Future Tech

The world is changing. Listen here for the latest audio about inventions, gadgets, devices and other emerging technologies that will influence the way we live our lives in the future, broadcast on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Volvo Cars to go fully electric by 2030

BBC World Service

00:39 sec | 17 hrs ago

Volvo Cars to go fully electric by 2030

"Has autocratic tendencies. Swedish car manufacturer Volvo has announced that by 2030, it will only so fully electric cars. It's unveiling a new electric model today. Here's Andrew Walker. Volvo is accelerating its electrification strategy. There's an interim target for 2025 of half its sales being fully electric cars with the remainder hybrids. Five years later, the hybrids will be gone according to the new timetable. Was only last year that Volvo launched its first fully electric model. The company will reveal a second one later today, Volvo says it's move is part of what it calls an ambitious climate plan,

Volvo Andrew Walker
Will Virtual Reality be the Future of Work

Automated

05:23 min | Last week

Will Virtual Reality be the Future of Work

"Great well andress. Thank you very much for coming. Onto the automated. Podcasts is great to have you here saying you so one of the things i like to do with all my guests when they first come on to get a little bit more of a personal connection with you to understand what made you originally interested in the topic will be talking about vr today Quite a bit so what initially got you interested in that. So actually my my interest. In in i came morris A site thing and it was kind of a coincidence. You could say like around a year ago. I started to really have this interest in teaching in particularly meditation and and kind of how to work with your consciousness to get more awareness in your life and happiness in. Oh that's really what is And Because i had a background tech entrepreneurs kind of thing. Obviously maybe i can kind of build like tech product around you know leverage some of my knowledge as an entrepreneur an also that that could like because many people teaching meditation. That could kind of be in it. That was how i thought about it in my mind and what happened So so and i had seen these kind of rectal. Visualizations that. don't know if you're aware of sexual medics. So i'm also a practicing meditation guy. So i've been doing it for quite a long time so i understand also within the covert lockdown situation. I think there was a massive gravitation towards meditation apps in general so Whether whether the fracture or guided. Or otherwise i think i think i understand where you're coming from. Yeah well deal was to create the ultimate meditation machine and then using these kind of rectal visualizations in three sixty and had that as like an edit component there is actual research jesting that have are very common effect and potentially are able to like make the kind of analytical mind a bit more passive so it's elective and try to digest which is really wanted to do in the initial phases of learning meditation anyways That kind of That coincidentally fru working on this the startup. I bumped into the guys. I'm working with now in meeting vr. Because we would just at the same place only having that via thing in common. And i was just seeing what they were doing and it really awesome and that was right before the pandemic and and we were talking about. Maybe should help them a little bit. Just on a consultancy basis with some business strategy and stuff like that and then the pandemic hit. And i was like okay. I can i jump ball ship. Kinda struggle moment fruit food for the first free s that they had already kind of gun fruits so i just decided like why buy make it hot for myself and and And yet so we are. You're almost a year after i guess. Well i think that's one of the more interesting backgrounds that somebody's given onto the podcast. It's rare that meditation. Some sort of interesting introspection leads you into either. vr technology. Talk on here so so great to hear we have talked about. Vr a number of times on the podcast. I think what would be good is if we just kind of dive into. What is the company that you're working with a meat in vr. I looked at it quite a bit on the online. It'd be great to hear a little bit from from yourself. Kind of what is what is it. What makes it different from other platforms and kind of what makes you excited about it. I think initially what made me excited about. It was that i saw that. The founders stimulate for people. And i mean. I didn't actually need to know a lot more than that. Because i just saw people's reactions and it was just kind of gut level feeling of all lead. Holy fuck it's really possible. Like sorry can occur on this. Yeah yeah yeah go ahead. But people were so they were so blown away and And i described towards those kind of expensive moments in my life. I feel like that's what the an important part of what life is about. And i think now that with the pandemic still upon us Rooms where we can meet in. Vr specifically are maybe more needed than at any other time in the in the past four for the for the listeners. Can you maybe describe what Meet in vr. Is i think the idea is relatively simple to grasp. But i think that the the impact it would have is actually quite interesting. This of course So the isis is that it's a it's a virtual meeting room. It has everything you would expect from being in a meeting with somebody You'll represented you have like a character. It's kind kinda like a game. You have your headset on you. You have a character that looks like you and then you'll meeting in in a virtual meeting room and so it's a lot like it's a it's kind of what's it called a substitute for soom and video calls and what it can do video course kinda cannot do. Is that feeling of being together with the people joe meeting with

Morris JOE
Twitter announces paid 'Super Follows' to let you charge for tweets

Techmeme Ride Home

03:01 min | 4 d ago

Twitter announces paid 'Super Follows' to let you charge for tweets

"Like twitter. Had its entire product roadmap in drafts for and finally hit send all end quote twitter last night announced super follow a feature to let users charge for tweets a communities feature to let users create and join groups based on specific interests so monetize followers i'll twitch or any number of things like patriot and facebook groups but for twitter. Basically quoting the verge. The payment feature called super follows will allow twitter users to charge followers and give them access to extra content that could be bonus tweets access to a community group subscription to a newsletter or a badge merely indicating your support in a mockup screenshot. Twitter showed an example where a user charges four dollars ninety nine cents per month to receive a series of perks season as a way to let creators and publishers get paid directly by their fans. Twitter also announced a new feature called communities which appear to be its take on something like facebook groups people can create and join groups around specific like cats are plants. Twitter suggests allowing them to see more tweets focused on those topics. Groups have been a huge success for facebook and a huge moderation problem too and they could be particularly helpful tool on twitter since the services opened in nature can make it difficult for new users to get started on the platform. There's no timeline yet. Four win either of these features will launch twitter listed them as what's next for its platform during a presentation for analysts and investors. This afternoon and quote as jasmine. Watkins tweeted quote. Y'all tweeted how is this app. Free one too many times and quote these are we should say literally features anyone. Any one of us could have seen as likely and possible for twitter even a decade ago. Like i know that. I saw this angle years ago and i'm by no means some sort of product guru but i guess better late than never a fire has been lit inside of twitter so let's not look a gift horse in the mouth right and it's not just on the product front twitter says it's also planning a safety mode that would let users automatically block and mute accounts that quote might be acting abusively or spammy quoting the verge again. It appears this feature will be a toggle you can turn on in a new safety mode. According to a slide in the analyst day slide deck. Here's twitter's description of how the toggle will work. If you flip it on quote automatically blocks accounts that appear to break the twitter rules and mute accounts that might be using insult to name calling strong language or hateful remarks and quote with the new safety mode. Twitter will automatically detect accounts that quote might be acting abusive or spamming and limit. How those accounts can engage with your content for seven days according to the slide and quote so feature iteration product innovation and attempts at moderation and giving users greater control to allow them to hopefully stem the tide of trolling. In your hell. Freezing over joke here.

Twitter Facebook Watkins Jasmine
WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:21 min | 4 d ago

WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

"So adam. Let's start with a couple of notable things about this rover one. It's collecting and to you. Just wrote a story on wired dot com this week about the cameras on perseverance and how they actually perceive imagery much differently than we do. Tell us about this. And why this is significant for this mission will. there's something almost philosophical. You have to address if you're going to send not people to explore another planet but robots which is you're trying to acquire like sensory information and some of that some of that can be quantified can be sent back as data. You know the numbers for certain for certain analyses that you can send an instrument to do and i. I can talk about some of that but some of it. Is you want to send a robot that can look at stuff that can hear stuff in this case they can sense this world. And then that that information through the sensory organs the mechanical sensor organs the technology. That you send the microphones and the cameras and the sensors instruments and then it has to get home has to get back to us somehow. Us not wired reporters but jet propulsion laboratory and then the whole vast team of humans who process all of that through their own machinery and then it becomes something that they can that they can look at. Its this this. Arc of how data becomes information and then becomes knowledge so we humans send these robots to mars to some extent to learn how to send better robots to mars a lot of the instruments on perseverance. That's the rover that's there now are versions of instruments that went up on other missions and now they kind of the scientists that jpl and are all these universities. Nasa know how to make them work to do more what they wanna do which is to look at their surroundings in ways that that we humans would would. Would i be able to identify easily as looking at stuff to to see things in the colors that human is also see we were standing there and also to look at them multispectral hyperspace literally and other parts of the electric spectrum that human i wouldn't perceive but the eyes of this rover is in scare quotes that i'm making on a on a screen even though this audio medium so that's not helpful at all. The eyes of this rover can see into the little bit into the ultraviolet partway into the infrared. And and also can see x-rays and have an are using a laser project light outward to obliterate some bits of rock. And see what what happens when you do it. And to listen with microphones that that might be more sensitive than human ear. Then all of those things get get reduced transformed or changed in some way into meaningful knowledge so that we can understand more about what what's on this other planet where humans have never been but humans have sent a lot of our stuff. You're saying that each brand has gone up tomorrow. At least the ones that we have had progressively better technology on them with each version. And i think it's kind of interesting that this rover that just went up now. Perseverance is essentially the first rover of the iphone era. Curiosity launched in two thousand eleven and it was designed for a period of five or six seven years before that so the imaging technology on it is very representational of like that time in imaging technology the imaging technology that we have now and the imaging technology that we have on. Perseverance is pardon the pun astronomically better than the tech that we had ten years ago. I mean if you think about like how bad your instagram photos. Were in two thousand eleven. And how fantastic they can be now. You can see just like as far as mobile technology goes and just imaging sensors. The leap has been huge. That's a it's a really interesting observation. I think that's right. Although i will also say that like one of the one of the instruments that i wrote about is called the masked kim z. And so it's this. This binocular camera to cameras linked together left and right eye on top of the tower. That's on the rover so sits up a little. Bit high zina's presume because there was a mass cam on curiosity the z. Has zoom capability and it does a bunch of stuff. It's there to identify targets of interesting scientific potentially interesting scientific value and also to be able to look around and navigation and take pictures and do a whole bunch of other stuff. The the ccd the charge coupled device the optical sensor the to in mass are off the shelf kodak cds and they have the they have in front of them the bear pattern of pixels. The probably gonna get this wrong but like the red green blue. I think that that's that would be familiar. That if you if you could look into your phone you would see it. And then mass games does what. The experiment instrument is take advantage of some capabilities that our phone cameras. Don't really do to do much more. Because because the also can see into the infrared a bit and so if you put the right filters in front of them you can do even more science with them so there is some sense that we send up a camera. That would be the same camera that a lot of people have in their pockets right now sitting on their sitting on their desk. I can get sort of derivative about but there's something important i think in the pictures that are starting to come back already. That include parts of the rover itself and people will describe those as celsius as mars selfie camera taking pictures of itself and and nasa among all agencies is very very good at At its own promotional work saying like. Here's the thing. Here's the picture of the thing we're doing. There are pictures. There's video of the landing which was dramatic but also like the video of the landing. Is there to video of the landing has engineering value but also publicity value. But but i think the calling it. A selfie also includes the recognition of the the. It's not personal because of course it's not a person of the machine hood of the individuality of the humanness of the technology that that we sent that has to do a thing there. That's doing technological work and and seeing mars through a kind of filter that's akin to but slightly different than the filters that if mike if you took that billionaire ticket up tomorrow how you would see through the visor of your of your back suit

