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Jochen Zeitz on the Power of Fashion to Drive Sustainable Change

The Business of Fashion Podcast

9:40 listening | 5 d ago

Jochen Zeitz on the Power of Fashion to Drive Sustainable Change

"Good afternoon you can. How are you today? I'm very good high Iran from America. You're in new. Mexico is that right. Yes shattering at home because our officers are still closed until later this month. Okay and tell us a little bit about where you're at in New Mexico. You have a home there. I know but you. You spend your time in quite a few different places. So why did you choose New Mexico as a place to sit this quarantine out because Just being appointed to the position of senior and president of Davidson then the company's movable key and to and I'm only one time zone away from Milwaukee so I'm headed. Us publicly listed company now. And and hence. Why I'm a US together with God it well that I guess. Pratt for practical reasons that makes perfect sense though. I hear that New Mexico's also very beautiful and I can imagine that doesn't hurt. It certainly doesn't enter this still lots of opportunity to ride a motorbike as well. You know. Yuck and before we get to the topic at hand I think you know that This week on the business of fashion. We've really been focusing all of our content and discussions around building a responsible business so it strikes me as very interesting that you've taken this new role as the president and CEO Partly Davidson because apart from the fashion industry and maybe the Energy Industry the transport industry is one of the most damaging industries in the world when it comes to our planet and so I know you have this incredibly long and sustained career in focusing your professional time and energy on building more responsible sustainable businesses. So you can you tell us a little bit about you know why this opportunity at Harley Davidson was so appealing to you. Well first of all because I believe that sector leaders and iconic brands have a tremendous opportunity to contribute to a change in consumer behavior. As a whole and I've done that in my boss lie that coma as both carrying also helping them said business. The Independent initiatives at the time being called. Ppo hold now carrying. And I just believe that sector is an iconic brands have that opportunity and we should use it as a as a way not just to be more responsible but the actually looking at it as an opportunity for jobs in the market. You're seen as a kind of turnaround specialist. You know. You've gone in from a very young age at Puma. I think you were the youngest. Ceo in Germany of a public company. At that time. And you took Puma and really help to not just turn it around from a business standpoint but also really inject some of these principles That we've been focusing on this week at B. O. F. into that business so I guess you know in the first instance someone who's operated in this space for a very long time. I mean how is it that you defined what a responsible business means now but a sustainable socially responsible business means how do you articulate that to people in your teams or elsewhere when you're trying to kind of gain further? Bienne that this is the way you more businesses need to be thinking your lipid limit. Stop with the first part of your statement rather than Christian and calling me a turnaround specialist. I would look at myself as as a change. Agent more than a turnaround specialists and the foster. The world changes the boy. I need to be a change agent and an still change it. What you do in Your Business and I guess ozone our private life if you look at how the world has changed especially in the last few months so I don't look at myself of turnaround specialist but somebody that's challenge the status quo and to come back to your question is when you when you look at the State of planet. Today we recognize that we are taking more resources away from old planet leaving if irreparable damage that means we have to change and hence we cannot just look at shareholder. The value growing a business any longer but we have to look at it responsibly. But at the same time also as an opportunity and how we can actually do better as a business but doing so by keeping our stakeholders robin just showers minded. Our Planet is key stakeholder because without our planet we won't be able to function so that's clear and then the corona virus crisis hit in the last few months and businesses throughout various sectors. Have been hit hard including Harley Davidson the industry that we work in the fashion industry. I mean how. How do you see this kind of responsible? Business thinking in light of the crisis that we're now all experiencing both from kind of public health and an economic standpoint. I'd say even going into the crisis you start to see change. In a lot of companies more and more companies that may be compared to five years ago where it was handful of select leaders and companies that we're promoting a more responsible way of doing business And I think this is only going to accelerate. I think investors are asking the question that was one of the missing links in the past that quite often investors. We're not really looking. Yes G. or sustainability as a as a an important Harrasment based on which one should just judge investment. That has been happening. I actually see this accelerating post-crisis that you can make the business case for a planet And you can say what we experiencing now with. The virus is just a false way of experiencing climate change that will happen over decades but the resolves is creeping change or planet which will have negative impacts on how live operate and work hence something. We need to get our hands around on. This virus is is a testament for a needed cross change in order to deal with a much bigger crisis that the would it be affecting our lives wrong world in twenty thirty years to call. So we've been talking this week as I mentioned about. You know the idea that. The fashion industry needs to clean up. Its Act and you have the very unusual position now of WHO's operated right at the very heart of the fashion industry as you mentioned both at home on caring and I know you stepped out of the industry some time ago but I'm sure as an observer and you know someone who was kind of closely embedded in this industry previously. You've been watching and I'm curious to understand your like. How do you see the fashion industry now? In light of this need for the industry to clean up its act and you know some of these things that you were talking about for years. These principles around sustainability and creating a business that simply extract resources from the planet and exploit people businesses that really found a way of operating while respecting these different stakeholders. I mean as a as a as a former insider now an outsider. What are your thoughts now on the fashion industry on this journey of of of kind of shaking things up when I look at every crisis in opportunity. It's an opportunity to really look at your own south. It's an opportunity to look at Your Business and how you operate and say what can we the essentially change to adjust our says to the new noma coming out of this crisis. I would say it's it's a given that they will be do a which is affecting our lives which is effective way effecting the way we we by the way we triple. A. And our consciousness about critically shes of our world advising domestically I think that's if businesses don't ask themselves that question you know you would be history of rather than the future attempts to fashion industry. I always believe that you need to embed sustainability into the DNA of Your Business and of your brand. You don't want to be the one shouting. We are sustainable. Be less understandable and others Jimmy. It's a definition of quality and a new way of looking at what is quantity in the future versus what was deemed the poss. When our Resources Ltd I would just simply say as quantities. Such an important driver luxury and desirability. If you're not sustainable. You don't actually operates with quality products that that's the new definition for me. That embed sustainability in every decision. You make us a business as a business leader as design as a manufacturer and and we need to look at this very seriously at and not just a setup sustainability departments that only scratched the surface but actually embed the word sustainability into our day to day operation.

Harley Davidson New Mexico Puma President And Ceo Mexico United States Iran America Coma Milwaukee Pratt CEO Resources Ltd Jimmy President Trump Germany
Nordstrom at Freehold Raceway Mall to Close Permanently

Fat Mascara

3:27 listening | 6 d ago

Nordstrom at Freehold Raceway Mall to Close Permanently

"Is not earth shattering news but something happened last week. Like for. Some reason is really sticking with me the Nordstrom. We didn't report on this news last week but Nordstrom announced they were shuttering. I believe sixteen stores in the US because obviously we know a lot of companies are going through hard times Marcus filed for bankruptcy. J. Crew filed for bankruptcy retail is taking a huge hit but the NORDSTROM. I grew up going to every weekend at least every weekend really closed. Yes the Jersey Nordstrom the freehold raceway Raceway Mall Nordstrom. Now for anyone listening. That is like wow okay. Upscale retail store were closing. You spent your childhood in a in a Nordstrom. This is not exactly. You know wholesome consumerist. Here's what I have to say these. Are we all have memories like different places? This is where my mother and I could forget our cares for an hour or two on a weekend. Go to the clinic counter. Get OUR FREE GIFT with purchase. This is where I really forge. She know my interest in beauty. You know what I mean. Yeah like I would go with my mom. And then when I had my driver's license I would like go by myself and like hanging out with the Matt counter. I even took like a Nordstrom. Had like a Mac masterclass one day and it was on the top floor and the private room and I would leave talked about that. I've heard you talk about that class. I never knew where it happened. I thought it was like a the IDC at the plaza like being served like tea-and-crumpets. Like no it's where you got your view of beauty and the glamour that comes with completely and like I really just thought it was another world. You know you laugh because it's like okay. It was like a Jersey Mall unlike route nine like combat but like to know that this place is closing. All of these people are losing their jobs. Yes is so sentimental sentimental for me and it's like the end of an era but it's like I was texting my friends salary who is from Marlboro and like which the neighboring town to the free old at I was like I don't know why this is hitting me so hard. And she just said it really sinclair. She's not like a beauty crazy person like I am she goes. I'm really upset to she goes. I think it's like I'm just not ready for all of this negative change and it's the negative change from Cova. It's also you've talked about how you've been watching commercials from your childhood just for that feeling of nostalgia yes. This is a piece of childhood in a way that is just never. You can't get that back and whatever I have that feeling. It's like this weird existential feeling of like okay. No turning back now like moving forward things are different. Your mom now like it's an I get it I get it. It's not about the store and like the shopping experience. It's it's about the memories. I think yeah I was thinking like. Is anyone going to sympathize with me? Who doesn't have food in the fridge? She's husband are themselves. Those lost their job like nordstroms. Close No it's not about like where am I going to go? It's like when a piece your childhood and innocence disappears. I think for a lot of people in the last couple of months like that. Innocence disappeared for a lot of

Nordstrom Freehold Raceway Raceway Mall United States Jersey Mall Marcus Cova Marlboro
How COVID-19 Has Changed Fast Fashion Forever

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

6:59 listening | 6 d ago

How COVID-19 Has Changed Fast Fashion Forever

"We've all heard how fast fashion is damaging to the people and the planet. What you probably haven't heard is that the covid nineteen pandemic has created a crisis for garment factory employees around the world amid this unprecedented event workers factories and brands are losing wages and are being forced to make difficult decisions to keep their businesses running while protecting health and safety orders are being produced postponed or canceled. Lockdowns are preventing work in some countries and viral exposure on the job a threat to workers and their families in this episode of Good Together. Liza and I discussed with Jessica Andrews Deputy Fashion Editor Bustle. How Fair Trade? Usa is mobilizing to protect garment workers. Jessica's years of experience in the Fashion Journalism Space and her passion for fighting back against the negative impact of industry make for a fascinating and timely conversation at the intersection of Human Rights Fashion. An advocacy. Hey Jessica welcome to good together. Were so excited to have you so for listeners. Who aren't familiar with Jessica. She is the deputy fashion editor at bustle overseeing all things fashion from red carpet roundups to trend reports Before she went she was at bustle. She did stints at refinery. Twenty nine teen vogue an has also contributed to places like L. Vanity Fair New York Times essence. Just like all of the wonderful news sources. I could say so. We are thrilled to have her on a speaking about all things fair trade USA. An ethical. Fashion so Jessica. I wondered if you could give us an intro As to your background I know I just covered a little bit of it there. But you know why you got into The the ethical fashion space specifically. And we'll just kind of take it from there. Good why I love The you because it really sums up my career. I've done a little bit of everything I've worked in housing brands and as a freelance writer and I found that I was really passionate about not just about fashion though. I love beautiful clothes. But like the ethical aspect of it on whether that's diversity on the runway or treating garment workers fairly and being conscious about the environment and I think for me. My passionate about environmental issues really developed from my sister. She's a climate analyst. She works out of DC. And she's always been really passionate about how we can make the world a better place four to leave behind our kids and that really starts with us being more responsible about our carbon footprint and I always loved hearing her talk about it because she's so passionate but I didn't realize how much it crossed over with the fashion industry until I started my career and I saw just how wasteful the industry can be An also I learned about Rana Plaza and I was devastated to know all the garment workers who lives were lost that day And I really felt like I could make a difference through my platform and my jobs by speaking out about this because I thought if I wasn't aware of you know how the fashion industry was contributing to climate change and just that like lack of environmental responsibility that they had I bought. There must be other people that feel this way to you know so. I I realized could really use my platform to spread awareness. And you know working with my sister. Her name named Sabrina and other advocates in this in this space like Rachel weighing who was established for the fair trade. Look book who such an inspiration to me. I was able to learn more about these issues and then find a way that I could cover them at all the different places I've worked so that's been something that really rewarding for me to do to feel like I'm helping make a difference in somewhere. So yeah it's good to hear how you of got into ethical fashion and you absolutely kind of Nailed it in terms of like when you feel like even you don't know about it and I think at despite the fact that we are in the fair trade ethical fashioning still we all know about the staff we are super passionate about you know spreading awareness about what happened. Rana Plaza by the way for our listeners gives you know Rana Plaza was a factory collapsed in Dhaka. Bangladesh holding tire factory collapsed on Apple. Two fourth two thousand thirteen killing over eleven hundred people garment workers and it kind of gave Was fuel behind the ethical fashion fashion pollution moods which is With we we've been through so much over the years of the seven years now It's you absolutely right. Not everyone knows about it and spreading awareness solely incredibly Just so everyone knows what was happening the because again. We are so so disconnected this days. from the people who are making basically every product. Not just the that. We're wearing but products that we eat with for the run our with in the house Absolutely right with that So you also mentioned that we wear fair trade campaign ride UA one of the Bruins women spokesperson for the we wear trade campaign that was launched last month right and time of professional dilution week buy fair trade. Usa. Can you tell us more about it? Yeah of course so. It's interesting that you brought up Rana Plaza again because that really inspired it And Fair trade originally launched the where fair trade campaign last year on during fashion revolution. Week to honor the Rana Plaza Garment Factory Collapse And I think doing it. This year felt really urgent as well. I'm just to raise awareness around how garment workers are still being impacted today on and then also especially considering the effects of cove in nineteen And how you know. Fashions most vulnerable people are impacted during a crisis even more so this campaign we wanted to really highlight that Rachel Wang again She was the stylist and the creative director. She collaborated with B. Y. T. NYC too short film And that would really moves me so much just to hear about how these different advocates started getting active in the space and why fair trade is so significant to all of

