Food and Dining

We're dishing up the tastiest podcasts your ears have ever consumed.

A highlight from Reinventing the Eel

Gastropod

07:51 min | Last week

A highlight from Reinventing the Eel

"That's all blue right there. Yeah, a little dead sticking out. Oh, there they are. There we go. I got one. I got him. My friend. Look at this guy, poor little good dude. I'm gonna let you go, don't worry. He's so little. He is. Wow. Going for it. Oh yes. He's like, let me back. I'm sorry, my friend. You're gonna go just as soon as you started in a couple of photos. Your famous okay, well. Fly away. You might be wondering what we were so excited to manhandle, Nikki, to my great shock, had plunged her hands into a cold main river and caught a tiny, nearly see through baby eel and then let it go. That's right, this episode is all about eels. You're listening to gastropod, the podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm Cynthia graber. And I am Nikola twilly surprisingly gifted catcher of baby eels with my bare hands. Another skill to add to my resume. Today, you might think that eels mostly belong on a sushi menu, but eels have actually been an important source of food all around the world for thousands of years, and maybe they should even be part of our traditional Thanksgiving dinner. That's if you can afford them, those little teeny tiny baby eels, I was scooping out of the water. They are actually one of the most expensive fish in the world on a per pound basis. Yes, this episode does involve suitcases full of cash. But it also involves proud search for testicles, specifically eel testicles. Those remained a mystery for a long, long time, and there are still mysteries today that have to do with eel sex. Really, everything eel related is bizarre and fascinating and bizarrely fascinating, and we have the scoop, as well as a visit to America's only ill farm. This episode is supported in part by the Alfred P Sloan foundation for the public understanding of science technology and economics, gastropod is part of the vox media podcast network and partnership with eater. And before we grab hold of those slippery eels, we wanted to tell you about wet stone radio collective. They're a network of podcasts all about food, great storytellers representing people and places at the origin of food. Their shows are deliciously subversive and just a great listen. Check out South Asian food stories and bad table manners, the stories and histories of African American cuisine and food ways in setting the table indigenous foodways in the spirit plate and more. Check out wet stone radio collective wherever you get your podcasts. For your city is a new podcast from the San Diego union tribune presented by the Los Angeles Times. I'm Sandra dibble, a journalist who left my job and family in Washington D.C. to report on Tijuana Mexico. I expected to stay a year, but my plans changed as I discovered the many different worlds that converge at the U.S. Mexico border. Subscribe and listen to border city at San Diego union tribune dot com slash border city, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. In natural science, they even talk about the eel question as one of the hardest scientific questions to answer. And it's a mysterious creature, and it's a creature that has been very, very hard to understand. And that's also why it's fascinating. Patrick svenson is really fascinated by eels, so much so that he wrote an entire book about them, it's called the book of eels and his love affair began when he was quite young. Well, I grew up fishing for eels during my whole childhood together with my father. Late summer nights down by a small river in the southern part of Sweden. Just my father and myself always just the two of us together. My father told me on those nights about the eel being a very mysterious creature and he told me about the yield going through changes and metamorphosis and he told me about the sargasso sea where every eel is born. And it sounded like a fairytale place for me. And it's a lifelong fascination that started right there. We will be coming back to this fairytale place. The sargasso sea, but that's a relatively recent stop in the story of the human eel relationship. We should really start with some basic getting to know you stuff. An eel is a fish, and I hate to be judgmental, but it's a pretty weird looking one. Snake like and it's moves like a snake and it's very slimy and that's also why many people think they are actually quite disgusting and people are afraid of them and they don't want to touch them or have anything to do with them. But an eel is not a snake or a reptile at all as we said, it's a fish and not just any fish for many people in many places for most of human history, it was the fish. Eel fishing has been important in many parts of Europe and in the southern part of Sweden where I'm from. It's been very strong and important tradition to fish for eels. Regularly when archeologists are excavating rubbish dumps in Germany and Northern Europe in the Middle Ages, they find that fully half the fish bones in the dump are from eels. People were eating a lot of eel. Eels were even used as currency at times in parts of Europe, in England you could pay your rent and eels, the village where I grew up by fleet in the year ten 86, according to the earliest survey of anywhere in the world, the doomsday book, by fleet owed 325 eels a year to their nearest monastery. Japan obviously has a long history with eels, the first written record of a still traditional Japanese dish of the late and then grilled eel comes from the 1200s. And eels were big in the Americas too. When the Mayflower arrived in the U.S. in 1620, I think, and the pilgrims were discovering this new foreign land and they were lost and sick and cold and starving and they met a man called the tisquantum. To quantum, you might have heard of him as quanto. He was a Native American and pilgrims wrote home that the very first thing he did was show them how to fish for eels. And they loved them. They describe him as sweet and fat and as a lifesaver actually. One year after that, they celebrated the first Thanksgiving and you could argue that instead of turkey, maybe you should be eating yield on Thanksgiving. I would gladly make this swap actually, but for all this very loving human eel relationship throughout world history, heels have remained something of a dark mysterious stranger, not for lack of trying. I actually started with Aristotle about 2300 years ago. He wrote a book called the history of the animals. And in this book, he writes a lot about the yield. Most of all, he was trying to explain how eels reproduce. Aristotle obviously knew about sex differences in humans, and he knew you could look for those sex differences in male and female animals, and he really wanted to find sexual organs and eels, but he just couldn't. We came to the conclusion that eels don't have any. He said they are born out of mud. Life that comes to life from nothing. And that's conclusion that actually lived on for a long time. Almost into modern times. Different cultures came up with different stories to explain where on earth eels came from. In ancient Egypt, people thought eels were born when the sun shone on the Nile in a very particular way. In Italy, people thought that eels came from a special kind of

Cynthia Graber Nikola Twilly Alfred P Sloan Foundation For San Diego Union Tribune Sandra Dibble Washington D.C. Patrick Svenson U.S. Mexico Nikki Sweden Tijuana Los Angeles Times Europe Apple Northern Europe Germany Americas England
The Pros and Cons of Soya Beans

Gastropod

01:38 min | 9 months ago

The Pros and Cons of Soya Beans

"The only time to my knowledge that i've ever eaten a soybean in soybean form is at amami those green pods you get as a starter at sushi restaurants which i love so young soybeans which is what mommy is is generally esteemed but once you actually had the mature bean and then you try to cook it. The results tend to be less than appetizing. Gen fu is a professor at emory university. Who studies the history of science technology and medicine in china. And she's the author of the other milk. She published under jetson but she goes by wendy her everyday life. So that's what we're going to call her. This episode wendy told us that the soybean was likely domesticated in what's now northeastern china. Right on the border with korea wild soybeans and then domesticated soybeans. They're not particularly high maintenance. They grow well in a lot of different regions and their beans which are in general. A good thing to and so people ate a lot of them. It isn't early crowd that is recognized and becomes part of what is known as the classical grains. so we know that soybean is not actually green but it was treated as sort of staple food similar to weet As well as rice it was a staple yes but it was only a staple out of necessity. Like wendy said. The mature soybean has some issues more so even than many of its fellow colleagues. It causes pretty intense gas innocent flatulence and even though like all means it's packed with protein. It also contains a chemical that means our bodies kant really process that protein but there is a way around the protein blocking problem and at least a little of the flatulence problem and that is to boil the crap out of mature

Gen Fu Wendy Jetson Emory University China Korea
The Pros and Cons of QR Codes Replacing Restaurant Menus

Le Show

01:12 min | 9 months ago

The Pros and Cons of QR Codes Replacing Restaurant Menus

"Grown virus pandemic ushered in the instantaneous widespread use of qr codes restaurant industry. Experts think technology will stick around long time after the health crisis ends according to cnbc. You don't qr stands for quick response. There you go see. You've learned something and it's not halfway through the program invented by japanese in nineteen five to keep track of car parts. Mainstream saw the entry of qr codes years later. A smartphones with cameras took over. But not 'til they pandemic forced businesses to double down on a sand on sanitizing. The became ubiquitous sight inside bars and restaurants instead of paper menus but aside from being able to update instantly when there are supply shortages which is the declared reason restaurants like using your codes. There's the little thing of qr cords because enable restaurants to gain data on everyone who sitting at every table because everybody has to have their own menu. Thanks restaurant thanks. Japanese engineer

