Audioburst Search

Feminism

Get woke and expand your idea of what it means to be a feminist today. Listen to insightful audio content on trailblazing women, feminism and gender equality. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

How Rolling Stones Suzy Exposito Made History with Her Bad Bunny Cover Story

Latina to Latina

6:38 listening | 1 d ago

How Rolling Stones Suzy Exposito Made History with Her Bad Bunny Cover Story

"I feel like I am constantly pitching celebrities and publicists. So let me ask you before we even get into the making of this. How were you able to score and interview with Bad Bunny? Luckily I had interviewed him before I interviewed him at the Latin grammys in two thousand eighteen. And I seem to have caught him at a time where he was definitely. You know making it big in the Latin space but had just you know started to crack the anglophone market and I went to the Latin grammys and figured what this is where I'm going to find him. Generally bad bunny is a bit of an elusive chanteuse. So he to quote Mariah Carey He doesn't like doing very many interviews and at the time I got like maybe fifteen twenty minutes with him honestly. He's just such a freak. I love it. I feel like Latin music has been sorely lacking in legit freaks. And I'm someone who had described myself as a freak by that. I mean people who are not afraid to try new things people who aren't afraid of like breaking ground who aren't afraid of experimenting whether it's like you know like bad bunny. I think it's in both his style like personal style and also in his music and in the ideas that he shares so I kept in touch. With the publicist. Sue Haley. Sola in I told her I was like I really want him on the cover of rolling stone and she was like okay. Let me know how we can make that happen was like well? Let me know the next time. He's putting out an album and we'll start to work on it. I think lake just every time they would talk about the cover. I be like I think bunnies GonNa do something really big soon. We should be ready for it. there's also the Jaylo insecure a super bowl coming up. I didn't know he was going to be performing with them but I suspected because he did that song with Jaylo before He might be one of their surprise guests. And then he appeared. Soi in Swarovski crystals in so I went back to my bosses and I was like look this dude. He's blowing up like he performed for the biggest most mainstream television audience in the United States at this point like come on and they were like. Okay let's talk about it so I talked to sue Haley and I was like I think we need to make an impression and she was like okay. He's going to be on fallon. Why don't we stop by your office? I was like stop by the office. Bring a few of the songs I'm going to invite my editors and then they can hear the music and like chat with him a little bit and so he came to the office and I only invited like maybe six or seven people and within like two songs. The office just filled up with people. Once they realized bad bunny was in. The office went from like ten people to like fifty sixty people crowded into the conference room. Just like listening to his music. He played a few songs and people were super stoked. I mean the energy in the room was just like so. It was just like dynamite. You know like people were dancing. Kinda grooving with it editors for like are a we can. We can see the appeal and he's so charismatic even for people like who don't speak Spanish. He's his charisma. Just like shines through. They were like all right. Let's do a cover like that's how it happened. How did Gabriela Bailing Gary Get to shoot the cover? Oh it was. It was an idea our creative director had. We couldn't fly anybody there. So Katrina was like. Why don't we ask bad? Bunny if there's anyone like within close proximity to him who might be able to take some nice photos and like she'd already taken photos for him a lot of the photos that you saw in his instagram. I mean over the past three years. She's taken those photos. They've been dating for three years and he hadn't gone public with her and I didn't go into this in the story. A lot of people they say nasty things about people's partners especially because she's a civilian. She is not involved in any of this. She's not a celebrity and so he kind of wanted to protect her. But of course in quarantine. It became apparent that he had someone there with him. And who better to photograph him than the Woman? Who's been secretly photographing him this entire time. At least like his assent in so she took amazing photos. She really did and she did it with an iphone which. I love did it. Add an element then to also be able to have the first let the Anna shoot a cover for ruling. Yes absolutely I mean. I think I'm going to get in trouble for saying this. Because it's it's a fact like most of the people who shoot covers and it's not just at rolling stone but it's across the board in print journalism. Most of them are men. I think it's amazing in a way like how this worked out. At first we were so scared we were like. Oh my God. Are we going to make this happen? Are we GONNA have to shoot this cover over zoom like what take I just really love? The gabby like agreed to do this and she knocked it out of a park. I'm like really proud of her. And Benito's really proud of her to. I told him in an interview I was like. Did you know that your girlfriend is going to be the source To cover? He was like he's like. Wow he was so proud of her and he didn't take any credit for it at all. It's not like he was like Oh yes. She could only do it because he was like. She is talented and like He. He wants people to see that he was just like thrilled to kind of like push her into the spotlight

Sue Haley Mariah Carey Bunny United States Jaylo Gabriela Bailing Sola Benito Katrina Director Anna
Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

Skimm'd from The Couch

2:42 listening | 6 d ago

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

"I WanNa talk about the concept of mentor ship because it sounds like from your story and from what you've said in the past you didn't necessarily have it earlier in your career or you've talked about the lack of being able to see people and be like. Oh that's someone that looks like me or has the same background as me. How do you think about that? Now that you are in a position to obviously be a mentor. What do you think about the importance of it? I feel like when I learned about mentorship. It was like okay. They're going to take you out to lunch and then you're GonNa do this. And it was a very strict idea and euro idea. I think of what I thought it was going to be but I think over time now I realize it. It really is a two way street in has to be more of a relationship with somebody that really feels like they're also getting something out of it can't just be you asking this person for help recommendations all of those things even though that is very valid. I think it really has to be more of a two way street of that person. Feeling like okay. I'm investing in this for these reasons or this person really adds value. Or you know all those things I think it just it has to make sense and I think they I've been blessed to have really good bosses and those people have become mentors to me because I think the over time in working for them and understanding them them getting understanding of me. We were able to come to a place of okay. I can reach out to this person but I think it's hard like I wouldn't have had that relationship with them from blind emailing them or just damning them like there were reasons and there was a method to Hauer relationships. Developed over time. You obviously work for someone. That's a legend. Now in the business that you worked for Sela be before that you've worked for women that have had huge impacts in careers. You also talk about. How what you. WanNa do requires pushing boundaries? Change there's a certain sense of fearlessness. Just hearing you speak. Would you describe yourself that way? Everyone says that but I don't think of it that way. I just think that if I'm not doing this no one else will do if I don't do this work. Honestly I've looked and searched for other people in it's just not really insight and I think they a lot of people can get to positions like this and just be grateful and super comfortable and not push into see like I got the job or I got access to this network or I was able to make this amount of money. So I'm just GonNa sit here and enjoy it because I've worked hard but that's just not the way that my parents raised me. It's time to work even harder and so I don't really think is fearlessness. I think it's just the way it is

Sela Hauer
A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:57 listening | 6 d ago

A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

"We are very excited to have Lindsey People's Wagner. Lindsay is the editor in chief of Teen Vogue magazine and is the youngest editor in chief of Conde NAST publication. She's also the only black female editor in chief of A. Us Fashion magazine as a career journalist. Her work focuses on the intersecting world of style identity culture and politics. Lindsey thank you so much for coming on today. We're really excited for the conversation. Thank you so much for having me. So let's start out with our basic question. Skim your resume Flores. I started religious interning into. That's really how I figured out that I even want to publications and teen. Vogue was my first actual internship and my first big internship in general so after doing that in college. It became the first job that I actually got out of college and I worked in the closet basically schlepping and doing running errands. And all the not fun things that wasn't on the hills of for a couple of years and then from there. I went to style DOT COM which merged into vogue dot com eventually. And that's when I really wanted to get into more writing and more of the storytelling and more of the behind the scenes of like how all of these pieces come together to really make a feature. And then I went to New York magazine in the cut for awhile and I mean that was an incredible experience for me because I was able to be at a place where I think you learn so much about your own story and how that plays into everything that you write or edit or that you wanna cover and I think there I was able to really flex love the muscles of things that I wanted to do from styling and producing shoots to working on you know really long. Form pieces like black and fashion. It's been over a year and a half. I would say of being editor-in-chief Teen Vogue so it's been a fun full circle moment to be back now as editor in chief and I think we've really leaned into a lot of the core things what I loved about Teen Vogue but in a modern in fresh and inclusive way that I always wanted to make it. I always love talking to people in fashion when they talk about like. Oh I started off in the closet and it's this thing and for people that aren't in fashion. It's like way that it's an actual real job that requires a lot of organization. And it's how a lot of people start off but I always think that's such a funny face when people see you working in fashion in TV or films. It looks very glamorous and it looks like you're just around town shopping and everything's breezy and their champagne and it's not that at all for those of us who've actually had to work our way out so I think that's an interesting point because you actually have to do a lot to figure out even what it takes to make a magazine come together. What something that people can't find on your linked in or that is in Google about you that you want people to know the only thing you can't really do but it's not like a secret and it's something that I have on my social media how much I love to cook. I grew up in a family. We always had to be at the dinner table. There was no fast food allowed. I find it really just calming and reminds me of home and so that's something that I really enjoy and I think it's interesting because in fashion people tend to not want to talk about food or not food to be the center of any conversation. Because there's always these very stupid pressures and anxieties around body image and how much you consume and even in this time. I think it's been really disappointing for me to see so. Many people in the industry say really insensitive things about you know not wanting to gain weight during this time and it's incredibly insensitive but also just ignorant and I want the industry to move to this place of inclusivity in a real way. I'm so grateful for this body that I have and I'm grateful to be able to make food and to be able to. You know to live this life. And that's really all that I think. Cooking food conversation should be about. Yeah and it's it's especially a very relevant conversation right now as you said thinking about so. Many people that are experiencing unexpected turns poor health that thinking about food and how we think about our bodies and being thankful for it in this moment his very different on that note about covert. You are leading a team a team that is part of Conde nast which is like any major media company has had its its ups and downs. How are you leading through this with the balance of trying to keep people calm? I know from leading our own team that it's not like we have a magic eight ball of being able to see when this ends. How have you handled this environment from a leadership perspective to be honest? I think it's been really tough because it is so open ended. We don't really know what is going to happen in the future and you can make all these plans for life and then you know life happens and I think for me. It's been a lot of just having those conversations with people you know. Do you need a mental health? Day Do you not. Do you feel like you can't do this today. And that's fine and now take on that you know today if I can and I'll figure out a way that we can move forward. That feels good for everyone. I've been having so many conversations of bandwidth and what people can just emotionally and mentally handle right now as journalists in like someone who's always overly ambitious. There's so many ideas and things that I always WANNA do. But I've been very transparent with my staff of like this is a great idea and I think this would be cool but I'm not trying to pressure anyone in ad anyone's workload of this is a cool idea but like I can't emotionally handle anymore worker. I can't spend any more time on this right now and I think we all have to be understanding of that and you know so many people have had family issues and I had a family member pass away from Kovin so I'm so sorry I'm very sorry for your family. No it's okay. It's just it's emotional roller coaster for everyone. I think just trying to be understanding in that. Is You know an empathy is everything. Yeah speaking about empathy is studies and more information is coming out that shows Cova nineteen infecting and killing people of color at a disproportionately higher rates. I think that there's been a lot of conversation about how this can reveal inequalities and disparities in our society that sometimes people don't spend time or don't WanNa think about as someone that has written about the overlap between culture and politics. I'm just curious to talk about how you're thinking through this moment and the type of data that we're seeing it just sucks to see that people of color going to be affected even more in the situation because you know people have covered just disproportionately don't have access to healthcare. And I mean really what this. Kobe situation is put so much light on his problems with class. And how we treat certain people in how we give you know other people privileges and I think it's it's been really upsetting to see a lot of popular influencers. You know be able to get tested really quickly and be able to have access to be able to get any medical advice and to be able to just hop in their RV and go to some house and be able to just escape and this is a reality for a lot of people have colored. They can't get the help that they need and I think for us. It's a constant conversation that we're having of. How do we amplify the voices of people of Color this because it just spans to so many things like even in my hometown from Wisconsin and the Wisconsin primary was like Sony? My family members were saying people of color are going to be directly affected by this election. And they're not being you know comforted in this at all. The polling stations are actually safe. And there's no hand sanitizer. They're they're not able to wash their hands in the bathroom. But they're told you know you need to just wait in line here for three hours. It affects so many different things and I think the economics of it and you know this class war is just. It's crazy and I think the it makes me really upset because it's going to have such a lasting effects on people colors communities that won't even have the resources to make it better and I mean we're going to continue to figure out ways that we can help in ways that we can make those communities feel like we're at least here for them because there are a lot of people in situations that won't be able to get out of this speaking of how you grow up. You grew up in Wisconsin. Tell us a little bit about what your family was like. Oh I have a really loving family. it's weird interview. My family is the best people planet. And it's just been really hard for us but I think that I grew up in a family just has really strong faith and I think that that has been a big point in my life. My Dad is a pastor. My husband's status pastor. And I think in these times you really kind of on your faith to help you through this and so I'm regardless of you know nervous being sick and this just being a really crazy time. I think that's really stuck with me and I think that the older I've gotten the more that I'm grateful of the ways that my parents have grounded me. I'm not any of these things that people may think in fashion. That isn't really my identity and my identity is really who I am in the integrity that I have as a human being. I think that you know we are trying to just walk through this with as much grace in humility that. They've instilled in me that I can. Do you think your family than like looking back on who? You are would be surprised at what you've become today. Yes no I mean. I was always very opinionated on a lot of artistic things like my mom always jokes you know they like allowed my sister and I to pick out colors for our bedroom and my sisters chose really you know. Pale floral wallpaper very basic in my opinion and I was like this. None of this will work for me. I need a custom color and my mom was like. Who Do you think you are? Yeah I can see that being such a pain in the ass for a mob like just pick a fucking color. Your that was me. She saved like all of my art projects and she was. She's that mom and so she always has like we were really upset when the glitter spill and we. We always had to have talks with you about things. Aren't going to go your way and I mean I was always definitely into creative. Things of his incenting Lessons Piano Violin. I like to dry like those. Are I love to do all of those things but I think it? The fashion stuff didn't come 'til lot later for sure just because the nature of growing out in the Midwest. You don't know anybody really who works at a publication and so it took a while for me to figure out really how. I wanted to use all those creative