JPL Kim Z Nasa Adam Zina Mike
Apple reportedly developing next-gen ultra-thin displays for AR devices with TSMC

Daily Tech News Show

05:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Apple reportedly developing next-gen ultra-thin displays for AR devices with TSMC

"Nikei sources say that apple partnered with chipmaker. Tsmc to develop micro. Ola displays would displays built directly onto chip wafers for use in our future. Headsets that displays underdevelopment are less than one inch in size with mass production estimated several years away the beta for iowa's fourteen point five adds accident hazard and speed check reporting to apple maps. A new report button is available in the bottom tray of maps to report incidents and voiced support for siri is available as well and analysis by cambridge university university although they probably have anniversaries also estimates that bitcoin mining consumes roughly one hundred twenty one point three six terawatt hours of electricity per year which would make a top thirty energy consumer if it were used by country however for context the researchers noted that electricity consumed in the us by always on inactive could power the bitcoin network for year. I liked that comparison there. It's like yeah that sounds bad but then also that Following its launch in australia. Google new showcase launched in argentina and the united kingdom offering now includes free and paywall two articles for more than one hundred twenty uk and forty argentinian outlets bringing its total to four hundred fifty publications twitter announced monetize daily active users increased twenty seven percent on the year in. Its q four to one hundred ninety two million but missed analysts expectations of one hundred ninety three point. Five million with growth slowing for the third consecutive quarter. Twitter also said wednesday it suspended more than five hundred accounts and reduced certain hashtag visibility in india to comply with several orders from the indian government amidst farmers protests on agricultural reforms in the country. The twitter accounts are only being blocked in india and don't include news media entities. Journalists activists were politicians who have twitter accounts and twitter. Cfo ned siegel said on cnbc. Wednesday that people removed from its platform are not allowed to come back and that applies to president donald trump. Even if he ran for office again. All right let's talk a little bit more about what twitter is planning jack dorsey. He's been talking a lot about decentralisation over the past couple of months what did he say. This time scott feels like every time i'm on the show. There's something about his little idea but on this same call with investors on tuesday twitter ceo. Jack dorsey explained how it's internet project or internal project rather called blue sky and this something. He first announced wave back in december of two thousand nineteen Could create a decentralized social network to give people more choice over their twitter twitter experience Dorsey said twitter might create multiple rhythms for you to choose from offer them alongside those made by others a sort of marketplace on a lot of detail beyond that but dorsey feels Choice like this would not only help out business. But dr more people into participating in social media in the first place Decentralisation could also help twitter address concerns about moderation neutrality. all that kind of stuff Pretty fascinating idea I i still hope he does it with partners. And not just a a twitter store with algorithm skins. Well i mean it sounds like it's it's a combination of both the way twitter sees it happening. The company itself would say all right. You might want this experience. We have enough user feedback to know that some users are frustrated with the kind of stock twitter experience and using hashtags and maybe Filtering out certain keywords or searching for users or topics isn't enough for you you want twitter built a certain way and we can do that for you but then the company saying also third party developers might have some really great ideas and we welcome those algorithms as well as long as you know people wanted that. Could this be something that people would potentially pay for in the future. I would think yes. Yeah although i mean his focus on decentralisation implies that this would be something out in the wild right to the for longtime twitter's been talking about maybe we'll partner up with an existing decentralized solution which there are a few out there like mastodon. And i think that's a really really interesting way to approach this to say what if we decentralized twitter and differentiated twitter is just one of the better ways to talk with folks but like you said scott. He thinks that would help drive more people into participating if there was a federation so to speak that mastodon is that right now but twitter isn't part of mastodon so you don't have enough people using it so it doesn't get that momentum that it needs if twitter gets behind something like that whether it's mastodon or something else then suddenly it's got momentum and if you could say like well what i would like is a more environmental spin on this. I want a more libertarian. Spin you know wanted to promote things that are more about molecular biology promote scientists. I want i want to have a spiritual issues in christianity. Promoted more you you could have that and still everybody be participating in the same network and to his point about moderation neutrality. If you're the one picking the algorithm then you might have issues with how that particular algorithm works. But there'd be less burden on twitter or any other participant to be the person in charge of deciding what gets promoted and what doesn't because you'd have a lot of different approaches to it

Twitter Cambridge University Universit Jack Dorsey Cfo Ned Siegel Chipmaker President Donald Trump Tsmc Apple United Kingdom India Indian Government Iowa Argentina Cnbc Dorsey Scott Australia
Twitter 'Super Follow' borrows OnlyFans strategy to charge for tweets

Z Morning Zoo

02:36 min | 4 d ago

Twitter 'Super Follow' borrows OnlyFans strategy to charge for tweets

"Shared a sneak peek at a new feature called Super Follow, which would allow users to charge their followers for access to bonus content. That whole thing sounds like only fans to you. That's kind of what it is. The details weren't very descriptive. But basically, Twitter showed how the new feature would allow users that's people like you and me. To charge our followers a monthly price for things like community access, subscriber only newsletters and other parks So he didn't really go right down the road of adult content or naughty photos or anything like that. They're considering. Well, Maybe you want to put out a newsletter about your business or your life for your new TV show or what you're doing. Anyways, it would be example they showed charged one user of 4 99 month for added content. Super follow is what they're gonna be calling it. It will also allow creators people like you and I to put certain tweets fleets by the way, is anybody fleeting? And chance chances. It's audio chat feature. This is similar to clubhouse. We told you about clubhouse a couple weeks ago, you could put all of these tweets fleets and cheats behind a pay a chance behind a paywall. Twitter didn't offer an expected rollout date yet, but the I said they are looking forward to rolling out. It'll be called super Follow this, by the way, if you're wondering what this is all about, This is Twitter, and they admitted to this trying to move beyond depending on ad sales. How many times have you seen ads on Twitter this week or you're scrolling. And how many times have you seen ads for gambling sites? Hey, you can gamble now I can't get it. Thank you. So yet Twitter's been really dependent on the ad feature lately, and that's how they're making money. They didn't exactly come out and say that they're competing with on Lee fans, but that's really what they're doing. That's exactly what this is. So it isn't out. Yet. It is something they introduced to the world yesterday. Kind of they kind of did a quick reveal almost as if they were trying to like. Show it to you to see what the world said about it, Like almost like, Let's show them a little bit of our new haircut. And see if everyone loves it or hates the idea, and then we could always back out At this point. The opinions are mixed, but it's pretty obvious that Twitter Is trying to become the next only fans. This could be something you might want to keep an eye on. Especially if you have little ones on Twitter already which I don't know why they would be, but in case they are Just know that that's out there now or we'll be out there soon. When we come back next to the

Twitter LEE
Your smartwatch could detect COVID

Talking Tech

02:04 min | Last week

Your smartwatch could detect COVID

"Your apple watch or your fit bit or samsung galaxy. Watch or other wearable device and tracker could eventually signal whether you've been infected with covid nineteen or other illnesses such as the flu. Most of the research studies underway suggests that a few days before a person would test positive for the coronavirus their heart rate or activity level. Changes enough to suggest your about to do so. Now you probably know this most of our listeners. Probably know this but where will just the apple watch and samsung galaxy. Smartwatch fitbit and other devices already collect information such as heart oxygen data as well asleep and activity levels so researchers at mount sinai hospital in new york and at stanford university's healthcare innovation lab. And there's more places like the scripps research translation institute in la hoya california and in the universities like university of washington purdue are all at various stages of research looking into this and fitbit is actually also working with the department of defense. The department of veteran affairs at nasa on covid nineteen detection. So there's a lot of interest here but the findings aren't foolproof. Because could be false positives and things like that. But at stanford eighty one percent of the thirty two patients who became infected with covid nineteen had changes in heart rates. Time spent sleeping and daily steps that they've taken the researchers wrote in a publication. They put out in a journal called nature biomedical engineering now. Most of the covid nineteen patients there about sixty three percent had changes that could have led to early detection before the onset of symptoms. They found researcher. N- probably not ever going to be able to tell you definitively that you will develop covid nineteen based on the variations in your heartbeat. Or how much sleep you got. How much activity level you've had and how that's changed. However if there's a way to give you a heads up to get a test and perhaps quarantine that could potentially prevent the spread of covid nineteen or other illnesses to other people including your family friends and coworkers so this research is ongoing to the studies are looking for more participants. The links are in my story on ticked usa today dot com. And this is a topic. I'm sure we'll be covering in the weeks and months

Samsung Scripps Research Translation I Universities Like University O Department Of Veteran Affairs Apple Stanford University Mount Sinai Hospital La Hoya FLU Department Of Defense Nasa New York California USA
Pfizer Rain Clouds