Jessica Andrews Rana Plaza Rana Plaza Garment Factory Fair New York Times Editor Rachel Wang USA Liza Dhaka Analyst Writer Usa. B. Y. T. Nyc Sabrina Bangladesh Apple Bruins
Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

Skimm'd from The Couch

2:42 listening | 6 d ago

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

"I WanNa talk about the concept of mentor ship because it sounds like from your story and from what you've said in the past you didn't necessarily have it earlier in your career or you've talked about the lack of being able to see people and be like. Oh that's someone that looks like me or has the same background as me. How do you think about that? Now that you are in a position to obviously be a mentor. What do you think about the importance of it? I feel like when I learned about mentorship. It was like okay. They're going to take you out to lunch and then you're GonNa do this. And it was a very strict idea and euro idea. I think of what I thought it was going to be but I think over time now I realize it. It really is a two way street in has to be more of a relationship with somebody that really feels like they're also getting something out of it can't just be you asking this person for help recommendations all of those things even though that is very valid. I think it really has to be more of a two way street of that person. Feeling like okay. I'm investing in this for these reasons or this person really adds value. Or you know all those things I think it just it has to make sense and I think they I've been blessed to have really good bosses and those people have become mentors to me because I think the over time in working for them and understanding them them getting understanding of me. We were able to come to a place of okay. I can reach out to this person but I think it's hard like I wouldn't have had that relationship with them from blind emailing them or just damning them like there were reasons and there was a method to Hauer relationships. Developed over time. You obviously work for someone. That's a legend. Now in the business that you worked for Sela be before that you've worked for women that have had huge impacts in careers. You also talk about. How what you. WanNa do requires pushing boundaries? Change there's a certain sense of fearlessness. Just hearing you speak. Would you describe yourself that way? Everyone says that but I don't think of it that way. I just think that if I'm not doing this no one else will do if I don't do this work. Honestly I've looked and searched for other people in it's just not really insight and I think they a lot of people can get to positions like this and just be grateful and super comfortable and not push into see like I got the job or I got access to this network or I was able to make this amount of money. So I'm just GonNa sit here and enjoy it because I've worked hard but that's just not the way that my parents raised me. It's time to work even harder and so I don't really think is fearlessness. I think it's just the way it is

Sela Hauer
A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:57 listening | 6 d ago

A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

"We are very excited to have Lindsey People's Wagner. Lindsay is the editor in chief of Teen Vogue magazine and is the youngest editor in chief of Conde NAST publication. She's also the only black female editor in chief of A. Us Fashion magazine as a career journalist. Her work focuses on the intersecting world of style identity culture and politics. Lindsey thank you so much for coming on today. We're really excited for the conversation. Thank you so much for having me. So let's start out with our basic question. Skim your resume Flores. I started religious interning into. That's really how I figured out that I even want to publications and teen. Vogue was my first actual internship and my first big internship in general so after doing that in college. It became the first job that I actually got out of college and I worked in the closet basically schlepping and doing running errands. And all the not fun things that wasn't on the hills of for a couple of years and then from there. I went to style DOT COM which merged into vogue dot com eventually. And that's when I really wanted to get into more writing and more of the storytelling and more of the behind the scenes of like how all of these pieces come together to really make a feature. And then I went to New York magazine in the cut for awhile and I mean that was an incredible experience for me because I was able to be at a place where I think you learn so much about your own story and how that plays into everything that you write or edit or that you wanna cover and I think there I was able to really flex love the muscles of things that I wanted to do from styling and producing shoots to working on you know really long. Form pieces like black and fashion. It's been over a year and a half. I would say of being editor-in-chief Teen Vogue so it's been a fun full circle moment to be back now as editor in chief and I think we've really leaned into a lot of the core things what I loved about Teen Vogue but in a modern in fresh and inclusive way that I always wanted to make it. I always love talking to people in fashion when they talk about like. Oh I started off in the closet and it's this thing and for people that aren't in fashion. It's like way that it's an actual real job that requires a lot of organization. And it's how a lot of people start off but I always think that's such a funny face when people see you working in fashion in TV or films. It looks very glamorous and it looks like you're just around town shopping and everything's breezy and their champagne and it's not that at all for those of us who've actually had to work our way out so I think that's an interesting point because you actually have to do a lot to figure out even what it takes to make a magazine come together. What something that people can't find on your linked in or that is in Google about you that you want people to know the only thing you can't really do but it's not like a secret and it's something that I have on my social media how much I love to cook. I grew up in a family. We always had to be at the dinner table. There was no fast food allowed. I find it really just calming and reminds me of home and so that's something that I really enjoy and I think it's interesting because in fashion people tend to not want to talk about food or not food to be the center of any conversation. Because there's always these very stupid pressures and anxieties around body image and how much you consume and even in this time. I think it's been really disappointing for me to see so. Many people in the industry say really insensitive things about you know not wanting to gain weight during this time and it's incredibly insensitive but also just ignorant and I want the industry to move to this place of inclusivity in a real way. I'm so grateful for this body that I have and I'm grateful to be able to make food and to be able to. You know to live this life. And that's really all that I think. Cooking food conversation should be about. Yeah and it's it's especially a very relevant conversation right now as you said thinking about so. Many people that are experiencing unexpected turns poor health that thinking about food and how we think about our bodies and being thankful for it in this moment his very different on that note about covert. You are leading a team a team that is part of Conde nast which is like any major media company has had its its ups and downs. How are you leading through this with the balance of trying to keep people calm? I know from leading our own team that it's not like we have a magic eight ball of being able to see when this ends. How have you handled this environment from a leadership perspective to be honest? I think it's been really tough because it is so open ended. We don't really know what is going to happen in the future and you can make all these plans for life and then you know life happens and I think for me. It's been a lot of just having those conversations with people you know. Do you need a mental health? Day Do you not. Do you feel like you can't do this today. And that's fine and now take on that you know today if I can and I'll figure out a way that we can move forward. That feels good for everyone. I've been having so many conversations of bandwidth and what people can just emotionally and mentally handle right now as journalists in like someone who's always overly ambitious. There's so many ideas and things that I always WANNA do. But I've been very transparent with my staff of like this is a great idea and I think this would be cool but I'm not trying to pressure anyone in ad anyone's workload of this is a cool idea but like I can't emotionally handle anymore worker. I can't spend any more time on this right now and I think we all have to be understanding of that and you know so many people have had family issues and I had a family member pass away from Kovin so I'm so sorry I'm very sorry for your family. No it's okay. It's just it's emotional roller coaster for everyone. I think just trying to be understanding in that. Is You know an empathy is everything. Yeah speaking about empathy is studies and more information is coming out that shows Cova nineteen infecting and killing people of color at a disproportionately higher rates. I think that there's been a lot of conversation about how this can reveal inequalities and disparities in our society that sometimes people don't spend time or don't WanNa think about as someone that has written about the overlap between culture and politics. I'm just curious to talk about how you're thinking through this moment and the type of data that we're seeing it just sucks to see that people of color going to be affected even more in the situation because you know people have covered just disproportionately don't have access to healthcare. And I mean really what this. Kobe situation is put so much light on his problems with class. And how we treat certain people in how we give you know other people privileges and I think it's it's been really upsetting to see a lot of popular influencers. You know be able to get tested really quickly and be able to have access to be able to get any medical advice and to be able to just hop in their RV and go to some house and be able to just escape and this is a reality for a lot of people have colored. They can't get the help that they need and I think for us. It's a constant conversation that we're having of. How do we amplify the voices of people of Color this because it just spans to so many things like even in my hometown from Wisconsin and the Wisconsin primary was like Sony? My family members were saying people of color are going to be directly affected by this election. And they're not being you know comforted in this at all. The polling stations are actually safe. And there's no hand sanitizer. They're they're not able to wash their hands in the bathroom. But they're told you know you need to just wait in line here for three hours. It affects so many different things and I think the economics of it and you know this class war is just. It's crazy and I think the it makes me really upset because it's going to have such a lasting effects on people colors communities that won't even have the resources to make it better and I mean we're going to continue to figure out ways that we can help in ways that we can make those communities feel like we're at least here for them because there are a lot of people in situations that won't be able to get out of this speaking of how you grow up. You grew up in Wisconsin. Tell us a little bit about what your family was like. Oh I have a really loving family. it's weird interview. My family is the best people planet. And it's just been really hard for us but I think that I grew up in a family just has really strong faith and I think that that has been a big point in my life. My Dad is a pastor. My husband's status pastor. And I think in these times you really kind of on your faith to help you through this and so I'm regardless of you know nervous being sick and this just being a really crazy time. I think that's really stuck with me and I think that the older I've gotten the more that I'm grateful of the ways that my parents have grounded me. I'm not any of these things that people may think in fashion. That isn't really my identity and my identity is really who I am in the integrity that I have as a human being. I think that you know we are trying to just walk through this with as much grace in humility that. They've instilled in me that I can. Do you think your family than like looking back on who? You are would be surprised at what you've become today. Yes no I mean. I was always very opinionated on a lot of artistic things like my mom always jokes you know they like allowed my sister and I to pick out colors for our bedroom and my sisters chose really you know. Pale floral wallpaper very basic in my opinion and I was like this. None of this will work for me. I need a custom color and my mom was like. Who Do you think you are? Yeah I can see that being such a pain in the ass for a mob like just pick a fucking color. Your that was me. She saved like all of my art projects and she was. She's that mom and so she always has like we were really upset when the glitter spill and we. We always had to have talks with you about things. Aren't going to go your way and I mean I was always definitely into creative. Things of his incenting Lessons Piano Violin. I like to dry like those. Are I love to do all of those things but I think it? The fashion stuff didn't come 'til lot later for sure just because the nature of growing out in the Midwest. You don't know anybody really who works at a publication and so it took a while for me to figure out really how. I wanted to use all those creative

Editor In Chief Teen Vogue Lindsey People Wisconsin Conde Nast A. Us Fashion Magazine Midwest Lindsay Google Kovin New York Cova Kobe Sony
The 7-Eleven x Nike SB Dunk Low Has Been Canceled and Now I Actually Want a Pair

Let's Kick It - Courtside

2:15 listening | Last week

The 7-Eleven x Nike SB Dunk Low Has Been Canceled and Now I Actually Want a Pair

"I want to jump right into the news because there are certain people who are not doing that. Well for instance. A collaboration with seven eleven and Nike from what I'm hearing everybody was giving him mixed reviews even on our own show. We had mixed reviews. Remember the last time we spoke about that. Remember you absolute flop. Thought they probably could be pulled off. But I'm thinking the project has been scrapped. Yes the Nike The NYC SB dunks and seven. Eleven collaboration has been scrapped. Is Not coming out. It's not happening. So if they're to me. Purse League has done. Now is now built to desire in meets. Try and get them. You know what I mean because back there scrapped even made like what one hundred years. I want one now. Now I one just to say I have a discontinued you or just say. That shoe has never been released. Never seen the light of day. The retail version. I gotTa have that now so now it has by insurance so what night has done dear. I say it. They came up with a method. Get even more hungry for seven eleven. Dunks that we weren't even Hungary four in the first place isn't that amazing. There's evil genius. I can see the possible bee's over something that people didn't even like in the first place but now it's like I gotTa have yes and I gotta go ahead and give a shout out to our producer crystal. She was on Wedneday. I dropped when they were first talked about coming out. She was on the fly so she was on I. So if anybody's a hype beast and they go after them now. I'll tell you I'll tell you just probably just following. How know what you're doing? She was on it first so she became hot before. It became a trained. I to go after it But Nike you're slick slick. I must say

Nike Purse League Hungary Wedneday Producer
Marc Jacobs: I Still Have Stories to Tell