Cnbc
Alfresco Dining Tips From Outdoorsy Diva Lauren Gay

The Zest

02:12 min | 9 months ago

Alfresco Dining Tips From Outdoorsy Diva Lauren Gay

"Let's talk about the food. Let's start with camping. When the weather cools down this is floridians. Time to get out there. So what would you take on a camping trip today. Not cold cuts and pb and j. I'm guessing no no no like so for me. I beat the go-to as those foil. Packet mills that you can kind of prep beforehand and just keep them in your cooler on ice so you can take stuff like shrimp and potatoes with some veggies and season it and have it and you're full packet in. Just throw that puppy on the grill. And your any eat you can use Baked potatoes and stuff from with whatever it is. You like you can eat regular potatoes. Sweet potatoes you can even do like breakfast type of things like with frozen hash browns and your sausage and cheese and all that stuff and prep it and just have it. Ready to go in a foil packet. That's probably the easiest way if you don't wanna like carry a skillet or something like that even just heat up the foil packet and boom like whatever you could imagine that you could do like in a dish like in a in a casserole dish or something you can do it in the packet. I never really thought about that. My imagination is kind of running wild. Now what if you do want to carry a skillet. What are some tools or utensils that you maybe would bring along you. Did i mean you you wanna use something like a cast iron skillet. You don't wanna go putting your you know the that ceramic type stuff on like an open flame so you wanna use something. That's girl friendly on is the biggest thing you want to make. Sure you had your utensils like your spatula. Your tongs on bring your seasoning things like that. I mean it's is nothing to deep is just you know you have to remember if you're camping where you're just driving and you can keep up in the car. Then that's cool. That's great if it's a situation where you're backpacking and you've got a bit of a hike to get to your site. Then that's a whole other beast and so you have to completely rethink kyler gonna do this because whatever you have you have to carry it

The Dangers of Sugar and Children

Food Issues

02:09 min | 10 months ago

The Dangers of Sugar and Children

"We all know that sugar isn't good for us but really let's take a deep dive into why we really need to limit it in our kids diets. Oh absolutely well. I think you know. Sometimes we forget that during times of rapid growth like in childhood and adolescence that you know kids bodies are really sensitive to the influence of dieting activity. Because they're growing so fast they're seltzer turning over rapidly and that makes them especially vulnerable to the effects of food of physical activity and weight and even environmental damage that can occur and so we really need to put an emphasis during this time of rapid cell growth to make sure that the genes that are being activated or turning on towards health not towards a genetic susceptibility and sugar can actually displace some of these high value. Nutrition foods that play in essential role not just in growth but an immunity but also cognition and genetic expression okay. That's something that we don't typically hear about. And so what about the things we do hear about a lot in terms of childhood obesity. Type two diabetes like these things. We should be concerned about. Oh absolutely i mean first off anytime you look at childhood obesity wolf whether you know kids are really actually normal weight or an overweight. Too much sugar again. Just places. high value nutrition and micronutrients that can increase the inflammatory process that leads to chronic disease over time. Even kids who were teenagers who are overweight and adolescents have a significantly higher risk of colon cancer later in life. I mean we're even seeing precursors in heart disease in children. I mean if you look at like obesity in preschoolers. I think it's risen from around five percent in the early seventies like nineteen seventy two up to close to fourteen percent

Seltzer Obesity Diabetes Colon Cancer Heart Disease
Fermenting Kombucha For a Healthier Hard Beverage

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:52 min | 10 months ago

Fermenting Kombucha For a Healthier Hard Beverage

"You talk about your process. What inspired you guys take kombucha and and make a actual shell stable hard. Come each. oh yes well i mean the origin of us starting With a commode shah because served the we have more than just combustion now of a heart which art self serves. We we in our tap room's which we have. We also have a beer that we we make with different types of functional ingredients mushrooms and things like that and we have we look at ourselves really as innovation on company. That's looking to explore all the different categories and create the best tasting the most flavorful the most functional version that could be made in in all different categories. But the reason we start with kabuchiko is because my partner when the the founder. Bill moses He he was part of another company called kavita and vito was one of the other large companies at got early into. They actually certainly similar to to accomplish evidence. Coconut water keefer back. You have three lines do the action three license. They started their original was keefer which is really unique in different at any kind of because of that they already had the mindset around. Alcohol wasn't really a part of it because they knuckle boot shah as you know or manageable don't know capuchin the national from process creates 'cause you began to say an early on a ten seven years ago there was an issue of like how much is still to this day. Actually how much. Alcohol is actually in your non alcohol Is if it can. It has sugars. They will continue to ferment right. In fact often it might be a legal to be below below this. Earn an amount of alcohol allowed to be non alcohol. You go and you start driving and it's in the sonnet saying. This sugars are fermenting. The alcohol starts growing and it actually might pass that that. That limit veto was One of the first ones. They are to have super control of that. How much alcohol in it now. They had to coconut keefer. Had to As apple cider vinegar tonic. So three different lines but really learned a lot about the control. And it's kind of funny. Is you know. Some of the founders of a company that was kind of became famous for controlling the alcohol would then go ahead and and and let it go and and and actually let it flourish and actually create You the best alcohol version of the

Kabuchiko Bill Moses Keefer Kavita Vito Apple
AJ Wolfe: Why I Started a Disney Food Blog

The Zest

02:45 min | 10 months ago

AJ Wolfe: Why I Started a Disney Food Blog

"My name is aj wolf. And i run a media. Company one of our websites and youtube channels and everything is associated with disney food blog. Okay when and how did you get into this. Two thousand nine is when this particular site started. We have a few other sites in our company. We started those a little bit earlier. She thousand nine was the beginning of dfb and it was mostly because back. Then people weren't really talking about food at disneyworld in disney parks. They were real focused on rides. They were real focused on. You know all of the rest of it but there was almost kind of a stigma about talking about food. People didn't want to be known as as folks you really cared that much about their theme park food. But i kind of wanted this site to exist in. There was another site called. Wd w foods where this couple would just go to disneyworld a couple times a year and put up pictures of their food. And i thought this is great. And i kept refreshing. That page hoping that they'd go back to disneyworld than so you're all i want this to exist. Then there must be other people who wanted to exist and so i started the site for that purpose. There are lots of people who wanted it to exist and we can see by bass following. So what do you think. It is about disney food. And who's actually following people who go to disney people who fantasize about going to disney. So i think it's a little bit of everything and yeah. People are super interested in food at their theme parks for multiple reasons. I is that you're going to spend a ton of money on it and at disneyworld specifically you have to book your restaurants really far in advance especially those really expensive really popular restaurants. It used to be six months in advance right now. It's sitting at two months in advance. But you figure you're gonna probably spend more money on food than your per ticket than potentially even your hotel and so this could be the most expensive part of your trip. Why would you not want. You wouldn't just arrive at disneyworld randomly. Choose a hotel like you're gonna research you're gonna figure out what hotel make sense for usa. Why wouldn't you do the same with food. And i think that the people who are following people who are big disney fans and love disney and are going to disney all the time and also people who are brand new to disney and just have no idea what to expect. And i hope they're following because it really can completely change your trip if you have planned out where to spend your money on food especially if you have allergies in your family or picky eaters or you're going to be in certain places. At certain

