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The world is changing. Listen here for the latest audio about inventions, gadgets, devices and other emerging technologies that will influence the way we live our lives in the future, broadcast on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A VerySpatial Podcast

A VerySpatial Podcast

6:00 listening | 1 d ago

A VerySpatial Podcast

"Hello welcome to a very special podcast. I'm Jesse I'm sue and this is frank this weekend. We're talking to Dr Scott in the Wiki who is the lead. Rnd scientists over quantum spatial Some the work he's been doing But I of course we have a lot of newses to catch up on In fact there is no way we keep up because apparently everybody decided to release a press. Release this week. Yeah everybody my dog did too. Yeah I mean it's just ridiculous so these would be selected that yes these are. These are all right. We might and do to be more alert. Dogs is not any you know we it. It was more. It was not really spatial more than a spatial type of topic for spatial. Get off my lawn. But that's another. Yeah it was. It was spatial stuff but it wouldn't really the anyway. So let's get onto the news. First UP IS LLEGADO. Fcc Quagmire continues for the hundred twenty seventh year. At least. That's what feels like all right. So here's the latest and greatest update on this whole nonsense as we've been reporting last couple episodes. Fcc said Yep it's great go forward with it whole lot of people have come out of the woodwork. To Go on Jack it is not okay. Do not go forward. And there's been a formal petitions against the FCC to reverse decision to allow llegado to go forward this is based upon blocking the GPS. Now it's going to be the normal people you would expect the airline pilots association who have a big interest and GPS working correctly and accurately and not having anything messing it. Up Association Equipment Manufacturers Aviation Interests The radium corporation Lockheed Martin Trimble. I mean antibody has anything to do with. Gps saying no. This is a really really bad idea but the really compelling bit here that may make the FCC think twice a hope is thirty two US senators which is over half and indifference. Bipartisan It's it's under heads. Sorry it's not it's it's a third I'm sorry A third of US senators which is when it by half ballpark. A half is is on from each party. So that's a bipartisan Thing sorry I misspoke I postseason. This is why we don't do math in front of people that's right So anyway they've come out and said no this is probably a bad idea so hopefully the FCC takes this all under advisement and reverses its. I'm going to terrible decision to allow. Continue for it. I would really like the the only way this gets really properly. Fixed is if Congress does what Congress is not probably going to do given the current crises. That's going on. Is they need to make legislation about this and that would be very clear guidance. Fcc A WHAT WOULD. It wouldn't be allowed but until then we run into the situation where the FCC can contain to make decisions and reverse decisions were versus sessions. And it's just a nightmare and in another. Us government News items this week The Department of Commerce Has Actually issued new rules for a commercial. Remote sensing satellites the Satellite Systems And in this case removing a lot of restrictions and so a lot of the the changes and it's it's They had a couple of drafts out. the current set are much more streamlined and they are lifting restrictions on not everything But especially on systems and types of data that could be sold elsewhere so outside the United States. So the argument is that others can do it then A of those restrictions are removed. There's still going to be some restrictions And they actually are setting up a tier system the full set of rules when we actually started according to I had seen published out yet but Essentially there are a lot of other obligations related. To remote sensing is stuff that that have to be still met so Some restrictions are in place but Essentially if you've got a system that is Only producing a on enhanced data. That is the same as unenhanced. Data available from sources that don't have Or not under the jurisdiction of Department Congress in the US so foreign sources will be called Tier One and they're actually going to have lots of restrictions changed however there's tier two and three and that has to do with systems that don't actually have any competition necessarily outside. The United States are outside of commerce purview. Meaning they're like well. If you're still competition that that would you know hurt you then yes we could still regulate you And so some of the questions that came up with things. Sar Data Nighttime data I think certain types of infrared in and stuff that had been heavily restricted. And the other thing that's going to change is how long the restrictions when there are restrictions a can go for which I guess you The original two thousand six Regulations had Basically just said they stay until new regulations are legislation. Come along. I think the new set of rules actually has a time period. I think two to three years. Something like that where potential they can review those So if you want the full text sort of the full details There's a couple of links the show nuts to one of the articles that discuss this But I mean you know. There was a lot of excitement Around when this was announced but The full rule set still has some things that will restrict. It's not it's not. Let the wild west of by any means but A lot of that restriction that that was there at least for existing systems and systems that do sort of traditional stuff is now going to be a little bit easier to deal with.

FCC United States Llegado Dr Scott Congress Martin Trimble Department Congress The Department Of Commerce
How Automation will look like in our Post-Virus Future

Automated

6:25 listening | 2 d ago

How Automation will look like in our Post-Virus Future

"So it has been a few weeks since the last episode. I actually had to move once. The lockdown conditions loosened a bit here in Barcelona and really the amount of paperwork and organization that was required to move during this special period was a much more time consuming than I originally expected. I was unfortunately not able to focus on any new podcast episodes but the podcast will definitely continue. Now as I finally settled into my new apartment so in an earlier episode I discussed some of the initial trends and technologies that were relevant to the themes of the podcast that were being impacted by the covid phenomenon. Right before the lockdown here in Barcelona and much of the West started so this focused on robots drones etc being used to actually fight the virus in hospitals or for tracking certain cases. So a number of my guests have also spoken to how the crisis will impact the specific areas they presented and I think now as we are seeing the world start to move out of this lockdown period. I thought it was really timely to revisit this theme as we can perhaps start to see long-term signs of our post virus future already today. So whether we see a resurgence in a second or third wave of this virus. I think that the trends are really well established now to identify more solid future scenarios which we can talk about in the podcast today so the first and I think the most obvious change deals with the remote aspect of work so clearly the stay at home orders across the world have forced many organizations to adopt these new remote working practices and also adjust. How work is done to stay productive. So zoom was actually one of the popular choices. And I'm sure as many of you know they went from ten million to three hundred million users in just a few months and similar increases in tools like slack or Microsoft teams. Were also seen so. I think it is also interesting to note that when certain. Ict tools were built in the Internet's early days. This kind of remote working reality wasn't fact a vision for many of the early adopters but it has really taken a global crisis to enforce a reality that has actually been possible for several years already so now of course all work won't automatically see a full shift to being remote long-term but as the possibility is now more known it can become a more probable course of action for many businesses and individuals so for example twitter CEO. Jack Dorsey has come out recently. Saying that some twitter and square employees can actually work remotely permanently and though other high tech. Silicon Valley firms have said similar things. Their policies are less open. But I think that can be expected that this trend will continue for organizations across the world as we have gotten used to doing so and of course the infrastructure is now they're to enable the significant proportions of the population to actually undertake this remote work so an interesting fact here is that the server market actually grew thirty percent in the first quarter of twenty twenty compared to the two thousand eighteen growth. So I think that the infrastructure really is there and of course we'll continue to be laid out for a larger and larger proportions of our populations to continually work remotely for the long term. I think it's also understandable that without a vaccine many countries may experience a second and even third wave potentially reinforcing the state home orders which would further solidify a remote working lifestyle so really linked to remote work. We have seen an explosion of virtual reality usage so personally. I've used a lot of your during this two month. Quarantine to go to conferences events and even visit in air quotes netter environments which has always been a big part of my life Before the quarantine of course so with the increase in remote work the level of immersion and interaction with colleagues and friends definitely decreases so v are really enables and increase sense of presence which promotes the effective exchange of ideas and knowledge which is really essential to the twenty th century type of work that many of us are doing so. I've read many examples of product designers specifically using VR to assemble their teams to work together through the entire process of generating on new design even full scale vehicle designs. So I think with our Continuing Remote Work Paradigm as VR. Technology improves becomes more affordable and of course widespread is really possible that a substantial proportion of the future of work takes place in a virtual rolled so apart from the impact on jobs. I think it will be quite interesting to note the influence on other obvious candidates such as transportation real estate and events as many large and small business events have shifted from The physical to a full virtual experience with varying but often high degrees of success so moving onto more automation focused trends. So I think that. With social distancing in place and the need to restructure workplaces of course minimize human contact. We've seen several examples of automation being accelerated across various sectors especially in the Essential services domains so in the previous corona virus episode. I talked about numerous examples of robots being used in hospitals to either deliver supplies. Or even disinfect. Parts of the hospital to reduce the strain on the healthcare workers so an example within the waste industry however is P. Robotics which actually offers a empowered robots to sift through recycled material to identify and weed out different sorts of trash

Barcelona Twitter Jack Dorsey Microsoft Silicon Valley CEO P. Robotics
Don't Call it a Brain in a Dish!

a16z

6:56 listening | 2 d ago

Don't Call it a Brain in a Dish!