The Business of Fashion Podcast

10:11 listening | Last week

Marc Jacobs: I Still Have Stories to Tell

"Mental Health Awareness Week and last week on Bureau F. Live our editor at large Tim. Blanks spoke to the celebrated American designer. Marc Jacobs who touched on a variety of topics from working through the krona virus crisis and maintaining his creativity but also on how the crisis is impacting his own mental health at this time of anxiety and stress for people around the world. Here's Mark Jacobs inside fashion. Hi Tam I'm such a pleasure to see it today. It's always a pleasure to see you. Tim and this will be out conversation for the next few seasons. I guess because we want you seeing each other in well who knows who knows where I am. I am in New York City in my hotel room in Soho Talking to you you've seen in a hotel rooms for the whole luck. Yes yes yes has that been. It's been let's let's put it this way. I'm grateful to be in a place where I'm comfortable. I'm going to start under the start on the. I'm going to start this chat on a positive note. So what have to keep going back to my mind is that I am grateful. I have my two dogs with me. I have clean made bed that I made this morning. I have what I need. I've got a closet full of clothes that I can play with. Have got a couple of makeup bags that I can play with. I have my iphone and my ipad which connect to other people with and I have the where I can sit outside and get some air so I am very grateful that I'm comfortable today and I feel like I'm taking care of and obviously you confidently connect with people. I'm finding. I'm actually connecting with people more than I usually do because quoting about connecting with now. But I have well. It's a strange thing. Isn't it connection? Because I never really I think of this as a type of connection and I we can use these devices of hours to connect with people in some superficial way or in some way that's different but I'm a luddite and I believe in live contact. I believe in note writing letter writing. I believe in seeing people across the dinner table or having a coffee with them I see. I don't see I didn't grow up with life on the screen and I didn't grow up with cell phone in my hand at or or night at or nih-funded whatever and I like live performance in live theater and I liked. I like going into shops. I like seeing people on streets so while this is some form of connection. It certainly. I don't have any kind of real connection to this form of connection. So but how how? How does this thing for you then? Well it's a kind of a kind of goes in waves and spurts. I mean they're I'm very sort of manic depressive. In a way I mean I am you know. My mental health goes from mania to depression. So there are days where I just feel extremely depressed and feel like it's the end of the world. And then your days were mannequin. I just think what a great opportunity for us all to learn collectively from this and move forward and then there's all the grays in between but I mean I tend to go from the basement to attic in five seconds. You know like In terms of emotions and so it's been very hard because I also not really in control of how you feel. You know the ceilings common. It's just a question of how I kind of accept them and and sort of you know honor them etc. So so I've had moments of feeling very productive and creative and moments feeling just like what's it all sore or is that all there is as I keep saying the south. You Camilla Louder. You have exactly. Isn't it funny? How life comes along to trip up those kind of those little notions and give them a sort of real time white. Will you see it's this? It's this computer right here. That fascinates me the most. And that's what I think is always this kind of amazing thing. I have this kind of faulty computer. Which is my brain and it's not faulty in the sense that it doesn't work but it just kind of works as it does right and so. I mean for absolutely no apparent reason. I could do everything I did yesterday. And Go to sleep on time and wake up on time and have my vitamins draped might juices for some reason the Sun could be shining and I can have the most miserable attitude about life and see things through the darkest leads and then I could stay up all night and and and not drink juices not my vitamins and like the sun isn't shining and I'm just like full of hope and you know like so who knows and then yes they're like these songs that comes my head in these things. I've seen in these performances. I know I don't know like books I've read and you know I don't. I'm not in charge of where the where where my brain sort of fires on a particular day but like it just doesn't it and it's like kind of fascinating as kind of goes through all of its little find sub dreaming a lot more. I have some very weird dreams but I've always had weird dreams that I've always been a bit of an insomniac because apparently that's a that's a huge side effect of this pandemic. Is People a happen. Incredible Dreaming Nkala at a lot about real people like either family members will celebrities or whatever but that they remember the dreams full of almost movie. And that's by to pick this. That people can depend up in the daytime and then the minds slowed us. I don't think that I'm dreaming more than I was before. And I think my dreams are kind of still of the crazy surreal content that they always work which combines a little bit of like the tape recorder you know things I've just recently heard but then then concocted into something that might have some other greater meaning but No I find my dreaming kind of the same. I guess you're making a movie while you yeah so via via recommended. I mean she. She had this idea. Unfortunately it was like four weeks in she was like. Oh you should have taped yourself every day. Like just videotaped yourself every day like you had this like you know daily journal like on tape like everything you did just like this endless documentary journal and I was like well if I had started it for weeks ago. It would have been great because we're already for weeks in if feels that will have to do something else. So so nick My friend my best friend and and someone I work with very closely you know at. Marc Jacobs He he and I came up. And we decided we'd do more of a fairy tale like this this kind of life in quarantine more of an louise or a you know like or a home alone or something like that right played all the characters who would normally be here at the hotel but or not like what kind of well everything from the porter to the manager to the chef in the restaurant to the housekeeping to the engineer to the different people who are residing in the hotel to the different things. I do in my room on different occasion to me documenting my set like just just just like I never any element of the other look creeping in. No just just just anything. I can do within the confines of this hotel. Your instagram is being incredibly vivid. The whole time that you've seen in Lucca. It seals almost like you are testing out characters in well. I'm not really I'm I'm kind of just you know I've always been this way. This is like this is nine year old mark who you always was in his bedroom. Escaping chaos of what life looked like you know like a very disturbed and dysfunctional childhood. And I went to my room and I sat with my clothes and I painted my jeans or embroidered. Jean Jacket and I put on my outfits. I comb my hair one way or the other and you know maybe I found a curler for my mother curled by whatever it was but that nine year old kid that me was like a in his own world in his bedroom and had to use his imagination to create a world. That was a happier place. And that's kind of what I'm doing I mean. I have two months worth of clothes that I packed to move in here. I'm I have a couple of bags of of makeup. That randomly for some reason felt were important to take with me and And then you know just and the dogs and Some hairclips jewelry and I'm just playing around and and keeping myself entertained and and doing what I do which I think is taking care of my mental health. I mean I have to get up everyday and shower and I have to Rome and I have to get dressed and I I just feel like not only do I have to do it for my sanity but like I enjoy doing it. So it gives me pleasure and it allows me to kind of be of service in some way. Because if I'm not well. In taking care of myself creatively and in every other way then. I'm of no use to anybody else. I mean I just can't lie an unmade bed all day long. It's the most pressing thing I've I mean. I used to see my mother who suffered from manic depression. She wouldn't get out of her bed sometimes for weeks and her bed was never made and the site of an unmade bed to be as just about the most horrifying thing. I can remember.

Marc Jacobs Mark Jacobs Manic Depression New York City TIM Blanks TAM Editor Soho Instagram Camilla Louder Lucca Jean Jacket Louise Engineer
Millard Drexler: I've Learned That Growth Is the Enemy

The Business of Fashion Podcast

3:55 listening | Last week

Millard Drexler: I've Learned That Growth Is the Enemy

"The first question. I just wanted to you to ask you you know. How did we end up here? That so many of these big American retailers find themselves in a position where you know there are teetering because you know the the companies that seemed to be surviving seemed to be seemed to be kind of getting through at least up until now are the ones that were strong going into this crisis. But many American retailers were already Suffering before this all started and this is kind of become the kind of final you know the the proverbial Straw against the camels back so talk to me a bit about how we ended up here in the first first thing I'm GonNa say is Speak to a lot of people every day to work and do whatever most people will say. I have no answer to your question. I mean I have one opinion on how he ended up here with. Most of us don't know what the other sides could look like in my own opinion on and I think statistics There's been for twenty years or so to many retailers too much inventory and I think what's happened because of a corona virus in one short sue. What probably could've happened ten or fifteen years ago. Too much out there to choice to inventory drove down prices drove down margins increase of price. And they're well if you look at Tj. Max I think the biggest most profitable department store in America if not the world and they have a great merchant account rich wanting running at night. I think the great were cheap or is also part of it. I think this just too much square footage for human being in America. It always has. That's one thing. Lack of creativity I think is another thing although with too many stores into choice of what you get is just a deflationary trend in retail nights. We've been going through that. Very simply stated is too much assortment out there too much goods not enough special. Not Enough unique. Lots of commodities Amazon certainly influenced a lot of this and that's life end so could add twenty or ten years ago because I always ask the question an I didn't know none of us knew about this while some people that Bill Gates I guess sold coming is what you do. Then you've named companies if solemn so didn't exist would you miss them and there was so many no. I will miss them if they weren't here anymore. Now what's happening is a lot of going away either. Unfortunately because they have no cash they're running out of cash in. They might be good at what they do and the rest. You just won't miss them and the balance sheet was week when you say their balance sheet was weak you mean they were heavily indebted right overly indebted or plus an I. Don't you know right now? Sitting with all these empty stores with huge Will push people over the edge if they might have survived longer than they probably would discount. It cleans up the landscape of Aqua Lung. Markdown companies and others who sadly will go away because you know maybe they just undercapitalized. And they might be run. Creatively have nice goods. The the report cards not in yet. I don't think it's close to being

America Bill Gates Aqua Lung Amazon MAX
Saint Laurent’s is ditching the traditional Fashion Month Calendar

Fashion No Filter

6:49 listening | 3 weeks ago

Saint Laurent’s is ditching the traditional Fashion Month Calendar

"Get down system news breaking news this week. I was pretty at. He can aback by the SUNOL announcement. Picking them back in a good way. Ya was although I guess in the last episode we'd been wondering whether big changes were actually going to end up happening so I guess there's your proof that's your answer so for anyone who doesn't know son. A Hall has decided to drop out of Paris fashion week and set its own pace for showing collections direction of the year. And it's going to pivot to adapt to the corona virus crisis and has said they told. Ww W D Saddam will said in a press. Release wd conscious of the current circumstances and it's waves of radical change. Santa has decided to take control of its pace and reshape. Its schedule creates Dr Anthony. Vaccarello said the violent impacted covered nineteen outbreak. Which has forced the closure of most of Santa Stores meant business as usual was not an option chief executive officer Francesca Valentini. Hinted that the brand famed for its spectacular outdoor women's catwalk shows set against the backdrop of the Eiffel Tower in Paris could still age a physical show at some point this year. But his favorite formats. They're more intimate and closely aligned. The final customer room. What do you think that means? It's such big news. I think that a house as respected and that does such exceptional job also needed such an exceptional job for its Shows has decided to to step down. Because that's a really really positive meaning that others will feel other smaller. Brands will feel like they can do the same without sounding like their brands in an unhealthy state. Because I feel like a lot of people will be worried about the way to investors and stuff at the same time as So that's also something to take into consideration when you're canceling big show and some of the big names of doing it gives a lot more room for others. I mean the rose also says that that's what they're going to be doing next season and I think this is a really positive outcome. I do that like brands. Moving away from the long lamented fares suck in place flashing. Schedules is a good thing. There is part of me. Worries that with brands. Big Sahel if they're off schedule but still in Paris are still gonNA maybe in completely off the mark with this that people are still gonna fly to Paris from other places to see that. But they're saying they're not showing. Well are they saying they're not showing? Yeah they said they're not doing a show could still stage a physical show at some point this year. Yeah at some point means one show instead of like the fashion week schedule. Which basically these three shows. Because that's two women or four shows to women's and men's which is from going from four to one is a big step. It's a big step back totally and I'm totally in agreement with that but I just worry that everything is going to become cruise collection competition e where big brands compete to have a more extravagant location or timing or whatever and then we're all just going to have to be on airplanes all the time in random directions and if that's what's going to happen? I would just rather we stick to the fashion week schedule because at least you just take one flight and then you go to Paris and you see the shows you know. That's the devil's advocate but bear in. Mind that that's if international flights have resumed. Which for the time being. It isn't the case and bronze will not have healthy budget. They used to fly people around on a whim as much as they used to. And I feel that for example a brand like Santa Hall would make sense to host an event of some kind in the form of a show. Something else every year in Paris. Because that's whether the house is located and you do have to find a way to promote and showcase what the designers creating certainly certainly so there is you have to be able to allow for some kind of formats. I think it's positive to see that it's going to be less than than it was and I really liked the idea of rethinking a system. That was so wrong but yeah I agree with you until we see what the outcome is. Exactly we can't really speculate county yet. No I assume you know what it occurs to me that some of our listeners might not beyond the fashion week circuit. I feel like I'd love you to go into a little bed and you're really up -cluded on the stuff as well. What about the fashion calendar is has been so wrong for so many years but especially in recent years? Can you speak to you kind of just touched on it? I think the competition for each brand to do bigger and better viral. Basically shows has become completely out of hand plus the fact that there are an increasing number of brands increasing number of people wanting to attend shows. Because it's good for positioning or like people just want to be seen their raw than the because they're actually you know helping promote the show itself and I also feel that we talked about this before. It's always fashion week somewhere and whereas they used to be only one week for each city it's now becomes so long and there's men's could chew and crews and then all the minor fashion weeks like Copenhagen and button and all the others that I can't think of the top of my head right now but I know there are loads of them. Do we really need a show format in an era which is increasingly digital. And when actually sitting front row to show would only be important if that show. It really is a proper added value to the brand. I think partly because of how exhausting has become for everybody and by everybody. I'm not talking about myself. I'm talking about people who really work super hot during that time. So the bias. The brands you work super hard juryman time. Yeah at the end of the day. I'm just that to report I'm not Like I feel like there's a lot of pressure during those those busy busy busy times and having so many shows back to back over a period of a month then Rick 'cause two three times in Aghia and where every single time you have to travel to a different city and attend just absolutely absurd amount of events and shows parties all in the name of promoting a brown and it just turns into a ridiculous exercise which is actually quite just quite cringe and especially after everything. We've gone through in last in the last few weeks. I think it would be quite distasteful to return to