Disney Aj Wolf DFB Disney Parks Youtube USA
The History of Cannabis

Gastropod

02:12 min | 10 months ago

The History of Cannabis

"Turns out we have geology to thank for cannabis. At least for cannabis's psychoactive properties. The ancient ancestors of the cannabis plant started growing tens of millions of years ago around. What is now central asia like pakistan northern india nepal. And then something dramatic happened the entire subcontinent. That is now. India drifted north crashed into asia. The crumple zone is what we now call. The himalayas and the cannabis plants that were growing in that zone. Got really really high and the ones that were stuck down low the plains near the himalayas. Well they didn't get quite so high is difference is both topographical and literal the cannabis. The grew in the mountainous region started producing thc. Which or the uninitiated is the chemical in cannabis. That gets you high. We don't know for certain. Why the plant produces it. It appears serve kind of sunscreen. Chris duval is a professor at the university of new mexico and author of two books on the topic. The african roots of marijuana and cannabis kris told us that the cannabis that stayed down low and temperate plains. Those plans did not produce. thc they became. What we know is hemp source of cloth rope and disgusting. Health foods cannabis grew really easily and a lot of different environments especially ones. We disturbed to build settlements. It was literally a weed. That's why we call it weed. And so there was probably a lot of cannabis just growing in central and east asia both the high mountainous regions and the low parts and so a really longtime ago as long as maybe twelve thousand years ago people figured out ways to use it. It appears for both populations. Initially people used it for the seeds which are edible You know you can buy them in. Eat them nowadays. Emcees are often founded natural food stores. Today they're full of wonderful nutrients but they taste terrible. And before you all right in and tell me i'm wrong. not only to. Cynthia agree with me. The historical record does to kris told us that in china hemp seeds were at one point considered a staple food but it was kind of slowly replaced as people in that region in china. You know kind of domesticated and started using other plants more calmly so types of militans organ kind of displaced at

Chris Duval Asia India Nepal Himalayas Pakistan University Of New Mexico Kris East Asia Cynthia China
How to Talk to Your Kids About Food

Food Issues

02:43 min | 10 months ago

How to Talk to Your Kids About Food

"What are some challenges that you see parents have when they talk to their kids about food and meal so you generally work with adult is that right i do and i you know i do have a program that i work with But admittedly a vast majority of my practice is adults. Okay but even still with their kids you know like i see it all the time where we'll get on the you know for our session and they're like so. My kids did this. And this is where it's showing up. And here's how i handled that or whatever and i think it's hard because we have concerns right. We can see the writing on the wall and it's hard to know we'll do say something. Do we not say something and the other side of it is. I think most often especially when kids well even as young as like five or six. I think we don't give them enough credit. And by that i mean they're already watching and paying attention. It's non even about what you say. It's what we're doing so they notice if you're eating something different than the rest of the family you know. They notice if you're saying oh i can't have that i'm trying to lose weight and so i think oftentimes the challenges are actually less about well. I guess it's twofold you know it certainly is what our kids are eating or not eating but also more than anything. It's about recognizing it's not just about what they eat or don't eat so when we talk about foods though. Should we avoid aid. Labeling foods good bad healthy unhealthy but we all fall into it. Ray we all say these things. Yeah we fall into it. Because we are looking for ways to label ourselves you know and i think the idea that we have to label foods is also sort of a challenge. Avoid the good bad healthy unhealthy black and white approach to food so when we talk about it with kids talk about it as an regiders an energy zappers right so the energizer foods are clean lean protein veggies and fruits and some whole grains and those kinds of things in the energies zappers. Are those things where we feel great for few minutes and then we're exhausted or we can't concentrate after

RAY
The Things We Eat For Others

Bon Appetit Foodcast

02:28 min | 10 months ago

The Things We Eat For Others

"We're closing off our six part series talking about food and relationships with writer baker and fellow food lover. Zoe dent berg. We recently published an essay from. Zoe called. never again will. I go vegan for a man about how in pursuit of a romantic connection. She stopped eating meat and dairy almost entirely. I found it's so relatable it's just part of being in a relationship that we don't really talk about a lot and usually for my experience. The person with the stricter diet tends to influence the other. so today. we're gonna get into all of that and more with zoe as well as ben. Weinberg the man who's zoe tried going vegan for welcome to the podcast. Both of you. And i am excited to get nosy. Things manda beer. So if you haven't read zoe's essay yet here's a bit of background. Zoe and ben went to the same college. The even had some mutual friends but they actually didn't meet until they separately moved to birmingham alabama for jobs after graduation. So tell us now about the first time you hung out one on one. How did that happen. We talked a little bit about how much we both liked cooking so then invited me over apartment downtown to cook. It was like this super-buick when you are when you're having this conversation does say he's vegan. His veganism was a running joke. It was one of the things that i learned about. Van nuys like. You're actually vegan. So i i did know that he was again. I did not know how we would cook together considering. I was allergic to half of his diet. Okay wait what are you allergic to. So i'm allergic to gnats in sesame all nuts all nuts and meanwhile i put like i love homocide. I love putting. That's is one of my favorite spices which zoe taught me has sesame in it. A lot needs in that one. Yeah yeah okay. We're gonna do this together. We're going to hang out and we're gonna cut. Yeah and then also do not tell me what you're gonna beforehand. He just like call me and gave me a gris relaxed. Because i didn't know what we were to cook beforehand. You know three hours before you're gonna hang out of van. I remember. I got there and you had the recipes pulled up your laptop and i was like oh like we can go off of this and you know we have to do the recipe when ben has a recipe is very adamant about sticking to it. Even though he's very chaotic in the kitchen. I feel the same way. It's all or

ZOE Zoe Dent Berg BEN Weinberg Baker Birmingham Van Nuys Alabama
Meat and Climate Change: What's the Beef With Beef?

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:09 min | 11 months ago

Meat and Climate Change: What's the Beef With Beef?

"So much conflicting information about me whether it's good or bad for us and whether it's good for health down planet in so tell us how how to get to be public enemy number one and be perceived as the most environmentally destructive and least healthy food that we're eating and how we got this wrong when it comes to this topic yeah. I really think that's true. I think it's kind of been you know it's been called the king of meats especially in the united states and i think part of that is because it was the most consumed meat in the us. For a long time you know for decades. It was the number one most consumed me. That's actually chicken now. But he has been placed but it was for a very long time meet. You know it was the number one me to there that aspect of it and then there's the fact that beef has always been the most expensive meat. And so you know. I mean maybe frog meat or something obscure would be above it. But as far as meats that are commonly available the beef would be kind of the the thing. You might just have on saturday night. You know the nice state. When i grow in my household had a stake on saturday night for example and that was because it was it was a more expensive piece of meat and so it was something that had just once a week and so it was kind of regarded as you know something that was a little bit special and In around one thousand thousand nine hundred seventy. I think partly because of the fact that it was the the most popular meat and it was also considered kind of almost a little bit of a luxury it but the same time these are large animals and so the individual animals are really visible on the landscape. And when you look at the individual animal like how much water at drinks or how much land purportedly takes to raise an individual animal. It just looks like a lot and so right around. Nineteen seventy you know. I think that i could kinda date. That as the key kickoff point when people really started focusing on you know cattle being a problem ecologically and beef. It shouldn't be something we're eating so much

United States
Mariana Velsquez' Refreshing Summer Cocktail Recipe

Monocle 24: The Menu

01:52 min | 11 months ago

Mariana Velsquez' Refreshing Summer Cocktail Recipe

"We continue this series with more recipes from some of the world's best shifts and bartenders. Today's recipes for a refreshing summer cocktail from columbia. Hello my name is maryanne. Alaska's i referred stylus and days make. You're an author of colombiana a rediscovery recipes and rituals from the soul of colombia. And today i wanna share with you. One of my favorites summer recipes from my book go by the vassal which is a street. Food is watermelon in line. Punch drink from the city of baron pizza which is great town. That's rolls over the mountains and into the mouth of the magdalena river and is such a vibrant city and i discovered these recipe on steamy afternoon. I was working all day and lunch was fire way and finally pulled onto the sidewalk to find a bunch of school. Kids chiding joking away as they dip their spoons into talk cups of crush watermelon with tons of line and ice and the watermelon pieces have been steeping into line for so long that they flavor had become some intense. And so the way you make these drink. It's really refreshing is you. Take about twenty cups of watermelon cut up into chunks by one cup of freshly squeezed lime juice and six cups of ice and you put everything into a large pitcher. And you use a wooden schooner model to sort of partly crushed that fruits for the watermelon seeps into the lime juice and dissolves a little utilit- really well for about forty five minutes and then read before serving new top it off with clubs soda and serving too tall bowl glasses with the lungs. It's delicious. i recommend