Editor In Chief Teen Vogue Lindsey People Wisconsin Conde Nast A. Us Fashion Magazine Midwest Lindsay Google Kovin New York Cova Kobe Sony
How to Feel Your Pandemic Feels

Unladylike

10:41 listening | Last week

How to Feel Your Pandemic Feels

"Basically been living in the upside down where one global pandemic and to home is where the everything is allegedly essential jobs gyms daycare centers doctors offices. Your neighborhood B. Y. O. Beaver like they've all moved home. Yeah covert has really put a fresh spin on the idea of having it all kristen which is why. We're starting this season of unladylike with one of the most loaded questions you can ask someone these days. How are you doing? Yeah I mean I think we can all agree with the unladylike listener at the top of the show that it is not ideal. This is a super emotional. Time for folks on so many levels and a lot of us are experiencing just different shades of grief over lost loved ones lost jobs or simply just like a loss baseline peace of mind and kristen as of this recording. You and I haven't had close friends or family members who've gotten sick from Cova but the pandemic has definitely changed our plans for twenty twenty like by this time we would have already been back from an East Coast tour where we were supposed to meet one of our favorite humans face to face for the very first time. Yeah our first tour stop was going to be in. Chicago home to Tyler. Fetter the amazing artists who illustrated are unladylike book and we decided that we still needed to call up tyler anyway for this episode to find out how she's doing so tyler just published a book of her own and it honestly couldn't come at a better time for those grappling with a lot of loss right now dancing. The pity party is a graphic memoir. Which is like a graphic novel. But it's a true story. It's not like a regular memoir with a lot of graphic injury in. It feels weird every time I say Anyway it's about my mom dying of cancer when I was nineteen and it's like the whole Enchilada from Lake. She first felt symptoms diagnosis than when she died on the funeral. And everything and then learning to like be an adult without a living on and it's not one hundred percent sad. A lot of it is sad. But it's not only it's not like the no folk or something. This unladylike episode isn't one hundred percent sad. Ever Tyler says that creating dancing at the pity party was essential for her processing her. Mom's death and also being able to make art through that and we think that hearing from someone who's really been through it and come out the other side of grief can hopefully offer some perspective and comfort listeners. Right now and speaking of listeners. Kristen after we hear from Tyler we're going to hear from an ladies who've left us voice memos and called in to share. How cove is impacting. Their day to day lives. Then we're closing it out with a much-needed zoom trip to our favorite unladylike therapist Dr Joy Harden Bradford Christian one of the things I love the most about tyler is her way of embracing the absurdity and awkwardness in the awful. Like the time she and her two sisters had to make a very weird trip to the mall. We went shopping for like funeral. Close at Forever. Twenty one and it was like blasting like club music there and a cashier said to me in sister. Or are you looking for anything special? And we're like no that's just like keep going through all the colorful clothes trying to find anything. That was all black flash forward to this spring when tyler was supposed to be out and about for her dancing at the pity party book tour. And let's just say she hasn't needed to shop for any new outfits this time around. What is it been like to have your book come out during a pandemic? I mean not at all what. I was expecting this book. But it's kind of been nice. I mean it's such a personal story and it's about a time of like illness and death which is what's happening in the world right now so I don't know the fact that everyone is like stuck at home which is sort of the way I am even not when it's a pandemic feels like almost appropriate. It's like I don't know if it were like an adventure or something like an action book. Maybe it would be different. But it's this like emotional. Like family thing in everyone is emotional and stuck with their families. So a lot of people are experiencing grief right now. You know whether that's because family member passed or like just because life is so upside down but grief is never just like one thing and it's not static so I'm curious like how has grief evolved for you and what have you learned about it. Especially now that you've written a whole book about your mom. I think grief is something. That's really personal. And it's really different for every person who goes through it and it's something where you can't really predict how it's going to affect you so like when my mom I died. My Dad was just crying and public all the try and was kind of embarrassing the and but now I'm like you know what like it's fine. People can deal with seeing someone showing motion and like that's what he needed a now. He's doing way better and with me. I like got really sentimental in capped a ton of my mom's staff and I found myself being angry a lot at lake people who had complained about their moms where it's like. Oh my mom calls me too much. I just WANNA like punch face and I would never say any of that. I just feel like Oh yeah. That sucks but yeah. It's just everyone's different and it's still very much a part of my life. That's like another thing I've learned. It's not GonNa go away and I'm okay with that I mean so it's been eleven years now since my mom died and most of the time. I'm totally fine. It's just like something I know about myself is that I have a dad. Muhammad's like a quality of who I am but sometimes I'll just like have a whole like breakdown from like watching a movie or something really small and it's just like something I have to deal with just like any other part of my mental health has the like the current environment. The way things are like has this moment stirred up any additional emotions for you around the book or like around grief. I'm like not a particularly like touchy feely physically kind of person but I have just been wanting hugs so badly during the pandemic and I live by myself with a cat who does not like hugs but he has to deal with that. Because I'm going to give them anyway. But there is there's something relatable about the uncertainty and all of this and that was something that was really hard about my mom. Being sick is that we were sort of like itching for any kind of like positive like theories or possibilities that we could find so it sort of feels like. That's what we're doing now. It's like Oh could serve pandemic end by fall like. Are we going to be able to do Halloween? Like normal and that is like kind of how it was with my mom. I I used to think like a. Will she be able to see me graduate from College? Like do you think what's going to happen. And that uncertainty is really hard to sit with and I think we all have to do it now which is tough. What is your advice to listeners? Who want to support friends or loved ones who are experiencing grief but might not know the best way to express it and we don't want to be awkward and we don't want to bring it up because we make things uncomfortable but we also want people to know that we care. What as as someone who has gone through it. What's your advice for for folks? Who want help from the outside. I think something that's always nice is bringing up the person's parent or whatever loved one in a way that's like unrelated to their death or like if your friend mentions they're like dad or whoever to ask questions and be like. Oh Yeah what was he like? Or whatever because it's it's such like bomb to get to just talk about her when I'm sad talk about not sad stuff. I also found one of my cousins said to me after my mom died. Like I can't imagine what you're going through. And that was like my favorite thing that I knew on had said 'cause like he couldn't imagine it and he was like acknowledging that and it just made it easier to talk to him about it just like it really like validated. How I was

Tyler Kristen O. Beaver Cova East Coast Chicago Muhammad Dr Joy Harden Feely
Momentum with Cal Wilson and special guest Ali Mau

The Guilty Feminist

3:39 listening | Last week

Momentum with Cal Wilson and special guest Ali Mau

"This is the guilty feminist. The podcast in which makes noodles twenty-first-century feminists in the postseason insecurities which undermined. This is cal Wilson. Today we're talking about momentum momentum keeping that feminist all in the it's hard it's really easy assault things and then lose enthusiasm for run out of time. Isn't it like you think I'm doing pretty good job on this turnaround? Anything I haven't done that for ages. Momentum is the hardest thing is I'm just not in quality because I'm puffed from the intro. Speaking Momentum Mickey momentum got quite a lot of momentum as a career off the stage. There's a new. Instagram called her backstage. And it's show business people really. It's things that people have said. Backstage at theaters is mostly that Broadway and things like that and one of the things backstage is. I'm going to give one hundred percent of the sixty percent I have left to give this show and that's often how I feel about. Feminism is your wake up and go. I just don't have much left but I'll give one hundred percent of what I've got and I feel like that's all anyone can be expected to do. And then we need to just refresh reboot and all of that and then come back with more vengeance but keeping things that keeping going keeping resolutions. It's hard as a not really is hard. I hit something today which is also interesting. I was in a lift with two Englishwomen and they walked into the left and one of them was saying no. I really don't think you could fit a wholesome the lift and the other the other we surely opponent and the okay. Maybe it was a pony looking for a link between that and momentum. Choose to believe that the lift is Beck at a hotel. Oh I see Yes yes so. I just wanted to tell you that who'd we'd conversation between two out Englishman. I wonder because I came from a high of Florida. United with a maybe there was the horse pony upstairs like could we get some meet some cheese toasties and some English whip some English posh. Something just push women in England. Wash they were they. They hit the sort of accents that maybe that's stolen the horse to do that to you. Harnessing accent you see and you don't use thought you've all your eggs in and criminality based on socioeconomic disposition inanity basing it on the fact that two women were discussing getting a horse into a lift listen people of all regions of Britain. We'll have horses cow clooney though outrageous. I'm just GONNA deduct two point because that's not feminist. I'm making a tally on the point system. You'll being used. It's I've never done this before. We haven't you've got points for the show and you've lost one it just by noise. Who Else believes that? All English people steal horses. Nobody is supporting know that they Pity was a charitable woo. They'll just the horses in the audience that we came here so already on our conversation about momentum we have lost momentum so we cannot sustain a conversation about momentum for more than one exchange. Is there hope for feminism

Cal Wilson Beck Assault Instagram England Englishwomen Clooney Florida Britain
How Writer Karla Cornejo Villavicencio Maintains Control of Her Narrative