"Hi and welcome to the as Sixteen Z. Podcast I'm Hannah and in this episode general partner. Vj Pond Day. And I talk with says you. Pasha professor of Behavioral Science at Stanford all about a new technology we have for Understanding Brain Disorders. The Wild and Very sci-fi new frontier of brain organizes so what our brain organizes were they developed. And how can we use them? The conversation starts with the essential problem that we've never had real access to the tissue and actions of the developing brain or even living normal brain and the problems with all of our existing models for understanding it from genetic studies to autopsies to primates. We look at those models we've relied on in the past and what this new model of brain organizes now brings us allowing us to study the human brain both how it develops and what goes wrong in certain disorders with living human brain cells in a dish for the very first time we talk about what these organizations can do and can't what they're good for understanding and where that understanding becomes limited and. Wi calling these mini brains or brains in dish. Isn't the right terminology at all and finally how far this new tool model might be taken now and in the future and how it will lead us closer towards one day even perhaps understanding psychology itself on a molecular level. We're here today to talk about understanding brain disorders and some of the new tools were developing for how to do so. So let's start where we actually are in that. Are we actually anywhere significantly? More advanced than we were in the days of hysteria. You know thinking about things like labeling these sort of conditions idol conditions that we had no clue. Where are we actually right now? Psychiatric disorders are still behaviorally defined and there are very few biomarkers. That are considered reliable diagnosis. The truth is that our understanding of psychiatric disorders is actually quite limited. I often like to joke that I suffer from an Oncology Syndrome which essentially this deep frustration that you feel as you see just like how fast cancer research has has gone in the few decades from really like no treatment whatsoever to almost completely curing certain forms of cancers. And if you look carefully. Did you realize that one of the reasons for this? Incredible progress is that on college has really made use of the revolution molecular biology and it has done so because it actually has access to tissue to the tissue of interest we know almost nothing about how the human brain develops. Because it's it's completely inaccessible. And so again we are defining psychiatric disorders based on combinations of behaviors presence or absence or certain patterns behavior. We've made a lot of progress into classifying disorders and reclassifying them. But the truth is that our molecular understanding of psychiatric disorders of brain disorders more. Broadly is very limited And probably behind any other branch of medicine which I think is reflected in the therapeutics that we have And the complexity. I mean. It's fun to think about like you know in the eighties molecular biology. Was this hot new term. I mean you're talking about something. Almost like molecular psychology raking this big sort of emergent phenotype that is a behavioral and then trying to connect it noxious at the tissue level. Not just at the cellular level but all the way from molecular level. That is a hard thing to do. It's hard to imagine someone has schizophrenia or severe depression. What's the target to hit? You said something really interesting about just never being held back by not really having the tissue and you by that you know that we the first time we get to look at the tissue is after somebody who has suffered from a psychiatric disorder has died right that is our primary obstacle helmet. Yes and there are a number of challenges associated with studying postmortem tissue from patients. Of course the obvious one is the fact that the tissue is not a life. Yeah for me as a neuroscientist is really important to be able to record. Electrical signals from sells really look at hard communicating with each other. But at the same time another limitations actually the availability of tissue. I mean if you were to just think for instance evolved autism spectrum disorders which is very common one in sixty or so individuals and there is even an autism brain back but the number of brains that we have in a brain bank is really in the hundreds not thousands for disorder that is still and it's probably for adults to read it's right and other limitations actually age of this individual but very often also the cause of death because in most of the cases actually traumatic yes and most of psychiatric patients will take many many medications and other goal various therapeutic interventions across their lifespan. We don't know for instance. What is how is that influencing what we're seeing in postmortem tissue so you're getting a very small amount of information that may not even be accurate or very anecdotal. Yes and that's the only tool that you have at the moment besides behavior. Well I think of course are imaging studies that you could use. Mri and functional. Emory's problem with those studies is that you don't really get the molecular resolution. You don't get to really study. The tissue an alternative which has been using the last decade or so has been to model many of the disorders with animals. That has been quite an exciting field that was primarily accelerated by identifying genes associated with psychiatric disorders of. But I think we always have to be aware of the differences between Between species right even in how the brain the structure of the brain the fact that there are millions of years that separates us in evolution and the behavioral repertoire is very different across seas now. Of course they're the behavioral repertoire is much closer to that of humans but as you can imagine again the limitation there is. How scalable isn't that? How many primates can we really use this type of studies and who can afford to do this experiments on our scale? The truth is that most of the psychiatric those have a very complex genetics. It is very rare like one single gene or one single variant but often a combination of this. And it's not just obviously about the jeans but what are the cells and the circuits that are affected by this and I think that only once we start to understand some of the molecular machinery behind the psychiatric disorders. Can we as it happened in the cancer? Fueled Star thinking about therapies. That have been designed for specific disorders rather than identified by chance. Because many of the drugs that we have for psychiatric disorders today have actually been identified by chance

Pasha Professor Of Behavioral Vj Pond Day Hannah Stanford General Partner WI Cancer Oncology Syndrome Schizophrenia Emory
How a Top NLP Startup is Growing, with Caitlyn Brooksby, Executive Director of PR/Communications at Canary Speech

Inside VOICE

10:00 listening | 4 d ago

How a Top NLP Startup is Growing, with Caitlyn Brooksby, Executive Director of PR/Communications at Canary Speech

"Is the executive director of PR and communications at Canary Speech Walking Caitlin. Thanks for being here for having so Canary. Speech was named one of the most promising. Nlp STARTUPS TWO THOUSAND. Nineteen and the company describes itself as being at the intersection of healthcare and technology. Can you tell us a little bit more about what Canary Speech does? And why it is seen as one of the most promising and I'LL BE STARTUPS. Not a great question. You know what I think about. That really takes me back to origin story right. How do we start so five years ago? Our founders Jess Adams in Henry Call. They had been friends for over nearly three decades. Honestly and you know they had lived their careers and they got together and what they wanted to do was set auguste standard in a speech and language industry. They were poised to do it right both. Jeff and Henry. They have a clear the experience in Ashley had the excitement to do it and it really well doctors one question and why light you mentioned because normally talk about speech language industry it really can get techy if you don't really deep which is exciting that fun but what we started with nearest started with was this is how is was humans understand the raw motion in the words that someone speaks. You know when you're talking to your sister or your best friends and you ask how their duty say no good but not you know. There's something different right it's off. And how can we do that as humans? And how you use and what we've done is use machine guided machine learning and to really understand identify conditions. So that really is us so now. Today were six. Hatton's later boss. Us An international. And we've just taken this to a whole new level of redefining speaking language in the healthcare industry and so we talk about healthcare in No the intersection there. That that's really what we're setting out to utilize each language in the healthcare industry and bringing it just that step further so about you know. That's exciting because it does take voice to another level like you said you're not only hearing the words but your understanding you know they should behind what's being said and especially in the healthcare space. That's really important. How are you able to do that? I mean if you can talk about that a little bit. Is there a lot of testing research? They're able to kind us to understand the emotions. Someone's voice yes so really I like to Don frears and so what we've done is we've identified two thousand four hundred fifty eight biomarkers in speech. Okay what is a biomarker? What we're talking about here is like tonal. Quality these aspects of speech but mo up. It's what our body creates. And so we're gonNA find these biomarkers and then we developed bottles that are Z. Specific so they're not person's right cake a rich history of somebody's entire healthcare data and compare it but really what we're duty is a disease that he used mass in really scaled and just be utilized healthcare industry and then he used these models as our speech data so we started out here siege. Five years ago we really were focused on farm street. We were in FDA. Hire me cynical. Trials to this is very controlled environment right and we did this. Because we wanted to be able to cruise our technology and energy to get s right wide able to really tune in for router market or the playstation of it and so we really spent a solid three years of just focusing on these controlled. Studies REALLY AMAZING COPIES. Who wanted to get their to market or just simply to help with a civic disease and so that was really exciting to be a part of that and then we really moved into studies where we from the one hundred group right that were testing to really like in the thousand. Just last month we were able to reach a project that had heard ten thousand over dissipate and that was just exciting me. Mary siege his coming to blow background. Like how is this talk about area of science but what we realized early on was that we need full sets to go into a steadier going for project so what we do is hatcher tissue speech on a person's smart device so we use iphones IPADS android. We use these devices to captures fees. We also talk about the intersection of healthcare technology. What's really exciting is. We decided again early. On though he needed to create that bridge. What we were doing in the healthcare street was connected to what we were going to rate so reduce we include the gold standard Or are the panels which used to go to your doctor if you're dealing with stress I e Rd typically piece of paper that you're asked to allow the pen and paper and rate yourself on Howard layer urge years weeks ago and that's what your position uses to solve. You treats the symptoms that you're dealing with when you work with your physician that you say you could just read their seconds of across cheer South Kearns for the doctors I and made from that based on her stress near Zion Unions. And now we're there which brothels really exciting as a company you've made strides that that's a society scalable. That's Donbass it and resilient school that your physician to news you can use these tests. Don't have to be administrated within the hospital space or in the administrative is like family real and that's a place where is comfortable and you think about what's gone on over the last three or by months with coded ninety it really brings tall houses centerstage in funny. I was seven or eight years ago. I was on one of the committees to bring telehealth mount healthcare in your mouth. Nearly ten years ago I started my career there and is now. I'm embarrassed to say but I used to work for the very first time three months ago. I got a cold sore. I mean I knew it wasn't over ninety but I knew I needed some kind of policy packer. Someone is able to use tell homey bonus. I think that's really going to become the nor so. Yeah that's simple bit of our coaching kind of how I see it. How we see ED signing into healthcare. I agree. I mean we've definitely been using. How much more than we have over time and like I said I love that you all are kind of focusing on this emotional piece. You had mentioned earlier that your company also has multiple patents. Can you share with us? What they are. And why was it important for the company to have patents and do you think that something other voice technology companies should be doing for sure so that we pride ourselves? Moore is coming non-negotiable or Henry Projects. They knew that they wanted language. And in order to do that we had to prove that our technology was novel. And it's really exciting. Because just two weeks ago he had are six patents in the EU and so total right so acid time is for the EU. We were awarded one hundred of our planes which is now is not Donald Law. We were in a meeting with one of our clients. Actually find that I met last lie. Voice show guys and they astor pat they. So what do you think about these pens and looked around set rock-solid on that was exciting? I was excited be in for CEO. So I'll break down. Three strategic areas are Hatton's first one is that selection of the twenty four hundred biomarkers show and that had is called is slipping speech germs for building models for detecting medical conditions. So that patent is discharge behind. It is how we go about these biomarkers and using them within our guy and then the second is the. Pat Huddle is medical assessment based on voice. So there's really strategies around this particular the versus we use these selected biographers to identify. Disease are hunger stations. Each right. We're not to read this verbatim Hans. That's awkward not natural right. We're saying hey is our technology on conversational speech. Something that you and I are right now. And then. The third kind of strategy area is use of this artificial speech on vices in zone patented utilize the techniques together on smart devices. And what would that be your watch or your phone right? In an dots really were strategies are

Canary Speech Disease Hatton EU Executive Director Henry Call Pat Huddle Don Frears Jess Adams Auguste Ashley FDA Hans Jeff South Kearns Mary Howard Henry Projects
3DEO Posts Triple Digit Growth for 2019