Baron Pizza Magdalena River Maryanne Colombia Alaska Columbia
Dressing Up Those Summer Salads

Plant Strong

01:51 min | 11 months ago

Dressing Up Those Summer Salads

"One of the things that i wanted to share with our listeners. Today is this incredible. Balsamic dressing that. I've been using all of my summer. Salads and i love oprah definitely follow her favorite things list and i feel like we need to do a plant strong team favorites list and this would definitely be on there. So can i talk about this product out judgment. Because you're gonna think. I'm out of my mind for the money that i spend on a ball stomach vinegar so i won't wanna do want to know how much you spend on. So nobody would bat an eye for a forty dollar bottle of wine rate and in our household. Don't drink we're not buying the filet mignon or the lobster tails or the fancy specialty cheeses rates. So when we do splurge it's on things like vinegar and this is one of my favorite products. So it's the cuccia in moray balsamic vinegar of modina. It's thirty five to forty dollars a bottle at whole foods which it's expensive. Yes but a little goes a long way. All you need is the finest little drizzle and the reason is so. It's so expensive is because it's really reduced. They're more grapes in this than there is in the average Balsamic vinegar and as you can see. I'm kinda like singing. Around with maple syrup super syrupy. I mean you know it's sticking to the side of the bottle and it's absolutely delicious so this is also one of my favorite gift ideas. If there's somebody living plant shung diet living the plant strong lifestyle eating whole food. Plant based maybe. I don't want to bring them some chocolates. Maybe i don't wanna bring them some wine. I'll bring them really nice bottle of

Oprah
The Bottle vs. Tap Battle: Which Tastes Better?

Gastropod

02:49 min | 11 months ago

The Bottle vs. Tap Battle: Which Tastes Better?

"Are in the ring with tap and bottled and it's time for the first round. Let's start with a question of taste. My name is martin reason. I live in los angeles. And i am a water somali. So many years at gentleman who works in a restaurant and recommends to from wine pairings. I'm doing the same with water. Amazingly this is not satire. This is real mini documentary all about martin the war to somali. Sometimes i'm so proud to be angelino my passion for water against child but a drinker professionally since two thousand this whole water semi business has got to be totally well to keep it clean. I'm going to call it bull honky a water sommelier. This is penn and teller's point exactly that it's hor spooky that said their guests. Were totally fooled by the fancy menu. Even though they were drinking identical glasses of water what do you think about the amazon pressure. Okay now i can take on. this is definitely tasted. It's it's almost too easy to make fun of this. Whole business of different waters tasting different. But also penn and teller isn't necessarily the most trusted source for food news so we figured we should be open minded and scientific and test this whole thing out ourselves. We bought a bunch of different types of bottled waters and we through our own top water into the tasting mix. and then we each deputized partners. Tim and jeff to create a blind taste test for us. Tim down fourteen little glasses. Got a hold of some tap water and then he opened and poured each bottle and one cam here in los angeles. Jeff did the same following the instructions. On tim's spreadsheet we'd picked an american spring water the couple of european mineral waters some bottled process tap water specifically aquafina and then to mix things up. We added one of those bogus alkaline waters and some artesian water. All the way from the south pacific we have an array of glasses and each row of glasses represents different types of bottled water. There is some tap water in there to throw you off and we are hoping to see that you might or might not be able to tell the difference. I have to say. I embarked on this with a lot of confidence in my discriminatory abilities. At least when it comes to beverages nothing None of my previous wine tasting experience is helping me here but let me take a sip.

Angelino Martin Los Angeles Teller Penn TIM Amazon Jeff South Pacific
Why Do We Love Snacks so Much?

Bon Appetit Foodcast

02:22 min | 11 months ago

Why Do We Love Snacks so Much?

"I want to start with a simple question. That might be a sort of philosophical question but i want to know from both of you why we love snacks so much and i don't just mean the three of us i mean pretty much everyone in the entire world. Well my first answer was going to be at. We love snacking because we have too much free time or is it coming from boredom but then that kind of oblique answer but i think maybe people just love a small joy. You know like had love like a free perfume sample. It's coming from the same part of my dna. There's just like a little something a freebie. Yeah it's a little salt thing. It's little sweet something. And i just need those keep me going. Yeah it's like. Snack is entertainment. Which i feel like every candy bar commercial ever is like playing into you know absolutely entertainment. Yes it's a hobby. It's it's definitely a hobby for some of us. And i some of us. It's a career andrea. What why do we love snacking so much i would say it also plays into the psychology of rewarding. I think it's an indulgence. And i think that that plays into not just like the nostalgia of all of us growing up at a time where snacks or like our parents weight of like feeding us when they were both working et cetera. I think it also has to do with that pleasure that we're giving ourselves in the form of a snack yes. I can't tell you how many times i've been like sitting at my desk. And i'm like as soon as i finish editing this piece i can go get a snack. And it's like the dangling carrot. You guys did your parents give you a treat when you were potty training feeling that's when it starts this deep pavlovian stuff like i got candy if i pooped in the potty. That is real. And we'll how we just convert or osu basically at animals okay so andrea tell us a little bit about what snapshot is and. What's your great ambition besides taking over the world of snacking and becoming the like the ultimate snacks year with your predictions. Iaea i think in the beginning. I sort of thought of us space where we can just be like. If this is really offering a meditation. What does that even mean and snapshot is the rebelliousness playfulness to this industry. That sometimes people take too seriously. It's like you know. I get it but like this. Adopt the genyk drink has not really gonna change my life. You know.

Andrea OSU Iaea
How to Make a Blueberry Grenita

The Maria Liberati Show

01:51 min | 11 months ago

How to Make a Blueberry Grenita

"My first recipe is a blueberry gr- anita and it's really refreshing. This time of year is mentioned. You know with all the fresh blueberries. Four cups of fresh blueberries one teaspoon of freshly grated organic lemon peel a teaspoon freshly grated organic orange. Peel two teaspoons of fresh lemon juice and one cup of sugar or sweeteners. taste in a medium size saucepan. Combine the blueberries. Lemon peel orange peel and one cup of water. And then on high he bring this to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer onto the blueberries are soft set. A fine stringer over the bowl. Strain the mixture pressing with a back of a large spoon. Stir the lemon juice into the puree. Show this pure. I in a saucepan. Combine the sugar and one cup of water over high heat bring to a boil reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar dissolves. So you're making a sugar syrup for about two to three minutes or going to continue then transfer this to a bowl and chill this also star this sugar syrup into the blueberry puree and poor this into a shallow pan freeze the blueberry mixture until ice crystals form around the edges of the pan about forty five to sixty minutes with a fork scrape the ice crystals from the edges and. Stir into the mixture. Freeze the mixture until it's fully frozen about one and a half hours starring several times to serve place this into tall glasses. Garnish with chris. Cookies fresh blueberries than fresh orange slices. It yields about one court

Chris
Are Aldi Own Brand Goods as Good as the Real Thing?

Hungry Girl: Chew The Right Thing!

02:44 min | 11 months ago

Are Aldi Own Brand Goods as Good as the Real Thing?