Pwned: The Information Security Podcast

05:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Pfizer Rain Clouds

"What's up everybody this zach. I'm here justin justin. What's up so we are here with another breach of the week. And this is a doozy. This is So we're looking into iser and a data breach that they had due to unsecured cloud storage which hits on a whole bunch of the things we've talked about in the past one being and that really important data that you do not wanna get released because that creates all sorts of not just like the general like. Oh this sucks that there is a release but you've got like regulatory issues. The deal with generally frowned upon. If you yes. I mean the health information general is just not you know. You don't want anyone known about those like weird things you have wrong with you and so you've got some hip but more. Interestingly was also a failure like it looks like they were trying to do a good job so they have cloud data. Which we've said is a good way to sort of segment data off your system and protect it. Everybody's always get good intentions. But the breach was caused by unsecured cloud storage and they. It's it was found basically to be a miskin figured cloud storage system or they just set up their google cloud. Which i guess. I don't know when i think of google cloud i. It seems like that's something that i wouldn't expect a company like pfizer to do like i would sort of think that they've got their own system. And that's visors a multinational and obviously they're right now. They're probably making ungodly amounts many. Because i think they're one of the candidates that's trying to make the this is very reminiscent to a bank capital one. Yes so same. Same thing out while they were they were amazon. Yes cloud so i guess similar i hate capital i should probably say. Hey capital one wrong word. I really visually. I've had a few credit cards in my time. Capital was one of the worst ones. That i've that i had i. I couldn't get out of the card. I tried to pay it off in that. I wanted to shut it down. They like wh- like i had to go through so many layers to actually shut the car down. It's like they got me. He was one of those things where i was at college. Groundhog day. Pretty much like is it done like. Oh no you need to talk to this person but it was in college in. You know how that goes you like offered. Here's a credit card to go. Whatever you want about a really crappy laptop with it which was even more disappointing laptop stunk. It no god. Now that thing. I think i sold that to some poor doodoo about computers than i did or yeah yeah i feel bad but i was young johnny better so in this case though like so it sounds like maybe this has a little bit to do with what we and i don't know when this is gonna come out so we've either talked about it or we'll talk about it like privilege access. Which one of our partners. Cyber ark deals worth But the sounds like it might have been. It was a misconception geared cloud that that opened up access so i'm guessing it means they probably there was there was roles that maybe were created that provided someone an avenue in that should never or a path was created on accident. Or it's not a not a ton of information about the care that i can see but it looks like ms configuration at the storage level. It sounds like they caught it. Maybe during an audit or something that it was like they didn't know about it like wasn't captured as it was happening or there wasn't like maybe the indicators has sort of traveling through the system it sounds like maybe they were like. Oh yeah that looks like someone maybe got into this. That shouldn't have and downloaded the data. that shouldn't have. Yeah which is which is usually happen. Which could even be. I mean i guess. Here's a question so this isn't this isn't the first breach for pfizer. They've had a long history of Let stuff go okay. So that's true. I mean you know there's companies feel very evil. Even though they do really good things. I think it's just because there's so much money involved. That just feels like one of those very evil things so just out of curiosity if this was so. Let's say this was caught during an audit for instance. So this it doesn't necessarily mean that there was ill intent right so it could have been like an admin who maybe was or someone you know got fired in on their way out. They're like oh. I need to back these up before i leave. And they're like oh. That was not supposed to have been done that way. That could technically be considered a breach because it sort of approach. I'm guessing in this case. They wouldn't have announced that if the data had gone into somewhere where it could be exposed by right but it doesn't always mean that you know necessarily that. There's ill-intent right. It could have been done through. An accident and exposure occurred

Justin Justin Zach Pfizer Google Amazon Johnny
Jack Dorsey, Jay-Z set up Bitcoin endowment BTrust with focus on India, Africa

Daily Tech Headlines

00:24 sec | Last week

Jack Dorsey, Jay-Z set up Bitcoin endowment BTrust with focus on India, Africa

"European consumer organisation filed a complaint against tiktok with the us network of consumer protection authorities claiming the apps vague and frequently changed terms of service violate. Gdp are and for tracking users regardless of age or preferences tiktok said it's contacted the b. e. You see for a meeting to listen to. Its concerns and has developed an in-app summary of its privacy policy. Making it

Tiktok European Consumer Organisation United States
Microsoft may make its xCloud service available on a browser

The 3:59

11:23 min | 2 weeks ago

Microsoft may make its xCloud service available on a browser

"Do you play xbox games on your web browser microsoft maybe working on making its ex cloud game streaming service even more accessible writer chang. This is your daily charge here. Talk with us about x. Cloud gaming expert offering zola's so what is the latest with ex cloud. So right now myself is testing the streaming platform on web browsers report game outset company. Employees are currently testing it. And this comes before the big public preview the expectation for that is sometime in the spring where everybody else is going to be able to play the browser and for our listeners. Who aren't hardcore gamers. What exactly is cloud. Ex code is microsoft's streaming service. It's it's like the netflix video games. You pay a monthly subscription and games are available of via the xbox game pass and that could be streamed to your android device. It's a ciccio like having an xbox in the cloud ryan what games are we talking about these sort of current titles as it sort of back catalogue of older titles is anything is basically a free for all. It's a very wide range. Aid comes so you have. All the microsoft owned properties which includes of course like halo Bethesda games like fallout. So you have those games And also a lot of the newer games What the brand new ones and medium that's available and that's an xbox series access. Gabe came out. And you can play it on there. So you have those you have the bigger titles those you have any titles. You have odor games so we too wide range of what's available on the xbox xbox game pass got end in terms of the devices you know. There's the browser that we're talking about today you mentioned android. What about iphones ipads will. This is where the news of the web browser is the big news. This will allow ex class. Actually play on ipads and iphones will. What happened was win. Marks off tried to get x. Cloud approved by apple For the app store Apple said well since this includes two hundred games. Do you need to submit every game to be reviewed and of course that's a that's a paid especially since they switch out games every every mother's new games that come in and new games at go out so instead a string of Indicates amazon. Luna which will talk about embiid They're doing their service via web browser. And that sort of sparked. The idea of marks off of mike up began working on that. So yes this will allow people with iphones and ipads to play to stream games of the x. Cloud and of course people general that have a laptop heavy Chromebook have a would have any sort of windows. Device will be able to stream xbox games to it as long as they have a subscription got in so give me a brief state of the game streaming world. You mentioned amazon. Luna is obviously google stadia. What's what's been going on with the various cloud gaming services out there so let's with the big ones stadia stadium is going through a bit of a bit of a tough time. At the beginning of the month dugal said that they are shutting down their in house developers. So right now. Google is not making any games for stadia. They did say though last week that they are going to have a hundred four games. Come out for stadia. Twenty twenty one in general though it still hasn't caught on So there's not a lot of excitement for it as much as it was with. Google first announced it that people have tried and it's just not capturing every everyone then like i mentioned amazon luna. That's right now. And the early access phase people could sign up board. And they maybe picked to try it out if echoed x. Claude is the net flicks for video games. Amazon is appropriately. The amazon prime video of video games in that. There is the for the monthly subscription. Seven dollars you will get access to a certain number of games. Then if you want you can pay a couple bucks more and you'll get another you'll get you'll get access to another catalog like. Ub sauce games. So that's how they're gonna do it to where everybody's going to be able to sort of pick choose what they want. But they're sort of base line of games that are going to be available for the monthly fee de force that is for. Pc gamers wanna take their pc games and play it on a their their phone tablets or black or laptop if they don't have a gaming laptop that had a stumble row stumble last year when it launch because they invidia put out all these games available for streaming. But they didn't tell the publishers so the allergies publishers kept just pull their games from the g force now So it took a while for them to serve sort everything out now the services going smoothly It's actually free but you only get to play an hour for free but If you pay if you pay or you'll get a better access better better fidelity as well as well unlimited time. So that's also available of o'clock eighty. What about sony nintendo some of the other big players in the gaming world. Well sony was the first one to do cloud gaming. What their playstation now That launch back with the playstation four and not early on in the playstation. Four lifetime and sony just has not put any effort into it They release a few games for for its They'll they keep it. Keep it moving. But there's maybe a million or two subscribers which is hardly anything in comparison acts cloud It's just not not their priority at all I don't know if it will be. They'll if sony will change your mind in the future but as of right apple station is just stare sermon. Afterthought as for nintendo. They don't have a netflix type. Service yet The maybe that's the planning they do have a cloud streaming though For hey different reasons. So games like control. That is a very intense graphic game. It is just very beautiful looking and wouldn't it wouldn't attend all has done is dave. Dave reached out to a they partner up with a few publishers and developers and they are allowing these games to stream to the switch. So you still get all the scrape the -delity like you would on an xbox or playstation But you have it on your switch and that prevents the developers from having to create a very a very cut down low graphics low fidelity version of the game that we've seen with some other titles duke maternal win borderlands where they just have to cut out so much where it's doesn't look as great in it's on his memorable so that available but again that is for very different reason than say x. Cloud stadium got and we just went through or still going through the launch of new hardware right with the xbox series acts the ps five taco middleware streaming fits into the future of gaming well in the case of marcus off especially they want you to be connected all the time they want you to when you're at home they want you on your xbox. They wanted they play games. But they want you to look in netflix. Or whatever when you're on the goal they want you to be on the app so you could play games while your way And you're you know if you're at work the what you pull up your browser sake play while you're not working but So that's who marks off once they want you connected all the time and they have like they have the best option for that It gives everybody else. They're trying to find they're trying to get a piece of this because they know that there's a lot of people that wanna play games that maybe do not wanna spend for five hundred dollars on the latest new york so they're trying to find a way to get in there And it's they're. They're all taking their stamps at offering their takes on what the cloud services going to be. So are we ever going to get to a point where we can drop the hardware and the console entirely like you said there are folks out there who may not wanna drop five hundred dollars on a new system bogut appoint were that just completely. Needless completely out of the equation. Everybody's expecting this generation to kind of be the The real he wanted to determine whether we go with or without consoles. It's i still think we're going to need hardware. Future especially the way hardware is being developed with nvidia An md they're still producing this great hardware that that is really going to produce these even more beautiful games a blitz. It option is likely gonna be there in the It comes down to. Who's going to have the easiest access to stream to your tv. I mean the. Tv's are getting having more hardware than getting smarter but the only way to play on your tv right now without a console is like chromecast but if the if roku amazon smart tv's if those devices integrate completely with ex cloud and luna and stadia Well i mean crook assery works stadium but if all these other smart tv devices if they all start working together with these cloud streaming platforms where it seamless where you turn on your tv and you just switched to the the x cloud channel app and it starts going with all your without the xbox games that hey that may be it But we'll we'll have to see in the coming years how this generation pans out and we'll see what the other companies do