3D Printing Today

7:28 listening | 5 d ago

3DEO Posts Triple Digit Growth for 2019

"First story which is really good news. I mean a love hearing stories like this because we haven't heard these kinds of stories in a while is about. This company called Three D Ito. Three D. O. is a company in California of all places to expect that and they're showing incredible growth from twenty eighteen to twenty nineteen. Now of course twenty twenty might be kind of a problem for all companies at this point but the potential will always still be there and so I thought well. Let's take a good hard look at what's really going on here. Why are they successful? What is it that they're doing? That's making them so successful. So if you look at the article there's an article about their growth in two thousand nineteen in D. Printing Industry and our link will be on our show notes but it doesn't really explain it doesn't really get into it hints at it though. Basically it looks as though they're only producing systems for specific vertical markets. So a company that or knows what it needs to produce goes to three D three. Do tells them here's what we need to make. And then they propose. Here's a system that will develop for you using our technology to help you produce your products for cost and throughput. Well okay. That's great but other companies do that too. So how does that make what they do so special so I have to assume it's their technology? There's something about their technology. So I started digging. And what's really interesting is kind of another story here. Is that the. You're not going to find articles that will explain exactly what their technology is. There are links. That'll take you here and there and there and there but you're going to find that the links that should have given you the details of exactly what they're doing our articles that you have to pay for that only give you the abstract but you can surmise or infer. You can what the technology is because they. They described their technology as being. Sis or selective what is it again you? It's selective intelligent layering. No that's not correct us. Inhibitive its intelligent layering was but they call it but they use. Sis SIS as technology where selective inhibition centering where they use the same approach with multi jet where you not only solidify some material but you also provide something on the surface of the solid material which separates it delineates it from the material around in the you assume this is a powder like approach like like LS. So it's SOS SOS less. There's no separation between the the powder and the solid nylon material after it's been centered Whereas multi jet there is multi jet as the as the the arm over the line of powder it not only lays down a chemical which will bind the powder but also chemical which separates the bound powder to the loose powder and according to what we're seeing here Three do does this as well but with metal technologies unlike a desktop metal or Mark Forged va they. They don't do that at all instead they just use. Fdm like approach and then things are a kneeled. Are Things are cleaned cooked couple of times whereas these guys produce stainless steel objects that have extremely shiny surfaces are very very clean Now have to assume it's a powder bed type technology in that. There is some high-powered centering. Involved since its steel. Correct me. If I'm wrong with me but since it's still it's going on while they're using a stainless steel is less picky than than A meal less prone to corrode alloy but generally other doing it probably in either vacuum or under some kind of controlled atmosphere. I don't know the details of their technology of looking at a diagram of it right now and I'm not entirely it. It is a looks like a fairly standard powder bed but they're so Spraying binder on it So I'm not really sure what sets their part their technology apart just based on you know looking at a schematic of it but yeah it's it's hard to see exactly what I'm using. Air Quotes Intelligent. Layering Technology. Is that makes. That's different from ESA or anything any other kind of layering technology so. I'm not really sure what's happening here. And that could be their strength in. That could be why they're doing so well they also like to. They use what is referred to as right metal injection. Molding comes in the House and rings a bell. I think we've talked about before we're basically the is that your you have A metal a powder with some polymer binder in it which is sort of similar we have approached it from the other direction of Three D. Printing You know a polymer will lot of metal fill in it And then Basically you know cooking off all of the plastic and centering. The remaining metal and my understanding is that the metal injection molding systems. You basically use a powder instead of a film. And they're using their essentially injection moulding sometimes where the existing injection moulding equipment. A you know a polymer that has a very high metal powder content which can then be centered essentially to make a a solid metal part. Well if you look back at the original article that we cited the numbers for growth from twenty twenty eighteen nineteen or a little bit unnerving all that that that's six hundred percent. Yeah that six hundred percent you start to wonder That's kind of what you're looking for in a startup phase. If that continues for too many years it can't but But if you don't have that sort of growth. In the in the start of phase. When their technology yell initially comes to fruition and a bunch of people are starting to use it. Then you know you gotta you gotTa worry so It's encouraging yeah. Sure seventy five percent of that business yet. Most of the Three D. Printing Metal stuff I think is GonNa be going into the hat for a while least very very high value manufacturing with rather extreme Tolerance requirements usually So we have to keep our eyes on three. Do and watch them to see what's happening with these guys.

Three D Ito D. O. D. Printing Industry Twenty Twenty California ESA VA
A Rocky Time for Google's Hardware Division

All About Android

5:16 listening | 6 d ago

A Rocky Time for Google's Hardware Division

"Know who's not doing great. Google's hardware division. There have been a lot of shakeups and if you have been following along with the news as of last week then you might have heard about some. You might have heard about some t that's been spilled over at mountain view. Hq So as we learned from this very revelatory article published in the information which is a subscription only publication We are actually going to kind of give you the Quick Little T. L. DR points since not everybody can go immediately and read it So I one of the big reveals was that Mark Levin the person who is basically in charge of that wonderful Pixel Algorithm that made photos look so nice He left back in March. So actually since we've been in quarantine probably maybe right before he left who knows So that along with the departure of Pixels Mario Qudos last August which was kind kind of quietly You know snuck under the rug. This wasn't really something that we knew about. I mean we just found out about this last week really Sooner approach I was actually on the latest verge. Cast to Talk Abou this particular report He said that hardware is hard and that Google's playing to continue playing the long game by integrating the Hardware Division with nest absorbing ACC's mobile division and a couple of other little bits. They're just KINDA UNIFY. Those teams versus having them be in kind of their own spaces. He also talked about two to three years for deeper investments to bear fruit. I'm assuming that was you know relating to the Pixel lineup but we are coming upon the what the fourth bill for this one You know this also could possibly tied to the rumors that Google is creating. Its own chipset. And there's a lot of folks out there wondering if that news is something that's going to Kinda herald us into this new age of Pixel devices. What do you guys think or? Do you think this is all just kind of a don't you know? Let's Ya tempest tempest in a teapot. Yes yeah I mean I guess the question is are we worried about where the direction of Pixel phone when you've got the person who's behind arguably the critical key feature of the phones from day one along with another person who's critical to the division as a whole stepping out does does that signal any any warning You know any warnings Well yeah any warning signals around that I'm not sure how much effect this change would have on it. How much of Their DNA is already placed on the Pixel Brand But I mean you know it's also really important too to note that the Pixel devices as a whole hasn't really lived the world on fire. They certainly have done what Google intended for for them to do. I think they probably intended for these. These devices to go toe to toe with with the devices like the iphone and Samsung devices. And they're just not I mean but we are on. I'll I'll take all object to that though based on what though I don't I don't get the sense that Google ever expected this to go toe-to-toe the iphone in any capacity. I think that's I think that's almost a foolish endeavor. I think what I always took away from the from the Pixel. The pixels placement was to create the best in Google class. You know device to show off everything to do with android to really set the bar for Samsung End. A she see end one plus and all the other folks all the other. Oem that are using the the operating system. I think to to try to put out a device that would go toe with the iphone. Would would you know like it's you can after all this time period right? So what you have to do with the lead. By example so in that regard I think the Pixel has been a success. I think I personally never expected pixel sale. I think it would be it would be ignorant. It'd be naive to think that all of a sudden the whole world was going to be using a pixel been you have so many millions of of people who are in the Samsung ecosystem and so many millions of people in Motorola or whatever. It might be so I don't know I and I don't know what their goals are with the program. Who knows. I think if you if you if you create a piece of hardware correctly it. It doesn't have the DNA of just one person it could be said that the fund was Steve Jobs as last big project at has. Dna was all over it. But here we are. You know fifteen years later and that that piece of hardware keeps rolling on. Yeah so I it's. It's the future of the device will be defined by if they can outlive people who come and go and the you know becomes its own entity that other people you know becomes a some the sum total parts of everything every every put into it

Google Hardware Division Samsung Mark Levin Mario Qudos Steve Jobs ACC Motorola
Podcasting and the Future of Audio

a16z

2:51 listening | 6 d ago

Podcasting and the Future of Audio

"What is a quote podcast? Which seems obvious but isn't it? As a reminder please note that the content here is for informational purposes only should not be taken as legal business tax or investment advice or be used to evaluate any investment or security and is not directed at any investors or potential investors in any six NC fund. For more details please see a success dot com slash disclosures. So I mean the the interesting here is in the midst of a really interesting moment of change and there is internal conflict within the community about that question so historically it's been largely tethered to the notion the RSS feed it's It's basically an audio file or a a medium distribution that largely happens through You know the technology that was carried over from blogging and now with the entrance of of spotify and Span Pandora's stepping up And Google beginning to do whatever they're going to do on search inside apple already as an entrenched player as well yeah absolutely media and Luminary just announced their sort of big hundred billion fundraise and affected gonNA launch in July. A couple of days ago with a lot of exclusive content right so so how does like exclusive podcast fit in with the old definition especially with the luminary announcement that was like strong pushback from parts of the community has been around for a while and and generally folks who really believe in the open ecosystem and so we have a situation in? Which like you know. Technical definition is not the popular definition anymore. And if we go from the perspective of what the ordinary consumer things of Pie task that is it becomes a cultural question technical question which by the way I wanNA say parallels the history of the web because this to me reminds me very much of early blogging absolutely debates about what is a blog. What is an article? What is a website and there? Was this almost religious actors. Essential debate between the early kind of in fact some of the same people because Dave Winer one of the people also important to the development podcasting. He's exactly he he's I think he was technically the first person to do podcast in two thousand three years something or one of the early people and he's also specified the RSS feed which drives the pipes and plumbing an ecosystem of podcasting but today users don't even think of podcast that way it's like it's just recorded audio of people talking Gavin Times more. Call that a podcast. Yeah what am I? Very things on. The people always call our videos. Podcasts of early again still does that. There's a lot of people who still dual video audio. And so called podcast. I mean the way I see it is that the tension has always been between people who see podcasting blogging and people who see the Pakistanis the future radio and attention any many times. And I think we're in. We're in a place where that no longer matters because the ultimate consumer will lead us. Where do you WANNA

Dave Winer NC Google Apple Spotify Gavin Times Span Pandora
Taking the Headache out of IoT

CCC Talks

2:43 listening | Last week

Taking the Headache out of IoT

"Today John by Allesandro Bassey Iot expert on central Europe area manager at things and also if that wasn't enough president of Iot Italy Asandra. Thank you very much for joining us on. Today's podcast time having meets right now I was onto you. Describe yourself as an IOT expert. We're going to drill in on that in a couple of minutes. We know that you're heavily. Invested in digital transformation industry four point. Oh big data iot amongst money things and you're also leading one of the biggest EU co-funded projects on I'll T- free excitedly haired. That comprises what we believe of nineteen core partners on hundreds of stakeholders now Alexandra. Tell us a little bit about yourself. Also this fantastic project working on the not feeling thousand Sam which makes like tortillas today and What we're looking at the beginning of the help the European Commission to draft the very first calls on it and to make fast We'll have forty European Parliament at being part of the extra group mocking two dozen. Ten right So I'm coming in from diverse backgrounds. The midnight I'm starting with technology. Aman they work with clouds and big data before recalling clouds the daytime so a long time ago unfortunately in the recent years with a focus is really more on how to implement some sort of Kogen strategy for companies to transform the business I mean towards connected objects and how pieces of disposal together I is not by itself doesn't make sense in it's big data in that division dancing a lot of stuff of men with really two eighty You project you're are talking about. It's not a One of the huge problems of teas that such a you know par- such a galaxy of different technologies. The approaches different style. Not even the definition I mean is is is a single of. I mean if you search from the Internet connection the appropriate. Probably like forty or fifty different definitions. I myself I get three of them in history and you know if are moving. I know that's not really correct. Some teaser. That's because really it's it's really complex. Mean what exactly is what exactly he

