For attorney golden

Matthew Reese Royals Cultural Society Chess Tennis UK Greenwich France Rica Costa
What's Wrong With My Tomato Plants?

Your Gardening Questions

02:06 min | 4 months ago

What's Wrong With My Tomato Plants?

"David is having some real trouble with tomatoes. He says his tomato leaves are wilting. At the very top of the leaf and then a few days later they start turning a botchy blotchy black and then about a week after that. They start dying altogether. He's lost forty tomato plants this way and he wants to know what you think he can do about it now. His problem and mine are very different. And i i laugh only because the difference mine were just flat out eating. They were perfectly healthy. Not a spot on them now. David's problem is very different and it sounds like he may have a problem with them. Called sectorial league spot I kind of wish. I could talk to david at this point but at the same time. I have to make some assumptions. I'm going to guess that in that you have to deal with prophylactic in in considering containing many many diseases you have to prevent it. That's the big word. Prevention starts by buying plants. That have been what's called indexed for v f and that's virus cerium wilt and nematodes and that on top of those three comes one called sectorial leaf spot. And it's a plant where i'm going to bet. David got a busy Started his seedlings either indoors or planted. The seeds early they grew like topsy. We had plenty of moisture in sunshine. This spring for them to just have really rebelled. Now then that makes for a plant has softer skin so to speak which is good in many ways however it allows or organic disease germs. If you will to jump onto them start to grow enter through the softer skin or or flashier leaf if you will and away. They go when he lost that many. I'm going to bet he's using the same spot in the garden for them. More than one year that could leave toria spores right there waiting to get into a new plant each year.

David
Baked Pears, Listener Calls, Harvesting Garlic, and Chestnuts

In the Garden

02:21 min | 4 months ago

Baked Pears, Listener Calls, Harvesting Garlic, and Chestnuts

"Hey joel hello. It's a beauty out there today. Very nice yeah. And i hope to get up and spend a little time in the garden this afternoon myself. So interesting experience The my son. Jake and his wife nikki where the place we rented has a bunch of Pear trees and we noticed that the pears were dropping. You know it's sort of like apples. Early ones drop and the friday night. I came home to dinner. They had made. And one of the things they made was baked pairs. And these were the dropped pairs. It came down and they weren't more than maybe two inches or maybe three and i was so surprised. I sorta figured well. They were hard and and really unusable but they had they had cut them down through the stem and the seeds. The long way opened them up. They put him in a in a big baking pan and put on now. Oh butter and some honey and put them in the oven. Three fifty for about I think they figured it was about forty minutes and all because they kept baking them and they were absolutely fantastic. They were you know big pairs and i would never have thought. Those little hard pairs would would be edible at all but they turned out to be absolutely delicious and they topped it off. with maple syrup and a little brown sugar of course and that helped but they were absolutely delicious terrific. I did that one year. And i actually could do it again. Now because tapani. The place. Where i where i lived. I mean literally off the huge development behind me and all around me and all that but it used to be an orchard out there and yell it's bay and so there are a lot of very old and Vestigial i guess is apple trees and a lot of them look like a cross between crab apple something else. Small hard little apples long story short. Exactly what you said you know bake them in butter a lot of people sarah sugar and they're delicious

Joel Hello Nikki Jake Tapani Apple Sarah Sugar
Behind the Scenes at Prairie Moon Nursery

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:13 min | 4 months ago

Behind the Scenes at Prairie Moon Nursery

"All right. Caitlin o'connor it's great to have you on the podcast. I'm really excited to talk to you today. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do for sure. I'm a huge fan of the podcast. So it's very exciting to be with you here today. My name is caitlin. And i am the education outreach specialist here at prairie moon nursery and winona minnesota yes So i've been with moon for a little over five years now And i came to curry moon. Because i'm actually a resident of wis- koi valley community land co-op where was started So i was going to college in the winona area winona state university And had gotten my degree in environmental science and my capstone research project at winona state. was with native plants and so i got familiar with Moon at that point in time. And so you know. After a brief stint of going to the big city and doing doing some nonprofit environmental work up there. I came back to the more rural winona county and landed up as the moon. So it's really great to be here.