Amazon Microsoft Halo Bethesda Netflix Luna Dugal Sony Apple Google Zola Chromebook Chang Gabe Nintendo Ryan De Force Claude Mike
New report on Apple’s VR headset: 8K in each eye, potential $3,000 price tag

Daily Tech News Show

04:16 min | 3 weeks ago

New report on Apple’s VR headset: 8K in each eye, potential $3,000 price tag

"Myanmar's new military government ordered that local telecoms temporarily blocked facebook owned services in the country from midnight on february third through february seventh claiming that the platform was contributing to instability the digital rights nonprofit access now estimates that there are twenty two million facebook users in the country. A new report by canada's privacy commission found clear view is facial recognition database to be illegal mass surveillance and said sent a letter of intention to the company telling it to cease sevices in the country and delete canadian faces. Clearview has not operated in canada since july due to the investigation and says it will allow canadians to opt out of the database. But we'll challenge the determination in court analyst. Ming she quos on a bit of a roll this week. The latest from quo is word of another lend supplier for the main next gen. Iphone perhaps called the iphone thirteen. That's expected next year and it's camera. Quo says that sunny optical successfully passed apple's approvals process for ipad lenses and are likely to be approved to make the main camera lens for the iphone. Thirteen lineup currently logon eugene. Guang and can cut. Sue supply lenses to lg innotech for incorporation into the camera module so sunny optical would be yet an additional supplier for that lends parlor co founder. John mattes announced. He's been fired. Ceo by the company's board In a statement. Matt said quote. I've met constant resistance to my product. Vision my strong belief in free speech and my view of how the parlor site should be managed. He supposedly proposed expanding automated. Content moderation on the platform as well as a full ban on accounts tied to designated domestic terror organizations the blockchain based service network or b. s. n. backed by the chinese government access an operating system for blockchain program development china's state information center and affiliate to china's top economic reform planner credit card processor union. Pay telecom trying to mobile and beijing based startup called red date. Or all involved in supporting both consortium and public blockchain's this week. Bsn announced it will roll a permission. Diversion of cosmos. Cosmo's that's a network comprised of many independent blockchain's and calls itself the internet of blockchain's so just you'd have no concerns and just jumping on an open block chain from from china winter no tom sawyer. Red flags there. I mean the state information center is part of the deal. I don't know what you'd be worried now all right. Let's talk a little more about that. A little more about the information given some some details on apple's alleged upcoming mixed reality headset sources have more details including a rendering this time of what they say is apple's vr headset. A lot of the details are similar to what we heard from mark gurman of bloomberg earlier last month It's expected to use fabric. Mesh run on an apple design chip cost a lot. Although we've got a number as much as three thousand dollars the headset may have more than a dozen cameras for hand. Tracking lied are sensors for room. Mapping and a are affects dual eight k displays and i tracking to save battery life. The information sources says apple would use aided rendering. that's when you only render in full resolution. What your eyes are looking at everything. In the periphery can be a little lower sources. Say apple has not finalized input control but the options. They're considering are a combination of hand tracking i tracking a dial on the headset or something. They call a thimble like accessory. Oh boy well the thing that jumped out to me. I because we have talked about this before. This rumor has been swirling. I mean really for years but it seems to be more of a reality than ever. Is that three thousand dollar price points now again. It's a rumor and yes. Apple tends to make things that are similar to other products that are more expensive and then says but it's apple so you know we can do that sort of thing. Three thousand dollars. Oh my goodness Compare that to oculus to for three hundred dollars. That's a crazy price point. I don't know how the company could get away with such a thing.

Blockchain Privacy Commission Apple Parlor Co John Mattes Facebook Chinese Government State Information Center Canada Clearview Myanmar China Guang Ming Mark Gurman LG BSN Tom Sawyer Cosmo Matt
Is Silicon Valley "Over?" With Bloomberg Opinion Columnist Noah Smith

Techmeme Ride Home

04:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Is Silicon Valley "Over?" With Bloomberg Opinion Columnist Noah Smith

"The question specifically silicon valley itself Is it is it. Sort of settled science for economists like why certain cities become hubs for certain intellectual pursuits sir. Capital pursuits are things like that. Like is that well known and well understood no so we have a lot of theories about why this happens. one idea is that you have tacit knowledge exchange when engineers sort of hang out with each other. They tell each other how to do stuff. It's not clear how powerful that is anymore. I mean it's it's important for researchers to be able to exchange ideas very intensively at things like universities but engineer going out to the bar and saying like oh i implemented this that sort of dan that it's probably not nearly as big a deal and can now be done on like stack exchange in whatever get hub and so so that that sort of tacit knowledge exchange is. It's hard to establish it's hard to measure because you can't really observe these ideas going around you can look at patents. That's all you can really look at. But there's lots of problems with that data Another idea so another big reason for cities a these concentrations of knowledge industries is called thick markets. So if you wanna hire an engineer there's lot of engineers in in san francisco right and if you want to work for tech company. There's lots of tech companies in san francisco. So there's just so much more choice within these superstar cities right with all this choice you can lose your job and find another similar job really quickly or you Lose your employees and find another employee really quickly whereas if you're out in you know like butte you can't. You can't necessarily do that unless we move it all trout so so if we figure out how to do hiring and firing and job searchable blah as well remotely as we do in person whole new ballgame because you've you've just sort of canceled out that that thick market effect. We noticed. We also have to do that for. Vc's so vc's famously Want to live like a fifteen minute bike ride from there. The companies they invest in and that that mindset has got to change that cultures. Gotta change to really unbundle the startup cities. Well and i mean you know this is a the example of the moment and and one example. But you know what's the hottest startup in in in the world right now. It's clubhouse clubhouse is in san francisco. Clubhouse is andriessen. Horowitz is basically is one of the greatest thick influence. If that if that's using the term rape that. I've seen in a long time. In terms of injuries and horowitz really helping juice the success of that startup so yeah clubhouse in cleveland right yes and so that's a but but then again Could be because there is only what like eighteen people right right. Go ahead right. So i mean it that that depends on you know. Injuries and horowitz being willing to invest in distributed companies. And i think that they are. I know those those guys pretty well. I think that they are open to the possibility. And i think that there is a slow. There'll be a gradual change. I think they're realizing that They're realizing that. That costs in san francisco are just really high can cutler initialized capital hosted some data from her own fund the other day showing their investment in distributed companies is increasing and the number. The percentage of founders. Who say they would want to. Distribute companies has just shot up enormously. So maybe maybe this cultural changes coming. I think there always be some local a bias But i think that maybe it could be reduced. I certainly no vc's at bloomberg who are working to reduce that Because really i feel like the the due diligence and human touch that you need to keep track of a portfolio company. The necessity for that to be physical and onsite has just decreased so much And i think that the pandemic is maybe making. Vc's realized that. I hope. I think always be a slight advantage to being nearby but i think that can be outweighed by the cost disadvantage

San Francisco Andriessen Horowitz DAN Cleveland Cutler Bloomberg
Ahmed Elsamadisi Discusses Narrator.ai: Intelligent Analyses

Software Engineering Daily

05:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Ahmed Elsamadisi Discusses Narrator.ai: Intelligent Analyses

"I'm at welcome to the show. Hey jeff has been. I'm excited to be here. Yeah it's great so let's say i've got a ton of data in my company. I've got marketing data. I've got data on how my customers are interacting with my website. I want to do useful things with that data. It's twenty twenty one. Can i do useful things with that. Data yeah you can do a lot of really incredible things with that data. You can understand how you can actually start changing customer behavior just that understanding how customers behave and figuring out what makes some customers behave better than others and then pushing all your customers to do that. Behavior and that is done by an analysis. The process to get there is a little bit of work but the goal is always the same. It's for you to make better decisions that cause your customers to behave differently which leads them to your company to increase the revenue and decrease their spent. The big question is how we doing right. Yeah exactly. I mean i would be tempted to just hire a data scientist and say hey. Data scientists start to figure out these kinds of problems. Is there anything wrong with that. Approach well the scientists is going to have to do a lot of things before they can use data so your audience probably knows a lot by data but for those who don't data is captured in all these different systems as independent pieces so we often put them all together into. It's called a data warehouse and to give you an idea if you're if you're a small startup like us you have an internal database. You have your segment. You have your ads. You have your email client you have your crm. That's already around like ten thousand raw tables of data and your data. Scientists has to like figure out ways to combine that data and make useful sense out of it and make sure that he's a he or she is able to actually make decisions off of it. That process is what's what's common known as e. l. t. e. l. Is we take the data out of the systems dump it somewhere. And then transformation is when you take that data and structure it to make it useful and most companies spend all their like a lot of their resources and what majority of the work is done in is in this thing that we call transformations. It's taking this data and making it useful so you can begin to analyze it good example i would like to say is like imagine words if you're trying to understand something and you have. All the words in the dictionary is not really useful. There's somebody who has taken a structure into stories that that story can be consumed and with all these different topics and different questions. You often need to create multiple stories so that someone can actually consume data and make meaningful decisions out of it. Gotcha so you've touched on some of the technical difficulties of working with data. It's worth now getting into a little bit. About what you do it narrator explain what narrator does so narrator is about giving customers expert handwriting analyses in minutes so we realized that the questions that everybody's asking like how do i optimize my ltv. How do i decrease my cac. How do i allow attribution model. Should i use. They're all complex questions. That require a lot of analyses. And like i said every analysis requires different data to be transformed so narrator came at the world with a very different angle and we said what if all the data looked the same. What if every single company all their data was transformed to be exact same data model and if it what if it was just one single table that was eleven columns if we can get all the companies to have the exact same data model then we can start reusing analyses and that whole process of transforming data and trying to get the date in the way you needed to answer. Question goes away because we can actually build analysis on top of this standard data model. And what narrow does is it provides that entire end to end experience we help companies take the raw data and make it into our we. Call the activity stream which is the standardization of data. That is the same table for every single company independent of your industry and then because of that structure you can instantly run any of these analyses that we have handwritten by data scientist tour experts in the field and these experts get to write these analyses and test them with both companies and they make sure that they're the best announces that they can produce. They make it available. Narrator and then any company that uses the narrator standardized data model can run that exact analysis in a minute that skips skipping the line of all the hard work that you would have to do and it took us about three years to do this thing which is standardized olive data. So that you can answer any question.