Allesandro Bassey Iot Iot Italy Asandra IOT Alexandra European Parliament Europe Area Manager President Trump European Commission SAM
How IVR Design Can Help Us Improve VUI with Maria Spyropoulou, Speech Systems Analyst at Eckoh

Inside VOICE

6:44 listening | Last week

How IVR Design Can Help Us Improve VUI with Maria Spyropoulou, Speech Systems Analyst at Eckoh

"Think coming from a linguistic background in working in the voice industry. It has helped me likes so much because sometimes I haven't advantage because of the courses I have done for example because I have done a lot of courses on speech recognition if someone for example says let's ask the user. Do you want to get your parcel today or Saturday? Because I know how speech recognition works. I know that we can never ask for example because the system will very easily confuse the two words but also because in university we also did a lot of courses on saucer linguistics and analyzing text and Syntax and all of that and we did a lot of semantics and pragmatics and we did a lot of how to structure conversation. We even broke down humor so that was very helpful for me. That is so interesting. I personally am fascinated by linguistics. We've had a lot of linguists on this show and have brought so much value to the show she the voice space as well and you currently work designing. Ib Our systems. Can you describe to those? That don't know what it is. What an Ivy. Our system is and why you think they are just like any other speech enabled application skill killer action the IVR is some people call is the regional voice. User interface be are. It's an automated teller system. Basically that interact with callers through Internet and gathered information and routes the call to the appropriate agents. And it's on what we call the voice web while I'll be up to -cation they use the voice web. An idea does the same and that we've even have voice browser and just like you have graphical user interface you have voice user interface just like you have crow or which is a browser but collects data from servers and displays visual information to you just like that. We have voice browsers that Goto the servers and they collect information from a database. Or and they speak to you instead of displaying to you and it collects prompts any played back to you ride so this is what voice browser does and many people have been you know that connection is the same as the visual. Internet but his voice Internet the voice web. So yeah I mean the ideas where the original voice user interfaces and the most prominent well many of the most prominent people now in the industry originally they worked for the VR and all the principles that we follow now when we developed boy skills or actions they came of course from years and years and years of developing VR's making mistakes and learning how to fix them by looking at the danger. And I've your systems speech enabled skills your Alexa Google system there. They have the exact same thing so they both do automatic speech recognition and natural language understanding. They both utilized memory so when you use a skill the skill remembers it so when you use it the second time than it will say welcome back. Carry you know so uses memory. It saves that information. We save that information in the VR system so when caller bank. And let's say you say hello. What can I help you today? I and you say yes. I would like my balance than you hang up. Then you call after a week. The system remembers it. So it might ask you. Oh Stein you called. You wanted to check your balance. Would you like to do the same thing today? So we call. We have that functionality as well in the VR system and of course the whole design process is the same Flows we have problems. We have intense addresses says slots so it's the same reason. Just the different format and you're saying to me before we started this podcast that you actually think there is a great advantage of. I the ours over skills or actions. What would you say that is? And why do you think it's such an advantage? Yeah they have a lot of similarities. Ivr's skin actions are capsules. If you're talking about speak bad there's also defenses but the greatest difference is that when we are building Ivr's we are using enterprise scale platforms and they store the audio files of. What the user say so that we can improve the system. So let's say if I want to see how the recognition of number is doing in my system. I'll just go and download one thousand Watts. One thousand audio files from the server and then. I'll put him through the grammar that I have created and then I'll do some other process called Junie Save that I have for example eighty percent accuracy and Ben. I can walk on that and see why did not recognizing everything. Why do I need to change is my prompt? Not Clear is my recognition by grammar's not covering all the cases of numbers or in my cutting off the user too early so I can work with that but when you have been alexis killer Google action. You don't have access to those audio files in neither platform and he's actually one of the highest requests from the developers. What you have is a transcription off. What's the system? Thinks they use their said. Of course that is highly problematic because mean what is. Let's say that I have restaurants and people can order food and I have named my dishes with is like extraordinarily extravagance like the Magic Fountain or the Super Kelly Preciado Shas dish or whatever and a user strung to order these foods. So then if the system doesn't give me the correct transcriptions of what people said I don't know what my client orders so I'm less a human actually years to those audio files. You know what was said. So I think that's the great disadvantage and I think in the future there will change.

Super Kelly Preciado Shas Google Junie Save BEN
Interview with Carl Robinson live from Project Voice

The Voice Tech Podcast

5:46 listening | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Carl Robinson live from Project Voice

"What are you noticing? What are some common themes that you're hearing show so? I'm asking the questions of the people that I've been into seventy now since I've been here. One of them is that agencies are noticing. Their clients are moving from proof of concept projects from come from the budget just to prove the point that voices thing and that can help them through to that full budget. So I think there's definitely a movement now there's optimism and the projects in the APPS that people are building are becoming more complicated more integrated into the systems of the business. So that's positive. People are paying for full voice apps. But there's still uncertainty around discover ability so clearly the the model that people are transplanted from mobile into voice isn't working as as hoping there isn't a great APP store so that's an open question. And people have got different ways of tackling. I think the model and these component marketplaces that envisioning a future. That isn't individual APPS. They're more components that you can revenue from developers can revenue from by having them integrated into a larger experience. There isn't direct invocations to these APPs. I think that's really exciting but could be one way. That voices improved another way or these cross. Go Promotions or being able to invoke some fancy from one school to another but definitely. I think that these smart speakers are very intermediate technology. Voices got way more potential than a smart speaker fixed object on the desk. We can talk about some of the predictions between the space. I think you know what get excited about is every person I've talked to. So many NE- shes when you're talking about education or you're talking about cars or you're talking about fitness and everybody's got this need and they're figuring out how to use voice in a way that works for them and to me. That's really exciting. You know it just becomes more clear as a use case of what you can be doing really well joyce straight if you start to look a little bit broader and you realize how many people are working. Invoice is incredible. I mean I could do a podcast episode every week on a different subject. I never run out. We can add. It's true so you were saying one of the things you wanted to talk about with some predictions you have for twenty twenty you again because you have an interesting background. So you're working voice kind of development side but then you're also talking to so many people are getting a lot of information so when you're thinking about those things as a whole what are some of your thoughts for what voices GonNa Bring in the future. We'll I think a lot more people are going to be interested in learning the voice calls and I'm seeing evidence of that everywhere so does really fast. Growing interest seen voice developers purchasing utilize skills causes on my site that people are going through the very affordable that ten bucks to learn the basic skills of owning an APP. There is compensation designers that purchasing compensation design courses. Robo copy again. There's Lincoln for that and there's no copies great. Had Him on the show have you. We'll we'll we'll post sooner. Maybe I don't know when this will pose. Yeah he's doing great. Thanks for that space. And it's a serious cause. These are not because you can do in an evening. These are serious commitments. That people are paying hundreds of dollars for and they're selling so that really gives me hope that people are putting their money down the optimism in the industry and it's worth that time and investment. The other thing is obviously business. People are asking more and more about voice. Now we saw the sound guy and at the end of the last year or something like comments went in there that I did really well. We see the launch voice masters by the Vixen lab. Steve involved with James Porter. They're great people were again. Everybody's so passionate about this education so I think that that helps propel it forward. It does come station yesterday with Zach Gerard from the Puck University Missouri Alexa Club for the students so in literally. They're going on tall. He's got club they build these Alexa APPS and other going on tour light showing them off and getting more people into the fold as one of their own. They have their own APP in the university. Of what you scores. I know what classes are coming up. They all these things. So we're seeing things Levels Ngozi people to the tech showing interest people investing their time learning it. So that's that is a growing trend. I think we're GONNA see more. And more of really positive. Some of them will exciting ones than about the thing. That's most exciting for me. The novel uses the like. You're saying it's so broad so four five of these that I would say that for me. The most exciting festival I would say biometric authentication a second conversation with execute from ideology yesterday such Aku Tak basically at the moment as you know because voice assistance you have to log into them right to get your personal information to get your own APPs to have anything that access your own data you have to link it to your Amazon account or you account. Whatever but with biometrics you could literally walk up to any small speaker or microphone in the world. It's not talking and with zero logging. It who you are. It would grant you access to your data to your impersonal configuration. And if you go and that's really important I think is why because it's conversational interfaces you and I having a conversation now if I wanted to just bring Lexie or Google assistant into the conversation right now and just as a quick question about. What's my calendar softening? I couldn't because I'd have to log into it because it's your smile speaker. I couldn't do that on your phone. I can't just pick up your phone log into your phone. Phones are very private and smarts because at the moment kind of that they have these default open interfaces where I can ask general questions like a question about Google search pedia or something but I can't access my personal is services and as personalization connect your awareness so important for these loss assistance to be able to guess correctly. What your intent is so that is a huge one looking to be more secure as well. Because they've got life check so I've been learning about these multi-modal likeness checks. They can have cameras looking face making sure the or moving lifelike way and then not holding up a photo trickett and the same voice checking that against the database as well as other senses as well as putting all of these inputs together to make sure it's you and you're a real person from consumer side the business side. Everyone's asking about it so that's great to hear we're hearing more

Google Puck University Missouri Alexa Joyce Trickett Zach Gerard Lincoln Amazon Steve James Porter
First Person COVID-19 Information

Voice in Canada

1:27 listening | 2 weeks ago

First Person COVID-19 Information

"For monday. And today i wanna tell you a little bit about covert nineteen feature. That's now been built into lexi as you may know. You may have heard that for now. A couple of weeks lexi. At least in the united states was able to give some advice when it comes to cope with nineteen your concern that you may have the virus but that wasn't available in canada while i want to let you know that now it is and what they're using as the information source is the public health agency for canada. And so if you ask these questions. And i'll give you two examples. One of them is lexi. What do i do if i think i have. Covert nineteen and the other one is lexi. What do i do. I think i have corona virus and lexi will take you through a short series of questions To assess your level of risk of having the virus and then we'll give you some appropriate advice. I have to say that the way goes through. The skill is very very much. Like the way i had my skill. Coronavirus doc. poor got pulled amazon. So mixed feelings about this. I think it's a great service at amazon's doing i have to say i'm disappointed. A little bit in fact that mine was pulled and it really was doing pretty much the same thing as this skill nevertheless. i understand as you may have heard me talk about it in the past that This is the way amazon's going to protect the information that's being