Latina to Latina

7:58 listening | Last week

How Writer Karla Cornejo Villavicencio Maintains Control of Her Narrative

"This book was a longtime coming. Why right now? Well it wasn't a long time coming because it didn't WANNA write it. It was like a My parents came to this country to for me to have a better life Not to dwell in the migrants of my life like I wouldn't have been an immigration lawyer. You know that's that didn't feel like the proper repayment for my parents sacrifices. It was in far enough away from their migration and I felt like a proper repayment. And that's how I thought of my life that's why I still think of my life for their migration was something so far enough from their migration that it would make gum them not remember the trauma and so writing about immigration was not it and so just wrote about music for a long time and I wanted to be the guy in high fidelity in I was like this is me. I started writing this book in Two Thousand Sixteen because because trump happened and I thought I was the best person to do it. Because I didn't have someone like me to guide me as a teenager when I was undocumented in college I knew stuff was going to get really bad. I had no idea how bad it was. Get but I just was troubled by the idea that there is just. This was all going to go down and there was nobody like me who is going to say like the things that. I ended up saying my book because there was a lot of writing about immigrants would. We were expected to be patriotic. And we were were expected to be apologetic and we were expected to prove that we were good citizens and where we were expected to be grateful and that made me sick and I was like we are not like I'm not GonNa let the stand you right in the introduction to the undocumented Americans that you wanna give the reader permission to be punk. When was the first time you gave yourself permission to be punk? I've always been punk. I never accepted the have never accepted the title of a dreamer even when before Daca existed even before I could be like. I just don't feel comfortable with you. Know the way villain is as my parents and discharge transacts in like a narrative of innocence. I was just like Mike. I don't actually like Thought it was cheesy. I'M NOT GONNA call myself at people would invite me to things like where I would have to show a cap and gown and I was like I'm not GonNa fucking do that like Kurt. Cobaine with not to unlike bunk and a lot of ways but the way I define like being punked myself. Is that you understand that your accomplishments are not just your accomplishments. You understand that you belong to a community you understand that the world is a system you understand that the food on your table came from somewhere and you can envision the last hands that touched the food before they enter the package that you just open and that it's kind of like your haunted like you're haunted by your relationship to all of the people in this In this world and You Act accordingly and it also means like not giving shit about what people expect you to act like in order to fulfill a political or corporate goal or something so one thing that like has always kind of disturbed me has been like the Portmanteau that has the prefix undock you like undocumented. Roy or like on you something because that seems like branding and I just want like undocumented kids suggest like just be individuals like understand that they can be a part of a community but understanding. They also don't need to perform anything for anybody that they don't need to be consumed and at the same time you say. The dreamers have taken up a disproportionate amount of space in the immigration discourse. Well that's the media's fault that's not the dreamers felt talk to me about that well the media has been obsessed with them like I understand that that like I'm not bill nizing anyone but any specific person or anything but like you know of course it makes sense that you know kids doing sins in caps and gowns and showing their diplomas showing their grades. And that's for her sympathy for White Middle America when I was undocumented and I was a kid I remember being in like Eighth Grade A. Medallion bit was was like the Dream Act is going to pass. He was so sure of it. Now is thirteen years old. I'm thirty now. And the reason why he told me. The Dream Act was going to pass is because Americans love children and Americans love academically achieving minorities and I remember in two thousand sixteen when we had those marches for comprehensive immigration reform. My Dad and I walked with all those immigrants and people didn't go to work. People were risks. They're losing their jobs. And we all in white because we thought that would make us look not menacing. That's just branded in my brain. Just all of us marching down like just down lower Manhattan like all of these crowds and we were not afraid and people had like Mexican flags and then there were like. Don't your Mexican flags because people are going to be think that you like? You're not patriotic. My Dad made these t shirts that he had bought in bulk in Chinatown that had like the American flag on them. In the back he wrote we are the American Drina distributed them to his his undocumented co workers at the restaurant where he worked at and we wore those t shirts. And it's like we are not the american dream because it doesn't exist and i feel like the media's enraptured with dreamers because dreamers suggest that the american dream does exist that come here. You assimilate he go to college. You join the military and you know the American dream happens. But the camera doesn't stop filming. You know like after that. It's like well what happens. That guy is a temporary solution even if there was a dream. Act like what would happen. Is that these kids. We have to take care of our parents. We have to take care of her elderly who are sick who have been doing manual labor. Many cases for decades with absolutely zero safety net even though they've been paying taxes And we have to pay for them out of pocket and you know this idea that lake the possibility of inherited wealth which really is the American dream is unattainable for us because we have to take care of our

Kurt Daca Manhattan Mike ROY Chinatown
Jennifer Justice, entertainment exec and founder, The Justice Department

Skimm'd from The Couch

6:06 listening | Last week

Jennifer Justice, entertainment exec and founder, The Justice Department

"I loved what you said about figuring out what it is about you. That's different regardless of how you grew up or your circumstances. What was that for you? And when did you start to figure that out? You know it takes a while. You're like there's no in there telling you you're great and you deserve to be here and I would see people reacting me in a different way and it took a long time it took. It took some therapy at took an executive coach really to be like you have these patterns in your life and I started seeing that when I talked and advocated for people all. It was different than other people doing it. I was really doing it from a place of I knew it was the right thing to do. And even though there were financial benefits it wasn't just like being an activist. It was really advocating for people who deserved what I was asking for an almost getting a lot of that. Push back on it. I was like okay. I'm really onto something. Because if they're just GONNA capitulate than obviously wasn't asking for an off and so it kind of drove me and I knew that that thing was that I was really good at advocating and really good at marrying art and commerce. When did you start getting into the world of US editions and entertainers? So I mean even when I was in Seattle I was hanging out in the grunge scene. You know we didn't know the whole world was paying attention even though we all these bands have been signed and not albums out. It's small in comparison to New York and so I just identify with most of them from my background. You know and they weren't college educated. Are I WANNA jump into Jay z? just lay some groundwork hair. Where was Jesse his career? How old was he roughly us about what he just recorded? The hard knock life hadn't come out yet and so she was probably what twenty eight twenty nine and he'd really reasonable doubt volume on and he was about to release hockey. It's right before he becomes a superstar. Yeah what was your first meeting with him. Like I had been a fan of reasonable doubt which when I interviewed at Carol Grade on and they're like how do you even know who he is? You know because it's an amazing at that point as many copies as it has now and then we had to go to a meeting. Def Jam which was a tiny company at the time and I'm met him for the first time walking in so only seen a picture of him and I didn't realize how tall he was and hoskin skinny was. Are you like Mr Carter? It's nice to meet you or like Jay Z. No he liked leans over in the introduces himself. And I always like. Oh I'm your day. What does he yeah? I'm Jay now it's like I'm your new attorneys. Oh you're jj you know. And that's what we're not does he call you. J. J. Yeah J. J. my good friend Jay. He's famous for being an incredible businessman. He is known to be Astute at identifying business opportunities optimizing for them and obviously doing really well and making money. How did you get him to trust you? He knew that I was fighting for him. You know that really cared about what his assets were how he should be treated and I just saw really early on. I mean hip hop wasn't even on you. Know live telecast of the grammys. At the time they didn't even have a billboard chart separate for it and he came out breaking all these records you know he just saw how much you know. I fought for him and cared about making sure. He got what he deserved. I'm just fascinated. What was your lifelike at this point? We're you going out with these guys every day all the time all the time. How does that work? When you're the lawyer going out with them at that would make me like very very anxious. Yeah so I mean look. I listened things. You don't get involved in the entertainment attorney right. So there's no company in the ministry that is open before ten. Am there's no reception. Nobody's answering the phone before ten and then a lot of shows are at night so it just is you know what I mean. And it's just the way that the business works the you know. There are a lot of us running around together all the time they were in it and it was a lot of fun. How old are you roughly at this time? Mid Twenties like a young kid. Yeah but you're US superstar lawyer superstar lawyer. How did you ensure that you were respected as a professional while also socializing with your clients and I'm GonNA assume maybe not the most professional settings board room at night? How did you find that balance? Well I didn't to be honest with you. I was just going along because all the guys were to right and I was like well. You know it's fine everybody else's out and then there was a shift actually and I started to realize that one client in particular not any of them that I've mentioned and he's in a little bit of a different genre Saami outlet at night and was like I don't like my lawyer being out late and I was like okay but I was with your male lawyer and you didn't say anything about that that's when I really started to see because again I didn't have any mentorship so I didn't know that women are treated differently in Business. I didn't know there were glass ceilings and then all of a sudden I was like. Oh there's a double standard and what was your reaction to that at first I was like. Oh my God you're right. This is awful and it was like wait a minute. No this is not cool because I'm in the same room with other male attorneys other managers. Other you know accountants. This is the music industry music. Entertainment Law. We're not curing cancer solving world world. Peace here so it was very eye-opening to me when I think about some of the people that you've worked with even early on whether it's Mark Ronson obviously Jay Z. Back in the day and then you know to what he is today and beyond say specifically talking about those people it's a mix of creatives who have strong business intuition. How do you think through when there is a creative idea that super compelling but the business around it just doesn't necessarily make sense thus the thing it's like the creative and the business half to meet and if they don't then you know whoever it is my clients they have to make the decision? Do they want to fund it? Is this a nonprofit that you partner with a museum you have to do the math and give them all the options? What could really be the outcome? Is it you paying for it? Is it finding philanthropists to pay for it or returning in this into a real business? And that's my job is helping them Mary. Art and

United States JAY J. J. Yeah J. Jay Z. Executive Seattle Mark Ronson Jay Z. Back Hockey Carol Grade Mr Carter Jesse New York Partner Attorney
We Keep Getting Up with Felicity Ward

The Guilty Feminist

3:55 listening | 2 weeks ago

We Keep Getting Up with Felicity Ward

"So felicity our theme today is we keep getting up. It was suggested by you. He was now you have as we've mentioned a small bump beano. Tell us what that be like in terms of keeping on getting up a look literally we keep having to get up 'cause children. I thought you meant it but I mean we are at the moment getting off having to fade him. A lot through the night went down to one fade a night which is incredible but we have still got severe sleep deprivation. We HAVEN'T SLEPT SINCE NOVEMBER. And he is a great baby now. He's always been a great baby. I love him to death but he had something called. Click which you here get bandied around. But you don't really know what it is and the reason that you don't know what it is is because doctors don't know what it is. The definition is a minimum of three hours crying per day for a minimum of three weeks and that went on for about seven weeks. Maybe longer and it was just in the not to begin with. It was just like seven till eleven pm and he'd have a napping there and then it started to drift into the Diet and I didn't realize that was happening that I was Getting postnatal depression from the sleep deprivation. 'cause IT'S A. There is lots of things about motherhood that I was very very judgy of and I didn't know I was judgy of until I became a mom so when I'd say mums online and this is like I'm a feminist bought but when I'd say MOMS online going mothers are incredible Blah Blah Blah Blah. I was like it had a touch of the wellness enthusiasts. You know like we just want to be supportive and now that I have had a baby single parents. I honestly do not know how they do it. I genuinely don't know how they do it without losing their minds. It's the hardest thing I have ever done. Nothing Bah nothing and I have had a Lotta Shit happened in my life. I also When I had the baby I still had the expectation that do everything that I could do before. Maybe you know maybe it would take a little bit of time but not long. I think I'm pretty capable you know. And it's all in the mind and tons out having a baby is physical Surprise But I went back to work when he was nine weeks old and I went back to work in Australia. And so my husband quit his job and we flew to Australia when he was nine weeks old. And then I started filming two days after we got there and This show is incredible. And maybe the only thing that saved being but I have had some of probably the worst year of my life but also with this incredible baby and these incredible husband and with this incredible. Show a lot of good things happening but Yeah so I picked the subject just because where in the past. I've had a choice whether I can get up or not you know. I don't have a choice now because I have a tiny baby Any is I didn't mean to debate a serious right up top a no. It's absolutely fine as we love gearshift. I'm sure it coming any second now. Yeah I've heard tell of how difficult it is and I've I've got a little bit experience of babies and children now named and things I'm GonNa do you wear at the time and isn't the same because there was an end in sight we'll give them back. And I think it is the very relentless nature of at the DC own difficulty. That parents told me and it sounds like you did it in a difficult way as we're going to come hence television show. Yeah

Australia DC
Laura Prepon Opens Up About Having Eating Disorder

Skimm'd from The Couch

3:30 listening | 2 weeks ago

Laura Prepon Opens Up About Having Eating Disorder

"It's so interesting in doing prep for this interview. That in seeing you from that seventy show to October road and two oranges a new black. You've always come across as so confident in this book you bravely right about your experience suffering from an eating disorder during your early years as an actress and you were struggling with your body image. An industry that is very focus on appearance. How did you get out of that? What was your road to recovery? Like will you bring up a really good point? Which is yes in my industry. Unfortunately the way that you look. There's a Lotta pressure for that. Which is why I was so fortunate to be on something. Like orange is the new black. Because it's so celebrated women of all different shapes and ethnicities and backgrounds. But the thing about what happened with my mother. Yes she equated. Being thin things successful hundred percent and another thing I had to do was look at how she was raised and get understanding. Because I couldn't understand why you would teach your child while teaching them all these other great things and then you teach kind of dysfunction. That did take me years to get out of. But it's really understand where they came from the fact that she equated that with success in thought she was helping me. That's what was very complicated about it and for us for myself on my mother it was. It was a shared secret. It was how we bonded and because I so badly wanted to bond with my mother you know this was how we would spend time together and when we were growing up my mother was always off doing some. She was eccentric chef. She was always off doing things at restaurants perfecting her picking duck recipe. And all these odd wonderful things that I grew up with but when I did get time and spend time to hang out with her. I couldn't wait and my father. He was an orthopedic surgeon most of cases in two hospitals. We never saw him either. He was gone in the morning before we went to school and he would come home very late at night. It was a very odd upbringing. You know and then so when I have this time to be with my mother. It was really special. So that's what was so hard about this thing that she taught me and the other thing too is the reason why I struggled with this dysfunctional relationship. To food for so long is because you have to eat to survive. You can't just quit smoking or stop drinking alcohol or stop doing drugs and things like that. You have to eat to survive so there's triggers all day. It got to a point where it was just. It was bad and then when my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's that's was a game changer. For me while the blame Ya. I don't think that the dysfunctional eating attributed to that it might have. I don't know but when that happened I couldn't help but wonder could it have been different if she was so better care for self and that was a game changer for me and then when I got pregnant it's like a switch left and when I got pregnant. That's when everything truly shifted for me. I would never even think of doing that kind of abuse to my body

