Fashion

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Changing Your Look After Coming Out

Forever35

04:48 min | 1 d ago

Changing Your Look After Coming Out

"Had heard from a listener. Who had come out in her thirties and was kind of wondering how she should change her style. Yes and also kind of dealing with friends feedback in changing of her style and we received such an amazing advice and thoughts from other listeners. That we wanted to share. We really did so. Here's our first email that were sharing today. I just finished mini episode one seventy eight and as a queer teenager. I felt that. I could provide some input here for the listener about their gay style. This year as come out as pan sexual unexplored my own style more. This is something i think about a lot. Recently i've changed so much of my wardrobe and found new things that make me comfortable in my look and my sexuality. What i've learned is that there are so many ways to be gay. You can really take any style and tweak it to express your identity and it doesn't have to be blatant for example. I've always had a darker edgier look and i've started wearing flannels with my goth. Clothes and makeup beans are also a nice touch that make everything a little bit gayer but not to gay also little rainbows are such an amazing and cute way to show your pride if none of these stereotypically gay items of clothing fit your taste. I have many friends who just like to dress and the colors that they feel express them instead of focusing on the items of clothing themselves. There's really no correct way to be queer and you can really and you really can make any item of clothing as as you want. True allies will support you no matter what you wear and no one should ever be pressured to dress in a way that they are uncomfortable with. Hopefully some of these suggestions help. Ps as a gen z. Are i must admit that. Cates use of the word ziesel her makes me cringe but of course i always appreciate the words. You guys make up as for trends. I think there's so much more acceptance of individuality in today's teens at the ones i know so whatever is considered popular online is really only. What a specific specific group of people are wearing regular life though. The controversy is always interesting and often hilarious to see Thank you teen listener. I loved us soak we. This was so such a great email to receive. I'm so honored. That teens are listening to this podcast. Oh the teens are so great. I think the teens are really great. Which terrifies me. Because i've always thought the teens were bad. Especially when i was a teen but i kinda think. Today's teens are awesome. Yeah i know it's really interesting. Yeah all right. You want to share this email diary. I would love to hike kantor. I wanted to write in response to the listener searching for her style. Post coming out coming out in my late twenty s i was so torn between looking to gay or two straight wanting to feel like my full self but also not wanting to seem like the stereotype who comes out and changes everything. It was helpful for me to consider. What stereotypically feminine elements of my style. Had i embraced. Because i truly like them. For example always having my nails done and other things had. I rejected. Because i was worried. Someone could suspect. I wasn't straight noticing what i had an impulse to like but held back from was usually an alert to that internalized homophobia rearing. Its head and usually was silly. I not buying fund metallic birkenstocks or not wanting to follow brandi carlile on instagram. I'm sorry to laugh. I'm laughing. Because i love brandi carlile and i. I love italian stocks. I did not realize that. Brandi carlile was Something that would lead someone to suspect that you weren't straight okay. So just like how. I tell the diet culture voice to get lost. So do i. Now try to tell the hetero normative voice in my head to shut up. Let me live when i find myself holding back from buying doing wearing listening liking something a helpful. A help fought narrative. Reframe for me. Was that many queer people have common interests were style just like many californians or new englanders or chefs have common interests or style. And none of those people aren't buying or wearing or doing something because it's to california or new england or sheffi so like what you like and if it gives people a clue that you're not straight so what it's not a secret and now you have a life more filled with things that feel good and bring you joy to boot as for the listeners. Friends my favorite way to kill those comments is a deadpan. That's weird or rude thing to say not creative that universally applicable

Brandi Carlile Cates Kantor Instagram New England California
A Conversation With Justin Trewitt of Dapper Woodworks about accessory storage.

The Fashion Geeks

04:11 min | 2 weeks ago

A Conversation With Justin Trewitt of Dapper Woodworks about accessory storage.