Caitlin O'connor Prairie Moon Nursery Winona Koi Valley Community Land Co Winona Area Winona State Unive Caitlin Minnesota Winona County
A Rallying Cry for Restoration

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:12 min | 4 months ago

A Rallying Cry for Restoration

"All right. Tim christoffersen it is an honor to have you on the podcast. Welcome but before we jump into what you came on to talk about today. Let's start off by introducing yourself. Let's tell everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Thank you very much matt. And it's a great pleasure to be on this podcast in defense plants. That's great title. So i'm tim. Christopher i'm the father of two wonderful children happily married and i'm working for the united nations to make a difference for my kids. That basically sums it up. I'm a forest by training. Though i've left being an active forester in the field about twenty years ago to work at the national and international policy level. Because i felt that they were changes that we need most stem than those you can achieve at the ground level. I'm still on that journey and trying to aim for that. Systemic change. well it's wonderful to see someone with an actual background enforced going in the direction of policy. Because you kind of understand it on a level that if you just want the policy route you might not have that on the ground experience but what got you interested in forests and ecosystems. I mean you mentioned your children really being the main motivation about working towards a more sustainable in habitable future on this earth. But what got you interested in the environment in the first place. I think that also goes back to. When i was a child. I was spending a lot of time outdoors and in the forest. My grandfather was also forest. I t took me out a lot on his journeys and on replanting And the that has really shaped me. So i've i've known that i wanted to become a forester ever since i was twelve. Think so it's It's been it's been an interesting journey to leave that behind. Sometimes i wish i was still working directly with plans. I try to make up for it in by having bought a little farm that i'm trying to restore and my spat time so that i don't really talk about restoration but also also do it myself. otherwise you can lose that connection that you just described right in what is real and works on the ground and what other policy changes that we need.

Tim Christoffersen Christopher United Nations Matt TIM
Mint Relatives With Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:46 min | 4 months ago

Mint Relatives With Ken Druse

"You all know kendrew regular visitor to the show and author of twenty garden books and longtime friend. When he's not managing the antics of two troublemaking but gorgeous canines. He manages his extensive garden in new jersey. Hi ken i changed. Your intro. gorgeous canines oak the their handsome. It's true managing left that part out. So i sh- since we're talking men's today which are often aromatic. Let's have a giveaway of your latest book. The central garden about sent and fragrance and so forth with the transcript of the show of runaway to garden dot com. Okay that's lovely okay. Good good So you know when you said it. As i said in the npr's like what. What are we gonna talk about. And then i really it was kind of. And then you and i both got to sort of digging around reading about mints the mid family and so for so tell us a little bit about the breadth of it. Well i could stand in one place. Just turn and look and see. There's oh there's bee bomb and there's a lemon balm and there's some you know there's so many family relatives and you can often recognize them. Not only because many are fragrant when you rub the leaves but also because many have square stems but there are over two hundred and thirty genera- and over seven thousand species of mint relatives plants in the lenny. Ac family

Kendrew KEN New Jersey NPR
Trillium Diversity: A Story of Ants & Seed Dispersal

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:04 min | 5 months ago

Trillium Diversity: A Story of Ants & Seed Dispersal

"Dr chelsea miller. It's awesome to have you on the podcast. I'm really excited to talk to you today. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are in what it is you do. Hi it's a wonderful to be invited. Thank you so much for having me Yeah my name's chelsea miller. I recently graduated with my from the university of tennessee and knoxville in their e department. So i'm an ecologist First and foremost. I'm not a botanist. i'm not an entomologist. Although many people think that. That's what i do. I studied plant. Insect interactions so I'm in both of those worlds but Yeah i definitely don't know all about taxonomy plant or insect Only really the the organisms that i work with but a little bit about background i grew up in northern illinois in the middle of the cornfields so very agricultural not a lot of what i would consider to be nature available to me in my backyard for example and as a child. You don't have the option to pop into your car and drive wherever you wanna go. You know i was. I was really used to playing in the little catches woods by my house and i. It was very safe and comfortable. But i really didn't love growing up there on. Inci went to central arkansas for my undergraduate degree. Permit parents Went to school and they have a really great honors program. There that i got into. I had an awesome time in arkansas. I loved it arken. Fuzzy opposite of illinois there-i wild and natural at least the northern half of it in the ozarks and that's that's where i spent most of my time. I just played in the woods. And i hydroxide and i. You know floated the buffalo Is gorgeous natural scenic rivers. And i just did a ton of feels worth so. That's kind of where. I got my start in biology with dairy on the ground. You know the good old southern boy. Kind of research so yeah. That's how i got started in really wear my My research