Jeff
Why Your Supply Chain and Cloud Arent As Secure As Youd Think

Aragon Live

05:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Your Supply Chain and Cloud Arent As Secure As Youd Think

"Hi i'm jim lundy founder. And ceo on research and today's episode is focused on a topic. That many enterprise already know well. Enterprise security and cloud computing now in the kobe. Pandemic security risks of seemed to increase. We've previously discussed and some other podcast. How the rise of remote work presents a new era of vulnerability for enterprises and so does some of the evolving technology that is allowing hackers. Much more sophisticated. And we're going to dive into that today. So what does your organization need to to make sure it's protected. How can the right cloud technology to help your enterprise. Sometimes close some of those security gaps joining me to answer. Some of these questions is craig kennedy senior research director at research. Craig is one of the latest analysts. Join our team of trusted advisors before joining aragon craig was director of it. Infrastructure and operations have been dabo. He has also held roles at makara. Ariba inc n. P. t. c. Urine earned a bs in mechanical engineering. From the university of massachusetts at dartmouth brings his wealth of practical business experience in it. Knowledge to oregon. Crag it's great to have you with me today. Thank you jim. I'm excited diorite in. Let's start by taking a bird's eye view of what's happening right now. You re wrote a first cut. Analysis of the hacking of a company called solar winds. Can you tell me a little bit about what happened. At this event and why enterprises should care about it why was such a momentous event. Absolutely so in december of twenty twenty solo wins disclose that had had been hacked by an undisclosed foreign government entity resulting in at least eighteen thousand of their customers being exposed to malware in its orion softer product offering this cyberattack extremely sophisticated in is believed to be a russian hacker group and boasts likely state-sponsored they targeted and successfully breached solar winds corporate network eventually gained access to its build servers once. They're the hackers able to inject malicious code into the solar winds orion build process. Then this infected code code. Sunburst was in package and signed with valid solo in certificates giving all recipients of this package the false assurance that this was indeed a valid and safe component of their orion product. This was so devastating because the orion product which is designed to manage a wide range of it resources in an organization requires elevated privilege access virtually all the it infrastructure and enterprises. Both on premise. And in the cloud this new type of attack vector means that supply chains are more vulnerable than we'd ever thought before it will put additional pressure on software vendors and enterprises to use extreme diligence when testings after products and updates before promoting them to production. That's certainly a big time. Hack and you know. Obviously they're still reeling from this and we're still learning what reaches occurred. Craig what are some of the recommendations for enterprise when it comes to preventing clinks their. It supply chain so arrogant reminds that any organization procuring software should evaluate creating their software. Qa teams it will inspect thoroughly test inbound software offerings and upgrades in an isolated staging environment before being even thought of deploying production. We also advised that any service agreements be updated to include software cleanliness clauses so for software providers to perform extra due diligence to prevent this from ever happening again. Lastly and this one is a no brainer. An enforced multifactorial in your enterprise as for all users and servers one of the easiest things he can do help ensure your enterprises secure. Okay thanks craig. And that's really actionable advice. And also add that procuring endpoint and privacy protection platforms and another best practice and reviewed some of that and some of the emerging providers in our hot vendors in privacy and security. Research showed from twenty twenty in fact one of the things that has come out as part of that research is that sometimes the good guys of the bad guys that people that wanna borrow some information for advertising or actually taking a lot more stuff than we thought so. Check that research out. I want to shift gears a little bit and also talked to you. Craig a little bit about cloud and bring cloud in this conversation a little bit about all the different options that people have and how it ties into enterprise security in twenty twenty one. Many organizations are developing newer. It strategies sometimes from scratch or sometimes just to migrate services and obviously there naturally drawn to public cloud options. Some of their benefits include pay-as-you-go operating costs limitless elasticity much less up front capital costs reduced operational complexity and most importantly levels of security. That may be much higher that they can get immediately then they could maybe get themselves often due to maybe the new of this of the company itself a public cloud can provide highly efficient secure. It services for many organizations and it can also help reduce vulnerabilities.

Jim Lundy Craig Kennedy Aragon Craig Ariba Inc Craig Dabo Crag University Of Massachusetts Dartmouth Sunburst Oregon JIM
The Future of Digitization, Innovation, and Customer Experience

Future of Tech

04:48 min | 3 weeks ago

The Future of Digitization, Innovation, and Customer Experience

"Bit back into history. Because i recall once we spoke about a journey that you had within comcast obviously building x want so i wanted I alone if you can share with the audience you know what is x one and then maybe few lessons from the journal making x one such a big success so the x one l. Backup the story. Where when i first joined comcast and was leading the advance video. Products group are set. Top boxes were the user experiences where we always called the blue screen but it was. It looked like something that was built on visual basic rank. The screens were little ovals. And you could pick something. And then there'd be a bit of a delay and you go to the next menu with a bunch of ovalles' you've probably a bit Then your commodore sixty four but not not the not much not much not much and none of us were really proud of the experience back. Then but that was the stated technology back then and we had partnered with a couple of companies to try to bring it to a new interactive level. And we just could not like the technology in cable had just was fairly stagnant when it came to video interfaces and so we ended up starting from scratch. It was originally a project called caliber. Where we went. And from the ground up in this was really tony werner in sri coattail with our organization started this initiative which eventually became x one where we decided to build a new video platform from the ground up and so the user experience. Now you would probably take it for granted but when we were doing back you know. I'll say ten years ago. It was stated the are where all the video was very graphical the menus or graphics and tyler and very easy to navigate and it's blended between linear tv and on demand as well as internet video. So everything's blended together. We have music in there now. So just it's really a entertainment system at this point and so that's what we ventured out to build and in winter number trials but then mass launch not just comcast but we also provided as service to other. Ms owes so for instance. Communications in the united states is a customer of ours. they use the x one platform rebrand. But the main lists from from this. If you need something to happen you need to develop on your own. Or i think the funny thing was. We didn't really set out saying we wanted to build something on her own. I think we tried to partner with a couple of companies in the past against inter. We get there. But i think one lesson for us was when you really do have to. You know transform a product space or an industry. Sometimes you just like we took team and put them in another building. You kinda sometimes you just have to step away from from all that you know and go start fresh and i think we tried multiple times not do that but we finally realized that was the only way to really break the paradigm in so that was really important. We felt as the largest broadband operator in the country that we needed to start to become more of a leader in less as less a follower of technology and so i think that was our way of figuring out how to serve lead in this space. I will say we did learn mean first and foremost we learned how to build software italy. Which was that was really. The biggest challenge for us was we'd always built. Software is oh saying earlier where someone wrote a big spec you know the product team would write a big spec handed over to engineering team. The engineering team either term to a vendor and give them that spec or start to build it themselves and the exxon was really the first time where we took on a massive initiative and singled out how to build software and build products inevitably. And that was. I think that changed the company that that changed us from being a buyer of technology to understanding how we could build it ourselves and the right way to build it ourselves it also impacted the way. We work with technology companies. Because when we did that we decided that's the way that's the way we want. Our technology partners should go software so it it started to create a bar when we dealt with technology partners it vade it and build software that way we really didn't want to be buying using their software like we. We started pushing all our partners that if they wanted to have a strategic relationship with us long term we expected them to injury and build more modular solutions and iterative quickly with their

Comcast Tony Werner SRI Tyler United States Exxon Italy
Why Texas Went Dark

Slate's If Then

03:17 min | Last week

Why Texas Went Dark

"Right. here's the show. When i got josh roads on the line on wednesday he was his friend's mom's house west of austin because his friend's mom still had power like millions of other texans. Josh didn't the massive winter storm has devastated texas knockout power where he lives in austin powered about two. Am on monday. I really didn't notice until about when i woke up the next morning somewhere around six you know in knowing was on. Is that eerie silence. He stumbled around in. That silence found flashlights and candles and then improvised a morning routine. I do a lot of camping. I've got camping stoves and you know they will. It'll make breakfast and found a hand. Crank for coffee where it was able to make coffee. And then we're just trying to figure out what's going on when we're going to get power again. After more than a day of no power. The temperatures house was hovering in the fifties and josh is comparatively lucky given what other texans are facing people here literally freezing to death. Gigi no propane to try to larger behavior. More batteries more candles you now we. We find a which. I had fun at least sixteen. People in texas have died since monday. Millions have been living without power or heat. Houston austin fort worth have all had boil. Water advisories and hospitals are treating hundreds of cases of carbon monoxide poisoning as texans try to heat their homes with grills or generators. And it's unclear when any of this will end. You posted this picture on twitter of you working out of your car right. When did you make the decision or have the realization that you had to do that. Oh he's too cold to type flash. Your fingers are starting to freeze in the amidst. Don't help many texans have nowhere to go and no one to turn to for help. Then there are others. Who like josh have been improvising ways to stay warm and this power. Failure is literally joshua's work. He's a researcher at. Ut austin where he studies energy he also helped found a company that consults on energy issues for everyone from bp to the wind solar alliance and in particular josh. Study something you may have heard about in the past few days. The energy reliability cancel texas known as urquhot. The texas great is my specialty. Like i'm trying as you know trying to gather as much information as i could figure out what's going on in at the same time trying to help people find places to go and it was all the way down the street. I mean people. You could see people's cars. Were running in their in their driveways is. They're just trying to trying to warm up. Because that's the only thing we had that do it today on the show why the texas power grid failed so badly leaving millions of people in the cold and the dark. I'm lazio leary. And you're listening to what next

Austin Josh Texas Gigi Wind Solar Alliance Houston Fort Twitter Joshua Lazio Leary
The Phone Wars