"Today we're gonna talk with justin trae would of dapper woodworks love that name who's in texas. We're gonna talk about a category of menswear that the everyday man should have in their arsenal. We're going to talk about assessories storage. Jt in the building. How are you man what you rich. I'm i'm hanging in here. Based on the circumstances holding down here in texas. So yeah yeah. I'm sure you're holding it down at the dfw so before we go into our tobby please tell us. So what do you do what Yeah like you said. I'm just in a run. That road works. And what i do is i make search oriels source solutions and accessories. So basically what that is is the best ways that you can store your men's wear accessories so ties bites worse. Collor stays any sort accessory I've tried to figure out some way to create a sore solution for that Make other items such as a shoe horns lapel pins all sorts of bins. Were inspired woodworking. So it's just a fun side business for me. Got you accoutrements. Yes my grandpa's word. I'm borrowing it. So how has your brand your business been doing during cova. Justin and going crazy really took off last year. Which is insane. Considering the circumstances twenty twenty doubles revenue of what it was in nineteen so this is one of the person being in e commerce. Currently everybody that. I know of this in some sort of commerce. Business has been just the businessmen going crazy this year. I mean but of course everybody's shopping online more people aren't really going stores as much as people are getting everything. Online that includes men's word accessory stores things which i guess. If you're not wearing things much lately like ties in cesary meisel finalist store. So yeah it's a good point. I've got these ties. Debra what works sin. So that's so interesting that you you have been part of that wave and really kudos to you again. It's it's a blessing. Do you primarily. Because obviously you know i did research on you. Do you primarily operate through the shop. Fly collapse so. When i started out of a three years ago i started on I had an account on their sold things on there for a few months. I still have my seo industry in sales every once in a while them through there. But i knew pretty much immediately. I need to get my outweigh inside and so Start looking ecommerce. Platform shop was the best solution for my knees and has been one of the best decisions of may. Thro brand is getting and using java fai something cool absence stuff that i've added to the develop me sell products. Better off more options. So

Justin Trae Dapper Woodworks Collor Texas Justin Debra
How Virgil Abloh Is Lifting Up Fashions Next Generation Of Creatives

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:05 min | Last week

How Virgil Abloh Is Lifting Up Fashions Next Generation Of Creatives

"It's good to see you in Snow choke chicago. Likewise tim could see as well. So i have been immersed in imaginary tv the last day. And it's interesting. We were just talking a little while ago that The difference set this year is made to everybody living under the shroud of a pandemic and imaginary. Tv would not have happened with that this last year. Would it now not not in the slightest. And i think what marks the time is obviously like a pandemic has run through our previously existing life right and in response to that i as a participant in the fashion industry wanted to use the time to sort of be thoughtful but also sort of give an optimistic sort of trajectory to these like very uncertain times. And so you know. Fashion shows are a mainstay important. Part of our artistry in the industry itself and so i took a step back and thought like what's the right construct to show off white developments. I hadn't shown in a year basically so all the collections that i had been working on all the the sort of like introspective. Nece about what off-white means. Why's it important. Why does it have to exist. I could pour into a construct not pour into a seven minute fashion show. You've very deliberately. I mean the notion of of creating a new tv network in a way and then giving people a menu so they can choose what they want to watch is. It's one of those ideas that seems so simple leads. You wonder why nobody else it but on the other hand it's one of those ideas it so simple. Nobody ever thinks about it but it feels to me very much like it. It's very responsive to the moment that in with imaginary tv as you launch off white collection which is the subtext so also white is present. You celebrate solitude in in various various films that you that you present. It's all about people doing things on their own doing creative and a beautiful things. Which i found because i'm in a state of mind right now. My little bit depressed by by the situation. Now it has kind of got to me. I find that very inspiring and reassuring and i wondered if that was deliberate that you have you have all these people doing beautiful sultry thing. Yeah now definitely that stems from reading the room right like it stems from being at one with the solitude myself you know i was like i was racking up the global travel miles every meeting. I would just agree to and then figuring out how to be there. You know work. A holic is definitely a in my sort of category of of like operation. But you know like inputting ideas into culture into the world you have to read the room and understand the ecosystem that we're all living in right now and you know solitude is something that you can run away from. It's something that you can gloss over you know we're in social media era right so you can post things or you can move at the speed of instagram. Which is very fast. But instead i thought like this is the time to sort of turn the page right you know and also known for that like that. Vibrant millennial spirit. That's running consuming and moving fast and i decided to turn the page for off white to say slow content meaningful content might not sound bite editing. Just to sort of be in the site geist is okay because i say it's okay instead of adopting to the pace that the world is existing. It's like someone has to turn the page and so imaginary. Tv is slow. It doesn't fit on instagram. In a way. It's a as you know i could. I like have a run on sentence problem but basically all the ideas and the inquisition and the thoughtfulness that goes into off white is is better suited for a platform where those that are interested can sort of just research and spend time with content and feeling like i have to get in and get out. Because that's the that's the metric. That engagement says is the