Dr Chelsea Miller Chelsea Miller University Of Tennessee Knoxville Inci Illinois Arkansas Ozarks Buffalo
ADVENTUROUS DESIGN and CIVILIZATION BUILDING

Cultivating Place

02:05 min | 5 months ago

ADVENTUROUS DESIGN and CIVILIZATION BUILDING

"Welcome david i am just really happy to speak with you about these things at this exact time and i'm really excited to speak with you. Thank you very much. And you know if i were to ask you your current mission statement at this point in your life at this point in your work for your relationship with plants and planted spaces whether that's personal at home or it's also as manifested by teramoto. What would that mission statement be. David you know. I just did a funny thing last week where i was looking at our office profile on our website and we kind of have a think manifesto is too strong a word but we have kind of a a series of paragraphs that kind of outline what you're asking and i actually listeria and i looked at it and i was like. Oh my gosh this is out of date. And so then. I added in a couple of sentences that kind of explained that this manifesto or a this belief system is allowed to change any ball any point in time. So you your questions. Kind of timely. In that when a so i started teramoto with a turnout is not just mind. A it's it's alan for. Roy is my business partner. Jenny jones house partner in our la office and we have a team of about seventeen people at this point which is really incredible and All incredible humans. And when allen and i started teramoto our of guiding principle is a formally and conceptually adventurous office for landscape architecture. And i would say that that very much still rings true and a stand by that and that's like the tag thing on her instagram. That being said the practice has evolved. We the team has grown and time has passed and we've got to build a lot of work in evatt to learn a lot in all of this

David Jenny Jones ROY Alan LA Allen Evatt
Summer Cocktail Tips, Straight From the Garden

Plantrama

01:54 min | 5 months ago

Summer Cocktail Tips, Straight From the Garden

"I. I'm not going to talk about a specific cocktail today. But i'm going to encourage people to experiment you know ellen. The mo- hito has been so popular of late. Right and there are several mint based cocktails. And they're fine. They're wonderful and all kinds of mintz can be used for them. So that's delicious. But i would encourage people to experiment with other flavors with any traditional cocktail recipe. That calls for meant whether it's a mint julep or mo hito instead of using the mint think about using other flavors in that same recipe and i would encourage you to try basil. That's a wonderful herb to use for flavoring. I would encourage you to try lemon for beena. Which is a little milder and But also plays well very well with anything that has lime in it. Of course and i would also encourage people to try to stir cham's because using minister shem foliage instead of the mint and even minister shem flowers. You put those flowers and foliage in the cocktail shaker and you mix it up and straighten it out and you've got the spiciness of distortion and you can garnish the cocktail with mr shem flour. And it's it's yummy. I wasn't even thinking on long the substitution line. But last year i had an august a in my garden and at the end of the year i was cutting them back and i dried all the foliage and it's got a wonderful sort of half meant have liquorice flavour and i made some of it into a syrup and i've been thinking what could i. How could i use this in a cocktail so going to go back and look at all the classic mint cocktails and see one. This substitution does for just mixing it up a little bit.