Reset

00:57 sec | 14 hrs ago

The Phone Wars

"We're going to be sharing an excerpt from the recode. Podcast land of the giants. The google empire. We mentioned the show a few weeks back when the first episode dropped. But we want to give you a more substantial. Look at the show. So even episode today about the fight between google and apple if the atlas first episode go ahead and do that now before jumping into the whole show okay so we all know about the fight between ios android but back before apple and google became enemies in this fight for the mobile phone. They were actually friends. Google ceo eric schmidt even sat on apple's board while they were developing iphone and you'd think that apple would have expected serious competition from google. But that's not exactly what happened fred. Vogelstein who wrote the book on the war between apple and google to the apple ceo. Steve jobs new. Google is working on android but he didn't take it seriously until it was too late. Hugh

Google Apple Giants Eric Schmidt Vogelstein Fred Steve Jobs Hugh
Planet YouTube

Land of the Giants

06:30 min | 15 hrs ago

Planet YouTube

"Also shapes the world's information a lot of the stuff we online wouldn't exist without google and there's no better story of that dynamic of google hand and what we experience online than the story of youtube to tell the story. I want to bring in my colleague. Peter kafka senior correspondent at recode. Hey peter some listeners recognize you. I'm sure because you co hosted the second season of land of the giants the net flicks effect. And you're an expert at the intersection between tech and media. You've been reporting on this since. I don't even know one sharon. If you want to say. I'm old and you want to bully me. Live on a podcast. That's fine but yes. I have paid a lot of attention to youtube since. It's very early days. And i've talked with a mated in ranted and bought it and worked in and around and have a lot to say about it but let's start the story way way back so we're talking early mid two thousand and back then if you wanted to watch a video on the internet it was really hard and there's video site showed up and it was full of weird stuff. Yeah this is real life. A lot of it was harmless and odd and often pretty funny. You didn't know you wanna watch it but if someone sent you an e mail the link you'd watch. That is the youtube peterson her husband. Kevin hines remember. I feel like my experience with youtube. But was like kevin's best friend. Who would make us. Watch videos of like newsman. Swallowing fly then one day jillian and kevin became one of those videos that everyone made you watch. This is jillian kevin's wedding ceremony. From two thousand nine you probably recognize it. If you don't remember it's jillian and kevin and every member of their wedding party in the dancing down the out to forever by chris. Brown is not slick at all and they are definitely not professional dancers. They're just nice. Young people from saint paul minnesota having some fun. It's impossible to watch this and not smile so join. Kevin originally posted the video because they just needed an easy way to share it with friends and family. Tech was clunky back. Then you couldn't send a file. That big a youtube link was perfect. We jokingly sent it to people and said something like make us famous. And that's what happened. Jillian kevin's wedding. Entrance is one of the earliest viral heads of youtube. Eventually racked up more than one hundred million views. It became a national event eventually jumped from the internet to tv here. It is on the office on the episode where jim and pam got married. Sorry for the spoiler. You see this on youtube. This is the era of youtube history. I would call to. If i send you a youtube link today until you gotta check it out you might definitely have some questions before you clicked but back then the wear member it. It probably meant you were going to get something goofy your fun. This is when people had less complicated feelings about the internet. In general jillian saw it firsthand. She had created a special email address. Where fans in the video could writer we got. I wanna say ten thousand emails. Within the first few months. I mean people from like soldiers serving in iraq and women in domestic violence situations. I mean the emails would just pour in but then things got complicated. Joe and kevin didn't right or form forever and they didn't have the rights to use the clip. Sony music did. And when sony realized one of its songs was the soundtrack for giant had video it reached out to youtube and kevin said they were given a choice. They could let sony monetize the video or they could take it down. They wanted to keep it up so the handed it over stood back and watch what happens with lots of people. Start watching your video. It's no longer just a video. It's part of the youtube ecosystem. It's surrounded by ads and other stuff which can change the way people respond to your video and maybe makes it complicit in things. You don't like. I mean. I saw political as on there and i and i was irate in two thousand twenty eleven years after they posted their wedding dance. Kevin checked in their video saw next to an ad for donald trump's reelection campaign. You know. I'm an immigration lawyer. I represent asylum seekers and victims of domestic violence so seeing ads latin. Maybe you know run. Contrary to some of our our morals was pretty upsetting at the same time you know we just got an email like last week about home. Somebody was watching it for the first time and was getting her through corona virus alone and and that is this like down then. I'm not taken that down like just because there's an slime balls. I wanna make some money off of it. I think there's something about jillian kevin's experience that mirrors the way a lot of us experience youtube now used to be useful and lark. And it's still can be but it's also just a lot of other stuff and it certainly isn't anything you can control you. Click a link. You roll the dice. Who knows what you're gonna get wearing the mass literally activate your own by fell down all right if the world is not a glow but instead enclosed then wars and used to be a side business for to go but that's no longer true. Last year it did nearly twenty billion dollars in revenue. But it's really much bigger than that. Youtube is so huge. Two billion users huge that generates its own gravitational toll on society and culture and much of youtube. Some power in the world comes from the youtube. Here's become famous on the platform. This is what sets you apart from. Virtually every other product youtube has personal face. Users are the people who make you youtube. It's kind of like the internet itself. Youtube is filled with great stuff. Dumb stuff and stuff you wish didn't exist but and this is an important but youtube is not the internet. the internet is just the internet. No one really owns it. Youtube is private property. It's enormous sprawling but it's thing owned and maintained by. Google has global influence so decisions google makes about youtube or decisions. That doesn't make shape. What happens in the world

Youtube Kevin Jillian Jillian Kevin Kevin Hines Peter Kafka Google Sony Giants Sharon Saint Paul Peterson Peter PAM Minnesota Chris Brown JIM
Amazons race problem

Reset

02:14 min | 1 d ago

Amazons race problem

"Amazon has a race problem. That's the allegation of over a dozen current and former employees who spoke to recode. Jason del rey. Jason wrote the story and is here with us. Hey jason hey teddy so jason. You spent the last few months talking with current and former amazon employees. Gimme the the quick headline on what you found. Sure so there. Quite a bit of anecdotes and allegations of discrimination at the company. But there's also this bigger point which is structural issues at the company that created a place where black employees are promoted less frequently and raided more harshly than their non black fears and jason. You're talking about amazon's headquarters. We're not talking about warehouse workers which you've also covered. We're talking about amazon. Each in seattle correct so these are corporate employees who may work in seattle but amazon now has sort of big office presence in a bunch of major cities obviously around the globe but also around the us. Right and jason you. You lay out in the piece kind. Some of these big structural reasons. How amazon is acting in a biased way against black employees according to them. Talk to me about the ways. In which amazon employees are classified. Which you know seems like inside baseball but i think it really speaks to the bigger issues here. A play amazon has these corporate levels that employees are slotted into four through twelve and so these levels are super important because they impact your salary range sort of who your peers are and all the impact you can have at the company. What all the black employers. I spoke to told me that they believe that either they or colleagues. They know when they came to amazon. Were swatted at a level that was actually lower than peers at the company who had sort of similar experiences right. It's called down leveling. Which is something. I never heard of before amazon. E. and sort of that. That came up. A bunch in this reporting and specifically as relates to the acquisition of a startup founded by two black entrepreneurs called park pick.

Amazon Jason Jason Del Rey Seattle Teddy Baseball United States
Designing Trustworthy Voice Assistants

The Future is Spoken

05:27 min | 1 d ago

Designing Trustworthy Voice Assistants

"Elaine lee on building blocks of building. Trust elaine lee as a designer specializing in artificial intelligence and machine learning with a focus on ethical. Ai she is currently a principal product. Designer at twi-. Leo on the i team and previously led the design of ebays. Ai powered shopping assistant on facebook. Messenger and google assistant. Enjoyed the show to the future is spoken today. I have a very special guest linley with me and we are going to talk about designing trustworthy voice. Assistant welcoming thanks sean. Thanks for having me thank you. How are you doing today. I'm doing great. The weather here is pretty good in san francisco right now. So i'm happy about that. Awesome awesome. could you tell us a little bit about your background. And how did you get into conversation design. Yeah so. I actually consider myself as a product designer. I started my design career in the advertising industry. So i didn't go to design school or will i actually studied psychology in undergrad. And then also the in grad school. So i guess like fasting. Four to two thousand fifteen is joined a startup in san francisco. Paul assembly mate. When i joined we weren't working in the competition a space or conversation. I experienced this but we quickly pivoted to product says essentially a slack bus and what it did was got people things in their office space so for example goofy for lunch or got them office supplies and things like that. When i first started in space it was quite exciting because it was very different from what i knew as practicioner as like a surly friend aware. We're working in the constraints of a slack interface for example when when we have to light essentially stopped working on that i was still quite excited about the space because i felt like there's so much more that can learn and i only had a small taste of it so at that time ebay was actually looking for designers to work in that space walk in the shopping essence space so i joined ebay are working on that. The difference between what we were doing at assembly made and what seeing ebay is assembly made the body recreate. so essentially that was like some of the conversation was automated and then handed off to human whereas at ebay it was completely first. So that means there's never going to be a human to come to the rescue for any kind of fallback reasons so that was a different type of design challenge there and currently right now. I'm at tulio on the platform side. So i worked on a product called autopilot and essentially that is a conversational a building platform for you to be able to like building train conversation. I experienced this fascinating new fee. Lake your psychology background in any way when you're designing these or renew on designing the experiences and he thinking about the conversation in general our own on like you mentioned one was where you had a little bit of a and then there was a handoff were says it was completely. I drew in where there was. No i think. Actually the psychology background line housemate in all aspects of mike design career from anything from the even the visual designs strategy behind to conversation on design. Anything it's mainly because of the communication parts of it of like seeming together. How do we communicate with people how to we engage with people to have them respond to what maybe your website your app or even your conversational but is asking from the user to do so. I believe that part definitely help in just like thinking about the user a lot more thinking deeper about what are some of those problems that they might have that we can solve for them so as a product manager. You also have to think about us. So is kind of Plan for you than because you have a background where you actually understand what the users think new but also using the same kind of things products which is ended up amazing right. Yeah definitely i do see that. Overlap between the product manager and the products designed a role in regards to that which only really helps build a better product in. You have a more cohesive team where you're all kind of thinking about the same problem space trying to tackle the same thing tonight pretty much so human january would feel right now and Tell our audience a little bit more about claim modernist video designer centric product where people can see it on the station on floor. It is immoral for devils injuries. A very good question. If you if you're around the bay area you probably see a lot of these assets from chile saying like developer. so i think traditionally it's developer focus. Sue in general is a cloud communications customer engagement platform. We essentially enable businesses to be able to communicate with their customers through different channels like texan voice video emails in chat. What's up etc. I would say like specifically the product that i was working on. Autopilot is a platform for not just developers. Then people who. Maybe don't know as much code.