Nece TIM Chicago Geist
Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:34 min | Last week

Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

"Verse seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. A podcast where. We explore the who. What when of why we wear. We are fashion stories and your hosts abra callahan and cassidy. Zachary dresses thurs. I know that you will join april. And i when we say that we were both very sad to hear about the fact that miss mary wilson passed away last week at the age of seventy six years old. Yes i was a little heartbroken. I texted you right away. And i was like. Oh so of course miss. Mary was a founding member of the iconic american singing group. The supremes she was there at the beginning of the group in the nineteen fifties and was the last original member in the group when it officially disbanded in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven and she went on to a career as a solo performer motivational speaker author and perhaps unsuspecting archivist. Yes because miss. Mary took it upon herself to preserve the supreme sartorial legacy and her collection of the group's stunning performance ensemble served as the foundation of her two thousand nineteen book co authored with mark. Bego supreme glamour and april. I mean we feel so. Honored chose celebrated fulling episode of dressed with miss mary herself. She came on last season of course to share with us her incredible stories behind the supremes singular style she truly was an inspiring and wonderful woman whose legacy will undoubtedly live on for generations to come. Thank you for joining us stress listeners. In this listen back at our time with the one. The only miss mary wilson. We are super excited to have miss. Mary wilson with us today miss mary. Welcome to dressed. Thank you so much. And i'm glad to be with you. Yeah of this is truly an honor to have you here today. And i have to say i have not been this excited about a book in a very long time. I've i've read a lot of fashion history books and this one is is so beautifully written. It's so beautifully illustrated so many stories so much love and friendship and of course there's so much fashion in this book. It's such a beautiful mosh to your time in the supremes and the clothing. That was part in parcel to that experience. So i'm curious. What inspired you to write this wonderful book. Wow well it was fairly easy. Because i had already written books about the supreme so therefore you know it was one of the things will. My research was not as it didn't take as long because i had so much research from the other books. And you know writing about the supremes and our biography and and talking about how much we had accomplished and our career was a pleasure to actually sit down now and do something not just write about the book but do show pictures and and and the looks and what was behind the singing which was more fashion so it was really a lot of fun. Sort of demonstrating what we did in not just on recording and the music but how we look at how he felt when we were certain count and so was all about the gallons per gallon down to just like we were onto all those years and many of them are in your personal collection cracked. Have i think in the book. There's over twenty four sets of matching onstage on sambas so not just one of the dresses but all three of the dresses. How did you go about comprising this collection. Well First of all we supreme florence ballard diana ross and i would always travel and when we came home from the road we'd have to store the gown and then of course by new gowns or designers with bring us new gowns and some of the old account that we made perhaps worn on television We went to store them. And they accumulated who Throughout all the years right And as you know florence was no longer mcgrew. Diane was no longer in the group. And then we had the seventies supremes And i became sort of like the keeper of of everything and the manager of the trains and all those different things. So i accumulated the gown because of that and whenever anyone would leave As you know a couple of them. Did i ended up with all these counts because no one can take the guy. No one can take the gal with them. You know we the supremes as a group paid for them. And that's how. I ended up with the majority of the gals. Now all other gallons should be in my possession but The reason that i can't tell you how many i have is because many have been not just lost and i won't say stolen you know things have just disappeared. And then some of the places we have them stored you know. I don't i couldn't figure out where everything was stored inside. All these years asked the supreme i have just been Trying to recover those downs that are not in my collection but it really is my collection. Because as i said when i left everything was left to me also should say that even though they were left to me and i had bare instead of three Sometimes i ended up with just one but all three gowns were overset were supposedly with me.