Mintz Ellen Mr Shem
For a Different Look in Your Garden, Try Yucca

Your Gardening Questions

02:24 min | 5 months ago

For a Different Look in Your Garden, Try Yucca

"Initially and i'm talking way back in time. I thought that plant doesn't belong here. It looks like the zone plant or new mexico. Plant or whatever i i was. I was a bit of a situation with a class and i turned to the professor to ask question. I must have backed up. Just a touch. I had shorts on at that point in time. And i knew i backed into something. Because the tips of leaves are bordering on being that of a needle. I understand they use the indian people used to indigenous people used to strip the leaves of some of their vantage and so on and use them as wine or minor rope and so on. Yucca is the name of the plant yucca is has been for. I don't know we can have now and going on. It's about i think half over tall boring on four and a half five five and a half feet tall. The leaves are staying at. Oh i don't know need to buy and then up comes this stem gangly looking thing when it first starts up when it starts to flower. It's very different now. Summer white white and beyond that summer kind of a creamy white there is a variegated form. And so i still think the plant belongs in arizona however when it is used here in in all zone five and six it still fits in If it's not just one plant and that one plant can be used in a perennial garden. sticking up background. That's fine but i. I've seen them used wrong or they don't i don't know they don't seem to hold their own visually against we'll call the normal foliage and things around here however i've seen the music groups and a group of yucca. Five plants whatever it might be can be seen. I swear for up to a quarter mile when they're standing tall and saw it. So i put that in there. It's it's the red white and blue time Up up close. The plants are always sending out new flower florence. If you will and and some old dead when so when you're up close you kinda see a mixture but at a distance it's all just a great big four and a half foot stem of white flour. So it's it. It has to be a plan of the week. And since it's about what i call mid bloom period That's it and it does kind of add to our fourth of july red white and

New Mexico Arizona
Palms Through Deep Time

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:43 min | 5 months ago

Palms Through Deep Time

"All right. Dr kelly matsunaga thank you so much. For coming on the podcast. It's an honor to have you here. And i'm really excited to talk to you today. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is. You do all right. Thanks for having on the podcast. My name is as you just said. Kelly matsunaga currently an assistant professor in ecology and evolutionary biology at the university of kansas. And i'm also curator of paleo body in the biodiversity institute which is sort of the collection of natural history museums Here at ku. That's really exciting. Paleo botany to me. Is i have to live vicariously through people like you. Because it's something that was has always interested me but i want a different path with my career. So i'm really excited to pick your brain about this but one of the things that always interests me is how you came to paleo botany in the first place where you a fossil kid a plant kid. Where did the combination of the two really find their way into a fruitful career for you. Yeah so i I would say that. I came to paleo botany through a lot of sort of happy accidents home. I was not a paleo kid. Or a plant kid numb. I got interested in plants when i was in college. I was not a science major. But we all had to take intro. Some kind of intro. Biology works as a general education requirement. And so i took introductory botany in. That's what really got me interested in plants Specifically the the whole evolutionary story of plants that the professor that taught the courses frank shaughnessy at humboldt state university. Who was able to sort of weave through the course of the class.

Dr Kelly Matsunaga Kelly Matsunaga University Of Kansas Biodiversity Institute Frank Shaughnessy Humboldt State University
Natural Communities With Patrick McMillan

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:55 min | 5 months ago

Natural Communities With Patrick McMillan

"Patrick mcmillan came to herons would last fall from clemson university in south carolina where he ran the south carolina botanical garden and was a professor in the college of agriculture forestry in life sciences he also hosted a pbs series called expeditions with patrick mcmillan and led the development of the botanical gardens natural heritage garden. Which will hear more about so. Hi patrick. I'm so glad to make contact and get to know you a little bit. I margaret. it's it's wonderful to speak with you in wonderful be your. Yeah so i feel like it must have been a bit of like dorothy. Were not in kansas anymore. When you found yourself in the pacific northwest compared to south carolina. it really was. It really still is I've been a little shocked. How quickly of this area has started to just feel like home One of the. I mean herons would as one of the world's great gardens of with some of the best garden people in the world and into the area itself also to me just has this wonderful kind of maternal nece to it Seems to just envelope you and and convince you pretty quick that this is one of the best places on planet earth. Yeah so. I mean it's a distinctively different natural community or habitat from where you were and so besides being shift in zone and so forth. It's a distinguished place in many ways no thousands of different types of plants and so forth but also being i think one of the largest public gardens in the us that's wholly owned by native american tribes does. Did that influence your decision to come there and tell me a little bit about that absolutely You know when i when i was sort of looking around to to sort of slowdown and change and i know you know what that's like to to want to Get away for maybe six job. Titles down to one.