Paris Sunol Eiffel Tower Santa Stores Santa Vaccarello Saddam Dr Anthony Santa Hall Chief Executive Officer Francesca Valentini Sahel Rick Aghia Copenhagen
The Alabama Chanin Story

American Fashion Podcast

7:49 listening | 3 weeks ago

The Alabama Chanin Story

"A leader in the slow fashion movement. Can you describe what slow fashioned is? How do you think about it? Well you know. We first started talking about slow fashion on of as a derivative of the slow food. Newsman I think you know in many ways that That industry is light years ahead of where fashion so people started really looking at the way things were planted and grown much sooner than we did with textiles also I think a lot of what's being done around. Sustainable sustainable fashion is really taking cues from that movement. What made you start your own act. Actually let's just go back. What's your background in in the fashion business and textiles? Obviously this is a really good question. Well I do. I have a degree in what's called environmental design from North Carolina State University. Which sounds very modern today but really it was Degree that was kind of based on the house education so did a double major that today's called the Anti Albert's programs at a degree in Like design fundamentals and Textile design sort of handmade textiles on. And then I have another degree in industrial textile design so at at North Carolina State University. Water the other degrees other than the environmental design. So if you're doing environmental design where he not doing yes so I think the structure. There's a little bit different now when you were there. When I was there it started out you either. Signed into textile design product design graphic design architecture and landscape so environmental design is really cross disciplinarian. Volvos correct it was sort of modeled after the bow house Wheel of learning You know I think. A lot of people know that when the Bell House designers left Germany some of them settled in the mountains of North Carolina in a place called Black Mountain and that was very influential in the in the school of design which is now called the College of design at NC state income. So so how did you get into the fashion business out after he left school? Well that's a really good question I You know I just imagined when I graduated from. Nc State is that was kind of cradle the textile industry. At that time that I would be have been working in Charlotte or you know somewhere around. North Carolina there quite a few factories In a lot of textiles being made in that area while I was in school and I graduated in eighty seven and it was sort of the beginning of the great migration. Or let's call it the the next migration because excels are pretty migratory It's a pretty migratory industry so when I graduated there really had a really hard time finding a job in North Carolina and I You know I just you know back. In those days you had to go to the library. And there are books that listed all the companies that Were working in textiles in New York. And so a sent-off about sixty letters and you know. I got like five responses and I came up to New York for a week and interviews and at the end of the week I got an offer from a company calls US joint junior sportswear NASC- so third floor with I think that the Tagline was do use use you like a jeans and t shirt company. I started out there just as an assistant designer and went from there. And how did you come to the point where you started your own line? You know. It's kind of a roundabout story. After as you I worked for a company called sub studio. That was doing all the manufacturing and samples and India so spent some time going back and forth between New York and India. And after I Stopped doing that job. I actually sort of changed the focus and became a stylus so working on the other side of the camera you know instead of on the design and manufacturing side. I was Doing costume design and So I did that for a decade and During a sabbatical that I was taking my life as a as a stylist. I wound up. You know cutting apart some t shirts and sewing them back together again by hand and a low down half that eventually became a business very crazy story. And what led you to Florence Alabama to have a headquarters for your business model. Florence is my hometown so You know It took me a while to kind of figure out this when I was sowing the t shirts in the beginning that actually what I was doing looked very much like a quilting stitch and so is living in New York on Twenty Third Street and at the Chelsea Hotel and I started going around the garment. Destroy Looking for. You know embroiderers to help me do this. This vision of having these two hundred. One of a kind t-shirts Buying recycle t shirts from the Salvation Army and goodwill's and You know as the joke. I think some of these places thought of as a bag lady would come in with like these backs of recycled t shirts cut up and I wanted them. To put these elaborate embroideries on them and they're like Oh lady no so I mean I remember very clearly the afternoon I was standing on eight and thirty eight And I looked down at one of the pieces. Just kind of dumbfounded on. Why couldn't figure out of getting these made in New York and you know just sort of hit me like a light. Bulb went off like. Oh these. This is a quilting stretch. And if I want to have these made in this way that him sewing them I need to go home where there is still some ladies who had quoted with my grandmother who had this little quilting circle. That would get together once a way to do this. Quilts and thought will F. I go home I could have this made and so the idea was that it was just going to be a one off project. I was going to have these. T shirts made wanted to make this documentary film about old Tom quilting circles so I went home. And you know the the humor in it. Was that You know the little ladies who'd quilted with my grandmother really weren't interested in New York City fashion or you know doing this work. They were talking about the grandkids and planning collards. And you know all the things that they had to do outside of the They're quilting was kind of community service work and so we just ran added random at a newspaper that said part time. Hand sewing and quilting. We got about Again I think you know there were about fifty sixty responses in about twenty of the ladies stock and started doing the hand sewing and then we presented that first collection of Two hundred t shirts during New York fashion week in February of two thousand and one I had a friend who became a partner and then another partner. So we You know it's gun of history. The first person to come to the door was Julie. Bill Hart from Barneys and

New York North Carolina North Carolina State Universit NC Florence Alabama Charlotte Salvation Army India Barneys Partner Bell House Bill Hart United States Julie Albert Florence Black Mountain Bulb
The Advanced Style Challenge

Dressed: The History of Fashion

3:43 listening | 3 weeks ago

The Advanced Style Challenge

"Am very excited about something. Called the advanced style challenge I had. I'm sure you're familiar with our Isa Cohen and his advanced style blog which is an I mean really. It's a movement at this point. I'm but for those of our listeners. Who MIGHT NOT? Know Ari is the brains behind. This incredible. I think started out. Maybe as a blog maybe it was a journal article or Like a column. I'm not really sure. But he has a website and a blog called advanced dot style. He's a photographer an author and he's the creator of this advanced style project which according to his website is devoted to quote capturing sartorial savvy of the senior set and he says that I feature people who live full creative lives they live life to the fullest age gracefully and continue to grow and challenge themselves and really sartorial splendor so many incredible men and women featured on like I said this blog website and his instagram at advance style so he posited a challenge to his followers it's called Hashtag advanced style challenge and he writes right now. It's more important than ever to support our older populations and so he's really asking his followers to interpret their favorite advance style looks using this Hashtag and then citing the name of someone in their life that they want to honor. Have you seen these April there really such beautiful attributes? I have I have and if anyone has already been to the site and you don't know about it. Basically are features and he has an instagram as well. I don't know if you've mentioned that already casts. Maybe you did. But basically he features seniors who are like literally killing it with their stop mazing and so many of them on the streets of New York City. I know I've seen many of these women at auctions. I used to see them about fashion week walking across the way. You can't miss them. Of course you know. They're not a group necessarily but just just talking about women like that end men that just express themselves in the most beautiful ways so Ari actually started this challenge. He did he did a leopard-printed tribute to Barbra Chapman. And then I don't know if you saw amber which are Who's pass dress guest? Fashion historian she did attribute. She did her own version of it but she did her tribute to Ari's so she recruited look complete with stiffling for the beard. So that was really really fun. There's so many things to To really explore with advanced style. If you're not if you're new to this blog website instagram. He also has an incredible documentary. That's streaming on Amazon Youtube. You can go to advance style the movie but April. I think I have to ask him to come on the show because he just released a new book called advanced love which includes highland exactly. Pass dress that's highland booker fashion designer. He was the very first guest we ever had on the show. He worked for worth the house of worth in the nineteen sixties and him and his wife. Charlotte are featured. There's such a beautiful couple but this book includes profiles on forty inspiring couples from around the world and he says a profile explores themes of love and companionship through firsthand insight from the subject they share their stories of falling in love what they have learned after decades of partnership and valuable relationship advice. And of course it's all done in high style so I highly suggest you all check it out

ARI Instagram Isa Cohen New York City Charlotte Barbra Chapman Amazon
Designing Downton Abbey, an Interview with Anna Mary Scott Robbins

Dressed: The History of Fashion

4:41 listening | Last month

Designing Downton Abbey, an Interview with Anna Mary Scott Robbins

"Can you take us through? What a typical design process for an episode might look like I mean how does one design a TV show? There's so many things to consider that there are a great many things and especially with dynamics. Such large ensemble cast you know you've got some twenty-five principal actors the Turin Day in day out. So it's the kind of huge logistical challenge and we filmed. So it's nine episodes. Who is eight episodes plus the Christmas special in each series? I did so. You're never really designing one episode. I start with and possibly a couple of weeks pratt on my own. Which would be my research. Volume would be wonderful and exciting and then slowly my team with those so. I have my assistant designers in supervisor. Starting the workroom would start and it would slowly build up to a very fast paced team of people working very hard to get ready for the first day of shoot but then carried through as you prepped ahead. So you'd be establishing costumes from episode one of prepping for episode two. So it was a a kind of plate. Spinning exercise has an empty pain one. I had Breaking them scripts and check those as you went up so that you were never call tights and things moved quickly with the way that when a script would be an issue too when we start filming. The wasn't a huge turnaround period. So it was pretty challenging but brilliant. I really did utilize the work. Climb may law from scratch and we use a lot of original pieces so I could see a lot of pressure myself to kind of use as much as I could. You know it's interesting because I'd costume design and working costumes American. I'm super curious. Kind of the difference. how departments are organized in the UK. But do you start by so you get the script. Do you kind of have a trajectory already about where the seasons going. Yes I think. We had two treatment that gave us a a rough breakdown of fought. Might be in store and it's crypts. Were kind of rolled out as we went. I think we filmed two episodes together. So you would do one in two three and four or five and six so that locations wise it made a bit more sense and so you did have a have an overview but when you break down the scripts no beat so many specific requirements each script that were controlled hugely by what they were doing at the time if they were having you know whatever conversation and thing that happened within the script the costumes were dictated by what time of day it was to vent. They were taking in because there were so many rules of dress it for adhered to at that time so and designing such a collaborative process to right. So you're collaborating you have those initial meetings with the director and you guys kind of agree on expectations for that episode or whatnot. But then you're also collaborating with other departments right yes absolutely I mean. My Job's very collaborative. The initial conversations are with my producers. Who showed run that The the show as it were alongside the director. I work closely with an Donna which the production designer net. Colin's the hair makeup designer cinematographer director of photography. I would work closely. With in terms of lighting and grading you know how the fabrics were going to behave in front of the camera. So you're looking at bigger costumes. Wouldn't the world that going to inhabit? An? How am I going to work with other against that set? So there's lots of different considerations when you're working out will each person wavered never nice Latian. They're always working within a multi factor affecting and. Can you tell us a little bit? About how your department structured? How many costumers and Taylor's cutter fitters How many people worked in just in the costume department on any given episode a bit? Tricky to think BECCA beaten as being five or six years and play started and then gone on to design the film and the film was a bit bigger. And so my. My memory of the television series has faded. Essentially it was. It was a a forward croom on the series. I had one better and to food makers and to train me. I would grasped in addiction seemed to sit and I needed to. I had a supervisor and an assistant designer and then I had my onset team or droop manager and two or three Standbys Department of two so it was a smaller department in the film which then increased across the

Director Supervisor Croom Becca Principal UK Pratt Donna Colin Taylor
Supply Chain On The Brain - Lisa Morales-Hellebo

American Fashion Podcast

3:20 listening | Last month

Supply Chain On The Brain - Lisa Morales-Hellebo

"So you started the New York fashion tech lab which have since departed and that. That's running on its own. Yeah what was it like to to start that? How did you pull all the pieces together? Because I mean that was. That was something that should have existed for a long time. And just didn't yeah. You're right so after Shops shut down. I was having dinner with Amy Millman from springboard in the city here and she said so what next for the first time in my life. I have no freaking clue and she said well what if you know money was no object. What if you didn't have to worry about an income and I said well in that case I would love to build the fashion tech accelerator? I wish had existed when I went through stars and it would be focused on really getting buy in from the C. Suite Executives and champions within these huge companies to actually hand select the technologies that they thought were most meaningful to their bottom line rather than what. Vc's think is flippable within a couple of years which is a vast difference in in focus and then really having them dedicated to Chaperoning them throughout the program to give them access to anything they needed internal to get to a. Yes for pilot a paying customer partnership collaboration. Whatever because that was far more valuable than just raising capital so from that first dinner. Amy Said you know I'll get a couple of at Sombor D- If she is on board then she'll bring the first couple of brands to the table That so that was two thousand thirteen in the summer. Right before Christmas we met with three brands coach. Kate spade and J. Crew See does and CIO and Two of them said yes. And so- January first. Amy Calls Me and said okay. Lisa go and I had from January first until I think it was April third or fourth when I turn on the website open applications to do all the legal the branding the website the Closed Ten browns. Get them to pay for it to dedicate their C. suite executives times and commit throughout this program To coordinate calendars which was the insane. The most insane part in that time and being able to get inbound so that we had applicants we didn't have budget to promote it for weeks in advance and we literally turned on the switch and had two weeks to get applicants with no prior promotion. So I knew I needed to have the brands to put on the website to attract so when we launched as soon as I turn on the website I was inbound with like fast company. Women's wear daily saying how. What did how did this happen? It happened overnight. I'm like no. It took little over three months of sixteen hour days but there it is so we had more applicants than springboard had in the prior fifteen years of them having programs and more media coverage and we raised more money in a short period of time so they were really excited about the success of the program. I realized throughout the cohort that