Elaine Lee Ebay Paul Assembly Linley San Francisco Tulio LEO Sean Facebook Google Assembly Mike Chile
Boss Talk

a16z

05:34 min | 2 d ago

Boss Talk

"The a sixteen z podcast. I'm dos and this episode is bostock with a sixteen z co founder. Ben horowitz data brick. Ceo ali goats all about leadership and management. Their conversation originally took place on social audio app clubhouse where they host a live chat every tuesday at five. Pm pacific you can find more of their and other conversations on our separate feed a sixteen z. Live here though. We're sharing the second installment of their show. And it ben. Ali cover conway's law and shipping your org chart making the transition from being a boss to a boss of bosses silicone valley post pandemic and more okay so today Bostock we've got. We're gonna have a special beginning because many of you know my background. Because i wrote a book which went through my whole background But you might not know ollie's background as well and his even more interesting and i think that it's it's really relevant because when you get into these discussions about how to run organization and and how to make decisions in all these things. They're all very situational. There's no kind of one way to do any of it and it's really important that you know where people are coming from. Take to know what to do with what they're saying. So this is going to be kind of a very important basis for the show. so i'll eat. Could you take us back to. Iran and your uncle was one of the founders of opec. While i didn't. I didn't even know you remember that he was young. He was You know like five or actors and You know the You know that part of the family had it well What actually not so much on my parents side. There were sort of in opposition and i was born right around the revolution. And you know pretty. Common nineteen seventy nine. There was you know. I call it. Took over and shot was kind of exiled by with help of the united states. Interestingly yeah yeah he came over here and you know soon died in cancer. The mosque over my parents were an opposition. And actually what was interesting. Is that they around that time. The iran iraq war started Which put the country in tennessee. Because suddenly like you know those this revolution these people have taken over the country but they just scrambling to figure out how to run the country the more the mola's and suddenly they're being attacked by so you know so. It was sort of take no hostages kind of situation Especially when iraq started bombarding That ron which was where. I was living at the time as a kid You know the aeros attacks started against capital of iran You know everything just changed right. It was sort of suddenly. The government was sort of like you know. We're we're not messing around like this is more time And your family ended up being one of those. That was not going to be a hostage so tell us about that. Yeah i mean look so first of all the is going on in the background. So like everyone dan. You know at at nighttime The sirens go off to hear sounder. And then you know our house. We're actually overlooking ron. So you could see the city and it's kind of interesting that shut off all the all the sort of electric city in the whole city when the bombardment starts. So that's the fighter jets can't find that find the houses you know and and then you know your parents scramble. The freakout to tell the kids to get under the tables and You know and they turn on candles and they turn to lean on the radio to see what's going on and you know and they'll tell you which locations are being quite a few times. Actually we had ma-margaret in our neighborhood. One night actually. I remember it felt like they actually hit our building. I felt like the whole building this lapse. There was actually yeah. It was like a building. You down on the block and your kids. You're like five and you remember that. Yeah yeah four five you remember the medicare remember very clearly is your parents are always super cool and calm just drinking out like crying screaming running around like using their shift and yes we know smash hit our building but accurate did it. It was like a building next door next day. We walked outside. The whole building had collapsed. The next door house i to me. I've i thought at the skyscraper. Probably i was a little kid so it was probably just a three story building or something like that but it's collapsing. All these people like crying you know. They're all these women crying. I remember i asked the my dad. Why the crying. And said they lost their sons and they're sitting there crying and there's rumbles so that's going on in the background so as a result of this the government started sort of hitting back on any opposition that was in the country right you know because they were not messing around this time and my parents happened to be in opposition so So very suddenly you know The going up kind of against so when you say the going what

Z Co Ben Horowitz Ceo Ali Ali Cover Conway Iran Bostock Ollie Iraq Opec RON BEN Tennessee Cancer United States DAN Margaret Medicare
Gadget Lab: Gadgets on Mars

Get WIRED

05:02 min | 4 d ago

Gadget Lab: Gadgets on Mars

"Just wrote a story on wired dot com this week about the cameras on perseverance and how they actually perceive imagery much differently than we do. Tell us about this and why this is significant for this mission. Will there's something almost philosophical that you have to address if you're going to send not people to explore another planet but robots which is you're trying to acquire like sensory information and some of that some of that can be quantified can be sent back as data. You know the numbers for certain for certain analyses that you can send an instrument to do and i. I can talk about some of that but some of it. Is you want to send a robot that can look at stuff that can hear stuff in this case they can sense this world. And then that that information through the sensory organs the mechanical sensor organs the technology. That you send the microphones and the cameras and the sensors instruments and then it has to get home has to get back to us somehow. Us not wired reporters but jet propulsion laboratory and then the a whole vast team of humans who process all of that through their own machinery and then it becomes something that they can that they can look at its this this arc of how data becomes information and then becomes knowledge so we humans send these robots to mars to some extent to learn how to send better robots to mars a lot of the instruments on perseverance. That's the rover. That's there now are versions of instruments. That went up on other missions and now they kind of the scientists. Jpl and are all these universities. Nasa know how to make them work to do more what they wanna do which is to look at their surroundings. In ways that that we humans would would would be able to identify easily as looking at stuff to to see things in the colors that human is also see. We were standing there and also to look at them. Multispectral hyper spectral and other parts of the electric spectrum that human i wouldn't perceive but the eyes of this rover is in scare quotes. That i'm making on a on a screen even though this audio medium so that's not helpful at all. The eyes of this rover can see into the little bit into the ultraviolet partway into the infrared. And and also can see x-rays and have an are using a laser project light outward to obliterate some bits of rock. And see what what happens when you do it. And to listen with microphones that that might be more sensitive than human ear. Then all of those things get get reduced transformed or changed in some way into meaningful knowledge so that we can understand more about what what's on this other planet where humans have never been but humans have sent a lot of our stuff. You're saying that each rover that has gone up tomorrow. At least the ones that we have had progressively better technology on them with each version. And i think it's kind of interesting that this rover that just went up now. Perseverance is essentially the first rover of the iphone era. Curiosity launched in two thousand eleven and it was designed for a period of five or six seven years before that so the imaging technology on it is very representational of like that time in imaging technology the imaging technology that we have now and the imaging technology that we have on. Perseverance is pardon the pun astronomically better than the tech that we had ten years ago. I mean if you think about like how bad your instagram photos. Were in two thousand eleven. And how fantastic they can be now. You can see just like as far as mobile technology goes and just imaging sensors. The leap has been huge. That's a it's a really interesting observation. I think that's right. Although i will also say that like one of the one of the instruments that i wrote about is called the masked kim z. And so it's this. This binocular camera to cameras linked together left and right eye on top of the tower. That's on the rover so sits up a little. Bit high zina's presume because there was a mass cam on curiosity the z. Has zoom capability and it does a bunch of stuff it. It's there to identify targets of interesting scientific potentially interesting scientific value and also to be able to look around and navigation and take pictures and do a whole bunch of other stuff. The the ccd the charge coupled device the optical sensor the to in mass are off the shelf kodak cds and they have the they have in front of them the bear pattern of pixels. The probably this wrong but like the red green blue. I think that that's that would be familiar. That if you if you could look into your phone you would see it. And then mass games he does. What the experiment instrument is take advantage of some capabilities that our phone cameras. Don't really do to do much more. Because because the also can see into the infrared bit and so if you put the right filters in front of them you can do even more science with them so there is some sense that we send up a camera.