Patrick Mcmillan South Carolina Botanical Garde College Of Agriculture Forestr Botanical Gardens Natural Heri South Carolina Clemson University Pacific Northwest Dorothy Margaret Patrick Kansas United States
Fruits! Berries! Things You Can Grow in Your Garden

In the Garden

02:08 min | 5 months ago

Fruits! Berries! Things You Can Grow in Your Garden

"Well. It's been a lot of interest in in the garden. Ever since and the fruits is a really wonderful thing to grow in the garden. It's it's a little tougher than vegetables on some respects. Some are easier than ground vegetables and but all of them are a challenge in their own way. Just like whether it's a broccoli lettuce they. They all have their own challenges. We have a small patch of blueberries about ten bushes or so and We've last year. We had one heck of a of a harvest. It was a beautiful blueberry year. And this year when when i was Back at the house and looking at the blueberries We've always let the The wild Strawberries grow underneath them. That seemed to be a good mulch and didn't seem to bother anything and they both like an acid soil blueberries and strawberries and This year was the first year. I've seen a just a massive amount of little baby. You know well for fully mature tiny little strawberries. Oh yes. I was surprised i was picking a few and of course the the wonderful thing about those wild strawberries is. They are sweet and they are delicious. There are a lot of work. Well i used to go into by my. When i was a kid used to go into my grandfather's backfield and pick a whole court and i think i covered a half an acre. A court again. My grandmother gave me the the old little wooden strawberry boxes the billboard size once you get as many as you can fill it up to that. I wanted to tell grandma. I and even picking even picking them by putting one in the bathroom. I would come back with a court. But i'd also i'd also defoliate a half acre to do but who else was gonna do it anyway. Right

New Naturalism With Iowa-Based Plantsman, Kelly Norris

Cultivating Place

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

New Naturalism With Iowa-Based Plantsman, Kelly Norris

"Kelly. It is such a pleasure to speak with you. Thank you so much for having me jennifer. So i'm gonna ask you to take us beyond that little resume sheet and described for listeners. If you had a current personal mission statement for your own gardening practice and growth right now in your life what would that personal mission statement. B kelly that personal mission statement for me is to plant the world a more beautiful functional place ecologically functional place that is and that is a course that i have been on for longtime really a of course of some self discovery along the way as well as a sort of marion of various interest in order culture as i have have come to discover them in the course of my career today.

Kelly Jennifer
The Foragers Dilemma with Alexis Nikole Nelson

Bon Appetit Foodcast

02:40 min | 5 months ago

The Foragers Dilemma with Alexis Nikole Nelson

"Wanna ask you about your background. So i know you're not the first generation of of nelson or whatever surname. There is on your maternal side in this in the ohio. You've talked a bit about your mom's relationships with plants and what you learned from her. But i also know it goes even further back than that. So how far back. You want to tell me about how that kind of relationship with the land is part of your family. Oh absolutely so. We're very lucky because not not every person of color especially not every black person in the united states is lucky enough to be able to trace a lot of their familial history back on my mom's side of the family with her father they'd been they've been in the united states since the sixteen hundreds they were farmers in new england after the revolutionary war. And with my mom's mom's side of the family with my my nanna. She was a second generation. Cape verde an immigrant to the cape cod area and with a lot of bigger and immigrant families. A lot of them brought foraging practices with them and i mean my nanna was like working in the cranberry bogs in the nineteen thirties. To help better support her family and bats a whole lot of exposure to plant lice. But you just get to learn about with each passing day while you're out there so tell me more about that. She was picking the cranberries and selling them for a while. Picking the cranberries for a someone else's business which one of many reasons why i think being a forager of colour is very revolutionary as because nine times out of ten historically in even in the present day you're a person of color and are attending the land it is typically for someone else's game and that person tends to be richer and unfortunately often quieter than you and so when you go back far enough has some sort of connection to foraging because none of us would be here wasn't for that action but for the indigenous people who are already here like that. That was food that was eating and then a lot of those indigenous folks in turn taught black people who were enslaved. Those same tips and tricks in about the same kinds of plants because as a black person living on a plantation. You're lucky if you were getting enough to eat to sustain the kind of duress you were putting your body there every day so it was smart to know how to forage. How trap how to fish how to hunt so you could better take care of yourself. Better take care of your family and the rest of your community

United States Nelson Cape Verde Ohio Cape Cod New England
Rue-Production in Thalictrum