Amy Millman Kate Spade C. Suite Executives New York VC CIO Lisa
Just Say No to Free T-Shirts

Allow Us to Rethriftrodeuce Ourselves

7:04 listening | Last month

Just Say No to Free T-Shirts

"Do you ever buy t shirts at the thrift store I try not to. It's usually pain in the butt. Yeah I'm with you. I'm not like a big T shirt drifter but I'll pop into the t shirts section every now and then when I want to look for some graphic tees and I was there looking for some fun stuff to share for the April twelve months of thrifty prompt because the prompt is words and one of the easiest ways to incorporate. Words is to is to wear graphic tees. I was absolutely stunned by the number of t shirts on this rack. I'm like what is with our obsession with all of these t shirts. I'm thinking of the ones where you go to a festival and you buy a t-shirt right or go to like. I said a five K race or a local Chili Cook off or a bank event. Where they're giving away t shirts and pens like those are the t shirts I'm really thinking about. Not necessarily like a t shirt that like a plain white t or a plane grade V neck t that I would wear with jeans or something. I'm talking about like those other t-shirts that because they're producing such mass quantities. I don't think that they're going to be very high quality. I mean we literally shoot t shirts out of t shirt guns for crying out loud on my gosh. I never even thought of that before. But so true like every event we go to you get like a free t shirt and I don't think twice about it. I mean typically. I don't take one but that's mostly because of other reasons but I don't think about any environmental background. I agree with you so one night night. I came home for about thrift store. I was like I'm going to do some research on the environmental impact of these shirts. I really wondered what happens to all the T. shirts that don't sell like at this one thrift store. They had just back to back t shirts and I wondered like. There's no way that they're going to sell all of these like. Can you imagine all the other thrift stores that have all of these t shirts and so I found a lot of information on the environmental footprint of t shirts on the front end of the production? So things like the amount of water it takes to grow the cotton. The Chemicals Harmful Dies. The toxic waste is often dumped in local waterways. But not so much on the back end. So what happens when we've used these t shirts and were done with them and so I ended up on this instagram page called the or foundation and it's a US based nonprofit. That's been researching the secondhand clothing trade in Accra Ghana. For the last several years they have incredible stories on their instagram page and one of them was about the global waste. That single use t-shirts create. And I was like okay. That's interesting I've heard of single use plastic. But I've never really heard the term single use t-shirt before okay. So can we back up to did you rabbit hole. And how late were you up? I'm kind of embarrassed to say how we saw. I was up till three. But it's because I had diet coke at like seven with dinner and I'll be fine. I'll be fine museum to this now and I'm not. I love that you thought your immune to caffeine all of a sudden it just because you wanted to be but really like I feel like you thrive on this like this is just like something once you get excited about something diet. Coke is just like your your drug to like keep it going. It revs you up. Yeah all I need is a diet coke taste. Shoot me down a rabbit hole. We need to create a me like of Dina like swirling and in some cute dress like thrift ahead of course and then like holding a diet coke typing vigorously about t shirts and the environmental listed. T shirts like how? How Boring is that me? Oh my God we can have you like Like beer funnels. We'd heavy like funneling. Diet Cokes. So Anyway single-use t shirts are free or cheap t shirts you get. Things like racist sporting events business strategic retreats. Things like that and a lot of times. These shirts aren't met for long term use and there really isn't a big reuse resale market for them locally or globally and so they were saying on their instagram page. How a lot of these single use t shirts are a major contributor to global waist? Okay so this reminds me of like I'm GonNa Guess Two Thousand Sixteen because I really don't know because I'm not a sports person but it reminds me of like the first time I ever found out that when there's a big championship game of some sort. That two sets of shirts are printed so as soon as the game is over there. Are People outside ready to sell you the winning shirt so say two thousand sixteen calves one? They have the shirt ready as soon as the people. Walk Out of the stadium. And they go to purchase in there like all pumped up and they WANNA purchase this shirt that the cavs ones they wanna wear if they want to be proud but they also have like under the counter that the warriors won and so now they have to find a place to put. The warriors won t shirts. Like what is this part of the nonsense and what happens with these shirts now right. Yeah that's actually a really good point and I don't know enough about their process right like they have to be re purposed or reused. Somehow so I don't know if maybe they donate them or whatever ends up happening to them if they do end up in the donation stream at some point. These t shirts are probably going to end up probably in somebody else's landfill if not our landfill just to provide a little bit of context in a previous episode. We talked about the cycle of donated clothing typical cycle of donated clothing on. What happens to your stuff after you donate it to a traditional thrift store. And I'M GONNA RECAP THAT PROCESS very briefly. Just so you can get an idea of where the single use t shirts fall in this cycle. So you purchase something you wear it. You donate it to a traditional secondhand retail store like a goodwill or something and then they sort the item they put your clothes on the sales floor for purchase. If it's in good condition and then after a few weeks if it doesn't sell in some cases it ends up at like a last chance location so maybe at a thrift store outlet or something like that after a few weeks go by and still doesn't sell three things typically happen. Some items can be recycled into rags or installation. Some items will go to a landfill because they've reached the end of their life cycle. And that's just the reality of it. Then some items will often get exported to other markets and this is where their sole traders and other countries who attempt to sell these items in their local markets and then unfortunately what they can't sell will end up in their local landfill. Sometimes even burned or in some cases dumped on local beaches a lot of times what happens. We produce so many of these t shirts that so many of them end up in secondhand stores and a lot of them don't get purchased because who wants a five K. T. shirt from two thousand and two that you never ran you know. And so it's it's a new want system but yeah because we produce so many of them and we're consuming so many times. Something has to be done with them

Instagram Cavs Ghana United States Caffeine Dina
Luis Venegas on Print Media in an Age of Uncertainty

The Business of Fashion Podcast

5:18 listening | Last month

Luis Venegas on Print Media in an Age of Uncertainty

"Kind of Dream. Save like well someday. I will like to do my own magazine. And since the first one zero seven that was that was in two thousand four. I mean it's like a sixteen years ago and even blocks back event. Where can starting seeing so I mean for me? There was no option. Maybe if I was thinking about when amazing today new I will start with digit or something but at that time I mean black from that the next stage to remain starting little by little. I mean he wasn't something I am not also he wasn't the thing that I will related to the time so yeah. I tried to start and I made them less now. You see you say that if doing something now you imagine it might be digital but I think what I've always loved about what you do. Is that you you honor the magazine as the Phantom jet. You know when when when I think about the magazines that I when I left New Zealand in one thousand nine hundred seventy four. I had three suitcases and one of them was full of magazine and it was. It was like my favorite magazines. It was the life magazine. Charles Manson on the front and it was very the very first issue of Fabulous magazine with the Beatles on the front and it was a David Bowie. God knows they're actually the only ones that are in plastic. I mean everything else Everywhere but the actual physicality of magazine is something that you ana That you very deliberately set out to do with candy. Which was to take your subject. You'll the marginalized people that you wanted to focus on and give them the absolute multi Vogue Treatment Make Candy as glossy and gorgeous and in disposable as it possibly could be guests douglas. The the I mean I I the I mean. When I started to plan the Doing Candy I felt like it was. It should be something white up the opposite of Dr Magazine I wanted to be glossy on his DS huge celebration of all the subjects and although modest that I was hoping to treat in China amazing show. It's not about them. Tell us about. You'll you'll subjects yet. Well as candidate is focus on what I call the transversal. A people People many people I mean the people who know can be maybe often they think is a trans for transgender magazine. But it's not only about trans or transgender people is also an Rajini stays gender nonconformity people drag queens and also The gender people who suddenly go for transformation for one day for a shoot for fun so for me but was the. That's what Games Branka exactly. The BEBOP Franco puts on the coat. Or like it's for Spanish versus kind of ask you about that is so the thing is like I. I said All of those manifestations basically everything that was like Okay go fuck. Gender Denver doesn't matter. Let's celebrate everything. Well if matters of course but it doesn't matter in a way you know as like Let's focus on everything that has to be. Celebrate the around all those many stations. And that's how it came with bursts of grants because it means going from one place another transitioning going you know and then universal transversal. It felt like okay. Maybe this is the word in a way and That's the magazine focus on. I felt like fashion was for a long time taking inspiration from all the transversal world but never pay back. You know it never it never. I mean that was very all of these aren't by Conde. Dining was something about. The people didn't really know many people who can deduct it was maybe it wasn't obscure subject before especially the younger generations. Sheds Allegra K. Let's put it all together in a magazine. Let's see what happens. Let's see he's going to explode or survive? I don't know but you don't want it to be like a political steam or something like a political statement. I want it to be a celebration. Actually a celebration of style. A celebration of awesome intelligence way on humor and everything that's related to fashioning to celebrate the although stinks and indefinitely broad broadening. The concept abuse. See as well Just making beauty side much more of an inclusive idea taking the traditional fashion magazine approach to beauty and then just In

Fabulous Magazine Transgender Magazine Charles Manson Beatles David Bowie Denver Franco New Zealand Allegra K. China
Lafayette 148 New York: Fantastically Vertical

American Fashion Podcast

9:35 listening | Last month

Lafayette 148 New York: Fantastically Vertical

"We are a global luxury lifestyle brand Led by women for women and the whole purpose of starting. The company was to be a vertical operation vertical. Meaning that we make everything ourselves So from start to finish we. We're able to control the process of manufacturing as well and you know we although we were founded in New York City. The company sort of outgrew the building and also knew that. We wanted to reinvest in some retail and in order to do that A. and Being a privately owned company. We're quite conservative. We decided to if we moved over to Brooklyn our rent. When I started the company it was nine dollars. A Square foot Twenty three years later it was ninety dollars a square foot so expensive so kind of expensive. So we we just you know. How do you re- reinvest in Your Business Model? So you know the number one expense for the company. Is the product the number two expenses? The people and number three was the rent so we went for number three because we didn't want to touch one into And found mazing hundred thousand square feet in the Brooklyn Navy Yard which is eight minutes by Uber from Lafayette Street and we collectively made a decision that this was great and we went to save money. But what we found was being on one floor completely changed the communications and the dynamics of how we work as a group so the culture which I think in today's world is such an important part of a business Our culture got better. It was good but it got great. Can you talk a little bit more about being a conservative business? Because I think a lot of people think about financing immediately when they're starting a business lately but but you haven't touched much of that well you know the first five years were really hard for the company and so not being Not Having the capital investments that may be other people had. We had to learn to live within our means. So what we would do. Is You know what we make. We would reinvest into the business. And so what what does is your growth is is more organic. Because you decide how you're going to grow how you're gonNA invest in in different areas when you want to grow and you don't WanNa you know. Look we all make mistakes? There's always a percentage of rnd and things that happened in in our business that you didn't predict but you know definitely we thought we needed a million dollars to start the company and ten million later we ran out of money and that was weird ca fears. You know the first five years Taught us a lot about what we didn't want to do in the future and you had to co-founders in the beginning I did and the Chinese AMERICANS SO MR and Mrs Sue were husband and wife team that manufactured clothes for me throughout my career Working at La's clayborn Donna. Karen Dana Buckman. So they were always there. They were always that jacket factory and yours needed great jacket in our industry That I could count on. You know they. They might have not been the cheapest factory because they were in New York City but they were reliable. Their quality was incredible and they were really nice. People that you could count on and so that relationship I kept throughout all the years whether or not I made close with them. 'cause it eventually. I moved to Hong Kong and started working for Germans and Italians and they didn't WanNA manufacturer New York so we just stayed friends and when it came back they asked me if I wanted to start a business with them and just the thought of not having to travel all over the world finding cheaper factories and being able to control the quality. The delivery the products Was Right up my alley. And they were just amazing. People that moved to America when they were in their teens they are forty years in America. They were you know They were that generation. Just like my parents were that came to the US to sort of you know. Build their dream In funding and in this case they ended up having to go back to their hometown. After forty years to rebuild our dream because in order to be competitive we had to move the factory if we wanted to stay vertical and you have an amazing sustainable complex in China. We have a fabulous. What you've built there. Yeah talk about that from the beginning and just training and what? That was what that was like. It's kind of fascinating okay. So you know We went over. Actually it was right after nine eleven and by the end of two thousand and one Mr Mrs Sue went home for the holidays and then he called me and told me he wanted to move the factory and by May of two thousand and two He flew me over there for one night to see the factory which consisted of three sewers a cutter in oppressor and just wanted to know what I thought of the factory. I was pretty speechless but I was smart enough to know that you know I could count on him so I asked him what he thought. And he said we're going to be just fine and he made sure we were justifying. He went from Ten Thousand Square feet to twenty thousand to forty thousand to the next time I visited him. He pulled up to an empty lot. And said what do you think and it was like? What did you do any says like bought the land And we're going to build our own facility. I want a building that is earthquake. Proof that sustainable. That's got solar panels on the roof for energy that that I can be comfortable Building in so he proceeded in less than two years to build a two hundred forty thousand square foot manufacturing facility that is state of the art incredible and today houses fifteen hundred people twelve hundred of which are sewers And you know anyone that visits it and plenty of important people have been from you know from the president. Fit's been there to to Mac Baucus. Who was the US ambassador to China and they all come there just to see what we've done and you know You know in our industry people just assume. Oh is it you know. Is it an acceptable factory? It's beyond acceptable. It's it's the pride of his hometown. So him and her really made a difference in their hometown. So was there a lot in terms of how he built the Culture In the quality of the factory in New York that was also taken there. And then you also side how to go so much. Further in terms of technology like to that. Just come naturally. No those are great questions. Because you know Mr superbeing factory New York City Was was getting smaller and smaller over the years. So technology was always a really important part of staying and surviving. So he was. He was ahead of his time in investing in whether it the Italian pressing machines or or or automatic cutting machines like all of this was sort of early. It was in his culture. Anyway you know when I think in East West Culture you know he used to. The First Holiday Party I went to I was there was only two people that weren't Chinese at the party. And he said turned to me and he said someday I wanted to be fifty fifty and you know he got he. He dreamed he dreamed really big but he wasn't a dreamer. He was a man that also taught you how to get the job done. You know you can rely on him and so he went back to his hometown and brought an American culture of manufacturing and also started teaching some of the local factories. How he would do it how we would do in the USA so you know. There was just an incredible ability to give back to the town. I mean after the factory was up and running of course we started to become profitable which was extremely exciting because after five tough years it was like wow when we could do hand embroideries and we could do leather in knits and things that we couldn't do in New York so it really helped us build at lifestyle brand but along with you know along with that You know he. He had to set up everything everything right. You know. Every there's eleven floors in the building each floor has different Sort of manufacturing system. You know there's there's a jacket floor. There's a blouse floor. There is a panton skirt floor. You know he built a building without columns in it and I don't know if anyone can say they've seen a modern building in China with twenty thousand square feet per floor without columns. But that's what you get to do when you build your own building you. You didn't have to figure out how the machinery would be laid out around these polls. So you know He. He was very amazing man.