Alzheimer
Supporting Women Leaders

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

8:43 listening | 3 weeks ago

Supporting Women Leaders

"The share of women in the House and Senate has increased over time. But it's still well below the share of women in the US population. And if you dig deeper. Congress looks even less representatives women of color make up eighteen percent of the US population but before the two thousand eighteen midterms the accounted for just seven percent of Congress and LGBT women. Make up about two point five percent of the US population but there are only two openly lgbt women in Congress that's less than one percent even with the recent wins by women candidates in the two thousand eighteen midterms. There's still a long way to go before. They're fully represented. I look at someone like just send our during the prime minister in New Zealand. I the way that she dealt with the terrorist attack on her country. Yeah the way that she wouldn't name the terrorists that was you know. She's amazing. Amazing. We will not talk about their names and then also the way that she's dealing with this crisis she is incredibly humble and that and just real like you really feel like she's telling you the truth this authenticity. Just I think is is one of her great strengths and I think just very clear. Nobody panicked. This is what we're going to do and we're going to do better for. I think she's really good also at hope and inspiration which people need people made in times like best. They need to know. We're all in this together and we're going to get back and we can do this and done things like this before we've done things that have been harder than before. Did you see that? The princess in Sweden actually took an online nursing class and entered into the frontline fighting this pandemic. It's the most amazing thing I was like. This is brilliant. She's a princess and she was like Nope. I'm going to take an online class and I'm going to really make a difference and it's just spectacular. The majority of frontline healthcare workers around the world. Are Women. Yeah actually in China. I think the numbers like ninety percent methods. And then there's also that stat that the country is that have been least hit as far as numbers go with Kobe. Nineteen have women leadership. Yeah so I'm wondering if you could shed a little light on how the challenges women face around the globe are maybe similar or different. Well certainly you've been a huge champion around Combating Violence Against Women and sexual assault and harassment. And that is in my mind. The biggest challenge women face I. Yeah globally there is no country no community no religion no social economic background of women anywhere on Earth who are not affected by gender based violence. That's just full stop. That is the only issue that seems to get worse. Not Better over time right. We're going to get more. Women elected to political office. More women are going to start and grow business. People are going to see. Oh Wow this is great for the economy okay. Yes let's keep funding. You can see steps forward on many of these issues but on violence against women. I mean the harder hit. Humanity is the deeper violence against women growth. Right now with this crisis in China triple. They had triple the cases really at the epicenter of Code. They had triple A. Cases of domestic violence in the height. They're of the virus and that is not a winston. It is a fact that when people lose their jobs and anxiety and stress is running high. That will be my own skin for that. There will be domestic violence. Bounce GonNa Children as well and then of course you add to that. Being locked down with an abuser or higher. Yeah it's horrifying. Yeah so to me. I mean that's that is the biggest issue and of course it takes different forms in different places you know in the DRC have rape as a weapon of war and other countries ravaged by war like Syria or Iraq in places like Afghanistan. You have girls being hung just because they're girls girls being burned with acid late certainly by strangers by partners by boyfriends acquaintances college. Campus Violence Sexual violence child marriage. Honor Crimes Cream genital mutilation. It takes on a different look in different places but we run. Something called an emergency assistance. Fund FOR EXTREME FORMS OF GENDER based violence is called Voices Against Violence Fund. And we will open up the fund and literally the cases that it's small bits of money that we can get out the door within twenty four to forty eight hours to quickly help a woman get back on her feet. Nadia Murad. Who is the is eating woman who escaped Isis in Iraq? Acting twenty fourteen. She was actually one of the first people to receive one of these. Just very quick fusions of financial support to help her family and she get healthcare relocation. You know her brothers had been killed. Most of her family was killed. The bill back something and I'm allowed to tell her story because she tells her story and obviously winning a Nobel peace prize a number of years later for suing Isis. But the fun that we continue to run at a number of cases is just through the roof and we you know quite frankly. We need more money to fund. Yeah believe me I would rather be preventing these Reno. And why should we were throwing money at a problem rather than trying to get it a solution but we're doing both let me ask you this. The numbers are just staggering. But do the numbers go down when women have power. I'm thinking about just even in the United States and domestic violence and violence against women and we have some really incredible women that are fighting in Congress and Senate and yet these numbers are still mind blowing. You know we fight so hard to get a seat at the table and then I'm wondering. Do you see changes within the community. Do you see that numbers go down. What is the tangible evidence of that? This is this is shifting or changing. Well certainly I think when the economy is strong right when other things are stable. That is certainly better. But that shouldn't have to be the case. Things be better never should be that humanity. I think we're not challenges. Honestly with violence against women is what I would call. One of the women leaders will work with called the silent. Majority silent majority is the majority of men who are good and who believed that bounced. Women should never stand but they don't do anything about it I well. I don't know anybody. You know one that. Maybe they don't know enough about it. They don't think there's a place for them to be part of the fight or minimal. And I think it's about. How do we engage those men to recognize that? This is a human problem and that they're part of the solution they have to be part of citation otherwise things will never change. Yeah so I think you see grace forward when Powerful men or influential men get it and they don't just get it and like a check the box way but they they really get it on a fundamental level and every decision that they make it somewhere in the calculus of how they're making those decisions and that's a big piece queer on an awards program here called the voices of solidarity and it's really about honoring those great guys who are in the fight. I love that and often risking their livelihood. We all met all around the world. There's some great. Ceo's and leaders that we've honored but there are also different young guys. I don't know if you're familiar with the Nail Polish undercover Keller's. No that into drank and it will turn a color. If you drink has been Mufi right yes and so these guys came up with this formula basically so that the nail Polish we turn a color if it was and now there's you just young college guys that they had a personal experience with a friend who had been drugged and raped in college and they decided to do something about it. It's kind of engaging men at different levels in doing good. I think that can make a huge difference.

Congress United States Violence Fund Senate China Iraq New Zealand Prime Minister Nail Polish Reno Sweden DRC Nadia Murad CEO Assault Keller Syria
Discussing the allegations against Joe Biden

Hysteria

6:10 listening | 3 weeks ago

Discussing the allegations against Joe Biden

"Get into a story that we yeah. That's kind of been percolating for a while but we haven't talked about and that's the story about terror reads assault and harassment allegations against former vice president and current apparent Democratic nominee for President Joe Biden. So we've had a lot of listeners. Reach out to us and point out that we haven't brought it up and before we start talking about it. I want to explain my reasoning for not wanting to bring it up and then Melissa yet you can kind of talk about yours because it's not just that it's not that I only believe. I think the simple baby way to accuse people of somebody has to say that you only believe accusations that are against people who aren't your guy but that's not the case. What are the primary lessons that I learned from me too? And that moment in media is that it is really important to take women's accusations seriously but it is also super important that people follow up on those accusations with a rigorous journalistic process. That looks for the Truth. And one thing that was lacking early in the story was there wasn't a ton of trustworthy reporting on it beyond something that had been said on a podcast. That is a pretty partisan podcast in favor of the candidate running against Joe Biden so the story was out there and didn't really want to weigh in on whether or not. I felt like it was true or not until there was some reporting on it so a couple of weeks ago. The New York Times did some reporting on it and the New York Times reporting made it about clear as mud because there is a whole bunch of parts of the story that felt like they hadn't quite been backed up. There were a lot of holes in it and some of the story didn't quite make sense the fact that she had been a Putin sympathizer kind of raise some red flags and so there was enough there that I wasn't quite. I didn't know what to think given the information that I had this week. There was a story that came out and This reporting found that a neighbor of terror reads at a few years after the alleged assault happened in nineteen ninety-three confided was confided in so she says that Tara Reid told her in the nineties that this had happened so it Kinda ratcheted the story up to something that I think I think deserves more discussion like it is pretty obvious. That terror read felt in the early nineties that she was uncomfortable. Working for Joe Biden. She felt that she complained about it. And that we're to retaliated against and she told other people at the time that she felt that those things happened and in addition now she says that she was sexually assaulted by Joe Biden and she told people at the time that it had happened. So this to me elevates it to a point where there's a lot of reporting around it and we need to discuss it so that's my thought process to not doing it. Until now Eliza. I wonder what your thoughts are. Well I mean you and I discussed this for weeks because we had a lot of the same concerns and also just even going back further in time for the first time we heard Her allegations was like a year ago. I think she had accused him of touching her inappropriately like on her shoulders and I think the lake her head and you know that rang true. A lot of women had said that they felt that his even if in his mind he was expressing sympathy or empathy or trying to comfort someone that they found that level of intimate touch off pudding uncomfortable and defensive end where the story and I think that at the time he did sort of You know his his I guess. Best self defense for that behavior that that's what people come to him for and so not that that's acceptable if people don't want us to touch them you don't talk them fucking wrong but that's where the story started and then when it came back the New York Times like you said you know. The New York Times story had some holes in it. The Washington Post had talked about that when they reached out to her brother. I think it was that he basically corroborated the uncomfortable touching but not the sort of assault part that she had recently come out with and yeah you know it's it's the story business either story that came out. This week has parts that we have not heard which I think shows that one way or another. There's still reporting an investigation. That should continue on this Because when one I mean just to be totally Frank. I would never want to lie to our listeners. I mean I had an office next to Joe Biden for like five years in the White House and he was someone who was always very supportive and empathetic. That doesn't mean that these things could be true but I think that for someone who had given me so many benefits of the doubt when I was like a young person who didn't have what was considered Historically appropriate experience for the job I had that I didn't want to rush to judgement and so I think that the investigation that's continued is clearly very worthwhile. There's still more stuff coming out And Yeah and so. That's why we decided to talk about it this week. But I'd be lying if I said I knew the right thing to say or that. My feelings were totally clear and straightforward But yeah that's where we are

Joe Biden The New York Times Assault Vice President President Trump Tara Reid Melissa Putin Washington Post Eliza Harassment Frank White House
Explorers & Contenders: Xue Susu

Encyclopedia Womannica

3:18 listening | 3 weeks ago

Explorers & Contenders: Xue Susu

"Today we're GonNa talk about a woman who was adored by politicians strategists poets and pretty much. Anyone who met her are contender of the day was lauded for her ability to shoot targets from a moving horse an athletic feat that perhaps was more accepted at the time due to her many other skills and more typically feminine pastimes. Meet Xiujei Sue Shuhei. Sue was born near the southeast coast of China. In the fifteen seventy S it was the latter half of the Ming Dynasty. An era in China now known for its population boom as well as vast expansions an art and trade are the fifteen eighty s Shuhei. Sue was a Courtesan in the city of Nanjing working in a legendary pleasure district frequented by powerful upper class clients. Their shoe as sue was local celebrity. She was a talented painter and poet. Who Only met with the most educated men as clients shoe? Isuzu poetry focused on her experiences providing historians with fatal insight into the world and culture of her workplace era in the fifteen ninety S. Shuhei soon moved to Beijing. She hosted popular literary gatherings and parties wealthy scholars in clients and she also demonstrated her own talents and interests. She was an incredible Archer and horseback rider and she displayed skills publicly referring to herself as female night. Errand fellow poets were so stricken by her depicted her in their work one female contemporary wrote a flower goddess with chivalrous mind. Your spirit can be confined by no means. You have the wisdom to command an army. This poet went onto compare Shuhei Su Su to a military commander and a legendary archer. Many men also wrote about as sue and historical accounts essays and poems. The horseback riding was seen as quite a masculine pursuit. She way sues mastery of that along with many other skills was seen as attractive. Shuhei Su Su also showed expertise in calligraphy embroidery music and Strategy Games after impressing Beijing. Xiujei sued disappeared off the map for awhile. It isn't entirely clear why some historians say she spent time as a private concubine others note that she had several husbands around this time but death or divorce ended each of the Union's among her husband's were military officers scholars and strategists leader in life as Soo- converted to Buddhism and chose to remain single. Her work is a cortisone may have ended she continued her artistic pursuits. She created many notable figure paintings depicting religious subjects. She also hosted parties prominent email artists. She Way Sue passed away sometime around sixteen fifty from horseback riding and archery to embroidery painting and poetry. She's remembered for her athletic prowess as well as her artistic abilities today. Shula sues work is held in many museums both inside and outside China

Xiujei Sue Shuhei Shuhei Su Su China Beijing SUE SOO S. Shuhei Ming Dynasty Shuhei Nanjing Shula Commander Union
Explorers & Contenders: Annie Oakley