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:45 min | 6 months ago

Rue-Production in Thalictrum

"All right. Melody saying it is so great to have you on the podcast. I'm really excited to talk to you today. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are in what it is. You do all right so melody sign and i'm currently a phd student at the university of wisconsin. Madison in the botany department my journey into botany was not the most straightforward at all. Let's yes i always hated. Min- was the person that all plants her boring. A coup cares about plant. Just sit around and do nothing so A win in two undergrad wanting to be dinner. So is the premed person wanting to gone dentistry. I'm also the type of person that really enjoys shoe. Have fun and i like to enjoy my life As a during undergrad Started to not. Enjoy what i was doing so much when i got into like the him i was just like is this i want to do and then i started thinking about you know dennis school like it's just like more ambitious cramming knowledge nutting for ted. That's all it is. And so i let my cell venture into the fact that i really liked reptiles amphibians. So i kind of transitioned in the middle of my undergrad During into my sophomore year into herpetology. Linda thoughts of okay. I think i would like to do

Botany Department University Of Wisconsin Madison MIN Nutting Dennis TED Linda
Fred Highlights a Couple of Plants Everyone Should Consider.

Your Gardening Questions

02:03 min | 6 months ago

Fred Highlights a Couple of Plants Everyone Should Consider.

"Already had a couple of other plants. You wanted to highlight. I definitely do the one that has been highlighting itself for perhaps up toward two weeks and then again like all other tree families groups and so on. They don't all bloom at one time. Now they gather up at one time. But i have been enjoying immensely my own and then dozens of other japanese tree lilacs. They are technically lilac. They have relatively little fragrance. Unfortunately it's it's not unpleasant but it's just not much there. They are anywhere from a creamy white flour to Well whitish. I don't i don't know about snow-driven but at the same time they're they're very remarkable and you can see them literally if you turn a corner on a city street and they've used as a street tree you can see in three blocks away when you turn the corner. They're they're quite remarkable for a period of roughly two two and a half weeks there quite a sturdy tree. I have seen them now and now being the last x. number of years where they're being known well enough to be used as a retreat. I've seen them from. I'm going to call them saplings. On up to about ten inches in diameter and then i have to tell a quick story about driving the countryside many years ago when i thought i knew what a japanese tree lilac was and hadn't paid any attention. Anyhow i'm trying to get on county roads from one town in northern ohio to another. And i'm i'm i'm kind of beaten it on the road and i came over a rise in his. I looked down there. Were three of them. Yeah that i could see honestly for quarter-mile with up being any attention. I kinda hit the brakes. So i get a better look. I forgot there was a guy behind me. Yeah i don read sign language that remarkable though march they add and their their their finishing up right now but even after the glory of the flower and the little little flower

Ohio
Rapid Changes in Slow-Growing Ecosystems

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:09 min | 6 months ago

Rapid Changes in Slow-Growing Ecosystems

"All right. Dr brian bouma. Thank you so much. For coming on the podcast. It's an honor to have you here. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is. You do short. So i am a plan to disturbance ecologist in particular so i studied things like Communities respond to disturbances like fires in wind and in particular how the edges of those things respond so my interest is in climate adaptation in one important aspect of that is the migration movement of species in response to climate change and things like disturbances and worming ends disasters. Give opportunity for that. So i tend to seek out areas of recent wildfires or windstorms or landslides and then look at how. The community is responding changing right on. Yeah i mean. Unfortunately you read the news. There's no shortage of that and a lot of ways but it also gives you know colleges like yourself a lot of opportunities to understand these dynamics but what brought you to this in the first place i mean. Were you always a plant person or do you just enjoy ecology and understanding the distribution of species. You know where did this all start for you. I was always in exploration person. I always liked wandering around in the woods. I grew up in the northwest northeast. Seattle couple hours north of seattle and spent most of my childhood wandering around the woods. Nice i always found it interesting to figure out what's wearing why maps always fascinated me and so it was a natural jump distributions of species being out in the wilderness in thinking. Well why is a species here and why is it not over there and it's a it's a natural jump into where things are geography and then my interest in forests Because i grew up in biggles forest led me to actually to disturbances because forests are fairly slow. Fairly slow moving on human time scales in many ways. It may respects up until they're not until you have his disturbed and so those quick sort of catalysts for change became an interesting target of investigation because a lot of stuff happens in a very short period of time even in a forest which has trees thousand