"To jump in. We are going to start with some of the hot food so they don't get chilly before we try them. First up we have earth grown vegan meat free chicken less patties. So this is all d.'s. Earth grown brand. Which i believe is an brand yes And that is their answer to like the boca. Fried chicken patty. So it's like a chicken list chicken. Patty and i made mine in the air. Fryer where did you make yours. I just put it in a frying pan nice and it was a frying pan that we bought on prime day. We bought like the pots and pans. Set and part of that sentiment. That you you had her in the episode on amazon and it comes with this little tiny like like tiny teeny tiny pan that you can put little burgers on or make little little eggs. It's the coolest thing we should put that whole set on the food cast page. It's a great so let's do it. I'm just chewing up a storm here. i have to say i pulled the patty apart and it looks like shredded chicken inside like i really really like this and what i like. Best about it. The texture is spot on to me. It tastes like chicken a lot of times when you do a chicken nugget or a chicken patty begin. It tastes like stuffing it just slinging bread but this tastes like chicken. It does and i feel like the outside it's really crispy and like it tastes like fried chicken it doesn't taste For the stats at tastes super. Decadent it season nicely. What are the stats. So each patty which is a nice size. One hundred and forty calories five grams of fat nine grams of protein. Three smart points excellent. I would totally eat. Same mike. Add those to the rotation earth grown. Okay next up. We have another all brand. I don't know who this mama cozy is but like every single thing in all the is made by her mama. Cozy makes tons of pizza. This is a cauliflower crust. Margarita pizza that you find in the freezer section so a lot of pizzas are the fridge. Some of our pizzas are in the freezer. This is a big frozen pizza. It looks thin crusted. I kind of burnt my slice lisa. Look at this adorable. Tiny slice might cut for me. That's so cute a little adorable minds. Burnt mine's not crispy is yours a little bit. Yeah i it's been sitting for a little bit. So they're lost crispiness is like the the non saas part. I think the sauce is good. It's a little sweet i think that i like the thin -ness of the cross and it just tastes like cauliflower. A little like not in a bad way. What i mean is it doesn't just tastes like bread. It tastes like there's actually a nice amount of cauliflower and

Fryer Boca Patty Margarita Pizza Amazon Mike Lisa
What is Intuitive Eating?

Food Issues

01:53 min | 11 months ago

What is Intuitive Eating?

"Eating as something. That's been around since the eighties. And the first the actual term was coined by two dieticians. So evelyn tripoli a lease rash so they are the founders of intuitive eating as a movement and they wrote a book called intuitive eating which is now in its fourth edition but the concept of intuitive. Eating has been around for even before they wrote the book. And i think it started because there had been this surge in dieting in the eighty s and specially we all remember below fat craze which caused us to create a lot of processed foods that were lower in fat. And this obsession with calorie count counting and then this and so it just created what we now call diet culture which is definitely still alive and well in present day but i think one of the coolest things about intuitive eating is coming back to trusting our own bodies because through diet culture through all of these plans and meal plans and calorie counting and macro counting. We started to lose touch with our own bodies and we started to distrust. Our own bodies started to believe that we can't trust our own bodies and sometimes we project that onto our children as well but children actually are born intuitive eaters. They're able to determine when they're hungry when they're satisfied from birth but we train it out of them so that usually by the time that they're five years old they start to lose that ability because repeatedly over and over we tell them you should eat more or you should eat less. Are you should eat this instead of that. And then they also lose touch with their bodies and lose that ability to tune in

Evelyn Tripoli
All About The Negroni

FoodStuff

02:13 min | 11 months ago

All About The Negroni

"The negroni what well The negroni is a cocktail made with gin sweet vermouth and a type of amaro called campari Traditionally you can put other stuff in there But that's the basic basic stuff It is garnished with a slice of orange or a strip of orange peel. The ladder sometimes flamed. It can be served chilled and straight up or over ice. A single large cube is pretty popular. And it it's it's the drink is smooth and bitter sweet and herbal little bit. Spicy or spiced i guess rather But with this brightness underneath and not to get like poetic on y'all like right off the bat but it just it tastes like a like a summer night. I should have a next time. We play dunston dragons. I should have some kind of like poetry off. Oh no you have to describe the negroni. And i shall just from my dungeon masters edition. Oh gosh that would be something. That ben bolan would be amazing at and that i would be like. Give me a few weeks. And i'll come up with an amazing entry. I like all of you are really excellent at coming up with some perhaps less than traditional poetry but poetry now we are a group. It's true that's true. So let's let's let's breakdown all of those ingredients a little bit so So jen is a type of liquor made with a neutral spirit. That's then infused with any number of botanical 's during and or after distillation the primary unnecessary botanical is juniper a which is sort of brighton. Piney tasting ginneries. All have their own complex blends of herbs and spices and imbibers all have their own personal preferences. Some common additions include liquorice or a niece cinnamon. Citrus peel nutmeg. Saffron savory all kinds of barks and bits and

Ben Bolan Brighton
America Has a Drinking Problem

The Experiment

02:08 min | 11 months ago

America Has a Drinking Problem

"Okay so when exactly did american start drinking. Was it at the start of america. Yeah literally so the reason sort of unbelievably or one of the reasons. I should say that. The mayflower landed at plymouth. Rock is because the ship was running low on beer people back then drink beer instead of water or they preferred it to water. Same and the sailors freaked out. And they thought that at the rate that they and pilgrims. We're drinking the beer. They won't have enough beer to get them back to england's so rather than sail on to the mouth of the hudson which had been the plan they pull the shore and kick the pilgrims off and that is why the pilgrims landed at plymouth rock. Of course the truth may have been a little more complicated than what was indicated in their diaries as they complained bitterly that winter about the beer and having been kicked off there were other things going on it was december. The weather was bad. The food was running low but the beer was a big part of the picture. People are dying in there. Like where's the booze yeah right. So william bradford who would go on to be the governor of the plymouth colony for thirty years that winter in his diary couldn't stop talking about the beer dearest diary. It has been another long and thirsty. Day here at the plymouth colony. How i long for the cool sweet feeling of a droplet of beer rolling down my throat part. That's not real. Almost half of the pilgrims were going to die that winter and the is what he was worried about now to be fair people back then. Were very leery of water. There had been problems with water. Purity in england and they thought that beer was safer nonetheless. They really enjoyed their liquor

Plymouth Plymouth Rock America William Bradford England
Talking Upcycling With ReGrained's Daniel Kurzrock

Smart Kitchen Show

02:07 min | 11 months ago

Talking Upcycling With ReGrained's Daniel Kurzrock

"Man. I'm great michael chief. She officer also. Ceo and co founder. You wear on ads over there. So i'm excited. Start today because we're going to talk about up cycling something that you've been pretty intimately involved with for about a decade now and i wanna talk about white kind of where word is and where it's going but i also want to hear a little bit about how you got started. So we're i think the original idea behind regan was you're basically taking spent beer ingredients. Barley hops and making protein bars. Is that right or did. I got the wrong close. Actually the first thing we ever made was bred. Okay yeah so. I was An underage home. Brewer as an undergrad. Start making my own beer because by the ingredients to do it and use about a pound for six pack. Every time we made a batch Equivalent of blake twenty thirty pounds of oatmeal with barley. But it's like saturate Soggy basically like a like meal and putting it into brad to sell the friends to brew for free didn't have the cycling language you know at the at the time that came that came later Then hip problem bread next day. Buy fresh bread anymore A lot of bars is an avid doors person and the started making making bars with it. You know as we were really thinking through what we're actually doing today around ingredients. I'm so glad that that pressed product instead of like throwing this in the compost spin which most responsible people wanna down in there being responsible you when once it further and used it for food. Consumption made those into calories that people consume what. Where'd you get that. He had actually bake bread with like spent grains. Yeah so there's actually a really rich. History of home brewers and also brewpubs Round the world probably more familiar with Around the us of using some portion of their grants from burn. Because it's well documented for many years of this really nutritious material bring has taken a sugar was left is a lot of great protein and

Regan Brewer Michael Brad United States
Bottled Vs. Tap: The Battle to Quench Our Thirst