New York City USA China Brooklyn America Brooklyn Navy Yard Mr Mrs Sue New York Karen Dana Buckman Hong Kong Mrs Sue MAC LA Mr Superbeing Donna President Trump Baucus
Sam McKnight on Why Fashion Is the Eternal Optimist

The Business of Fashion Podcast

7:23 listening | Last month

Sam McKnight on Why Fashion Is the Eternal Optimist

"To the work. When would you In your professional life when I'm covered nineteen I'm interrupted the rhythm of the will. We were actually just coming to the end of Fashion Week and Paris. Because we'd been in Milan in the wake to Paris and I. I think I did one day's work off tonight and that's that's that was it when did you? When did you become aware of this? Insidious thing was set inaugura set. What point during the season become clear that we were about to deal with this complete catastrophe? Well we were quite. We were quite clear. I remember from the beginning of London fashion week because at the beginning of London Freshman I was actually saying I will be revised surprised if Milan and Paris go ahead but they did. They did go ahead. And what were you? What was your feeling about that? Did you think that was kind of like everyone else like everyone else? It's in retrospect disease. the site at the time. You think well okay. They know what they're doing is fine. You know it's it's definitely it's definitely this thing is really big. This thing is happening. China's really getting bigger and bigger and bigger Is this the right thing? And we had to have Let's see trump before we went into the Chanel show than it seemed a little more serious and after that it moved pretty quick tweet. But it's it's it's an odd. It's an odd feeling seems to me that For Few seasons now this cloud over fashion and using how you how'd you I feel? I feel financially economically. The the the industry was Challenged and you kept hearing about businesses not doing well and and It was a little bit of smoke and mirrors of happening on. I think that's always been a condition session that it is an industry that presents an image of confidence and abused and and it has obviously. That's not always the case but it did shield to me in my capacity but it things would just get a little bit twisted in complicated and and and there was a sorted out winning and thing beginning to emerge that these businesses would survive. These businesses wouldn't department stores weren't doing well the sole was doing well. Let's all wasn't during while this designers that design and this is what people love now. It's over about Social Media. Whatever that all the gold closed kind of moving love and then when this happened did feel a little bit you know would it. I think for a long time people felt something's coming. You know with the climate crisis. Do you think people have wanted something to come to? It's just a feeling maybe as a as a general something needs to give Ya. I been for a while. I mean this is my age to IBM state for a while that it's beginning to me to feel repetitive. You know the the shows the the magazines coming every three months which is already dated but as a as a kind of reputation you feel for Waldo that needs a feeling of recalibration somehow will the reset resets. Yes we said the same is I? Keep me quite golden. But it's none of the things die down and then things grow back. So there's always that constant feeling of renewal and I'm very positive about this and feeling this will. I'm going to take away from this. Period is a definite feeling of renewal another thing. That's probably what's going to happen and that that did yeah and that needs to be a bad thing you know i. I think that I think that. What what seventy people was saying is that it was just too much. It will become so excessive And I agree with that that there was a sense of an unsustainable. It's it's interesting to hear us to using the past tense their walls. Yes my weird optimism. I think that's amazing. I think that's really great because that suggests hope in renewable to me. I think we're a long way from that. I think bits of very this. This is quite a adopt your to go through before we actually. I think having does go let the end of that. Is We need that too. I WanNa talk about that In authorized finished set soda. Bad that the Sensiti unsustainability of of fashion the whole all of it. All of the the exploitation of natural resources the the whole image making machine the content generation that this strangely the distracting. This thing that just seemed to be designed to distract people from What we what we needed to be thinking about and fashionable was coming around to that with with discussion of things. Like circularity and localization localization now seems incredibly Relevance fashion industry with everybody's five flung production facilities closed down You just see that we might be reaching a point where people will only be able to work locally. Wiping sank fee. Is that you know it's going to be about Taylor's dressmaker coblets. And you'll village. But that is my very kind of post apocalyptic vision of not saying much as fashionable. Well the the idea of The the optimistic often ass of all of this you know. I just said to you if we don't have things like extravagant. Fashion shows the image image making machine of affection Mike Revert to things like magazines. Soleil used to bait. Now you want so sure about that. I never really a great believer of things going back to how they are. You know why I don't yet I use away back. I should say food in your. I mean the guy's forward this definitely. Br definitely rooting for new ways of looking at things. That's for sure. Well I I feel that I feel that the magazine saying is is really dated. Now it is of course. There's room for it. They maybe not how Halloween

Paris Milan London China IBM Waldo Soleil Taylor
Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

Dressed: The History of Fashion

6:39 listening | Last month

Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

"I'm curious. What inspired you to write this wonderful book. Wow well it was fairly easy because I had already written books about the Supreme Court so therefore you know it was one of the things. My research was not is. It didn't take as long because I have so much research from the other books. And you know writing about the supremes are by argosy and and talking about how much we had accomplished and our career. It was a pleasure to actually sit down and do something not just write about the book but to show pictures and and and the looks and what was behind the singing which was more fashion so it was really a lot of fun sort of demonstrating what we did in not just from recording and the music but how we looked at how we felt when we wore certain gown and all about the gals the gals onto another. Just like we were on to all those years and many of them are in your personal collection cracked. You have I think in the book. There's over twenty four sets of matching onstage ensembles so not just one of the dresses but all three of the dresses. And how did you go about comprising this collection? Well first of all we the Supreme Florence Ballard Donald Ross and I would always travel and when we came home from the road. We'd have to store the gallons and then of course by gowns or designers bring those new county and some of the older gallons that we make perhaps worn on television We would just store them. And they accumulated through throughout all the years right And AS Roma's is no longer in the groove Diane was no longer in the group. And then we had the seventies supremes And I became sort of like the keeper of of everything and the manager of the supremes and all those different things So I yeah. I accumulated the gowns. Because of that and whenever anyone would leave As you know a couple of them did I would end up with all these coun- because no one could take the guy no one can take the gals within the frame as a group Pays for them. And that's how I ended up with the majority of the GALS. Now all of the gals should be in my possession but The reason that I can't tell you how many I have is so many have been not just lost and I won't say stolen. You know things have just disappeared. And then some of the places we had them stored you know. I don't I couldn't figure out where everything was stored inside all these years after the supremes. I have just been trying to recover those downs. That are you know not in my collection but it really is my collection as I said when Florence Diane left everything was left to me. Also just say that even though they were left to me and I had there instead of three sometimes I ended up with just one but all three gallons were upset. Were supposedly with me. And you're still like you said you're actively tracking are able to track some of these pieces down I saw A. I'm not sure what the name of the TV show is. But it was on BBC where this woman found one of your costumes in a garage sale or something of that Lake in London. Well being about it is we've bogged down that Some of the fans have called emailed me. Mira guess what we have we we think a couple of you guys on on Ebay and really so we were trying to get together and email each other and I look at that so a couple of fans actually bought off Ebay and got them for me The ones that you're speaking of in London. The young lady was traveling in I think it was France. And she sold this Sale like a garage. We call them garage sale here there. I think the boot sales or something like that. And so she saw this beautiful gown and She went and she bought it. She didn't realize it was a supreme count so after she bought and she saw the label. It had my name on it. That's when she realized. Wow you know this is. This is This is kind of fantastic and somehow another BBC or someone got in touch with me and told me about the story so we we established my coming over to when I was coming over to England to actually The book was coming out at the time we set up a meeting and we I met her. She came to the state we spoke and she gave me the Gallon Bat. That was really. It was wonderful and it was one of our gals that we were on the Tennessee Williams special However with the stage part about that is that it was only half of the cow because the Gal was a two piece count and had a leotard like a like a bathing suit type top and then it had a skirt that came off and then was a hat to it as well so I don't know where the skirt and the hat is looking for that. Maybe that's surely will show up in the future right and you know there's another set that Really badly outfitting up in the book. I'm not sure what pages on here is a A picture of the pants that when it was food that had a coat a jacket and the pants and it was completely beaded in bugle. Beads and there were three different colors one color with gold. I think Diane's with gold and Cindy in mind were orange and it was all beaded well. The jacket disappeared and disappeared from the designer hacking panels studio so I that that when this and that so I have the pants that but I don't have a jacket so jack ass floating around someplace and it's amazing a lot of times. They ended up being in a exhibit. And so we you know. We know where certain things are. We can't find out who gave them. Yeah so but but the orange jackets have never shown up lose. Maybe someone listening tell you that was not being. I know it was in San Francisco that they

Supremes Florence Diane BBC Supreme Court Ebay Florence Ballard Donald Ross London Gallon Bat France Roma San Francisco Tennessee England Cindy
Charles Jeffrey on What Its Like to Be a Rising Designer in the Midst of a Pandemic

The Business of Fashion Podcast

7:25 listening | Last month

Charles Jeffrey on What Its Like to Be a Rising Designer in the Midst of a Pandemic