Lexi Amazon Canada United States
Remote ID for Drones: FAA Names 8 Technology Partners

A VerySpatial Podcast

2:41 listening | 2 weeks ago

Remote ID for Drones: FAA Names 8 Technology Partners

"FAA has announced Eight organizations that are going to be working on the drone remote ide- process. Now if you remember in the FAA reappropriation Bill in the fall of twenty eighteen A few things came out. There was a push in that for some sort of Remote ID process. There's push for making it clearer and more I duNno heftier expansions for a hobbyist pilots. And so we also have those type of conversations going on now and so under if we look at. What's going on through that bill from twenty eighteen? A lot of this is just now getting to the point where the planning process is is really getting underway and so the FAA named Celeste Airbus Map Amazon Intel One sky. Skyward t mobile and wing as the companies that are going to be working with the FAA. And of course with each other hopefully on the remote ID technology Aspect kind of curious to see how this is going to interact and tie into what Nasr's already been working with or working on So we'll see how that goes I. It's interesting who they chose Lena. For example T. mobile as opposed to. At which arguably at and T. Is a bigger network that you'd be tapping into and there's not as many Drone manufacturers on there. I would have expected but you know. Yeah I mean Airbus. Of course you've got the whole were an actual company that makes these four planes type of situation So I get that air map. Drone company sky one skyward thrown companies Amazon in theory going to be one of the largest users Intel core technology And actually I think. At and T. And Verizon would think themselves perhaps above this to apply to be part of this group so I I'm not surprised by T mobile being on the list well and and you know keep. It mobile won't exist soon. So was the other way around when I thought spur doesn't really matter but the point is all that space no pun intended is changing Even as we speak in it's interesting to see who they've chosen You know it would be nice to know why but we'll see what the outcome is. That's important thing. They never tell us. Why

FAA T Mobile Airbus T. Mobile Nasr Intel Amazon Verizon
Apple AirPods 3, AirPods Pro 2 could launch as early as next year

Vicki McKenna

0:27 listening | 2 weeks ago

Apple AirPods 3, AirPods Pro 2 could launch as early as next year

"Is apple's next generation of airpods could arrive early next year well connected analyst Ming chi kuo says apple is likely to mass produce the third generation airpods in the first half of twenty twenty one and follow suit with that second generation airpods pro late in twenty twenty one or early twenty twenty two the timing seems to make sense as airpods been selling well and that means there's probably not a real reason to re design them especially not in a

Apple Ming Chi Kuo Analyst
How to Build Habit Forming Voice Products with Nir Eyal, Wall Street Journal Bestselling Author of "Hooked"

Inside VOICE

8:39 listening | 2 weeks ago

How to Build Habit Forming Voice Products with Nir Eyal, Wall Street Journal Bestselling Author of "Hooked"

"Does your interest in psychology and Technology Really Begin? Frio quality the first Baltic. The psychology portion. So for me I think you know I have to trace it back all the way to my adolescence. Believe it or not I used to be clinically obese at one point in my life and I was always a overweight. It's actually an obese. Kid I remember. My mom took me to the doctor and he had this chart. It's okay. Here's Normal. Weight jeers overweight. And here's you. You're like well into the obese category and I remember it from an early age and I remember it my years years. That food seemed to have this power over me that I felt like it controlled me and I was really fascinated by that particularly. I was fascinated by the marketing. And how a product's design Like how they designed the the cereal boxes look down all characters. Look down to the kids. We catch is why was always fascinated by that kind of stuff and to some extent. I blamed it for my obesity but over time what I discovered that was rootlets. That blaming the food companies didn't serve me that what serve me was learning really why I was overeating and I wish I could tell you. I was over eating because McDonald's made delicious hamburgers but really I was waiting for the same reason. The vast majority of people who are overweight or overweight is because we eat our feelings right. That's why I was over eating in my case I was over eating because I was sad. I over eating because I felt lonely. I was over eating because I was mad at myself and felt guilty and shameful because I had overeat and so it wasn't until I broke that cycle and understood the real reasons why I was doing things against my best interest that I overcame this problem. I still have to watch it. You know I have a tendency to overeat especially emotionally. But it wasn't until I face that fact and stop blaming things outside of myself that I finally got control over this and so I think it was that same fascination when I discovered this new tendency to over consume not food but information that when we got these amazing devices I became fascinated with how good they are changing our behaviors and so my first instinct was. Wow we could use this for an amazing power for good. And that's why I wrote my first book hooked which was all about how to build habit forming products. Because what I did. The book published in Two Thousand Fourteen so I had a few years to learn from companies like facebook and Google twitter instagram. And what's happened slack? I wanted to learn from them. And then democratize these techniques so that everyone out there could build products that build healthy habits and people's wise and that's exactly what the book is done over the past five six years now. The book has made a an impacted every conceivable industry from fitness APPs using the hooked model to get people hooked to exercise. The way sick does a case study that I put in the second edition of the book companies like cahoots the world's largest educational software. They just went public. They actually found company using the hope model to get kids. Hooked onto this educational product. I was an investor in Ankara a product that does in your space the audio spaces the product that use the book model beautifully. They gave me a call. They told me the hooked model. I said it's amazing. I want invest. Let me put money into it. And they just sold to spotify for report over well over a hundred million dollar exit spotify and so the idea behind. The first book is really. How can we get? People hooked to healthy habits. But given that I've spent over a decade studying the psychology of how to Bill Habits I also know the Achilles heel these berry engaging sometimes habit forming products and so we can use the same information in reverse. We can use it to help us break the bad habits that don't serve us and that's indestructible is all about. Yeah well thank you for sharing that. I didn't know that I think got like you said it's not just for businesses. I think people a lot of people have an issue with over eating and especially during this time when everyone's at home so it's a weekend golfer this and you had said in your book that forty percent of what we do is out of habit. So what does this mean how? Our habits actually triggered yes. Oh habits are in adaptive traits of our species. Many species have habits habits are defined as these impulses to do a behavior with little or no conscious thought. And it's about half of what you do. Every single day is prompted by these impulses to behavior out of little or no conscious purely out of habit and so the idea behind habit forming products is what if we could use those same habits for good so it's not just the social media companies in the gaming companies that are able to change our behavior. We can use these same exact Habit forming techniques deeper psychology to help us build good habits life. Yeah and the reason I wanted to have you on. This show is because they had found an article that someone had posted on your website using the hooked model for Amazon Alexa. And so we are in the voice technology space on this show today and a lot of feedback and when. I said we were going to have to show. Some people are like oh I love him. I've used as not offer my voice technology product. And it's working and so again. I want to congratulate you on that. That's music to my ears. Is the hell people building products out there right. It shouldn't be the game companies and the big tech companies that use these techniques. All of us should use these techniques for good reasons right for to help. People change their lives with healthy habits. Ed So exciting and so for those. That are they've heard of it or they're kind of like okay. Well how do I use this again? Because it's a voice tech space in this show. I'd love for you to kind of take us through the hooked model system. But if you're able to not only described as kind of four pieces but also how it could work for voice. Technology may be given example. Whether you know aren't are kind of a made up example so that people could kind of understand how they could use it in a great way for their own thing. Sure yes so I take your bank. If there's a habit forming technology that we want to tackle is there something in particular like I wonder what makes this that so habit-forming is there something you from the voice technology space as a whole the challenges? It's like more and more people are having smart speakers in their home. More PEOPLE WANNA be using it. Consumer adoption has increased. But there's still a lot of frustration consumers where maybe it's not working as well. It's not answering their questions. People use at one time. And so it's idea. How do we get people to understand how to use technology more as a habit in a good way in a way that helps them be more efficient in this day and age germ-free helping businesses music and so it's always that question of how do I get people aware of the scholar? I but that they'll keep using every day and again in an ethical. Great way right you know so. Let's do this one and we break down. A I think a very successful habit forming products. And then we're going to look at where I think there's some deficiencies when it comes to the voice interface when it comes to the skills on the Alexa so that article that you read broke down. What makes the Amazon Alexa product? So habit me and I think as a device itself it curfew displays the hook model. And that's what this article was written about. Somebody took the hooked model and wanted to attack down to wait what makes Amazon Alexa habit forming. And and how does it fit to this model and certainly does and they were going to look at some of the skills election why I think some of those are not habit-forming but I will say before we dive in? It's clear to me that forming habits as someone who is creating a product in or out of the voice space is increasingly important today. Because what we've seen over the past decade is that the interface has shrank. It's shrunk down so we went from desktop member. We all had big old desktop computers on our work and that went to laptops so the screen got smaller and then it went to mobile interfaces so now the spring is even smaller and now it's on wearable devices rights and now the screen is even smaller and now the interfaces even disappeared altogether right so now these are the interface right. The ear buds in our ears or the Amazon Alexa. There is no screen anymore and so the opportunity to trigger people with what we call external triggers. Right the things on the screen the the by now click here. Do this do that. The external triggers. There's just less real estate to trigger people with those external triggers. And so that what that means is we have to trigger people with internal triggers that if people don't remember to use your APP right if your APP isn't on the home screen they're Gonna. Forget it's there if your skill if you're Amazon. Alexa skill isn't top of mind. If it's not a habit people don't use it and so it's more than ever important for us to create these habits because there are fewer opportunities to trigger people with these external triggers right. There just isn't a screen is disappearing jennings becoming so ubiquitous that there isn't the interface to have a flashing Pinger. Ding telling you to do anymore. It has to be prompted out of habit.