Gastropod

01:54 min | 11 months ago

Bottled Vs. Tap: The Battle to Quench Our Thirst

"For as long as humans have been around. We've always needed to find sources of drinking water but that challenge is not look the same throughout our history. Peter glick is co-founder of the pacific institute. Which is a nonprofit focused on global water issues. He's also the author of the book bottled and sold the story behind our obsession with bottled water. And peter classifies. The human motor relationship into three different eras the first euro of water. In my way i think about it was really before. Civilization when humans were hunter-gatherers and we simply depended on nature to provide the water that we could find in rivers or lakes and life was miserable and short and brutish anyway and that era lasted literally for hundreds of thousands of years during the evolution of humanity. Frank chapelle as geologist who specializes in the chemistry of groundwater and he wrote a book called wellsprings a natural history of bottled spring waters. Frank says that finding clean water to drink was one of the many things that made our life as early humans so miserable and so brutish water by its very nature is not usually particularly clean is a very good solvent. It'll dissolve just about anything which means it picks up whatever it travels through and intermingled with whatever gets into it good and bad rocks quote unquote organic matter by which i mean. Basically animal poo and so drinking water for a lot of most of human history. A few how to source of clean water. Then you're pretty lucky because it's just not very common and humanity has gathered by these rare clean water sources but sometimes we do have to leave home and so one of the earliest examples of bottled water. We have has been just finding ways to put that water in a container for storage and then transported either for own use or to sell

Peter Glick Pacific Institute Frank Chapelle Peter Frank
Chef Kelly English on His New Orleans Influences

flavors unknown podcast

01:24 min | 11 months ago

Chef Kelly English on His New Orleans Influences

"Welcome chef to Flavors unknown really excited to have you on the show today. Well thanks for having me. I'm excited to be here. Thank you so. Let's just dive into it. So you grew up in new orleans. You are china from from yawning. So why kind of food free unswayed you exposed to. When you kid you know new orleans is such a unique and special food town. It's easy when you're growing up in a place like that to kind of take it for granted and so when i was growing up we we ate a lot of family meals. We ate at my grandparents house a lot and it was really leaving new orleans that made me realize how special food wise and and how how unique you know. The places i grew up was in the things That i knew what they taste like or were kind of like the backbone of the way that we eat. I went to college in mississippi at ole miss and it was getting there that i realized like man miss some of these things and then moved to spain first semester in college and there are a lot of common threads that i saw in the in barcelona over there that reminded me of new orleans and kind of spark a new. A new thing in me that made me want to do this for a living so it was kind of those very different approaches but but also very similar connections in the way that they treat food in the reverend's that they pay to that. That made me say okay

New Orleans China Mississippi Spain Barcelona
Alexandra Dudley Tells Us How to Host the Ultimate Sustainable and Waste-Free Feast

What The Focaccia with Niki Webster and Bettina Campolucci Bordi

02:50 min | 11 months ago

Alexandra Dudley Tells Us How to Host the Ultimate Sustainable and Waste-Free Feast

"Can you tell us some of your tips for hosting at to begin with and then we'll sort of move into the sustainable waste free as as we go along with our chat but often linked that often. Yeah absolutely so. We'll all your best tips for hosting in general and especially now because i think lots of people are going to get right back into it. Yeah i think so. Well i so. I would always say always go with something. It sounds like a boring while but always cook all prepare food that i think you feel comfortable with and that you know like this is not the time to stop pulling out some kind of like from birla like souffle and like do something very impressive that you have no idea how to do what you feel quite nervous about. During his challenge saw it will go wrong. You'll end up having to throw it away or you know you'll be very stressed and you won't be happy with it and you will enjoy. I guess the whole process. I tend to go with say go with a meal a menu that may eat feels comfortable even if it feels quite simple I in fact. I would tend to like them on the simple side and then there's a lot that you can do with and presentation. So things like loads of hubs or like beautiful flaked almonds You know edible flowers if a going ready fancy and then even even just the way you present things so if you are doing a pasta dish which cannot be quite other. Simple combine quite problematic. If you're feeding maybe like ten. P. t. s. you'll planting templates. Maybe rather than placing up on the hulk. Just just put it all on like your biggest sobbing dish and that common to the table with this huge kind of plaza of like spaghetti tumbling sprinkles again like some some hubs. Fresh hubs our we can use like some cheese if you're using And i just think the so much drama you bring so much drama to the table by kind of presenting this big sort of like pile of wonderful spaghetti and it's just such a simple way of doing something. Actually an actual fat is just quite a simple. It's quite simple dish. So i think presentation has a lot to do with it and then table wise. I'm a big fan of making the table. Just like a little bit more special. I think especially when you will entertaining it really. Just kind of like just elevate the evening and set up a bit. And you know the people of salient. But i did not things. have matching cutlery. Have glosses and all this stuff and actually that. I don't think any of that stuff matters. But i think it was not little things that you can do just to make it feel a bit more special so i often by like loads of lemons or you can even buy in like a bag of apples and not put them in a big bowl or even have them running down the table. That just sort of makes little bit a little bit

How to Balance Cheese and Wine

The Maria Liberati Show

01:57 min | 11 months ago

How to Balance Cheese and Wine

"National wine and cheese mon- tell us some pairings that you would recommend for. Let's say for fourth of july picnics. Any any ideas for you. People are doing this thing now. Where they're doing this shark to re boards where they put together ryan of cheeses and meats and door vegetables fruits whatever they make shark to reward. So what types of cheese is if we have the cheeses. What types of line to repair with cheese is you know. What would you recommend. You know. I've been asked a lot through the years at the winery in and different questions. Come in on the blog show and lashing what wine to pair with what meat or wind. Power was what cheese and all that and it. A simple rule always liked adopt. Follow is don't let the wine overpower your cheese. And don't let the cheese overpower your wine. You tried to keep a balance on everything and that's really the key to it more than any this cheese ago. Great with this weiner's something if you have a balanced where you can take a bite the cheese and fills your mouth and you love the taste of an lingers being you take a sip of wine and instead of the cheese covering up that wind the wind then takes over and starts filling your mouth and you're getting a taste of that the after taste and then you can take more cheese and again takes prominence. So it's really a matter of as long as the. The wine is intrigued powerful. I don't think i would go something of big heavy red wine with Most any of these cheeseburgers. After coming out. I would try to stay light and fruity and there's a lot of good sweet wines i love verster meaner myself. I think that goes with a lot of the different cheeses.

Ryan Weiner
What Happens to Wine Grape Waste?

BrainStuff

02:09 min | 11 months ago

What Happens to Wine Grape Waste?

"Takes about two point six pounds. That's one point. Two kilograms of grapes to produce a standard seven hundred fifty milliliter bottle of wine and after the grapes are squeezed about twenty percent of that way remains in the form of grape skins seeds and stems pomace or grape marc as grape waste is called is something that the global wine industry produces a lot of close to twelve million tonnes or eleven million metric tonnes every year. So what a wineries do with. All that gooey stuff you might think the disposing vast quantities of it would be a sticky problem but even though the tasty juice has been squeezed out the material that's left behind has variety of uses as a two thousand five article from winemaker magazine notes. The exact composition of pomace depends upon. What sort of wine has been made. And at what point. The liquid was extracted with white wine. For example the juice is removed prior to fermentation so the policy is richard and sugar nitrogen and acids with red wine in which the grapes are fermented juice. Before being pressed there's less sugar left and not as much of the tenants that give wine its bitter taste but fermented pomace still contains a whole lot of different components including cellulose tartric acid trace amounts of other organic acids sugars tannin's plant pigments and some aromatic chemicals. One way to get rid of all of that. Pomace is to use it to make other types of alcoholic beverages. Pumice from white wine can be distilled to make grappa a traditional italian brandy. Pumice also traditionally has been recycled as fertilizer or animal feed but scientists are increasingly interested in studying ways of extracting useful components of great mark for applications such as fuel alcohol production and fuel energy production as well as the production of bio circuits which are used in environmental cleanups food. scientists have also realized. Pa contains a lot of healthy stuff. Anti-oxidants fiber and compounds that helped moderate blood sugar and create a feeling of fullness. Just to name a few these can be used to make other foods. Healthier pumice has been used as an ingredient in bread cereal pasta cheese ice cream and has even been added to meat and seafood