"Charles. Where are you and what are you going I'm currently in my heart. Nur's apartments I've actually moved into his place because he has more space. Um so basically in Dowd's like just a stone's throw away from the station. accommodated his living room. And we've got like a work a workspace. Something both share because he dispassionate as well as he's sort of like making horses labout round. How is your day? Different now I guess it's it's more routine actually I guess because I have to kind of use the routine for insanity so I kinda start my day a lot earlier than I used to. I got like half six now and then I try and do some sort of exercise in the morning whether it's running or doing some method plus the online thing each day which is very interesting of. It's it's very much more routines day. on it's very much united communications back and forth he Zoom coal like this one feels kind of no conflict. Normalize destroy away. It's weird so how many people in your team you in constant touch. So we're now including myself for team of the five We'll do meetings with me and my core team. So may I mean some And then meetings with mine designer Donyo trading designer on Do meetings with all of us. Which is my other colleague. Chris who heads up sourcing without breaks assists NAMBI in production. So we'll do them in kind of you know the different kind of sets. And what are you actually working on together? Well it was a show It was a collection We still are kind of working towards Drops for staggered now. So vesey The June shows of being canceled on. There's something happening in September are so we've kind of got this thing. Cold like an emergency collection which is very much more reduced collection of around fifty pieces Which is around half of what we usually do and Which is working towards that. They're just like you know He says that the buyers when he trusts or things that we know who are Turnaround turnover of a good margin sites. So yeah we're working towards that it's a it's again. We're still doing the same amount of work but it's just It's just not as intense. I may sense to timescale. It sounds like it's more pragmatic though in a way that what? What do you anticipate on the other side of this that you will need to have will need to have sort of signature pieces? People feel comfortable with eclipse. Amelio you think similarity is going to be an important thing rather than you know the shock of the new that that you kind of specialize in Orissa arrested time. Yeah I think so. Toying between what feels right. See Note you want so dream in escape and feel sort of You know inspired by things in times of crisis then at the same time you. The Up is kind of weird. Moral feeling regulatory wants to become chauvinistic or Sort of Mambas in times like this is the idea. Something Beings millier. I mean you can think of Single nine about sales or like this collection at sort of weird double thinking that you have to have. It's like do people want to see that on a buy things. It's pretty weird. We're time will this does it. You know this is. I think this is going to be the question at that That people one of the questions that people have to cope with is Am and I find myself by law about it with with people is is do. Is it escapism or engagement? That's going to be more important. Immediate Future's fashion when when this is over Bearing in mind that there's a lot of This going to be a lot of attrition. I think it's going to be very very. It's going to be very very hard for a lot of people back from this reality. I'm what's your what's your feeling about them. All I think that in this time it's very much about sort like connecting with the customer. The follower on the fan of the work that you're doing just being authentic them and I think being very personal like I think beforehand. I was very much about so building the brand being loverboy into more kind of global concerts not so individual so that more scope for people to sort of engage with it but now it sort of feels the complete opposite like I feel more inclined to myself on the forefront and be like this is me. I'm Charles Jeffrey. Mrs My lover boy and misses me and this is what I'm about a year and you know I wanna get snow you. You're in the myself out there. Not Waiting I think that there's something really important about that. I feel like it's something of collecting sort of individual pieces or something has been touched felt by the designer Donna. This is feeling a lot. More personal is what's going to happen in the future. So into them intimacy ashore. I mean there's an irony in the fact that the collection that you were in the middle of shipping was you'll collection we actually really did reach out to the world Were consciously thinking roared manual. You'll frame of wrestling speaking him to you. So you have very clear. Customers say that you'd quite matches fashion that you would do as well as having the cultists in this was this is GonNa be you. Will you will address to the world. Ironic was being in right into a juice to a sort of S. Yeah I mean thinking about how were sore from distributing the collection when after the sales season the different pieces that was already large range of equal buying from all those different sort comes. You know there was not much as a smooth Killed Dresses and then there was a customer service customer. Who is buying? It was embroidery crazy puzzle pieces in the cultural reasons. And I think that it's Dowie talking about releasing the question will focus is now doing on our e commerce so that is our own personal platform again. I think it goes by being a bit more intimately. We can control. How old on Sir Schultz in? How the presented? No I think it's it's whether it's going to be in line with a shower has a different treatment to on the websites know whether shoots the more sort of a minded way. I don't know it's it's an interesting is interesting of change

NUR Dowd Donyo Trading Charles. Orissa Dowie Sir Schultz Charles Jeffrey Chris Nambi Donna
Joy Cook - Publicist and Plus Size

The Chenese Lewis Show

4:38 listening | Last month

Joy Cook - Publicist and Plus Size

"Of diverse industry. Experience you've also dabbled in the plus community so tell me how you discovered the plus community. Yes my I love my first love so I discover the Plus community the literally almost twenty years ago I had the pleasure of being The diva the mobile herself. Gwenda vote one of her Models in our commerce proteges actually Years and years ago and I participated in her full theory of fabulous back in two thousand seven and one of the things that a lot of people don't know is I Wrote the original press release for full figured fashion week back in. I think two thousand eight or nine And so you know of course Ms Devos has you know completely changed. You know the plug industry but for her to take a chance on me when I was just an up. And coming publicist to say joy. This press release and let's see how it goes You know and she gave me like immaculate feedback. That made me even a better publicist so just want to thank her publicly again For that guy. That's but yes I was able to meet you know Madeleine figure Jones from. Close my Maggie at that particular event I share the roadway with fluvial of star there I got to meet So many people in the plus size industry And that's really my first love and so you did double duty as a model and publicist in the plus community correct. Yes and that's something that I just thank you for reminding me of because it was you know so many years ago but again it was my heart's loving it has contributed to me being you know. A better publicist and a better woman. All the way around and so since you have dabbled in the Plus community you know my audience and a lot of people are trying to get discovered Trying to be the next big thing so tell us what the public do and who needs to hire one yes absolutely. That's a great question. So a publicist really engages target audiences to syndicate the message of the person the industry the organization that they're working with so just basically we make people. Famous we're microphones megaphones to messages to branch The DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PR and Marketing Marketing. You know takes you know money into consideration okay. What target market can we target to increase the bottom line? Publicity is a lot different. We want to make impact. We want to make noise and we want to actually make the brand rise above the noise. So that is what up here person does and and ways that we do. That is through traditional media. You know television magazines and then of course now in this Know Technology Age through social media strategically so and so who should hire a publicist? Do you need to be doing something noteworthy to even consider hiring a publicist in my opinion I believe everyone should have a publicist. Even if you don't have a major brand you're in the process of building your brand. It's best to build a brand on his ballot foundation Also one of the things that Publicist handle is crisis management and in this day and age of course at Nineteen My companies had to deal with a lot of crisis management and helping organizations jump the curve of how do we communicate with our our clients or our staff even if we can't see them face to face so every brand every person who wants to be a brand needs to have a publicist You know for strategic reasons and for crisis management

Ms Devos Gwenda Marketing Marketing Maggie Madeleine Jones
Rose Kirk: What I Wore When I Got My First Job In Corporate America

What I Wore When

3:42 listening | Last month

Rose Kirk: What I Wore When I Got My First Job In Corporate America

"Going to talk about what you were when you got your first job in corporate America I understand that this is this was the nineteen eighties and it was a time when women were sort of by large expected to dress like a man. Yeah that was that era when women would show up at work and they would have on either Blue Brown or gray or black suit always with the little white shirt sometimes you could be a little adventuresome and add maybe yellow or pink and then you had the little bow ties that went around your collar and then you pull your hair back with the little sort of Bo ribbon thing back there and then all the shoes really sensible and everyone had nude hosiery and that was the style because they were competing to be taken seriously by man. It was just era where we were really beginning to break down a lot of the doors and the and the glass ceiling so I come out of this journalism background where I was working in a newsroom where you could wear whatever you want it to work and I had to buy suit in order to get my first interview in Dallas Texas new mind you. I was coming from Alabama so I thought Dallas fashionable women right so I went and splurged to my little journalism salary which wasn't a lot of money. I think I was making. Maybe fourteen thousand dollars a year. So splurged and bought this fabulous ellen tracy soup so it was estimated beautiful it was linen. It was double breasted. It has this long flowing pleated skirt. Pleats are again. And it was extremely styles and as I walked across the floor that interview with everyone in their cubicles. I was sort of swishing across the floor and I see people popping up over there. Cuba is your woman has just shown up her skirt and this somewhat corporate but not quite corporate sued I kept sued for years. I got the job by the way I was obviously as yeah so can you tell me a little bit more about that job. My first job in corporate America was an executive speechwriter. Where for Southwestern Bell Telephone Company at the time it was really just writing speeches for the executive team that headed up the Texas division so each state had its own president and speechwriter for the president and his reports so all those journalism skills went into corporate America as speechwriter is style something. That's important to you right now. I think Stahl is important to me. Being comfortable with WHO I am and showing up in a way. That feels authentic to my southern roots. Women have a tradition of always looking their best right. Always going out Looking great if you think about even southern football teams the women's still dress up to go to the to the to the Games so it is important to me I. I don't over think it I have a set style that works for me but whenever I have a major presentation think a lot about what I'm going to wear and usually it's GonNa have read in it because that's my power color relics. Yeah a lot of women say that the red is a color to be reckoned with. Yeah you kind of breakthrough. It's unexpected and I believe every girl. She have some red lipstick so I carry a lot of red lipstick and not ashamed to wear and today my nails are actually polished. Red La that. What's your favorite lipstick. Do you have one. I don't know if I have a favorite because I'm one of those girls. That can get lipstick anywhere. I can get it at the You Know Loco drugstore I can get it. You know from the makeup counter. I just love to get it wherever I can always look for a

America Dallas Stahl Texas Executive Ellen Tracy Soup Southwestern Bell Telephone Co President Trump Blue Brown BO Red La Alabama Cuba Football
Keisha Holmes - The Woman Behind Curvy

The Chenese Lewis Show

8:11 listening | 2 months ago

Keisha Holmes - The Woman Behind Curvy

"Welcome Kishan to the show. Hi Hi hey it's been so long how are you? I'm good. How are you thank you for talking to me? I know you've had a busy day to day already Then a really busy day We're really really excited about you. Know People You know the excitement about being able to to to be safe and we were happy to heed the call of the mayor here in Los Angeles to Get the fashion industry. You know to us all together and You know to start making mask which we were doing ahead of time but you know it's nice that when they you know they heeded the call. We were like we're right here prepared so we turned our warehouse from making apparel into medical masks. And we're working on hospital gallons as well. Oh yeah yeah so. We're getting that up and running but it's coming okay. Now let's start talking about a little bit about you first so you started your career and bashing twenty eight years ago. Tell us how you got started in fashion. Well I mean when I say that out loud. I'm like wow how old am I? It flew by. You know I had a you know just I had come home from summer camp. I was working at a summer camp and I was like you know eighteen years old and I was looking for a job. My neighbor was the manager of the Frederick's of Hollywood store in In one of our local malls here the pointy hills mall and she says hey. I'm looking for some holiday. Help you know if you need a part time job until you kind of figure out what you WANNA do. I knew it was gonna be starting college soon. I was one of those kids who knew I wanted to go to school and go to college but I had not settled on a career. I thought I was going to go into social work. Or you know something you know. Admirable like that and Once I started working in the retail store I kind of found my calling like I fell in love with fashion and I you know looked up to see like how is this a career. What do I do? And I enrolled in the fashion program and Mount Sack Mount San Antonio College here and I worked and went to school. Got My college degree and kind of worked my way through the company into the buying office and I mean you know it's all uphill from there so it's it's been a nice little journey from laundry to you know it's a clothings kids close to and then I started When I was at Frederick's a really make sure that that plus size customer was spoken to so making sure that I worked directly with the buzz when I was on the sales floor of having enough plus size merchandise on the floor and then when I went into the buying office like plus I just became like you know my baby of making sure we had all the right size bras and underwear and every single item that you know we were purchasing came in plus sizes so we had a wonderful collection of plus size lingerie In in the on the floor because you know women of all sizes WanNa feel sexy and It was it was a nice journey into into you know making sure that all women were color covered and felt beautiful. Also now when I first met you you were working at Torrey in the corporate office tour and then from from torrid you went on to forever twenty one but I did not know you helped launch the plus size division F- forever twenty one. Tell me about that experience yet. That was a fun little You ever like gone to work one day and you did one job and then the very next day you were doing something else. So that's kind of how that started. I went to forever twenty one. I went to work with My friend Hannah who I worked with that. Frederick's she was there and we were on the ECOMMERCE TEAM. We were on the very beginning side of When they were launching the website so we were the ECOMMERCE buyers sort of liaison between e commerce and the rest of the buying team. And you know we scheduled all the photo shoots and made sure all the product was there and you know we did special buys for just the website and then one day Mrs. Shang came to the two of us and she said whatever you're doing right now. You're not going to do that job anymore. She says we're finally ready. We have been talking about it for a while but she keeps saying we're not ready or not ready. Finally one day she said. I think we're ready. You guys are going to plus sizes and that's it so that very day ECOMMERCE was not her thing anymore. We called every vendor that we knew we talked to the design team we worked with the other buyers and we started pulling you know pulling samples and pulling a collection together and We launched maybe a couple of months later at the most. And that was that was definitely journey of starting from scratch out of nowhere to pull this customer together and to To launch a plus size division within forever twenty one who had been around since nineteen eighty four and was just now at that point to be ready for plus as in two thousand nine now. How did you transition from forever? Twenty one to Kirby Center so I mean as you everybody kind of knows forever was going through a transition and I was on the beginning In the beginning wave of a layoff and so once I was laid off. You know I was trying to figure out what I wanted to do next. I knew I didn't want to just head straight back into another buying office for retailers. I wanted to you know. Use My skills to try to you. Know find something special and you know what they say. Be careful what you pray for so you know those doors kind of kicked what wide open and I was approached by a former sales. Rep that That I worked with that. I work for this company and said that they were looking for somebody to launch an e commerce. Plus I've website and they sought me out and so I came in and spoke to the owner of the company who I used to purchase. Um from what I was the buyer and they have everything ready right here and I was going to spearhead this this new launch of this new website right here and it was great. We have an in house designer. Her name is Michelle and she's fantastic. And we have sewers and cutters and to be able to watch something ourselves right here and kind of oversee merchandising from from the very beginning from fabric ordering cutting patterns to have it launched. We shoot here. Everything is done right here in our in our building here in the city of commerce. So it's been a great transition because I felt like I was really being able to. Finally you know kind of spearhead kind of my own thing and all sense of what it was from our experience of what you and I know that you know back when I first met you. You know you knew sort of sort of our struggles at forever as you know really trying to identify that customer trying to get people are sort of on board with what we know plus women to be but of course. There's girl my whole life so to try to get people to understand like who she is. She goes everywhere. She has multiple occasions. She's you know she's she's the same as a smaller girl. Just as fancy just as fantastic and you know. She embraces her body. We're not scared of our bodies and if we are we kind of learn to you know to embrace who we have. It's kind of hard to teach people that stuff when it's already being read in you so to be able to. You know kind of start. That sort of you know How would I say like the attitude of who this girl is and not have to convince somebody like was great from Day One? We knew who she was she was going to be. You know just as fantastic woman who has a million places to go and it's been a great journey.