Encyclopedia Womannica

5:03 listening | Last month

Explorers & Contenders: Annie Oakley

"Annie. Oakley was born phoebe and Moses on August thirteenth eighteen sixty in Dark County Ohio when Anne was sits. Her Father Jacob died from pneumonia and his mother. Susan wise soon remarried but her second husband died suddenly two with eight children and very little income. Anne's family was sent to the county's poor farm. These institutions predated federal safety nets like Medicare and social security residents often dealt with miserable living conditions while battling the cultural stigma of needing help and he was placed with local families where she would work in exchange for room and board. She started hunting at eight years old from the start and he was a gifted shot selling her game to local restaurants to help support her family. At fifteen annie's hunting skills paid off the mortgage on her mother's farm that same year she traveled to Cincinnati to compete in a shooting competition with Frank e. Butler Butler was a traveling marksman who made bets with local communities that he could beat anyone in a sharp shooting match. Anne made all twenty five shots. Butler missed the final one. The two started courting and married soon after eighteen seventy six and he was sixteen years. Old Butler continued butlers tour of the country with Anne acting as his assistant despite her skills and he was responsible mostly for holding up items for Butler to shoot. All of that changed our. May I eighteen? Eighty two when Butler's partner fell ill anne filled in on stage and from then on and he was officially part of the act after touring for a year with the sells brothers circus. Anne and Butler joined Buffalo. Bill's wild west show. It was Anne who had been given the name little. Shir shot by LAKOTA. Sioux leader sitting bull really rose to fame. Butler eventually chose to serve as her stage assistant and manager even by today's standards any stunt were jaw-dropping. She would shoot glass balls and coins out of the air and cigarettes out of her husband's mouth her show often opened with her skipping onstage lifting her rifle and in one shot snuffing out the flame of let candle. Anne and Butler remained with Buffalo. Bill's show for sixteen years. The tour took them all around the world. They performed for Queen. Victoria's golden jubilee in England and travelled through Spain Italy and France. Every time she stepped on stage and he proved that women were more than capable of using firearms challenging the disciplines. Masculine reputation. She publicly encouraged women to learn how to use a pistol and to carry it in their purses arguing. Self defense was empowering in nineteen one after returning to the United States and Butler were in a train crash. Any injured her back and stopped touring two years later in nineteen. Oh three it was reported in Chicago that Anne had been arrested for stealing a man's trousers and selling them for cocaine. Despite the story being entirely false the woman arrested had used the fake name any Oakley News outlets ran with it. Anne sued every paper that ran the false accusations over seven years. She won fifty four or fifty five cases in one thousand nine hundred seventeen. The United States entered World War. One and he wrote to the secretary of war. Henry L Stimson offering to fund raiser regiment of female volunteers to fight. She also offered to help. Teach soldiers how to accurately shoot. Neither offer was accepted in nineteen twenty two any began preparing to tour again but a car accident delayed her plans after a year of recovery anti finally returned to the stage soon though any fell sick and in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. She moved back to Ohio to be closer to her family. Annie Oakley died on November Third Nineteen Twenty Six. She was sixty six years old. Her husband Frank. E Butler died three weeks later the two had been married for fifty years in nineteen forty six a fictionalized version of Annie and Butler's love story debuted on Broadway as the Irving Berlin musical. Annie get your Gun Ami thing you can do. I can do better. I could do anything better than you. Yes I can yes I can to this day. The show is still regularly performed by theaters around the

Butler Butler Anne Annie Bill Annie. Oakley Frank E United States Jacob Susan Wise Buffalo Medicare Pneumonia Oakley News Dark County Ohio Moses Cincinnati Shir Sioux Henry L Stimson
Postpartum in a Pandemic

Bodies

6:25 listening | Last month

Postpartum in a Pandemic

"So I want to start with your pregnancy I'm wondering given your knowledge and your profession as a Dula when you're pregnant with soula. What were some of the things that you're doing to advocate for yourself and prepare for the postpartum time. I think that I was concerned about possibly getting postpartum depression just because I do have a history of depression and I had to get off of my antidepressant when I was pregnant. Because it wasn't safe for the baby and I was just looking for whatever type of body type therapy alternatives that I could find so acupuncture was really helpful for that and then I also Was in therapy with two different therapists by felt like I worked really hard and my pregnancy to ensure that I had the mental health support that I felt like I needed And Not a part of that was going on a second part of that. Was Me heavily planning the postpartum time in order to prevent not that you can prevent postpartum depression but in my brain in order to prevent it from happening? I'm heavy planner and I'm like if I plan everything and organize everything and get support that I need and I'm not like isolated by myself in those early weeks than you know things are GonNa go better and so Yeah I was and so am very concerned about mental health in this postpartum time. And what else did you know about postpartum mood and anxiety disorders going in? I feel like people a little bit like no about postpartum depression but I feel like the broader public doesn't necessarily have all the knowledge about the different ways that that can look. Well I think one thing too is definitely left out of the discussion is postpartum anxiety. I everybody instantly goes for depression. But a lot of people have postpartum anxiety and it presents and like so many different ways that there's not even like one like by the rule book they can look because everybody's anxiety shows up differently and I feel like postpartum anxiety is harder to pinpoint because as a new parent. You're already so anxious. A lot of the things that it says like the book say about postpartum anxiety about like watching the baby when the Baby Sleeps. And like you think the telling bad. It's going to happen to the baby and all that like that's just being a new parent in general so it's really hard to lockdown when that becomes more excessive so feeling that goes under diagnosed and Under reported a lot and a lot of people don't get support around because people don't know what's normal and what's not so. I felt lake as much information as I knew about postpartum depression. I was not prepared for postpartum anxiety as much as I should have been and I feel like that has been what has like cut more into play then. The depression Yeah so and I know you had your own Dula. Ns what were some of the things that Dula was helping you do My postpartum duly came to my baby shower and basically pasta out a notebook to everybody so that they could sign up for jobs for postpartum and at first. I didn't WanNa do it because I just felt like. I didn't WanNa like ask my friends that bluntly to be like hey can you? Guys take my trout and dishes but Actually had several friends after the baby shower. That were like that was so cool that year. Postpartum Dula did that. And they're like I always wanNA like support friends. That have a baby but I never know what to do. I also like this idea of asking people to show up in this time because this is not meant to be done alone and even for people who are single and are people who choose to be single parents or whatever like it's you're never supposed to like parent alone. They're supposed to be a community aspect to all of this. Yeah definitely definitely and so you know you come home from the hospital. It's an February beginning of March. Were still a couple of weeks away from the CDC announcing that there's a pandemic and so what was that first week at home like the first week was like everything that I have planned with my Dulas. It was Me being fed and people bringing me drinks and you know. Stang over to help with the baby and my postpartum do alike. Massaging my body. Because I was so swollen from the birth and it felt amazing that basically like I pulled off Lake. It actually worked. They actually showed up and I'm really grateful for that. Everybody was kind of like on a schedule of like who could do what when and who do overnight and stuff and it was really nice for like a week and a half to have that and to have them coming over in helping me get a break and Just like Lebanon us and everything and then this corona Situation hit and yet kind of all went out the window. She felt prepared to be a single mom. But not like this after about a week of being homeless soula. The governor of New York City put a stay at home order in place and all the people that were supposed to show up. Couldn't come anymore. We're stuck in isolation and that's not something. I would really wish on anybody that was in the immediate stages of postpartum or really just in parenthood in general It sucks. I don't even know how to describe it because it's like the exact opposite of what is needed during this time So many people were ready and willing to show up. It is nice that we have that support system and that when this is over we will still have that to rely on people. Were jumping on soon. Calls like nonstop and like doing like zoom hang outs and all these like zoom events. And I'm just like where was this energy before when you know we were all so busy with our lives constantly and so I like do like that. We've been told to slow down and like forced to talk to each other. I do hope that after this whole thing is over or whatever life looks like when it's over. I hope that like people continue to show up with the same energy and like really show up for each other

Depression Dula Actually New York City CDC Lake Stang Lebanon
Explorers & Contenders: Annette Kellerman

Encyclopedia Womannica

4:50 listening | Last month

Explorers & Contenders: Annette Kellerman

"Meet the one and only a net. Kellerman a net. Marie Sara Kellerman was born in eighteen. Eighty six in Merrillville Australia. A suburb of Sydney. Her father was an Australian violinist and her mother was a French pianist and music teacher. As a child Annette's legs weren't strong enough to support her so she wore metal braces as a form of physical therapy and conditioning. And that's parents took her to a local pool. She later described that experience. Saying only a cripple could understand the intense joy I experienced after I learned. I go swimming anywhere anytime. The swimming really did help. Strengthen a nets legs. She was a natural in the water and she had a flair for the dramatic throughout her life and that would combine her sport with feeder to entertain the public by the time. She was around fifteen years old. She was winning races in setting speed records. She was also performing diving exhibitions and swimming in twice. Daily shows with fish at an aquarium her skill and ability to entertain set a net part and she further made a name for herself as a fashion icon at that point in time. Victorian societal norms were strict. When it came to swimming tire women were supposed to Don pantaloons and a loose dress so as not to show their figures a net found that overly burdensome and created a new kind of beating costume hers left her arms exposed and was very tight warlike one piece bathing suits today if they extended down as shorts or pants and that was actually arrested for indecency while swimming on each during a Uso trip to Massachusetts in one thousand nine hundred seven volynets spent much of her life making varied contributions to fashion entertainment and society at large. These achievements stemmed from her incredible talent at her sport among other feats and that set the world record for the Fastest Mile. Swam and help the swim records for a number of major rivers around the world after moving from Australia to England. She swam a daily circuit from town to town along the coast in preparation for an attempt to swim across the English Channel. She eventually did try and fail to swim across the body of water though she made it three quarters of the way despite that failure a net kept on swimming and winning races. She swam in a seven mile race through Paris in front of five hundred thousand spectators and tied with another woman to sixteen men after. You're up a net headed across the Atlantic to the US stateside annette focused more on the performance part of rear. She wowed audiences by stunt swimming and high diving. She also allowed many with physical appearance. A Harvard professor deemed a Net. The perfect woman because her measurements were so similar to those of the Venus Diallo. Naturally this proclamation helped draw in even larger crowds. Those who couldn't make it to a live show. We're in luck. A net took her talents to Hollywood at the height of the silent movie era. She appeared in multiple films though most are now considered lost. Because there's no known footage still in existence. Most of her movies had plots connected to water and she often played a mermaid notably and that was the first major actress to appear. Fully Nude onscreen annette continued swimming and performing until the nineteen forties. She credited the sport with changing her life in nineteen eighteen. She said but for swimming. I might have been hobbling about on crutches today instead of skating. Dancing and indulging in twenty five mile constitutional in addition to making my regular livelihood as a moving picture mermaid or flirting with toto. The funny fish through the walls of the glass tank at the New York hippodrome later in life a net became an author speaker and owned a health food store in Long Beach California. She continued to swim till nearly the end of her life. In nineteen seventy a net and her husband who had been her manager moved back to Australia. A net died in nineteen seventy five. She was eighty nine years old. Annette Kellerman popularized her sport and buck norms for her gender paving the path for future women swimmers success. She was honored by the International Swimming Hall of fame and she has a star on the Hollywood walk of

Annette Kellerman Marie Sara Kellerman Australia International Swimming Hall Of Merrillville Sydney Hollywood Massachusetts New York Hippodrome Nets Don Pantaloons Harvard Atlantic Venus Diallo Paris United States Long Beach California Professor England
Feminists: Huda Sha'arawi