Winemaker Magazine Richard
The Foragers Dilemma with Alexis Nikole Nelson

Bon Appetit Foodcast

02:40 min | 11 months ago

The Foragers Dilemma with Alexis Nikole Nelson

"Wanna ask you about your background. So i know you're not the first generation of of nelson or whatever surname. There is on your maternal side in this in the ohio. You've talked a bit about your mom's relationships with plants and what you learned from her. But i also know it goes even further back than that. So how far back. You want to tell me about how that kind of relationship with the land is part of your family. Oh absolutely so. We're very lucky because not not every person of color especially not every black person in the united states is lucky enough to be able to trace a lot of their familial history back on my mom's side of the family with her father they'd been they've been in the united states since the sixteen hundreds they were farmers in new england after the revolutionary war. And with my mom's mom's side of the family with my my nanna. She was a second generation. Cape verde an immigrant to the cape cod area and with a lot of bigger and immigrant families. A lot of them brought foraging practices with them and i mean my nanna was like working in the cranberry bogs in the nineteen thirties. To help better support her family and bats a whole lot of exposure to plant lice. But you just get to learn about with each passing day while you're out there so tell me more about that. She was picking the cranberries and selling them for a while. Picking the cranberries for a someone else's business which one of many reasons why i think being a forager of colour is very revolutionary as because nine times out of ten historically in even in the present day you're a person of color and are attending the land it is typically for someone else's game and that person tends to be richer and unfortunately often quieter than you and so when you go back far enough has some sort of connection to foraging because none of us would be here wasn't for that action but for the indigenous people who are already here like that. That was food that was eating and then a lot of those indigenous folks in turn taught black people who were enslaved. Those same tips and tricks in about the same kinds of plants because as a black person living on a plantation. You're lucky if you were getting enough to eat to sustain the kind of duress you were putting your body there every day so it was smart to know how to forage. How trap how to fish how to hunt so you could better take care of yourself. Better take care of your family and the rest of your community

United States Nelson Cape Verde Ohio Cape Cod New England
Chocpocalypse Now! Quarantine and the Future of Food

Gastropod

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Chocpocalypse Now! Quarantine and the Future of Food

"I've been hearing about this quarantine book for many years many many years because our publisher has been waiting for it for many many years. And certainly i never thought i'd have any personal experience with the topic but i did always wonder and i saved up the question just for this episode. Where did you both get the idea for a book about quarantine. Let's go back a long long long time ago. you know. we are married and We were on a trip together in australia our first time. They're together Staying in sydney and at one point a local friend invited us out to a picnic and that was out on a peninsula on the other side of the bay from sydney proper and it was right by what is now in a hotel. it's called q. Station and it was a quarantine station. That jeff said. Now it's a hotel that remote oceanfront location that made a great for quarantining passengers travelling to australia by boat in the eighteen hundreds turns out to be delightful for people looking to get away from it all today. And that's not uncommon for sites that were used for quarantine in the past when you hear about a quarantine station. They tend be ruins They tend to have been turned into something else The maybe they've been eliminated entirely. Torn down a raised as if quarantine was this obsolete. Strange thing that don't do anymore and so somewhat. Ironically given how the book turned out you know our initial question was really kind of asking what was quarantine. Why did we do it. Where did it go. And why has it gone away. You have to remember. This was many years break ovid but once we began looking we realized that actually corentin hadn't gone anywhere and so in fact as we kind of started pulling the strings of quarantine. We started seeing it everywhere. you know. it's all over the world that was happening at various scales. It was happening in agriculture. Happening with human diseases. Like bola and covid nineteen but it was also even happening in things like on an interplanetary scale with talking to people who worked at nasa and the european space agency and terms of how they quarantine how they help prevent contamination of earth. From off world microorganisms. Or how they help protect places like the moon and mars from bringing earthly microbes to them. And so yeah. It was a huge topic and it really just seemed like the kind of thing that a book would be a lot of fun to do. And so we sorta dived into this thing. I mean that trip to australia was in two thousand nine. That's a little while ago. Not only are we still married but the book is finally coming out. So

Sydney Australia Corentin Jeff Bola European Space Agency Nasa
Restaurants are Back - What Now?

Smart Kitchen Show

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Restaurants are Back - What Now?

"Jen story this week about some some news on foot traffic restaurants which is up fifty percents since the beginning of the year. This that's apprising but like what we're seeing there is. we're hearing. what. The data origen. Yeah so this. Data came from a tech company called Marketing tech company. I reach and they do a lot of restaurant marketing tech and they basically said this week. That foot traffic to restaurants and also they did put some retail in with that In this report But it's up forty eight percent since the start of twenty twenty one which You know. I think like you said mike. It's not terribly surprising. Now that Vaccines are more. Widely distributed and economy is in cities are fooling reopened or almost reopened so This was always gonna happen I think i did think it was interesting And they didn't go into excruciating detail about this but san diego california had a one hundred ninety eight percent increase in foot traffic since january. Twenty twenty one and then los angeles and san jose were next both at one hundred forty one percent so You know california took. I think it was Five of the top seven spots on the list of cities with increases in foot traffic I wonder how much of that is. Due like what states had mandated kind of limitations on restaurants. If you're down. Maybe in the south where there wasn't as many restrictions to delete governors be more permissive to the jumps weren't as big but also like another more interesting part of the story is When you read about it and kind of what. We're hearing as well as like so many of these restaurants that are seeing surging traffic or having trouble staffing and this kind of goes to another story. I read earlier in the week. And that's so many folks who were in the restaurant industry during the pandemic found other work and they don't plan on going

Marketing Tech JEN California Mike San Diego San Jose Los Angeles
Scotch Whisky Makers Welcome Suspension of Costly US Tariffs

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Scotch Whisky Makers Welcome Suspension of Costly US Tariffs

"Scott single malt whisky makers and drinkers can breathe a sigh of relief because the US has agreed to suspend tariffs on the Scottish exports the move comes after a long standing trade route between the US and the E. U. has been resolved president Donald Trump and pays the twenty five percent tariffs in October twenty nineteen that's part of the trade dispute to the aerospace subsidies well the U. K. no longer is any member it belongs to the block when the tires were introduced the Scotch whisky association estimates that the tariffs led to a thirty percent full in total exports to the U. S. that's about the same as eight hundred and fifty million dollars since March twenty twenty one Karen Thomas landed

Donald Trump Scott United States U. Scotch Whisky Association Karen Thomas
The Myth of Healthy Eating

Bon Appetit Foodcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

The Myth of Healthy Eating

"I want to talk about your relationship to cooking and how it relates to your relationship with your body and food but i wanna also talk about what your life was like before the pandemic and how that changed radically i knew pre pandemic of course and you knew me and our lives were you know. They were what they were. They were very right. I mean look honestly. Sometimes i'm amazed looking back at the pace at which i was living my life and i feel like i look back at. I'm just like how much longer do. I think that could have gone on. Before i just ca plots you know like just totally lost it. I think for me without looked like was just. I've always kind of been a yes woman. I think that's just how. I am naturally inclined to live my life. It's like i want to go to work. And then i want to go to spin class and then i wanna go out to dinner and then i wanna come back home and cook my own lunch that i take it to work the next day and i'm going to bike to work. I'm going to do it all over again. And you have this huge appetite for life. You were like the queen of the eleven pm cooking projects right right and it's funny because i remember kind of reveling in what i thought that was doing for me. I was so into the idea that these ten thirty pm like after everyone who gone to bed like cooking sessions where i was alone in the kitchen like my roommate's gone upstairs. Whatever i was so into the idea of it being like my meditative zen zone. I was like this is how i'm relaxing. It's like no you're not you're being a psycho And i wasn't meditating. I wasn't relaxing. I was filling my mind with the minutia of what do i need to prep. Warsh what do i need to slice so that my brain could not contain a single other thought from my terrifying little brain