Amazon Alexa Spotify Ankara Facebook Mcdonald Jennings Google
Undruggable Drugs

a16z

8:54 listening | 2 weeks ago

Undruggable Drugs

"So I thought maybe we could start about just talking about what the category of undrivable really means to the industry. What is traditionally mean? This is a favourite subject but also for me a sore subject. The term undrivable refers to as yet the inability to drug a protein or protein family or a piece of origny. It said an unfulfilled promise. Imagine Drug hunting with small molecules. Where I've worked and trained as sculpting drug molecule that fits into the pocket of a protein. What if there's no pocket? That protein may be regarded in our discipline as a Priori undrivable. So is it always shifting kind of category or was there a particular group that always was understood to be that kind of undrivable? It's very much both you know. Mars is unworkable right until we arrive there serious. Human Diseases of the non infectious nature are often caused when pathways go awry and these cellular pathways are driven by little machines called proteins. That are globular and They have in where biology occurs. Enzymes that metabolize food and such when these pathways go awry. We tried to identify a critical note in that. Pathway typically a protein and work to understand functionally. If it's too active in which case we tried to inhibit it or not active enough in case we tried to activate it in the discipline of drug discovery. This biological knowledge is very powerful but sometimes we regrettably find out that it's a type of protein or protein. Fold that has never been drug before and this creates real challenges. So this is the undrivable when we have no idea how to get that protein there these are the undrivable proteins and and there are whole families of very tantalizing protein targets creating a conceptual risk that often keeps many scientists away from pursuing coordinated efforts in drug discovery. In my time as a professor I studied the way genes were turned on and off and cancer as a cancer doctor. I was interested in the proteins that would cause the growth program to be activated to turn one cancer cell into two and so on and so on these proteins called transcription factors that bind. Dna turn genes on our consideration be beyond the reaches of drug discovery undrivable. Class which is regrettable because the perception that they may be hard to drug has kept many scientists away from even trying so people. Don't they literally? Don't touch it because it seems like such a challenge. There are a couple of important exceptions. The estrogen receptor binds estrogen. It is therefore drug -able by the sex hormone estrogen rest revile. But the most commonly activated gene all of cancer called Mick the protein that sits around the human genome orchestrating. The Growth Symphony has never been successfully drug even though it is one of the best. Validated targets in Over the last thirty years in cancer science. It's so interesting because I sort of assumed that it had to do with a lack of of biological knowledge. But it's not using the not. The biology is very well understood. But we just haven't understood how to approach it so what is changing now. What are where are we in the landscape of these undrivable? Categories of drugs. I mean one way to think about that. Is that in a sense? When we mean undrivable. It's undrinkable by the way we normally do things. And only when you start to develop these new methods you realize even in the old targets. There's other things you might WanNa hit in other ways to hit it. That's right one of the things that really interests in years. You know we think about targets. We add adjectives to the targets. We HAVEN'T DRUG TARGETS. In the fullness of time there may be no such thing as an undrivable target when you take in sort of the full momentum of different modalities that we might go after a specific target. Can we take the other side of that coin for second? Is there such thing as a novel target a novel target in the language of drug discovery is maybe the first recognition that a protein is really involved in a disease process and the biological experiments have validated that protein or gene in that process novel targets may be fully drug -able like the proteins that sit on the surface of a cell that because of successful prior campaigns to drug kindnesses are now as a group considered easily drug -able but sometimes novel targets are in these undrivable protein families and this gives us pause? I believe that some of the best validated targets in disease biology would have clarified path to helping patients. If only we could get out of our own way and really commit to approaching these proteins as drug -able to challenge the dogma till echo of the the old concept that's right I'd love to hear what some of those successes that really sort of forged a whole new path forward for people were and then also break down the tech behind. What made those possible. I think a very fine example where drug discovery has taken down and undrivable protein. Target is our work to develop the first hitter of what's called foss face in this case a protein called ship to okay. Foss faces are some of the most interesting proteins in disease biology there. Fossil taste is very important for diabetes. And a couple extremely important for cancer you might know what a kind aces. This is a protein that drops what are called phosphate groups onto proteins and there are a great many important kindness. Inhibitor Drugs That followed once. Novartis developed the first if not one of the first called Glee Vic for chronic myeloid leukemia as there are interesting kindnesses that drop phosphates onto proteins. There are counteracting faces that pull them off Interesting and it's for no particular reason that kind aces are so commonly drugged and Fossa tastes are not Except that for twenty years people tried to make phosphates inhibitor drugs and they just couldn't do it. It's one of the most famous protein families in the UNDRIVABLE CLASS. And there's something really peculiar about it. Phosphates drug discovery campaigns almost always produce a very potent and sometimes very selective inhibitor of a pure enzyme studied. Say outside of a cell. Okay but these molecules don't work when the enzyme is inside of the cell the pocket. That's drugged in the phosphate. Tastes is very positively charged. You know how opposites attract the molecules that are discovered are very negatively charged. And they can't get into cells. Scientists Bang their heads against the wall for decades trying to make phosphates drugs for cancer and diabetes and other disease states and were unsuccessful. Well some very creative. Scientists at Novartis did really interesting experiment. They imagined that may be a way to inhibit. The FOSSA taste isn't to go for the most active site But to try to inhibit the enzyme through what we call an alistair excite to sort of sucker punch the phosphates at a different part of the protein and so we perform to high throughput screens. One with the full length phosphates that has two or three globular domains like three beads on a string and second full high throughput screening campaign where we just looked at the active enzyme. Pocket it self. We found two thousand hits in this essay and we through all of them out except to we only kept the molecules that would work in the full length protein but wouldn't work in the small format protein Basically that you'd find the the molecules that would hit the pocket that's only presence when the whole protein is there exactly drug discovery is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Performed thousands sometimes millions of experiments with chemicals to try to find the one chemical. That does what we want. We threw out all the molecules that would hibbitt inhibit the active site and kept only molecules. That worked when these other sites were present called Alistair excites. After many years of very careful science we produce the very first inhibitor of a phosphate tastes and the way this molecule works is it glues the ship to protein together we call it an intra within the same molecule and Intra Molecular Glue. What a cool

Cancer Novartis Diabetes Cancer Science Intra Molecular Glue Growth Symphony Alistair Professor Fossa Foss Mick
The coronavirus lockdown opens the door to VR theater

The 3:59

12:38 listening | 2 weeks ago

The coronavirus lockdown opens the door to VR theater

"So you've got an interesting piece on VR. As immersive theatre now. I know you're a big fan of of theater. What what is this experience like? What what is this experience about? Short so for a couple months now There's been a game or an experience in VR Called the under presents that was created by tender clause along with a theater company called Pie Hole And with OCULUS and it is a game but it also has actors performing in it so they created this as a way to look at immersive theatre. Vr that was back in November and it was supposed to stop with the live performances in March. Then Corona virus happen and decided to extend the performances for these actors. This is now their their main job. And there's also been an opportunity to look at how this experience can grow what what theater really is in Vr. It's taken on a different so I thought it'd be great to revisit and talk to these actors about what they've been learning. What what is that experience like? Obviously you've tried it You been in the immersive world. What is the like s? So it's not like theater the way you'd expect it and it's also not like zoomed theater and I want to say that because all of a sudden now we are surrounded by zoom as a theater experience and now this you know you look at Saturday night. Live you look at Hamilton I had a friend who acted in something. That's where everybody's in a great talking. You get the opposite here. You don't get faces and you don't get is you get cartoon because that's what. Vr Can do right now. Graphically and we can't scanner faces. And you're moving through that space. What you do get is a lot of movement. A hands. FIT body movement. The actors can talk. But you can't so if you ever have been to a Immersive theater experience usually in big cities. Famous one asleep. No more. You wear mask and you're not allowed to speak that's kind of what it's like you're an observer moving through the space able to move your hands and do a few things but not much more than that so you with a lot theater Cinema right idea the point. Is you sort of connect with the performance? Right sort of see there is you could sort of see their facial recognition the facial expressions. What the story about what what this whole experiences about. But you can't do that with this experience. So how is that likely? How did you connect with the performance? If you couldn't really connect with the performers what's really wild subtlety of it and when you go in you think houses can work then you not in. There aren't always actors. It's like a you know or were other people. Sometimes they'll pop up sometimes. You're alone there other things like a game to do when you find someone they will acknowledge you and if you're another perform if you're another audience member could Nikola tip of the head or movement of the hands there's also some magic gestures and things you can do. You could take off your mask and conjure weird things. That's another part of the game but the performers have different dashboard. They can see. Who's coming and going may even know who individuals are not who they are but they can find individual you know anonymous identities so they have regulars and in a sense they can craft the performances to Kinda see they want to kind of get a feel for that so they said as they go they start to develop this relationship even with actor even with audience members who can't speak to them which sounds weird. But it's it's wild now this fascinating look at. How many times have you done experience every time you gone in? I've got in like like somewhere. Like the the over a dozen less than fifty. You know like I would say in some sort of round like that. Far Less than what What what regulars would be doing right. But I mean that's still a decent number of visits right so I'm just curious how the experience has evolved over time especially as you've gone back in consuming. They know it's not you say but they know that you're like a regular Has performances like how have they evolved over time? So I didn't get a chance this weekend unfortunately to do. What is a new thing where they're expanding into a variety larger variety performance or they're trying to build up theatricality but when you find someone it? I found them to be very simple very direct. Like little almost like mine performances. Where you kind of go with them do something for a bit And You wonder. What am I supposed to be doing right now and you think ok well stop do something else. And you kind of almost like Improv. You of just started doing this thing and it seems kind of silly but you're all doing it together and there's something comforting in that that's how I found it is is it's not like A. It's not Shakespeare but it is These little moments and what I think about that is like it's the beginning of something so if that answers at like if feels like like little little dives and I think they're also knowledge that like unlike theater where you're GONNA be there for two hours. I could take up this headset in five minutes or could keep it on for an hour and they have to address both sides of that Because you're not gonna want to necessarily spend a finite long amount of time in VR right. Now there's an interesting point story when one actor talks about people you know getting more the virtual world a lot of questions about that but the idea was like this is sort of a reaction to lock down. Potentially Mathis station were frustration. But like how did that work? Like do people when he says getting violent like what does that actually mean people like attempting to attack the performance virtual lure or what did that actually mean as a question and the thing that? I talked with them for about an hour and a half so I was like trying to put this in a one story that made sense to clarify on that. They're only so many actions in the game. It was interesting. I think what the actors were doing was observing more micro motions like so. They were saying that they felt. The people seem more bound that they were getting into people's spaces more but also and not to speak on their behalf. But there are there are some things you can do like their certain items like could be like a knife or like. You can't shoot people but like you know like their their props in the world and I think if you bring them close to somebody you kind of do that make it look like you were. You're bludgeoning somebody but like you know I think that that's about it and the person does not die. It's just like but the play acting of it in a way it's like a play acting out and I think there's also like the idea of like a respectful spaces standing back versus getting in people's faces And so it sounded like in the beginning. It was like a a pushy intense Another actor in the show so there's a more intense needy sort of feel but then it became more about emotional like reception. It kind of became kinder over. Time will people. I thought that was amazing. The here also those interesting how they observed how we perform. How like like that Like that laughter seems like choking you know that if you see someone laugh and then people would start to enhance those gestures like a like Emoji. They start to do these things that represent certain emotions and it's like they're becoming these like mine performers. There's also by the way there's also a whole discord group for the under presents that they work basically like a like a very active chat where people are also sharing secrets. Kind of like an animal crossing secrets. You have the unders- present secrets and they had different. Totems they carry around in ways to represent themselves so like a whole new sub languages emerging which is a little crazy intimidating. If you're a first timer but I think that's a really interesting thing that happens in a lot of like really invested world's well so this is interesting because it seemed like there is obviously a to entry with this. You obviously need to have the hardware. What is the minimum threshold? Like what what type of gear that you need to actually take part in this experience yet so you need you need Vr headset and you need. You need certain types of your headsets It started out on oculus question rift and In then it has moved onto steam VR. But what you need versus the old phone. Vr cardboard headsets or even oculus go just before the real limit. There's you can't move your hands around so like things that have with six degree of freedom or the ability to do not hand tracking it but in the future it might be that too. It's the controllers that can make your hands move. I think that's really important because without that you are just kind of like doing this. So your hands kind of become the way you act. So could you like if you had not goes go? Could you experienced this or would work at all? Yeah you need a quest you need a or now with a PC VR headset. That can get into steam but still that's a limited group of people. Vr headsets that is that also ecstasy. -Vivor yes so anything. That can use team so so that you could use a you could use. I think Microsoft the are a lot of heads now can hook into steam in in different ways and but yeah but he's still need the gaming PC It's definitely limited and I think that's the big point. Vr Is that right now. The are has its own set of APPS versus the world of APPs that we live in. Which are the phone? Google Apple Your pc your Mac. I think in the future. Those are obviously going to dovetail. But we haven't seen that yet really so it. I think that's the hard part. Is you think. Well what do I need to buy extra versus? What can I use that? I already have so look. Vr Has Been Vr has been on the rise. Because like you can't buy those things are pretty much sold out Even facebook has talked about. You know the the success of Tad with that gear. Obviously we've we've got a captive audience. The are right now. People are literally stuck at home And is a I deal forward escape but do you think. Vr Theater has experience appeal to people even after lockdown ends. And we all go back out to the real world yet totally. Do I think that what we're looking at now is like the Beta test. That was already in the works but is now reached a different level of intensity because you have a captive a global captive audience that that is trying to figure these things out work tools ways to connect but companies are trying to figure this out you know had tele presence. We'd seen this at Mobile Congress and other places you looked at stuff. Were in a ways to protect yourself other places now. It's just taking on a different level of intensity that I think it's interesting because like immersive theatre for instance or even theater is a really hard thing to experience for a Lotta people you. We live in New York where you take that for granted that you can go see your show. Even the tickets are expensive and hard to come by and immersive theatre is like a rare flower. Thing that POPs up disappears really. It's a privilege to go to those things I hope it doesn't cannibalize those worlds. But I think it can definitely expand the reach of that to do things that you could can't get to or want to build. Maybe it's like a directing tool is asking them about Tender clause about who who created this about active audience members performing more bill building in his a creative tool. It sounds like they're not ready to do that yet. Not that they're not interested but it's a different thought process and I think that right now. It's working well for what they've got. They're GONNA keep expanding. But I think about like you know what if you got a bunch of actors or a bunch of people building inexperienced together Or do Improv. Or whatever you know and we could use it like that So yeah I think there's a lot of possibilities