Encyclopedia Womannica

4:07 listening | 2 months ago

Feminists: Huda Sha'arawi

"Let's talk about who Shar rally. Who was born in eighteen seventy nine in Upper Egypt? She came from an affluent family. Her father was a wealthy Egypt. Noble who spent her childhood in an Egyptian Harem which kept women secluded and veiled the Harem system required women to live in their own private quarters separate an isolated for men. Many women within the HAREM system were denied access to education but who was educated early in life alongside her brothers. She learned Turkish Arabic and literature from private tutors. Who grew older? Her resentment increased. She wrote years later about the bitterness. She felt as a young girl. I became depressed and began to neglect my studies hating being girl because it kept me from the education I saw later being a female became a barrier between me and the freedom for which I earned at the onset of puberty who does no longer allowed to be seen by the sons of her family friends which she described as a painful experience. She noticed great attention that was paid to her brother which resulted in jealousy despite her envy. Who and her brother had a loving relationship and he later stood by her side while she fought against gender injustice at the age of Thirteen. Huda MARRIED HER COUSIN. A man forty years her senior. Who Does father pressure her into marriage insisting that her refusal would bring shame to the family. File Huta reluctantly agreed. Soon after she separated from her husband for seven years during this time Huda prioritized her independence diving back into her studies and venturing into activism. Huda wrote in her memoir. I intend to vocalise my pain and start a revolution for the silent women who faced centuries of oppression in her early adulthood who to begin organizing lectures bringing many women into public places for the first time in nineteen. Oh eight who founded the first Philanthropic Society run by Egyptian women which offered medical services for poor women and children who believed women run service? Projects challenged the view that women needed protection as a wealthy woman who to believe that the rich could solve the problems of the poor through charitable activities in nineteen. Ten Huda opened a school for Young Women. She focused on academics rather than the domestic skills that were typically taught to women at the time during the early twentieth century. The fight for women's rights gained momentum around the world in nineteen nineteen after World War. One many Egyptian women protested against British rule in Egypt and sought to use the national struggle to Harem practices. Who to let the masses in an effort that ultimately became known as the Egyptian Revolution of Nineteen Nineteen in nineteen twenty following the protests who was elected as the first president of the Waft Women's Central Committee a political body founded by Egyptian women three years later in nineteen twenty-three after returning to Egypt from a conference in Europe Huda threw off her veil outside the Cairo train station. She encouraged other women to follow suit and this became one of the first public rejection of the veil in Egypt soon thereafter who founded the Egyptian Feminist Union which sought to reform laws that restricted women for personal freedoms who to remain president of the Egyptian Feminist Union until her death in nineteen forty seven organizing and leading the fight for women's rights. In the new Egypt she died at the age of Sixty Huda reflected on her. Life's mission in her memoir. She said I believe that history repeats itself and for that reason. I am indebted to my namesake Huda Al-Shaarawi Egyptian feminist and the first woman in the Middle East who called for female

Huda Young Women Egypt Egyptian Feminist Union Sixty Huda Upper Egypt Europe Huda Middle East President Trump Noble Philanthropic Society Cairo Central Committee
Glennon Doyle: Untame Yourself

Skimm'd from The Couch

4:38 listening | 2 months ago

Glennon Doyle: Untame Yourself

"My one thing right and my one thing is like trying as much as I can to stay in integrity so since that's my one thing. It didn't matter what everybody else was saying to me. How was it to actually live that now? Hearing you and seeing beautiful family and everything I don't want to say you know worked out but looks like you guys have fallen into this beautiful family together going back to that. How was it to actually make that decision decision to fall in love with via the decision to go public and just let the crowd falls? I mean for me. The thing that was most hard about that decision had nothing to do with public opinion or the book or whatever it was about my children. It was about my family as you. Well know it's like there's the world which lake will do whatever it will do but then really your world is the people that you can touch around you so those were the people that I was most worried about and I think that the reason I was worried is because I was just tamed. Into believing that mother is a murder right so I believe that a good mother does not break her child's heart. Good mother does not break up her family. So I might know in the depth of my bones that I am in love with this woman that I meant to be with her and this is like myself saying yes please but I can't do that because it would screw my people and then one day I was breeding my daughter's hair and I just had this thought which was. Oh my God I am staying in this marriage for her but what I want this marriage for her and if I would not want this marriage for her then why am I modeling. Bad love for her and calling that good mothering. Which made me realize how deeply I had been tamed right. The cultural messages to women are always no matter. What venue hear them from? Get as small as you can until you disappear. The way they do that to mothers is to say the ideal mother is a martyr the ideal mother is someone who just buries her dreams. Her ambition her feelings desires and calls that love and it took me looking at my daughter and knowing that she's looking to me to see. How does a woman live to figure out? No no no. The Taming of motherhood is saying no a mother is not a murder. A mother is a model. Children will only do will only allow themselves to live as fully as their parents did. So the call of motherhood the call of parenting is to refuse to settle for any conversation relationship room institution. That is less beautiful than the one we would want for our babies and what I figured out was this. Little girl does not need need me to save her. What this little girl needs to do is watch her mother. Save herself for me. It was one at a time figuring out that the one of the lies that women have been sold is that we cannot trust ourselves. We cannot go for what we want because it will be bad for our people that what we need and what are people need are mutually exclusive. Right that's why you always hear. Oh I would do that. I would go back to school but I can't because my kids I would do this but I can't because my kids and that's a lie that's utter Horse Shit like what is true and beautiful for us is always eventually what is true for our people right and there is no such thing as one way liberation. When you for yourself you automatically free everyone around you because freedom is contagious. So at the time you've built up an audience that was predominantly Christian women. What did you think the reaction was going to be? And then what was it in actuality? I had always been like for the decade before that I had been an outspoken completely like flaming supporter of the Algae. Btcu community like. I've been more gay. Pride parades that abby has and she's like the gasquet that ever gate I was intentionally creating a culture that celebrated inclusivity and differences and sexualities of all kinds. If you're still a part of my community that you understood that this announcement was less of a departure from our values and more like a manifestation of our values right and that's one of the beautiful things about living in integrity. Is that if you're always saying the thing that you believe on the inside you're always losing the right people so everybody that was there. They were because they had a they weren't all like minded but they were like hearted right. They were people that I would expect to say. Yes you have shown up you have shown us your untamed and whether we understand or not you are both held and free here

Murder Abby
Breaking up with Mom

Unladylike

5:01 listening | 2 months ago

Breaking up with Mom

"So kristen when I was prepping for this episode. Two big things surprised me okay. What's that okay? Thing number one breaking up with a parent is actually pretty common. Like the stats aren't airtight. But at least in the US and the UK an estimated ten to twenty percent of folks experience some kind of family estrangement and thing too well because of how common it is. I was expecting there to be a ton of research on. Who What where? When why it happens you know like cutting ties with your parents especially your mom is so ripe for research at touches on psychology mental health trauma but practically no one has studied it partly because it just goes so unspoken yet you know estrangement sounds like such a formal term but it's not a legal designation like emancipation but because it revolves around adult parent child relationships. It's kind of tough to track. You know because once we're grown ASS adults Technically these are voluntary relationships. Yeah and I mean one thing. Harriet although emphasizes is how estrangement encompasses a whole spectrum of situations geographical distance emotional distancing or completely calling it quits which is what focusing on today. Could you give us an example of sort of that line between just standard parent child conflict? That's GonNa Happen. And actual like boundary crossing problems that tend to lead to estrangement. Yeah that's a that's a good question I can speak to it from my experience but also having interviewed fifty or sixty other people who have been through estrangement. The stories are often very detail sometimes are different but the the basic pattern of the story is often the same and that is that there is some fundamental lack of ability to trust in the relationship. You know and whether that comes from way way back in the relationship or whether it's something that Sort of enters it. I mean most of the time. There's something that's really wrong. There's something that's really been wrong for a long time And so you know in a sort of non estranged quote ordinary family. Of course there's going to be conflicts and of course there's GonNa be problems but you have the ability to get past them because there is this fundamental trust and Sort of mutual understanding that you know we might disagree but I have your best interests in mind and I know you have mine in families that have estrangement that seems to be missing. There's not that sense of like unconditional love trust So often there's just this sense of like it's not just one thing that you did. It's everything that has gone into our relationship is it's the pattern of things you know It's this sense that you're always saying things that are meant to cut me down. You are always do violating my whatever privacy my boundaries whatever in very very often there's substance abuse or mental health issues involved Or alcoholism those have been features in a lot of the stories. I've heard too so what are some estrangement myths? That need busting in your mind. Ooh There are a lot of them. one of the most pervasive myths. Is this idea that kids today. They're spoiled. They get mad because mom and dad didn't give them a Porsche for their high school graduation or they didn't like something that one parent did one day and so they walk off in a huff and it's a tragedy and everybody suffers In other words this idea that people walk away from their families in a very casual way and that is not just just not true what the research suggests and what my own experience suggests is that walking away from. Your family is so complicated. And it goes against so many social norms and a- prohibitions. That it really takes a lot to make people do that and so it might look like there's one incident that make people walk away but in fact there's always you know a lot a lot a lot of things that have happened and gone on over a long period of time. So that's one and then I guess the other big myth to my mind. Is this idea that family estrangement is always a bad thing that it's always something that we should be trying to fix for some people. Walking away from family is not just a good idea. It's a survival

Kristen United States Harriet Porsche UK
Alice Paul: Feminist, Suffragist, Political Strategist

Encyclopedia Womannica

4:03 listening | 2 months ago

Alice Paul: Feminist, Suffragist, Political Strategist

"Are feminists. Today was a suffrage. Est Women's rights activist and political strategist. She brought a more militant fight for the vote to the. Us and steered the Movement for an equal rights amendment. Let's talk about the One and only Alice Paul Alice. Paul was born on January eleventh. Eighteen eighty five in Mount Laurel. New Jersey to William and tasty Paul. Alice was the eldest of four children and was raised in very comfortable surroundings. The Paul Family practiced the quaker faith. Alice leader cited the quaker belief in gender equity as formative in her strong drive towards promoting women's equality. Her mother tasty also had a major impact analysis later work tasty was a suffragette and a member of the National American woman. Suffrage Association herself. Alice attended swarthmore college and graduated with a degree in biology. While there she participated in a variety of extracurricular activities she was a member of student government and she played field hockey tennis and basketball. She was also a celebrated poet classes. Commencement Speaker in one thousand nine hundred seven. Alice traveled to England to work at the would brook settlement while there. She met Christabel Pankhurst. We talked about last week. Christabel introduced Alice to England suffrage movement. It was more militant than what Alice seen in the US. The British women fought under the motto. Deeds not words and took the words to heart. They smashed windows and went on hunger strikes among other tactics. Alice joined the 'cause later saying she broke more than forty eight windows and was imprisoned. Multiple Times Alice returned to the US in nineteen ten and got to work pushing the more radical suffrage agenda. She brought back from across the Atlantic in nineteen thirteen. Alice organized a suffrage parade. Woodrow Wilson had just been elected. Alice plant her march for the day before his inauguration purposefully stealing attention away from the President Xi succeeded in making the suffrage movement front page news but she also made the very problematic decision to ask black women to March at the back of the parade. She failed to appreciate the importance of the diverse movement instead focusing primarily on white women. This is a mistake. She would go onto her. Pete throughout her life in one thousand nine fourteen. Alice founded the National Woman's Party. She was incredibly good at rousing attention for her. 'cause members of the National Woman's Party were the first people to ever pick it in front of the White House during nineteen seventeen. They picketed six days a week after women won the right to vote with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment in nineteen twenty. The National Woman's Party had to decide what to focus on next? Alice was lobbied to work on. Expanding VOTING RIGHTS. More broadly instead. She turned her attention to expand women's rights. Outside of the electoral sphere in Nineteen twenty-three Alice wrote the equal rights amendment to the US Constitution to guarantee equal rights. To All American women. She actually went to law school. In order to be qualified to write its language the was introduced in Congress continually until it finally passed in Nineteen seventy-two still the amendment hasn't officially been added to the US Constitution. Because until recently it lacks ratification from the required number of states. Today it's actually the closest it's ever been the ER as tale is a long and wild story that warrants. Its own whole podcast in fact. We've made one. It's called ordinary equality and it's available wherever you listen. Alice passed away on July ninth. Nineteen seventy seven. She was ninety two years old Alice. Paul fought tirelessly for women's legal progress and equity in the US. She's not a perfect hero rather she's a leader who changed the course of our country's history while also having her fair share of flaws

Alice Paul Alice Alice Leader Alice United States National Woman's Party Suffrage Association Christabel Pankhurst Paul Family New Jersey Us Constitution Woodrow Wilson Swarthmore College Mount Laurel England Basketball Atlantic Congress Pete
How Ad Exec Nancy Reyes Became Undeniable