Warsh
Summer Chocolate Brownie Recipe

The Maria Liberati Show

03:09 min | 1 year ago

Summer Chocolate Brownie Recipe

"Chocolate is so popular for this summer. One of my favorite recipes to bring along for summer picnics. And you know. The fourth of july's coming up in just mentioned father's day is around the corner One of my favorite things to make is the chocolate coffee brownies squares. It's it's a recipe. That's in my book. The basic art of coffee. That was actually one of the giveaway books last month. So whether you're celebrating fourth of july or father stay home or away. These chocolate coffee. Brownies squares are easy to make. And take with you in. Besides who doesn't love you work effect of chocolate and coffee together and besides everybody said that you know in the survey that they're gonna be camping and or taking trips and bringing chocolate with them. So maybe you'll blake to take these chocolate coffee brownie squares with you. They are easy to transport. Here's the recipe a half a cup of flour a half a cup of butter third cup of sugar. One quarter cup of dried shredded. Coconut plus one tablespoon of dry shredded coconut unsweetened the one tablespoon extra is for the topping to eggs five tablespoons of mill two tablespoons of espresso coffee two tablespoons of dried instant coffee one teaspoon of pure vanilla a teaspoon of baking powder one tablespoon of powdered sugar two tablespoons of unsweetened cocoa powder plus two tablespoons for topping blend butter and sugar with an electric mixer till blended in the butter. Soft and creamy in. Sugar is well blended in ad in the eggs and five tablespoons of milk place in the sifted flour cocoa vanilla baking powder mix so well blended then put in coconut powdered instant coffee stir to well blended. Preheat the oven to three hundred. Seventy five degrees line square pan with parchment. Paper spread the mixture in the pan. Bake in a preheated oven for forty minutes in a bull mixed two tablespoons of powdered cocoa powdered sugar and hot espresso coffee and blindness together when the brownies are done turn off the oven. Take brownies out of the oven than place. The topping on and then place the brownies back in to see the warm oven for just five minutes. Take out and let them cool for five to ten minutes in another dish mixed two tablespoons of shredded coconut with two teaspoons of instant coffee powder when the brownies or cool cut into squares and sprinkle with shredded coconut topping before serving scoop of chocolate gelato. Ice cream refers in yogurt served on the side. Intensifies the well factor of this desert. If you're serving this at a picnic or you know a get together or sit down and get together you know. That's a a great way to serve it with some ice cream or gelato refers in yogurt on the side.

Blake
Masterful Pimento Cheese

FoodStuff

02:31 min | 1 year ago

Masterful Pimento Cheese

"Cheese is a type of sandwich spread that can include. It can include many things but but at its base. It's shredded cheese and chopped pimento peppers and some kind of creamy binder To to create a thick and slightly chunky. But yelich just spreadable consistency. So let's let's break that down The cheese is often a shredded short age semi hard tangy cheese like Often a blend of white and orange cheddars and or similar cheeses like colby or jack or even processed cheeses like velveeta the pimentos. These are usually jarred or canned sweet peppers. Which will have been up healed and cooked No seeds yep. Mentos are a type of sweet pepper. That turned just bright orangey red when they're ripe whereupon they are sweet and just a tiny bit tangy like like little to no bitterness vegetal flavors in there You can also use pickled peppers or a roast your own sweet peppers of whatever variety you choose a the binder is yes often mayo often dukes brand towards the east coast and blue plate brand a more towards like louisiana sometimes cream cheese may be involved as well and right. You generally wanna use enough to stick everything together but not enough to like make a sandwich kinda soggy or drippy right also. Most people will say that you don't wanna over mix the ingredients. It'll get kind of mushy. Which isn't the idea somehow trying to go through my rolodex of Experienced it can can vary pretty widely and speaking of to this base. Any number of seasonings may be added a salt and pepper onion powder or freshly grated onion or green onions or garlic to sheer sauce. Hot sauce apple cider vinegar lemon juice paprika cayenne pepper chili powder chili sauce like a saracho horseradish mustard. It can also feature kind of like guest star mixon's like jalapenos or fresh sweet pepper dill pickles. Bacon smoked gouda blue cheese. Parmesan toasted pecans chopped olives. I've seen one recipe call for per pseudo. Though right.

Colby East Coast Louisiana Mixon Apple Bacon
Is Eating Local Really More Sustainable?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Is Eating Local Really More Sustainable?

"Researchers alexander stein and fabien. Santini just published a fascinating paper on the sustainability of local food systems in the political discussion. They write the promotion of local food. Systems and short supply. Chains is sometimes presented as a means to increase the resilience of the food system. And it's also suggested as a means to improve the environmental footprint of the food system and quote so in their paper. They've reviewed scientific literature on the environmental social and the economic aspects of sustainability and. They reached some surprising conclusions. First off is eating local actually easier on the environment. When consumers tried to eat local they often focus on how far their food has to travel from its source to their plates. You might remember a popular book called the hundred mile diet which exemplified this approach. Barbara kings hovers bestselling animal vegetable. Miracle is another example and one assumption behind this trend is that eating locally will lower the carbon footprint of our diets however this is not necessarily the case for one thing shipping large quantities foods in cargo ships or trains may actually burn less fossil fuel than transporting the same amount of food across much shorter distances in hundreds of small trucks and now just consider thousands of consumers driving two farms one by one in their cars to pick up their local food. This thinking also assumes that transporting food is the only or even the primary factor in how much carbon is emitted in the production of that food but in fact food production can produce a lot of greenhouse gases prior to this final leg of the journey in fact stein in santini conclude that the carbon footprint of diet depends a lot more on what types of foods you choose then. It doesn't how many miles they travel to reach your plate.

Alexander Stein Fabien Santini Barbara Kings Stein
Picky Eating Or Something Else?

Food Issues

02:33 min | 1 year ago

Picky Eating Or Something Else?

"Why. Don't we dive right in and talk about picky eating. I think it's safe to say that. Most parents have kids with picky eaters and in fact there was a recent survey that showed that thirty nine percent of parents say that it's a challenge in their home. So what do you see in your practice. I see a lot of picky eating and there's levels of picky eating the general. Please eat your vegetables. And then there was very serious. Actually medical condition called avoided. Restrictive food intake disorder or kids are frantic about food and react in a very abnormal way. That's very difficult for parents to take care of. So it's a significant problem and researchers also found that picky eating is associated. Now is hard to do this with a direct causation. Because we're not gonna starve children and see what happens to them. But there's a direct association between picky eating and an almost double chance of developing mental health. Diagnosis wow okay and do we know why that is. I think that were. We have a pretty good theory about that. Which is that. Your body isn't the government and a deficit. So if you don't have it you budget cut and survival is the most important thing. So that's going. Be the last thing budget cut so things like learning to speak a second language and mood and and energy those are things that will get cut right right and i had seen that you wrote an article about anxiety and picky eating and obviously now we're seeing increasing rates anxiety and depression particularly among children due to the pandemic so what kind of role does anxiety play in in picky eating. an excellent question julie and plays a big role. Because would you think about kids in today's society especially with the shutdown and pandemic that's raging. They have control of so few things the one thing they do get to control they can close their mouth and you can't make them. Yeah so so. That's a place that they very often. What people are anxious. They want to find something. They can have some providence over right so so for kids. It's like well you make me go to bed. You make me stay home making me wear this mask but gosh darn it. I don't have to eat that. All right yeah. So that's where so very often. These issues are playing out in food. So i'm seeing more and more psychological issues that we used to take care of other ways playing out in my realm in nutrition.

Intake Disorder Depression Julie