Frederick Los Angeles San Antonio College Mount Sack Hollywood Michelle Torrey Mrs. Shang Wanna Hannah Kirby Center
12 Months of Thrifting: Words

Allow Us to Rethriftrodeuce Ourselves

5:39 listening | 2 months ago

12 Months of Thrifting: Words

"April's prompt is words. The theme is words. So what I mean by. That is clothing shoes accessories with words on them. So things like graphic tees inspirational quotes a little. Diy action that. I want to talk about so I looked back at some of my favorite things in my closet. And although I'm not like a huge graphic t- person every now and then I will thrift a t shirt or a clutch or something that has like a phrase or saying or bad name or anything that I kind of believe in an appeals to me. And there's some of my favorite pieces of clothing like do you have spot pants. That's a pink on your Butt Juicy Juicy. I have those immature early two thousand. That's not necessarily what I'm talking about. Like I have a t shirt from the Cleveland. Flea that says treasure hunter on my favorite is right like it's one of my favorite t shirts and I wear it all the time. So the thrift store is a great place to thrift things that have words on them. That kind of you can use a sort of like a self expression kind of Thing or you can thrift things to. Diy them so you could buy a Jean Jacket from the thrift store and then do some Iran on words Embroidery Screen Printing Din. You do that. Oh a couple of years back. You went to the What's it called Rubber City clothing? Yes and didn't you take Jean Jacket and have something on it? I sure did. I took a Jean Jacket. I took a t shirt. I took a trenchcoat and Robert. City clothing is a local screen printing store in Akron. And you can bring your own items in and get stuff screen printed there and they have salons of Akron centric things like the blimp and Akron sayings and all that stuff yes. There was an article in the local paper about it which I will link. Oh cool do you remember what you got put like what you put on certain item? I did I got One of the the prints that they had was a heart and in the heart were all of Akron's neighborhoods. Oh that's so. I got it on a blue habit or has it been a while no I think. I outgrew the trench coat on a trenchcoat. Gosh I cannot remember that. This is a long time ago. I do yeah I do. It was the pictures in the paper. The newspaper the other jacket doesn't fit me anymore. So okay think I donated it or something. Yes so that's one way. Look if you have a local designer or artist. I'm in the process of planning a little. Diy with local artists That asked to participate in the challenge. Her instagram name is encourage company and she does lettering and printing so. She said she thought it would be a really fun. Challenge if I drifted something and then she did some printing on it for me. It's cool. Yeah so Lincoln Account That should be a lot of fun. So we're prerecording now so we don't have all the stuff ready yet but check instagram to see the progress on that note. Trend Right now is kids are getting like white. Tennis shoes. Like white vans. And they're painting them Really like they're like they're really talented. Like I can't believe the cool thing. Yeah you can like could you imagine like if you have a person like this could right of really cool phrase or something that like you live by on your shoes like that's fun? There's so many ways to do it. I didn't know kids were doing that. Yeah the Thrift. Store is the GOTO PLACE. If you're trying to diy that because sometimes you see some really corny sayings on. Earth did close. Letting your like. I would never wear that but you can. You can do your own thing and I look. I said some of my favorite graphic tees came from the thrift store. I have one that has All these different genres of music it and I worked to the jazz fast it gets just so appropriate and I'm like I'm so happy with those purchases. Yeah that's so much fun. I love those. You know what it reminds me of. Is Laura lie from Gilmore? Girls she always would wear some cute like shirt with acute saying on it in like a blazer and she'd go to work and I'd be like I wanna be lower rely totally do that and it could be like a band like it could be anything anything that you want One of my favorite ways to incorporate words Chu is through like clutch bag. So you know. I love clutches. Yeah Sometimes words already on there right Or you can buy like a solid clutch. An iron on something was the canvas clutch. It makes me think of Betsy. Johnson stuff yes yeah. Cool Kate. Spade stuff has They have some a lot of graphic products too so find some designers that you're inspired by and kind of make your own thing like don't rip off of them but you can be inspired by them. You find inspiration online so we always talk about mild medium and spicy ways to incorporate the theme mild would be maybe accessories right. You could use like a necklace that says a phrase or earrings. Oh that's true. My love any words that appeal appeal to you do simple dainty accessories a mild way would be to do a graphic tee and like a spicy way. Could be like a big old you know. Diy on the back of a jacket. Ya Moto Jacket. Jeans Jacket trenchcoat. Something like that. That'd be hard for me. No I could see you do you do. It depends on what it says. I love my kitties. God that's so many innuendos rape care

Jean Jacket DIY Akron Cleveland Instagram Rubber City Rape Robert Tennis Iran Lincoln CHU Betsy Kate Johnson Laura Gilmore
Interview With Pier 59 Studios Founder Federico Pignatelli

American Fashion Podcast

4:08 listening | 2 months ago

Interview With Pier 59 Studios Founder Federico Pignatelli

"Understand. You started out as a journalist. I used to be a financial journalist. And I specialize studied monetary policy and because the dollar has been But a longtime the currency of reference for the financial world obviously didn't style the Italian monetary policy. Being Italian. I study. I made a common monetary policy. Okay because what America would do would influence entire world and With infants the value of the dollar to influence the value of all the commodities that we commonly use from copper oil and so on and so. I- specialize in the field. And that means also once you understand. Monetary policy understand interest rates once you understand interest rates. You understand many other things in financial world. How the world is going to evolve. They canonical in the comic. World also means a social world because obviously people affected by the economy so the high interest rates means slow Donald Economy. How your cost of business unemployment and so on its own so I started we. Death and I became Especially in Switzerland then I became a specialist in that field of managing a portfolio for laughed banks and anything was interest-rate-sensitive innocence so currencies and gold and commodities and Tom was successful at it and Later I moved to the United States and Became managing director of the investment banks but in nineteen eighty seven km oppose the financial crisis so Eventually in two years later Saturday on Investment Bank specializing in financing technology companies. But I had the passion. My passion was photography and In the early nineties I Finance a company called caller system. There was in California in Los Angeles in Color System Was Technology Company the neither capital to upgrade that equipment to to essentially do restoration colorization in specialist shanks on on the Library of attorneys usage colorization people for all the the tournament vs yet when he bought the archives from Mgm yes they would like three thousand between movies shows etc in all black and white and also the world like old so they needed to be restored. The needs to be made a little more exciting. You know with special effects to so The company of the five million dollars then to to buy new equipment because they got the contract from Turner and In so I provided that money I got on the board of that company to relaunch it. Was it released company and We did very well and I saw back then. The beginning of the digital revolution. Basically we were digitally Restoring in colorizing and doing special effects on the TV shows movies simply because the new generation would not look black and white. They're used to call her okay so to be successful in being back his Incredible Beautiful War from the past. We need it to Colorado and restore it

Donald Economy Colorizing America Managing Director I Finance Switzerland MGM Los Angeles Colorado California United States TOM Turner
Hook, Line, and Sink-Her: A History of Fishnets

Dressed: The History of Fashion

7:26 listening | 2 months ago

Hook, Line, and Sink-Her: A History of Fishnets

"Berry wrote to US last month with the following an inquiry. And I'm quoting him. He says my wife and I have very different. Connotations we see fishnets I primarily. Associate them with burlesque and showgirls. But she remembers wearing them as a young girl in the nineteen sixties and primarily associates them with much younger girls and more innocent fashion. What's the history of Fishnets as a fashion accessory and that Berry is a great question and an inquiry that I immediately jumped on and it took me way back into unexpected and quite frankly unchartered territory for myself. This might not come as a surprise to our listeners but fishnets are of course athlete named after Fishing Nets School. The obvious yes April. It's been awhile since. We've put our dress. Detective hats on. Oh I see where we're going with this if you wouldn't mind grabbing yours a we are heading back in history actually quite far back maybe the farthest we've ever gone we're going back. Twenty eight thousand. I think we might need more than a half for that up. But I'm ready whenever you. I'm so sorry to disappoint you. Dress listeners but women were not in fact wearing fishnets. Twenty eight thousand years ago that we have evidence however in two thousand eighteen archaeologist and South Korea found fourteen limestone sinkers so basically these weights that have these grooves and them that indicated that they would have been tied to fishing at these extent. Sinkers are believed to be anywhere from twenty eight thousand five hundred and fifty. I love how precise date is to twenty nine thousand four hundred sixty years old and this discovery actually added nineteen thousand years to the earliest known use of fishing nets. My mind is officially blown. A little pink. Yeah and Fishing. Nets are essentially fibers nodded into an open structure resembling a grid. They've been used by cultures all over the world for thousands and thousands of years obviously and while the net attached to those thinkers that cash. Just mentioned doesn't survive. There are some really really old net. Set still do. The entry net found an entry of Finland is one of the oldest extant fishing nets in the world dating to around eighty four fifty BC E. And what is especially fascinating? Is that the same technology used to make these early fishing nets more or less is still in use today which is amazing and while our fish nets might be made of different fibers. They basically exists in the same form as they would have thousands or even tens of thousands of years ago but when did fishing nets you know this simple impractical device used for catching fish cast become fish nets that we all know and some of US wear today. Well this was not as easy and answered track down as I was hoping although I am grateful to pass dress guests Karen Been Horan. Who pointed me to our earliest visual source not eighty four hundred BC early but fifteen hundred to fifteen twenty ad early so you know five hundred years ago carrying authored a book with Jane Merrill called. She's got legs a history of hemlines and fashion and in the book they feature an image of an Italian jar from the walters. Art Museum in Baltimore which depicts a woman wearing these calf-high stockings which basically we can describe as fishnet stockings. And will yeah. It's pretty cool and it you are. Maybe we'll post it. And this is a painted image so not an extent example of fish nets but we have little else to go on except that the artists took their inspiration from somewhere. So maybe somewhere someone wearing These actual calf-high fishnet stockings. But the question is were women wearing fishnets in sixteenth century Italy. We might not have hard and fast evidence that they were but this is around the time. That scholars generally agree that lace a handmade openwork fabric was first being developed and really implemented into dress in Europe. And I know you're thinking lace fishnets lace fishnets. Well stay with us here. You know there are essentially two different types of lace and there can be many variations of those two types but the main two types are needle lace which includes a single needle and thread or uses a single needle and thread and there's also bobbin lace which involves multiple threads on Bobbins and they get braided together crossed over into many number of patterns so while we often associate lace with its intricate. Floral patterning of the foundation or the ground of this patterning is frequently a net. So if you look at the ground of. Let's say Valentine's lace. You will see that it's a square or diamond mesh or like an openwork very similar albeit smaller size to what we associate with fish net. So there's there's there's usually a net background on lace or a lot of lace. Yeah in the same can be said for filet lace April where patterning is achieved by embroidery on a knotted net ground so emphasis on the nodded. Because we just referenced this in relation to the construction of fishing nets and in fact fillet work is thought to have developed directly out of the fishing net which would have been owned by any number of European communities to which it would have been an indispensable tool. It's not far fetched to imagine that an enterprising woman might have recognized its potential value as a textile and began experimenting with decorative effects that being said cast all of these places. We just mentioned. Were being produced at this time entirely by hand which was incredibly time intensive and highly meticulous in this process and this meant that laces were prohibitively. Expensive all better few and because of this they really became status symbols and it is because of this reason that we have so many amazing portrait's from the sixteenth seventeenth eighteenth and nineteenth centuries that have these incredibly detailed depictions of lace. These men and women wanted to show off their lace right. They're literally wearing their wealth On their clothing and and it was an important that that the the porteous relayed that to the viewer but while we see the origins of an open net patterning lace of this period. I still had a really hard time finding any evidence of handmade lace net stockings. An I surmise. That these pieces were just too valuable to us as a garment that in addition to not being seen what have been subjected to the wear and tear a practical use. Because they're on your feet. You Walk on your feet for women to even begin to consider wearing net as a footwear fashion accessory to things appear to have had to have happened. I saw one lace net. How become affordable and thus more disposable and to as an impractical garment because you know fish nets fishnet tights are nothing if not a novelty? They really have to be seen to be appreciated. It's not like they're keeping you warm or anything like

Fishing Nets School Berry United States South Korea Karen Been Horan Finland Europe Italy Jane Merrill Walters Art Museum Valentine Porteous Baltimore