VR Vr Theater Congress Nikola New York Facebook Microsoft Google Mathis Station
SpaceX is working with Tom Cruise to film a movie in space

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

0:40 listening | 2 weeks ago

SpaceX is working with Tom Cruise to film a movie in space

"Which A. list star wants to shoot the first movie in outer space Jason Nathanson has the answers the final frontier space really is the final frontier when it comes to movie making no one's made a movie about the planet and now Tom Cruise apparently wants to change that deadline reports the cruises working with SpaceX founder Elon musk to make the first ever narrative feature film shot in space no real details yet about plot costars a release date this appears to be in the very early stages but if anyone can pull something like this off it's extreme stuntman slash actor Tom Cruise his latest project brings to mind a sci fi epic from another avid follower of Scientology John Travolta's battlefield

Jason Nathanson Tom Cruise Elon Musk John Travolta Founder
How the Crisis Could Embolden Big Tech

Slate's If Then

8:40 listening | 3 weeks ago

How the Crisis Could Embolden Big Tech

"This week. Microsoft Apple Amazon Alphabet and facebook all reported their quarterly earnings typically investors view. These numbers as a way to measure how companies doing and the prospect of money to be made in the future but with the economy in disarray. These numbers tell pretty singular story yes things have slowed but they're nowhere near as dire as what other industries are seeing. Do you think these tech companies view earnings right now as as a one off you know just sort of a singular news event or are they something that can tell a broader story about where the companies are now in time. I think they're probably not beating their chests from what I've talked to people inside the companies. There is caution because nobody knows when the bottom is gonNA fall out. No one knows what's going to happen to the economy in on that creates anxiety for companies like Google and facebook that make all their money from advertising and the big advertisers are the brick and mortar world. You know the department stores. Even though they're failing the travel industry will there? That's tanking but at the same time like I'm unlinked in job alerts for Google and they're adding thirty jobs a day and facebook saying it's GonNa hire ten thousand people well if you're working at that kind of company are you gonNa feel versus anywhere else in America right now. Well that's the weird irony and you wrote about this saying that the pandemic is sort of a once in a lifetime opportunity for these companies. What are the I? Guess the specifics of that why they are able to do things like hire ten thousand people if your facebook well for one goes back to the cash reserve that they're sitting on Microsoft alone. I think is worth one point three trillion dollars to give some perspective that is bigger than the economy of forty seven. Us states these companies have just amassed the level at which they have profited since the great recession is just. It's really profound. You Know Amazon. Could buy all boutique retailers in the US right now if they wanted to so they're sitting on all this cash so they have a fallback. I mean look at Boeing. It's a major. Us company they're cutting tens of thousands of jobs. That says that. Tekken away in a class of by itself when you look at other major American companies and how they're faring. It's not just the mom and pop. Businesses that are laying off people. It's major American companies. That don't have the cash runway to withstand a crisis. These enormous cash reserves held by just a few big tech companies are the result of years of growth. Elizabeth says if you trace these reserves back to their source. The story begins during the last economic crisis in two thousand eight during the great recession the whole economy the whole market took its lex but what happened afterwards is very interesting because the great recession also coincided with the advent of the smartphone so just remember like smartphones. Come about people start using their phones for everything. Two Thousand and nine people start developing apps years later. People are using APPS for this and that but no one's really shopping on their phones and this is a big question around. Will people buy things on their smartphone? Well that is something that facebook and Google figured out to great effect and once they solve that question you really see their revenues just start to completely accelerate and kind of just catapult ahead of the rest of the digital advertising industry the tech platforms become the hubs for all of our reading habits and material and also on the back end all of the measurement and delivery of ads. And so people woke up to that. I want to say twenty and fifteen twenty sixteen all of a sudden you have these tech giants and everyone else's failing and the recession. That's Kinda come because of Cova is going to accelerate that so it's a lot of the same industries when we think about you know who was decimated during the great recession brick and mortar retail. Hospitality Media That are laying people off right now and tech is really taking over a lot of those spaces and certainly did back then. Do you think these industries can can weather this or is this. Just a truly transformational moment. Oh I think it's a truly transformational moment. I think I have to paraphrase Professor Scott. Galloway of nyu is so stupid on all these topics and he said you know. It's a tale of two Americas right now. So it's big tacking. It's everyone else. Everyone else includes not just other parts of the economy but smaller companies within the tech industry. Not only the giants have the cash to outlasted economy put on pause but also the ability to work actively to edge out competition for the services that people are still using when we think about other parts of the Silicon Valley ecosystem. That aren't the big four. What happens to these smaller companies? You wrote that you know a bunch of startup jobs. I think thirty thousand have been lost since March eleventh and yet at the same time we've seen companies like zoom. You know really flourish right now. What happens to all of them? So zoom is a great example because right now in this moment everyone's like zooms. The you know the success story of the you know the the the poster child of Success Story. Yeah during Cova. Not that anyone wants to say we're profiting off cove. It and I know they don't feel that way but certainly there's that exhilaration of their business just exploding. I think it exclude ninety percent just during the lockdowns but just look at. What's also happened in the last week that speaks to the power of giants? Google has announced. Hangouts meet they've created their own version of it and facebook is launching their own competitor to zoom into house. Party another APP that has exploded. I think I wrote in the Story House Party. According to APP Annie has grown fifteen hundred percent and so right. Now you're saying well. No one's heard of no one's using hangout. Google hangouts meat and no one's using facebook's thing but just three years from now we'll zoom exist will house party exist. Elizabeth says this moment gives tech giant's both the opportunity to push out smaller competition and capitalize on our new habits and also a chance to deflect or at least delay new regulations that were supposed to take effect this year. One place where you can see this happening is in California. At the end of last year the state passed a new law that would give people control of their data. It's called the California Consumer Privacy Act Law went into effect in January of this year and in California. The law says you can go to any tech company. You can ask them for your data. What data do you have on me? And if you don't like it you can have some to delete it. And so companies have said that there's a lot of cost of compliance with that law and so for a while they've been asking for a delay in the enforcement of the law because if you don't follow the law it comes with big penalties and you see the lobbying groups already for tech saying there's no way that we can comply with this on time. The enforcement goes into effect in July. There's no way we can make it by July. We need an extension and really kind of making that argument and at the same time increasingly on the other end becoming effectively. Essential Services for governments essential because governments are now relying on that same data to track the disease. I used the example in the story of Gavin. Newsom press conferences and he's holding up modeling for the Charting the course of the disease and those models some of them are coming from underlying data from companies like Google and facebook and so especially in California you see it because of the relationship of the tech companies to the state before the state was adversarial with big tax. I mean even when Governor Newsom came on came on board as governor one of the first things he talked about was like data bill of rights for people and it's and yet they're using the data that is collected now to model the course of Corona virus so that minutes office is is a big reversal