JPL Nasa Kim Z United States Zina
The Project for Good Information

Reset

05:45 min | 4 d ago

The Project for Good Information

"Traditional media is failing. Disinformation is flourishing. It's time for a new kind of media that quote opens the marketing materials for a new startup called the project for good information. It wants to counter the problem of right wing misinformation and restore social trust in media record steady. Cypher has the story. Hey so the existence of this organization hasn't been reported before what's going on so the project for good information is the outgrowth of a lot of energy and money that's been spent by the left over the last few years to try and find a counterweight to sort of conservative media. And what we're reporting here at recode is there is a new effort afoot. It has not been publicly announced It's kind of beginning quietly in progressive donor circles to try and build a new media ecosystem. This group called the project for confirmation. They're seeking sixty five million dollars and are beginning to talk with some donors about this and We got a hold of documents that speak to this new effort to you. Tell me more about. Who's behind it. And what else. They've done shirt so. The founder of this organization is named tara mcgowan who has become a pretty big player in democratic politics. Over the last few years her organization Now has been called acronym which is something that is not a household name on that under any illusions. About how close people. Follow this stuff. But it is a powerful Group with a super pac with a nonprofit arm acronym probably is most widely known for its ties to the startup that very infamously bungled the two thousand twenty democratic iowa caucuses but acronym has been controversial Terror mcgowan the opportu- behind. This is controversial. I think even her defenders would admit that but she's someone who believes that conservative media has become a big part of the public discourse and progressives have not countered it sufficiently so at acronym She's encouraged democrats to basically fight fire with fire. And as that quote you read at the beginning sort of speaks to. media. You know people like you and me. aren't going to be able. Structurally do a good enough job at checking this misinformation so that progressives need to build their own thing so she's out there and she's you know definitely become one of the most high-profile and persuasive spokespeople for this point of view that the system is broken and rather than kind of begging media to do a better job that we need a new kind of media as she puts it. So what is that exactly being. What is the project for good information going to do are they gonna create a publication or a new platform. What's the plan. Yeah i'll cop to not having all the details right. I think these things are still going to trickle out over the next couple of months. But it's a sixty five million dollar war chest to the two main things. One is to invest in for profit media companies acronym has been doing this sort of work for the last few years they started a bunch of newsrooms around the country called carter reum and what. These are our pop-up public relations Digital sites that exist in a few states generally competitive political stakes presidential swing states and they have sort of these homespun names like up north news and these things make them seem like your local neighbor. Next door courier news though has been tagged by the fact that it is tied to a political operation at akron. Akron has been a large owner of this newsroom. So people would say you know not totally unfairly like how do you know that these newsrooms our objective you're casting progressive politicians in a favorable light. How can we trust you. Basically you're giving us straight news not like you know the lefty news. There's going to be now a little bit of an arm's length relationship between the political operation at acronym and this kind of theoretically radically pro journalism social trust or innovation such one part of it and then the other part of it is sort of a nonprofit media grants arm still td on what exactly that's gonna fund but that's going to be another half or so of the sixty five million dollar pot so this idea of creating media outlets the courier newsroom has done in the past creating outlets that looks like real media outlets. That sounds an awful lot like Some projects that have gotten the right in trouble. How is the left's doing the same thing going be any more successful or are they going into totally new direction. Now that's a great question. I mean there definitely is some unease in even progressive circles about this direction You know this is not your standard journalism play. This is not sixty five million dollars by some billionaire to buy a metro newspaper. it's not too invested in havana. Csar buzzfeed or some kind of venture backed startup. there are some people who think that fighting fire with fire Is the thing for democrats to do. It's stooping till level Of breitbart or fox news so this is one of the most controversial projects in progressive politics. I think it's fair to say the reason why you could make the argument that this could succeed is that this mark is largely not served that well right now. I mean obviously there have been outwardly. Progressive new sites in the past like think of things like think progress which was a big progressive new site But a lot of the subscribers of your standard New york times washington post are progressive and They are is not a Sort of a digital. I especially a digital outlet focused in local communities.

Tara Mcgowan Cypher Carter Reum Mcgowan Iowa Courier Newsroom Akron Havana Fox News New York Times Washington Post
ATU509  AT Toolkit with Audrey Busch ATP

Assistive Technology Update

05:30 min | 4 d ago

ATU509 AT Toolkit with Audrey Busch ATP

"Now we all know. Smart speakers have made some amazing changes especially in the world of assistive technology back in the day to really automate most things in a home. It required a whole lot of money. Some rewiring general contractor. And usually maybe even creationism things. That didn't even exist before but then these devices. These personal assistant started coming out and not completely and totally. Just focus on the amazon echo. But that is probably the most popular the ones that have more people have in their home. That a story over at forbes and it's got some pretty interesting thoughts in it it's titled amazon alexa blurring the boundaries between assistive tech and companionship drew my gusts alexio and it really just starts off with talking about some of the things that i just said how these devices have really helped folks control their homes and on their lights cook their food answer questions that reminders all these different things just by using their voice but it digs into a little bit more about how is helping individuals emotional wellbeing and even staving off loneliness now if you can thinking there's a lot of programs out there including ones that we're working on here to use the devices with the cameras and the screens in reduce steve off loneliness so that folks don't get socially isolated can actually talk to other people family members and things like that with these devices but this isn't talking about that this is talking about staving off loneliness and helping with mobile wellbeing by talking to the device itself and it actually gets into talking about a couple of different studies that have really looked at the way that especially individuals with disabilities or beginning to form genuine emotional bonds with what they call an intelligent personal assistant or an ip a and to do this they interviewed folks they kind of did a broad sweep of some different reviews of the device as well as some keyword searches and things like that. So i mean it's it's new research to kind of see how it does. But here's a few of the quotes that they got from these individuals. I wanted official. Said i can talk to alexa when i'm lonely. Have a question or my executive function is failing others even say that alexis not only a caregiver and friend that i rely on her all the time. She's not only a companion. she's so much more. So if you really think these folks are actually completely bonding with this device and in some ways. That's completely understandable reviewed. Think any time. Do i have a question anytime that. I want to be reminded of something any time that i want to heck and make a call or eternal light or really. Do anything in my home. I just ask alexa. She does it. But only that i can even have casual conversation games with their do all these other things and a lot of other stuff that perhaps i couldn't do with my direct service professional with fame member of maybe comes by every once in a great while. It's someone that's always there always answers and someone that kind of just does whatever you ask to do by just using that little key word as it gets of deeper in there. It talks about that. Individuals with disabilities are more likely to suffer from a lack of independence loneliness loneliness and 'isolation and of course we all probably kind of knew that and i'm very sure the pandemic really exacerbated that issue but definitely something that i did not quite at the scale that it was suspended in two thousand seventeen a survey so that a typical day one in eight individuals with the disability experience less than half an hour of interaction with another person. Think about that. I mean just really and truly think about that and how little time that is. It also says here. Additionally eighty five percent of young adults with disabilities age eighteen to thirty four reported feeling lonely loneliness was really there and of course that can lead to a lot of issues later in life and just. Nobody really wants to be lonely. So they're using these voice assistance to kind of talk to. It's actually a pretty good article with a lot of different kinds of thoughts and even at the end gets into those ethical questions of you know. I'm i'm making friends. I'm i'm relying on this device that is owned by a sales company. Basically so could that be used for maybe not good purposes of course. Of course that's always always kind of there. But i suppose we need to look on the good side here and look on the. At purposes and how it can really help individuals with disabilities so all of us in this field. Really know and here on this show. We've talked about a sometimes. I'll what alexa could do. But i want to share this story with everyone. Just because i found it very interesting raises a lot of great questions and really is something that i think. We're gonna see more and more of as we go on as these these types of devices these as they call them. Become more and more intuitive. So we'll put a link to this story over in our show notes. Assistive technology can be really hard to explain to folks. I still think that a lot of my family and friends believe that i work in. It and they really just don't know the differences. Some of this is not really listening and some of it is that you just don't know what you don't know. For employers and other organizations knowledge about assistive technology can be the difference between attracting and keeping valuable employees and for organizations that serve individuals with disabilities and ageing populations. This knowledge can be the difference and increased independence and accomplishing goals. The where in the world start. I'm a little biased. But i would say that this podcast is a great place

Amazon Alexa Alexis
Episode 174: Clubhouse, Instagram & Bad Teeth

Double Tap Canada

05:04 min | 4 d ago

Episode 174: Clubhouse, Instagram & Bad Teeth

"At least that's what it says here. Markelle for la la la la la la he is from double tap tv. My steamed co host. He's actually the boss guy on the tv side of things on tv other to find that it's a big bloody picture. That appears on screen in my house. Shown prese or should i say sean says what can i be esteemed as well. Don't think i've ever been esteemed a fancy just steamed. Yes exactly good for you good old fashioned hotdog exa- especially that heating in the shade going sorry law as it's no. Yeah that's right. Yeah how y'all do this week mark. I'm getting by dove me to buy a lot of a lot of dental work over the past couple of weeks i this is. This is a a public service announcement for those who neglect their overtime. And not that. I'm you know very guilty of it because i. I don't think i've gone. Longest i've gone is probably year and a half between dental appointments. But you're supposed to be doing this every six months guys and when you don't things happen and you end up with things like root canal which you think is going to be just go in one day and and you know deal with pain. Get over it now. This is like five visits. You got to get a root canal. Then you gotta get the cleaning then. You got to get the crowd. Then you've got to get the it's just it's not fun that doesn't sound so i went to the dentist last when i was twenty one and i'm telling forty this year too long leave that may you know what stephen at this point you might as well just wait it out to they all follow. That's kind of wherever i just think. Just let it go. you know. they're all broken. Yeah just let it go feed the stereotype of the british and their teeth. Stephen well-done scotty see war. And the thing is. I don't have a drug problem. Which would obviously normally be the case that we should do. We should Post our respective smiles on social media. Mogul judge no. I think that sounds great. This is so on topic. When i when i smile on screen. I looked down every time. I'm like look at me ugly giveaway all your secrets would not much of a secret is on screen you know. I do on telly a secret. On teddy yes. How are you sean. Please price of it when you do that. Yes no i'm very good. I'm very good. Although i have just woke up it's up. Just you know when you i'm getting to that age. I'm way past the. But as soon as i sit on a sofa if i don't get up again we've in seminaries. I'm asleep open. Dribbling asleep is ridiculous. Stop feeding these british steady people. Oh we're just a just a prize or not really good at this. This is terrible. I mean come on guys this is this is like i mean. I must admit this is a great reason to wake up to talk about. Of course we're young sexy it we're tack than stuff. Yeah exactly like this we cry. I don't know why should we see this. I mean i didn't know if we should say this because then if we see it at loud it's like it makes it happen. What we've been talking this week about going on instagram now. I'd i still doing a clue. Instagram is and. I'm hoping that a child will tell me at some point. But apparently we're talking about this snow and i was looking at some of the videos posted on their own garbage question mark. Clearly you're not following the right people who to slow me. One guy was just sitting good. Boom boom boom and that was it was what exactly are you. Are you subscribe to an instagram. Because you primarily photos. I mean yes they do have some videos and some interesting video features on there which i think we might take advantage of but On the photo side of things you're clearly not following the right people i mean. There's this great great imagery that you're gonna see on instagram. And some great stories to yet you. You'll be able to see it. You'll be able to read the captions and you'd be able to. You'll be able to enjoy it that that that begs the question. And i think it's one of these things that we should maybe throw a poll out. There is instagram. One of those social media sites that people low vision actually use. I question is is a great question. I don't know clearly based on the room here. I'm guessing the answer's no well. I mean i can see a little bit rice off. Got the ability to look pitra close not necessarily get detail. Water is which is why fund enough we were looking yesterday. Sean i at some of the images to find if they had any was called takes. That's where people alternative text on so he can't see image you'll discuss sense warriors looking at one particular won't see who but we were looking at someone who's

La La La La La La Sean Stephen Instagram Scotty Pitra