Latina to Latina

9:52 listening | 2 months ago

How Ad Exec Nancy Reyes Became Undeniable

"I was going to ask you if this was the office. Where you do don draper style presentations or really just in an office office. There's no don draper in here. It struck me as I was walking over here from thirty rock where I work both how near we are Long Island City and how far you've come from where you grew up. Your Dad drove a taxi. Your mom worked as a housekeeper. What did you learn from them about work? Work Ethic work hard all the time and then you see the rewards of that hard work on the hours of a taxi driver. Are you know whenever there's demand and I remember my mom would never say no to cleaning a house so there was some days where she would clean three houses in the same day. Three to four houses in the same day which is just an enormous amount of cleaning. I did learn that everything feels better when you earn it that that is to me the the the best immigrant lesson and that has carried me my entire life is. I want to know that I earned it and if I put the hard work in then I can say this is mine. If heard you say that you retrospectively realize you never had the time or space to think about what you wanted to be when you grew up. What were you thinking about instead? Food money will we have food today? how much money do we have? How many more bottles doing to collect to be able to buy groceries? How many more grocery bags can I on my on my arms to carry them home because we didn't have money for a taxi? It was always short term stuff very very short term stuff and I suppose there was some benefit in that in that I felt like I was always solving a problem. That's a that's a skill. That's a skill always. There was always something to overcome and there was always a solution to that but yeah I do feel badly that I didn't. I don't remember times when I said when I grow up. I WANNA be an astronaut or I want to be a lawyer. I WANNA be a doctor. It was. How do I get to tomorrow when you look back? Were there signs that you would be a natural what you do now. No I don't know I hopeful. I don't think so. I think the one thing I knew I would be good at and I feel slightly guilty about it. Now is being incredibly articulate? I remember growing up and I grew up in a time where assimilation was valued which is very different than the time we are. Now where bringing your whole self whatever that is the most important thing so assimilation was about. How do you blend into everybody else in to do that? I DIDN'T WANNA speak Spanish. I didn't want to have an accent. Not a Hispanic accent. Not a long island city accent. Not a New York accent. It was like how articulate. Can I be so? I knew that whatever it was that I was GONNA do. I was going to be really good at speaking. Really good at presenting. Did that message. Come from your parents or from somewhere else. It didn't come from my parents because I remember hurting my mom's feelings a number of times when I said speak English. This is America. I must have picked that up from somewhere. I mean I think I was five. I remember where I was when I said that to her for the first time she was barking orders at me to do something probably my chores. Nothing nothing harmful and I just had had it Not necessarily with the chores just with I imagined with this. Why do I speak Spanish here but speak English someplace else? Why do I not know enough English? This is America. Get Your Act together. I had that kind of In patients with it which I of course feel terrible about it now but I was five different time where your parents from my mother is from El Salvador and my father was Puerto Rican. Study the Puerto Rican seems to take over your narrative in the little that I could find online. That's probably a New York thing fifth grade you struggling to prep. Which is this program that prepares kids from communities like yours that they will be leveled up academically with other kids. There must have been someone who said this very smart. Do you remember who that person was the principal? I remember a principal. His name was Philip. As emo I remember thinking his name was so grand. You Know Phillip as Emily and I remember. I was putting away books in our library. I say that with air quotes. It was like a shelf tiny shelf of Tattered books and he came over to me and he said I hear you're very smart and I think that carried me for ages six. Somebody noticed. Somebody saw that scrape the way someone like that can change. A Kid's life was one sentence I remember obsessing over that sentence and every single word in that sentence and so if you heard it it meant somebody else said it. So somebody else thought. I WAS SMART. So people were noticing. Somebody noticed. Somebody talked about it. Were you hearing that no no? I can't quite remember hearing any of that stuff at home. I I remember that I started in kindergarten. I didn't go to preschool. That was just not a notion for our family or even our community and somehow I I could understand. I spoke English but my parents both spoke only Spanish and I asked my mom at some point. How did I go to kindergarten? If I didn't speak English. And she said well we used to put you in front of the television to watch sesame street so I remember thinking my God. I must have learned all that. I know this language watching. Tv and watching Sesame Street. I think that was far as I could remember. Conversations about education or intelligence home was about working. It was about chores. We are coming up on a very special anniversary. Our one hundredth episode. And so we WANNA hear from you send us a voice memo to Ola at Latina to Latina Dot com telling us what the podcast has meant to you. When you've kept going a time you've persevered. We want to hear it all so then for high school through prep for prep. You end up going to a prep school in the upper west side culture shock. What specifically do you remember? What stood out to you? So many things stood out none of them commuted or they took the cross town bus and I thought my gosh what a privileged to take across town bus. I thought that must be a rich person thing. They went skiing lots of ski trips. They all had country houses. What is a country house and they all went every weekend to a country house or they went to the Hamptons. Every time there was a break from school there was a vacation. It's one of the complicated things about making these leaps which is even when you have the programs like prep for prep that are making the academic differential and the resource differential in many cases. There still is an emotional and cultural thing. That's already happening in your teens. Right like even if you don't have the upheaval of moving between worlds those years our heart and they are harder when you're also trying to understand things like why some people have those things in some people don't and who you are in a world in which you are from the get position does outsider. It's so true I think the Times I think about it now. I feel like they're two sides to it. That were not addressed that if programs like this are going to continue and they are very successful. I've said many times I oh my entire life to prep. I really do think it saved my life but if we're really GONNA see long-term growth in an impact from programs like that two sides to address. One is the sociological impact for the person of color entering those private schools. What should I expect? How do I answer questions about? Do you have a country house do you. Do you ski every weekend. It seems simple to say. I don't have that on. I don't ski. I would skip. But that's not what you say when you're thirteen or fourteen When I remember feeling I don't look like anybody here so I felt ugly. I don't have anything that these people have so I felt not worth it and I felt that in many occasions I was probably robbing a spot of somebody else that they didn't better than I did. But then the other side of that is who told those kids about me. Who told them I was coming told them why I deserved to be there. Who told them that? I had earned it and that conversation was never had those guys so as much as maybe in my teens. I felt like I didn't like anybody there. I didn't like the school. Now I know will why would they? Why would they treated me any differently? They didn't know no one spoke to them about it.

Don Draper America New York Puerto Rican Principal Long Island City SKI El Salvador Philip OLA Phillip Emily
Joan Rivers: Can We Talk?

Can We Talk?

9:24 listening | 2 months ago

Joan Rivers: Can We Talk?

"Joan rivers career spanned nearly six decades she started with cabaret and off Broadway shows in the late fifties and then became a star of late night television hosting the tonight show and the late show with Joan rivers and eventually the daytime Joan rivers show in the nineties. She was best known for her comedic and sometimes mean-spirited interviews with celebrities on the Red Carpet John. Style was self deprecating abrasive. Everyone was fair game including herself. She charted new territory and comedy by telling stories from her own life combined with her willingness to talk about taboo subjects like hot flashes sagging bodies bad sex and marriage problems. You may have noticed that we borrowed our podcast. Name can talk from this hilarious. Talented and complex Jewish woman. Can we talk? Was Jones signature. Tagline sometime. She's it as a punchline. Sometimes it was a setup. It was an invitation to her audience. A signal that she was about to confide in them. Here's Joan on the show in the early. Nineteen Eighty S. I would not cheat. I would not cheek Maine because nobody asked me but I not because I think why we talk. I think my husband's spooner man okay. Which is very hard to save. I feel very close to you. I especially if you can. We talk was also Jones way of calling attention to her flaws and other people's her way of saying let's stop pretending and tell the truth here. Can we talk? Let me tell you something. The reason I have nothing happy the way I'm blessed is because I'm getting older at least seven very drop because Oh oh you don't know what it's like to get older too. You know what it's like to go in the morning to take facial mask and realize you're not wearing what so. Why did we borrow her? Tigon FOR OUR PODCAST. When we started the show Joan had recently died and we were all steeped in the debate about her role and her complicated legacy as brilliant and hilarious. But also crass and sometimes cruel. We love that. She had so many dimensions and that she believed in telling the truth about women's lives and expanding the range of models. We see all things we knew we wanted to do to. We also liked that. Can we talk was an invitation to our audience to join us in this project of storytelling and with that. Here's a wonderful interview from J W as archive recorded in two thousand six for our documentary. Jewish women in comedy making trouble. Joan talks about her early days at the Chicago. Comedy Clubs Second City being a woman on Johnny Carson's tonight show and playing midwestern clubs as New York Jewish comic later in the interview. She talks about going back to work after her husband's suicide in nineteen eighty seven. She starts by telling Interviewer Rachel. Talbot about a fight. She had with her parents over her decision to go into comedy. I left my house in pedal pushes enter old car that I used to drive and went to New York in speaking of the year and it was just awful and my dad wrote me a letter say that we are going to You'd better come home or we're going to have you committed. I was living in the bars on hotel for women and my dad wanted says and pulled me out. It was a scene. I think they ever forgot dragged me out. It was just horrible scene Harles. They just thought I was really life as though question about it. They just couldn't accept that. This is where I was going to end. This is all I could do so the I went back home and then I went away. Yeah it was just awful and then Pity yes that was great. Second City was very competitive. It was six of US thrown on stage. And it was make up your own lines and get your own scenes going and everybody wanted to be the star second city and everybody wants to get their stuff and so it wasn't like being gracious. It was like I got a better idea I wanted. It was very competitive and that was great too. I learnt in second city. You have to talk up and I learnt the freedom of you. Think it's funny try it. Don't wait don't think about it. I still do that if freed me. It taught me to be tough. It taught me to fight. If you thought you're Si was good you went into four four and a taught me co with your instinct. Only do what you truly think is going to be funny. It changed my life and then you you came back to New York Nissan. You learn so much from second cities are how had your comic persona change came. When I came back with second city I was myself onstage. Good bed or different. I was what I was and I was a divorced when no Jewish smart college graduate not particularly attractive girl on stage and I was telling you about my life. It wasn't about my mother-in-law was about what I'm going through my mother's hysterical because I'm single and I'm having an affair with a married man and my gay friends. What happen to my gay friends and it was all about truth. The first routine that really worked. I had a WIG hairpieces. I was driving into New York to perform at this club. And the WIG flew out of the window and a car drove over it and I said there I was walking on the west side highway. With a dead Wigan my arms had says firestone on and no one stops and all the truth and taking the truth and exaggerated and it just opened me up. I never went back. I never went back to. He's so fat that unless I really believe when did you find out Johnny Carson? Nothing in my career. I think that's why I was that you log come easily ever. I've never been the first on anything all my friends. And that time I was working the village with my George Carlin and Richard. Pryor all these wonderful men everybody got through everybody was on Carson and on Griffin and I was brought up seven different times to the Carson show. I was finally rejected by Secretary. Who is eating lunch while I was performing? I mean beyond humiliating. I got on because the night before some comic bom so they called me up and they said you can come on but not as a comedian. They had no faith in me. They brought me on as a girl writer and at the end of the show at the end of that night on air. Johnny Carson said to me you're going to be a star it was maisy and I look behind me. I couldn't believe and the next day. My life change changed overnight. They were getting all these calls and stuff. Was there ever a feeling of like? Oh you're to New York reports. I was doing costume regularly. I don't think it was hosting really I was you know the Golden Girl Carson and the ages come back and say you to New York to Jewish you to New York and my husband was married by that point. Ed You said this is ridiculous. He said picked the worst city in the country. And they said Milwaukee they still have been meetings. This is nine hundred seventy. There's still enclaves. They dress up Nazi uniforms and saw Adolf stand. He said center Milwaukee. And let's see and they sent me to Milwaukee and I was. They had to change the size of the room and put in the ballroom. Our I put originally in a little hotel the pfister in their little comedy room and they had to over the ball and put me in so that changed everything they said. Okay America will get her. I mean people begin to put little pockets and it's so stupid because funny is funny. You're minutes was using back on state. What was that decision? The decision was very simple. One I know money I had to go back to work. I didn't have the luxury of being the widow in the house on the hill so I had to go back to and nobody wanted me and Vegas gave me back my contracts. 'cause isn't nobody wants to see anybody that has that kind of you would just fired. would terrible glistening one out that. I was very hard to work with It was just all wrong all wrong. I was banned from late night. I've never been brought back ever not one late night show So I was really struggling my career and I had all these bills. Listen was in. It was just a bad time so I went back to little nightclubs. I said well I'll start again. I went back and started doing little like us and out of that came the red carpet

Johnny Carson Joan New York Second City Milwaukee Jones Joan Rivers New York Nissan United States Maine George Carlin Spooner Wigan Chicago Talbot Rachel J W Firestone Secretary
Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