Facebook Google United States Microsoft Giants California Elizabeth Governor Newsom Amazon Boeing Story House Party Cova Apple NYU Gavin America
Get A Reminder at a Specific Time

Voice in Canada

0:53 listening | 3 weeks ago

Get A Reminder at a Specific Time

"Today I've got a quick tip for you. If you find that you are running around trying to do all these things in your home now that we are home and trying to remember what you have to do when when it comes to emailing or scheduling your next grocery order or pick up time or all those other things that we're trying to manage. Here's a little tip. You can simply get Lexi to remind you of something at a particular time of day. So let's say you need to send somebody email at two o'clock in the afternoon and you want a reminder five minutes before that you can simply say lexi remind me to email fill in the blank. Whoever it is at one fifty five PM and Sunday she. May I ask you a question to clarify? Exactly what their mind is. Four or the time But that way at that time you'll get a little audible chime from Lexi and she will tell you what that reminder was set

Lexi
Good News Stories in 3D Printing

3D Printing Today

5:21 listening | 3 weeks ago

Good News Stories in 3D Printing

"Good stories out there. We've got actually three things. That are adventurous. The first one and the ad they are Cova nineteen related. And that's kind of hard to get away from these days because it's what's happening in the world. It's all that's happening because we're all home doing nothing or hoping trying to work of so. The first story is about how Lamborghini is working with a company that makes ventilators and Lamborghini has put their HP multi jet to use to generate. What they call an an a an artificial lung or a lung simulator. Now I I looked at this and thought. Oh so. They're basically making an air pump for a ventilator. But that's not is it. No actually this is a piece of test equipment For A for a ventilator so if you have a new design ventilator or in the processing the manufacturing facility were you make ventilators you need to test them to make sure that they can produce you know a certain amount of of flow at a certain rate against the actual resistance of of a long and this is basically as a simulated long that allows them to To perform those tests. So I'm assuming that this is not something. They came up with on their own and decided that it would be clever for them to make that and and You know release it on the world. I'm assuming this is something that the manufacturer ventilator manufacturer ask foreign said that this was something that was Yohan an issue in in their supply chain that they needed more of these to be able to make and test more ventilators in the article. Which by the way is in three d? Printing Industry dated April Sixteenth. There's a photograph of what they're producing. And I gotTa admit like almost all new stories. When you study the photograph your little bit you can see that. The story was a little bit a little bit more hyperbole than it is real interesting news. Because if you look at the photograph you'll realize all that lamborghinis actually producing with HP MULTI. Jet Is the frame of this thing and the bellows you. Well you know that the multi jet did make it simply because you can see the seem. Yeah so are. We don't know where they get the bellows for this lung simulator from. But you know they didn't make it in their. Hp multi jet. There'd be no scene there if it was an HP multi jet unfortunately and then the story goes on to talk about how they're using Carbon dos technology to generate two hundred polycarbonate face shields a day and I found that also to be a little bit Hype he stuff. Because if you look at the photograph following that you see that they're actually producing like we all are those frames that get attached to your head and not the clear shield and I don't know about you but on seeing on TV. All the first responders risking their lives working to the bone in and out there every day. And what I'm seeing them wearing now are facials. That are attached to their masks. That their breathing masks. They're super inexpensive super flexible. Clear face shields. So there's no longer an essential need for these kind of headbands that we're seeing people producing for the most important people that are doing the work. There's a a way simpler approach that they're they're jumping at using right now so I am looking at both of these thing Atlanta. I think this was one of those hype. Hyperbole kind of things Gotcha see I don. I don't know that I kind of disagree with the the not need for For Fe Shields Because the the face shield where where you have the shield attached the top of the mask that that's a mad those have been around forever. That's been served standard hospital equipment and a lot of places but they may not have them. I agree but to use. Dos Technology carbon their carbon machine for this producing two hundred a day. Come on ABC. You're a couple of million a day right with yes there are. There are actually Injection moulding companies. That have gotten on this. Perhaps with Three D. PRINTED DIES. But they are injection molding these these things by the hundreds of thousands the in fact. I saw another article saying that. Now the the big problem in the supply chain. Is Ashley the plastic film that you see through exactly? That's my. They're having to to work on that. So yeah if you're if you're looking for somebody to three D print at home. I don't know that I would just set out and print a a huge number of these unless you have a call for them from your local hospital or local first responders and you have a established source for the film because otherwise you're just wasting your time wasting your film. I strongly strongly agree with

Cova HP Lamborghini Ashley Atlanta ABC
The Chief Security Officer in (and out of) a Crisis

a16z

5:56 listening | 3 weeks ago

The Chief Security Officer in (and out of) a Crisis

"When I first started working in security you would generally have see so that reported somewhere under workforce. It like a very focused. I will make sure your laptop is secure and that was security. Probably Twenty years ago I had to study the nature and design of chain link fences. That was protecting my data center right. That was very much a part of the curriculum. If you wanted to get information security was understanding physical barriers. We no longer run data centers. Everything's Amazon everything's in Google. Everything's Microsoft the world has gotten more complicated technically and there's a combination of factors. There one is just the evolution of the cloud. Every company has a hybrid environment. Now if you've been around for more than five years and you have the emergence of crypto currency and the pressure. It's putting on financial security in particular. The laws have changed so you have. Gdp are in Europe which is just starting to see the massive fines come out on the companies that didn't invest the right way insecurity or had major security incidents we're seeing boards and CEOS held accountable. And so there's a personal sense of anxiety that those board members and senior executives have and they want to have a senior leader who can help them navigate the security issues that they face looking at all those complicated factors. I think it leads to this question of is that too much for a single roll to handle as these teams get to be really large. It's hard to find a security person that can run a couple thousand people organization that can run a hundred plus million dollar budget. We've never really develop that muscle memory in that skill set in some of the larger organizations. You're still seeing the decision not to go with Ceasar's Eso and have different leaders for each of those functions sitting in different parts of the company. When I was the CFO at Uber I had responsibility for the technical security of the company. Meaning make sure we don't get hacked but also physical security of our offices and safety of our employees oversight of our attempts to minimize fraud and then rider and driver safety. Those are four very different disciplines that require very different technical teams. Sometimes you'll hear why don't they have a senior security leader and it may be because they've decided our physical security risks are so different from our technical risks and we don't have one executive who can do a great job over both of them the fact that these companies sometimes are structured in a single role. Sometimes they're structuring it out based on the different types of problems. What do you see as the trade offs in those two? Different structures is one better than another more. I think it definitely depends on the company and the business that they're in but there is a bit of a pendulum that swings from centralized to decentralize and I think I'm on the second shift of that pendulum. Now as we've moved from building highly centralized organizations we get these massive security teams and then we can't really find leaders that can run these security teams and then so it goes back towards a decentralized approach. My personal opinion is centralized the organization. You're sort of seeing this accountability. Wave twelve years ago. I went through a massive breach at a very large bank. I was running the incident response program so I was kind of frontlines and they held a cio of business align technology executive accountable and the security team actually got more budget. Now we're seeing when there is a breach of the ceasefire has held accountable. There's a new team that gets brought in. There's a complete restructuring and a big driver is the regulators saying that they want to see a meaningful commitment to change and that the sea so should be empowered to make changes in the organization. I want to talk a little bit about win. This role makes headlines. What's the role of the sea? So when there's a breach or when there's an event will if you step back and think about the role of a security leader regardless of which of those functions you're talking about physical or digital or safety cars. There's really three different responsibilities number. One is prevent something bad from happening. That's what we all come to work every day and probably why most of US chose the profession in the first place but then job number two is assume that you've failed at that and have a good incident response. Plan have the ability to detect something bad going wrong as quickly as possible. Then there's the third discipline which is okay. There's a crisis. How do we respond to it? And the interesting thing in this profession is that a lot of us joined because of number one prevent harm but get judged on number three crisis response. There are a lot of really good security engineers who say wow the head of security Job I don't want because I don't want to be a sacrificial lamb. I think it's really interesting. You brought up the concept of sacrificial lamb. 'cause we did just see capital one replace there see so following the data breach. To what extent are these breaches inevitable and is it fair to beholding anybody to account if you go to the closed door? See so conferences. This is one of the topics that debated heavily right now. So the first time I took this role was at facebook and I got great support from the executive leadership almost unlimited budget ability to grow and hire great engineers and by technology and the most surprising thing is that you realize you can't buy your way too good security you literally can't write a blank check and have great security tomorrow. Security requires long-term investment requires you to run alongside the development teams and the business teams understand them and help them reduce their risks. And on one hand you'll hear the sows who think it's unfair saying look. I shouldn't take the fall if I don't get to make all the decisions to prevent the fall but the reality of the role is you. Don't get to make all the decisions security. Such a cross functional process. There's so much that goes into what risks the company decides to take versus what they don't and then on the other hand there's no going in. I'M GONNA be the fall guy or fall girl if we don't do it right and so they're going to probably be more vocal and championing their cause among leadership

Executive Europe Microsoft Ceasar Facebook United States Fraud CFO Amazon Google CIO
Thermal imaging could be used to deny entry into businesses

KIRO Nights

0:22 listening | 3 weeks ago

Thermal imaging could be used to deny entry into businesses

"Thermal imaging cameras in the latest devices businesses hope will help re open the economy while keeping people safe from the threat of the cope with nineteen the cameras are used to scan temperatures from a safe distance and if a fever a common corona virus symptoms detected the company would require further screening or deny the person entry all

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NASA Looking to Repurpose Space Station Trash for Power and Water

Innovation Now

1:17 listening | 3 weeks ago

NASA Looking to Repurpose Space Station Trash for Power and Water

"Astronauts don't WanNa sit in their trash so a team at NASA is working on a solution. They Call Oscar this innovation now. An astronaut crew of four on a mission to the Moon Omar's will generate over five thousand pounds of trash in a year. Here's any Meyer. A chemical engineer at NASA Kennedy Space Center to talk trash so some of the items that actually get turned into waste include food. So there's the food packaging. We also have things like hygiene items. So we have hygiene wipes tooth. Pays you know bristles from the toothbrush any type of wash cloths since. There's no showers and we also don't washing machines on spacecraft at the moment so all of the crews clothing become trash and there's also things like nitrile gloves duct tape Packaging material so these are the types of things that we put into our reactor to convert it into the guest. Nasa's orbital Sin Gas Commodity Augmentation reactor processes small pieces of trash in a high temperature reactor effectively turning trash into usable resources

Nasa Nasa Kennedy Space Center Oscar Meyer