Dr Brian Bouma Northwest Northeast Seattle
Dr. Colin Walker on Snake Plants Aka Sansevieria

On The Ledge

01:49 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Colin Walker on Snake Plants Aka Sansevieria

"Well hi folks are. I'm calling walker. I'm currently president of the british koch succulent society. But my eight year presidency is just about to come to an end. I have been interesting growing and studying succulents for just over fifty years. I'm now retired. So i can spend more of my time looking after them. Them and writing about them. I have a lodge collection and two greenhouses conservatory on a porch. I currently live in scotland just gloss so the dry conditions are a bit challenging to what i was used to embed fiche. We hate talk about sense of areas and this has been a subject that people have been requesting pretty much since they thought of making this podcast. And we're finally talking about them dating a whole episode to them and these of grown his popularity in the last few years. But i wonder whether you could tell us. Start off by telling us a bit about where and how they grow in the wild and what conditions are like. I'm guessing they have to be tough because they're from a place where the not getting much moisture sons. Fear is a genus of about eighty species distributed in africa Also there's a couple in madagascar then going east daycare innova beer and his fall eastern burma. There's a severe burn money. I've only ever encountered severe is in the wild once we were on a safari in the eastern province of south africa. And there. I encountered what i am believed to be some severe hyacinth. Authorities are about five species native south africa

British Koch Succulent Society Walker Scotland Madagascar Burma Africa South Africa
Growing Gently: Honeysuckle and Hilda, the Floral Work of Claire Bowen

Cultivating Place

01:17 min | 6 months ago

Growing Gently: Honeysuckle and Hilda, the Floral Work of Claire Bowen

"Welcome claire what a pleasure to speak with you jennifer. Thank you so much. I'm so pleased to be talking to you as i said to you. I know off the record already. I'm so flattered to be asked. So thank you for taking the time to talk to me today. I would love to have you describe for listeners. Your own current personal medicine for your flower and gardening practice. What would that be clear. So my my real mission. One one that i think that i said hopefully i'm relatively new to the world of flowers. It was something. I've always wanted to be involved in. But i think i knew from the outset that i think what i would describe it as going gently before i began this. I had done quite a lot of environmental campaigning. And that was something. That was very important to me. And i came to flowers. Maybe five years ago six years ago when it wasn't quite as mainstream Ideas as it is now. And also i think to do it with kindness. I think it's really important to encourage and teach other innoventions. And so i think going gently as a as an Is probably where. I am

Claire Jennifer
Marking Your Territory, Elderberries, and Hydrangea Color

Plantrama

01:51 min | 6 months ago

Marking Your Territory, Elderberries, and Hydrangea Color

"Think we should start out with true or false ellen. It is about peeing in the garden to keep critters away. I have very mixed feelings about this. I have used predator urine in my garden in pennsylvania. I don't know if did a darn bit of good. I really don't but i'll tell you it smelled pretty darn bad. So if i were a bunny or a deer. I would not have gone near that stuff. It's interesting that We're starting with predator urine. Because i have very strong feelings about this and that is i cannot believe that this is collected in a humane way new. And you can't find any. They will not tell you how it's like. Well how it has to be as collected is they have to keep the coyotes or these fox in little pens with wire floors so that when they urinate goes down into a trough or something so it can't possibly be a humane thing so i am not in favor of using predator urine in the garden. Unless you're encouraging the coyotes and the to hang out and peeing your garden. Naturally that i'm all in favor of. I use the fox here in once i started looking into says this can't be good. This cannot be good but there are also people who will. Pd the borders of their garden in hopes of keeping deer and bunnies away. And i've read mixed things about this but well. i think i wouldn't encourage anybody to urinate too close to their vegetable garden or or things that you're going to eat that just kinda makes good sense that you don't want to bring you know harm on yourself in terms of bacteria tetra. That's why we carry waste away both either down into septic systems or sewage treatment plants.

Ellen Pennsylvania Coyotes FOX