Encyclopedia Womannica

5:36 listening | 2 months ago

Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

"Shining. Oh hello from wonder media network. I'm Jenny Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia. Manica deemed the first lady of Song. Today's Dreamer was the most popular female jazz singer in the United States. For more than half a century. She went thirteen grammy awards and sold over forty million albums. Her voice was flexible. Wide-ranging accurate and ageless. Let's talk about Ella Fitzgerald Ella. Jane Fitzgerald was born on April twenty fifth nineteen seventeen in Newport News. Virginia to William Fitzgerald and Tempe Henry Ellis parents separated shortly after Ella's birth and she and her mother moved to Yonkers New York where they eventually moved in with Tempe longtime boyfriend. Joseph Dasilva three soon became four LS half-sister Francis was born in Nineteen twenty-three. The family struggled to make ends meet. Both parents worked multiple jobs. L. Occasionally took on work to their apartment was a mixed neighborhood. Where Ella made friends easily? She considered herself more of a Tomboy and often join neighborhood baseball games. Sports Aside Ella enjoy dancing and singing with friends and would perform at lunch and on her way to school in Nineteen. Thirty two ELLAS. Mom Tempe died from serious injury. She received in a car accident. Ella was devastated. She eventually moved in with her aunt Virginia and when her stepfather Joe died shortly thereafter. Ala stepsister. Francis came to live with them. To Ella was in a dark place. She started skipping school and her grades dropped. She got in trouble with the police and was sent to a reform school where she was subject to beatings by her caretakers. Eventually Ella escaped from the reformatory. She was fifteen years old broke and alone during the Great Depression. In nineteen thirty four Islas name was pulled in a weekly drawing the Apollo Theater for a chance to perform and compete an amateur night. Two sisters who the dance in the sisters in the world call the edgewood sisters and they closed the show about I when I saw those ladies. Dan I says no way. I'm going out there and try to dance. Because they stop the show. She was planning to dance but when the Edwards sisters closed the main show. She changed her mind fearing she couldn't compete with their moves. And when I got out there somebody follow up nobody else. What is she going to do? She made a last minute decision to sing and ask the band to play. Hoagy Carmichael Judy. Heavens hurt to me. By the end of the song the crowd demanded an encore and Ella had found her calling one of the people in the band. That night with saxophonist and Arranger Benny Carter wowed by her natural talent. Benny introduced a lot of people. Who could help launch your career? The era of big swing bands was coming to a close in favor of bebop. Ls successfully made the transition using her voice to sound like another horn in the band. She began to experiment with scat singing. Eventually turning it into an art in nineteen thirty eight Ella recorded a version of the nursery. Rhyme a-tisket a task it. A million copies of the album were sold it. Hit number one on the charts and it stayed on the pop charts for seventeen weeks. Ella was suddenly famous her wife. Changed Professionally and personally while on tour with Dizzy Gillespie's band in nineteen forty. Six Ella fell in love with bassist. Ray Brown the two got married and adopted a son Ray. Junior through the two later got divorced. They remained lifelong friends L. O. Worked with all the jazz greats including Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Nat King Cole Dizzy. Gillespie and Benny Goodman from nineteen fifty six to nineteen sixty. Four Ella recorded eight songbooks in which she covered other musicians songs. Including those by Cole Porter Duke. Ellington the Gershwin's Johnny Mercer Irving Berlin and Rodgers and Hart Ella continued to work throughout her life by the nineteen nineties. She had recorded more than two hundred albums she received the Kennedy Center honors the US National Medal of Arts and Francis Commander of Arts and letters award. Thank you and I'm so proud to be in class with all these younger ones coming up. Ain't gonNA leave me behind. I'm learning out a wrap in her later. Life Ella suffer from diabetes. She was hospitalized. Congestive heart failure in nineteen eighty six and for exhaustion in nineteen ninety. Nine hundred ninety three. She had to have both of her legs amputated below the knee due to complications from diabetes. She never fully recovered from the surgery. And on June fifteenth. Nineteen Ninety six at the age of seventy-nine Ella Fitzgerald died at her Beverly Hills. Home fans all over. The world mourned her death. A wreath of white flowers was placed next to her star on the Hollywood walk of fame and the Marquee outside the Hollywood bowl read. Lmu will miss you

Ella Fitzgerald Ella Ella Fitzgerald Ella Hart Ella Dizzy Gillespie Virginia Grammy United States Carmichael Judy Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Francis Jane Fitzgerald Jenny Kaplan Benny Carter Mom Tempe Manica Diabetes Benny Baseball Cole Porter Duke
Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Women Working in the World of Plants

Cultivating Place

9:44 listening | 2 months ago

Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Women Working in the World of Plants

"We continue cultivating places. Women's history month interviews. Were joined this week by Andrea Delong Amaya director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin it is also the botanic garden for the State of Texas Andrea has been on staff for over twenty years and has more than thirty years of experience in horticulture. She Guides fifteen staff members in the design and management of nine acres of Native Plant Gardens. Two hundred and seventy five acres of natural areas and in native plant nursery. She teaches classes in native plant horticulture and writes and presents on her passion for the field widely. She spoke with US late. Last autumn to share more about the history and work of the centre including it. Being the legacy of another extraordinary woman ladybird Johnson Andrea shares. Her own enthusiasm for this field of work. Welcome Andrea Hi. How you doing? I'm great how are you wonderful? I'd love for you to start by describing describe the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center as visually as you can for listeners. Who may not have been there. And then we'll talk a little bit about your specific work there Andrea Sherr so we are in a South Austin and in the middle of Texas. We're in a part of the state that we refer to as Texas El country or the Edwards Plateau which is a beautiful beautiful part of the state. Of course Texans will say every part of the state is beautiful but I WANNA say text. The central Texas area is particularly beautiful especially in the spring were really renowned for having excellent wildflower displays including the Texas blue on it which occurs all over the state but the central Texas areas particularly flora for us in the spring. And so we are like I said in Austin and the site that were on is a public garden where about two hundred and eighty five acres. I think we actually added a little bit more In the last year or so and it's a public garden where we feature plants that are native to the state of Texas. That's the site now. The organization is bigger than that But the gardens here. We're demonstrating hell different. Native plants can be used in different kinds of landscapes different kinds of styles. We have collections of plants. From different parts of the State we are the Botanic Garden Texas. So we're trying to increase our collections to represent other parts of the state as well as the central Texas area so we have about nine acres of cultivated gardens and then we have a sixteen Acre Texas Arboretum of trees So those are the horticultural areas in then. We have natural areas in The other parts of the the property And that the natural areas also include some research areas. We have some Areas where we're doing Land Management prescribed fire treatments and different kinds of land-management to see how that influences the vegetation. Yeah we can talk more about that. If you're if you like definitely definitely I will i. I would love to get into some of the specifics of each of those areas you just described but before we get there. Describe your your your job there what it entails and may be the trajectory of your twenty years there. Andrea. Yeah well. I started as a gardener appropriately and really enjoy working outside. I mean I've always been interested in being outdoors and that goes way back to my childhood is probably most people who have an affinity for the natural world That usually starts childhood so I grew up doing things outdoors with my parents particularly with my dad. We'd go camping or canoeing. And I remember having a field guide of of wildflowers weeds that surrounded our area where we lived and that was great. Fun everything from astronomy to birds and lizards and insects. Just everything is so interesting And I just find that the more I learn about things the more I'm fascinated and in awe of the natural world so that's just started early but it's just been a long a lifelong interest in learning more and observing more. I mean I laugh. We have a big picture window at our dining room table. And that's our TV. We don't have an actual electronics of the Inter House. It's overlooking a garden and pond and we just sit there and watch the animal antics and what's blooming and it's great fun and it's a nice way to slow down in our fast paced world That's a that's a big part of what I think. Nature does for me and for a lot of people So you started as a gardener. What year was that Andrea and then tell us about the progression of your rules at the Center Which clearly you progressed in because of your deepening curiosity and ever expanding knowledge base. Yes so I started in December of nine hundred ninety eight and Worked as a gardener I've guarded in most of the areas that we have in Under cultivation over the years and at some point we had Position of gardens manager was available so I moved into that and then I don't know maybe fifteen years ago I transitioned into the direct report culture and Unfortunately that means a little bit less guarding than I used to do. But it also gets me in a higher level of designing decision making which is very exciting and allows me to have more influence over some of the bigger picture things that are happening And then overseeing the natural areas arboretum and the nurseries also been pretty pretty fun and adds different interest to what what I'm looking at. Yeah so talk about Before we get into the specifics of some of the programmatic areas and display areas there and then the research give listeners. A history of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center when it started what it's original mission in scope was of course the wonderful woman for whom it is named and by whom it was founded in its original iteration and So that that people have an understanding of just how much bigger is then. A Garden appreciating wildflowers. Because that is a fabulous mission but it's it is much bigger than that so we're very blessed to have had the visionary Labor Johnson as founder. She founded the wildflower center. Initially as the wildflower research center. The National Welfare Research Center and that was an endeavor that she took on with her friend and actress. Helen Hayes which a lot of people don't remember that part of of the history but it's Kinda Funny Mrs Johnson didn't feel like she had enough name. Recognition Systems of Helen Hayes. And so her mission right from the beginning was to really try to understand an unlocked the secrets of wildfires in native plants and understand how they grow and that was the original research. The the wildflower center did at that time and so that was a nineteen eighty two so the organization started back. Then we moved to our current site as a public garden Before it was more just a research site with some portables but it didn't really have botanical garden kind of exhibits. Someone moved to Our current site in one thousand nine hundred ninety five that was really a big focus of making the space Amenable to guests and having exhibits that people can interact with and having educational programming and really elaborating on that when she first started it. Why we'll just remind listeners? She was of course the first lady of the United States and she Had A as firstly. She had some remarkable initiatives to beautify. I think was the word that was used then. roads and highways across the country and she was taken by the wildflower diversity there in her home state for good reason. Because it's a pretty remarkable native flora. Will you talk a little bit about that? And and why people thought this was not just a pretty project but was worthy of deep research. Even at that time so yeah. Mrs Johnson grew up in a rural setting and without siblings so she was a long time so her best friend is. A child was outside Just the outdoors and I think that was what what instilled upon in her the scrape passion for the for the natural world and then as she became first lady She really had a great influence on President Johnson in terms of Passing legislation one of the things he's known for is the beautification. Act The highway beautification. Act and getting billboards off of the roadsides and cleaning up roadsides and planting wildflowers and the way I understand it you know we talk about it is being beautification and she knew at the time. She was very savvy that at the time. She knew that that was a word that would engage people. The public secretly I. I've heard that she felt like that was actually kind of a word and that it is she. I think she understood. It was deeper than just beautification was away to connect people with the idea that she

Texas Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C President Johnson Andrea Wildflower Center Austin Johnson Andrea Native Plant Gardens United States Botanic Garden Texas Wildflower Research Center Andrea Delong Andrea Hi Andrea Sherr University Of Texas Texas El Country Helen Hayes Acre Texas Arboretum National Welfare Research Cent
U.S. Soccer Federation argues against equal pay for women

KCBS 24 Hour News

0:38 listening | 2 months ago

U.S. Soccer Federation argues against equal pay for women

"The U. S. soccer federation says facing a hostile crowds in Mexico and Central America makes plane for the U. S. men's national team a different job than competing for the American women the U. S. S. F. made the claim in documents filed in federal court in Los Angeles where a lawsuit by American women accusing the federation of gender discrimination is scheduled for trial starting may fifth US women are seeking more than sixty six million dollars in damages under the equal pay act and the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty

U. S. Soccer Federation Mexico Central America S. S. F. Los Angeles United States
International Women's Day marked with marches and protests

Pantsuit Politics

2:01 listening | 2 months ago

International Women's Day marked with marches and protests

"I just want to compliment. The women who marched all over the world on their national women's Day and specifically women who marched in places where marching is really dangerous. There were arrests in Cuba. Stan there was tear gas fired in Turkey court. Petitions were filed in Pakistan Stop Women's rallies and they marched nonetheless in Mexico protests were led by mothers of women and girls who've been murdered more than ten women are killed every single day in Mexico which I did not know until I started reading about these protests. Often they are killed by male partners and often. The punishments are inadequate. I read a quote from Brazil about women saying we are raped and murdered and kidnapped and no one does anything about it. There are thousands of women in the streets in Chile. And it just reminded me. I kind of struggled with International Women's Day this year here in the United States because it gets very corporate and we sell a lot of things around it and sometimes I just wonder. Are we doing more harm than good in some ways here but when I think about it on a truly global scale and the issues that women still face in the world how dangerous it is for women to raise their voices and the fact that they do it? Anyway I am encouraged. I am blown away. I am reminded of the incredible privileges I have as a woman living in the United States. You're in two thousand twenty and I also appreciated the reporting from axes about this They cite a study from Harvard. Professor Erica Chenowitz and talking about how there's a direct correlation of success between women's participation and protest movements women involved keep protests more nonviolent. They take on a whole lot of roles during protests from organizing caregiving in protecting And it just really matters that women participate politically in this way. So I'm grateful to everyone around the world who did at great personal

International Women Professor Erica Chenowitz United States Mexico Pakistan Cuba Turkey Court Brazil Chile Stan Harvard