Mary Wilson Abra Callahan Iconic American Singing Group Mary Zachary Cassidy Miss Mary Ballard Diana Ross Mark Mcgrew Diane
Kim Jones on the Making of Air Dior

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Kim Jones on the Making of Air Dior

"It's been a crazy. Eight months herself is being crazy as being busy. Yeah and i've appreciated time at home and being able to have time to myself. Reflect more of john when you were say a lot of time to research the excited about a very eventful few months but today we're here to talk about sneakers. what makes an amazing sneaker. And what makes an amazing sneaker launch air. Dior or shoe which we have right here. It's like the most sought after sneaker in the world right now. yeah. I've been scouring the internet to kind of see what people are saying and how much they cost and you know it's crazy how quickly they've accelerated price. I wanted to start with your own relationship with sneakers because it goes back a long time. This is not a trend. You just jumped on. I mean most people who know me know that i started out working at a company called gimme five whereas college but before that when a student also at school nyc for me was the absolute must have an odd save off and dish. Dishwasher governed by pair of sneakers and people have michael jordan with the heroes and just everyone was wearing sneakers. Me and my friends would chip into bypass to share them and share parents of have jordan. Fives that were on. Discount in place in brighton that we bought a we went and three as on them now. Forty five pounds and we chipped by them and then we take them in terms of obviously make sure no one stood on them and sick have never allowed to go out anywhere teaching them and it was just you. Nuts is the design. It was just like it was a cult thing. It became colton. You know we both got these which the first one of the first has jordan's in the white and gray which is the basis for the ed your and the ideal thing was really dickel t and i've had a contract with nike for quite few years. And then they taught me about being jordan. And as i really love to do with your because they've never done and luxury house with georgian collaborations. I would take italian at you know jordan with the dior factories and really make something special and exciting. And it's really you know it was solid. Where do you want jordan's that was really how it started as bit selfish so before we get into the actual kind of design of the shoe. Because i think there's a lot of thought that goes into that. Of course the jordan one for the uninitiated amongst us. I think sneaker has called it the aj one. Why is that such an important shoe. Silhouette i think is just such design. Classic infamy you does periods in history. Whether it's been shoes. Come out like this on the air. Max ninety five that just speak to people and they speak to a generation of people for me. I didn't have the original pair of these because they a bit too young for them and they really out of my price range and they weren't so easy to get the uk. And then as i started going to japan as i graduated i started collecting fares what i think the first bought seven bucks in a flea market and then to visit a friend where does student and that was kind of to shake shaking. You just they just become infectious shots at me. Now you just love to design it so joining a club. I guess so. When you're thinking about designing a shoe that has to balance effectively three different brands right. Young jordan has its own brand completely new operated separately with its own team. Then there's night key which obviously is like gave birth to the jordan. There's there's three iconic brands so when you're when you're when you're designing a shoe and you have to balance the dna. Three brees was really like we need to netflix. Because that's one of the criterias of deal is significant advance. We knew the letter had to be sourced. We knew we wanted to have the finishings. Made like bag would be made. So you have the edge painting. You have the way that things are hand finished in the sewing. The oblique here is made specific size just the jordan and it scaled per size of georgian. And you have again. You have on the tongue which is a new technique that we developed an inside the leather so units inside which they did have the normal jordan and inside. I have the numbers or these are the ones from the miami share. Whichever forty has them and really making them for people that would appreciate something and understand the croft now in consumption when you talked about fashion. I'm very aware of numbers and craft being important people. I think young people are learning by nets and they won't buy things last longer for me. Doing things like this was something being a limited number of things but it's creates excitement. There were only thirteen. Thousand pairs of shoes made but there's also a whole bunch of other skews in the collection which may be the as much. Yeah i mean. We've mentioned what we michael jordan's wore jay. But he was because he was the coolest guy and it was like he will seats all the time and we were looking at we made of his clothes and then we had to call them present it all to him which was kind of because he sees everything can approves everything jordan. What was that like. I mean he was super lovely. And i get in chicago. We went to do the don't it was like. I was really impressed that he was to be honest. That's the cage stream isn't it. I guess it was. He was just radiant. He's and you want to keep them the stuff so we can keep it and travis was there and he was reading into it so you know promise travis he'd be one of the people have it and it was just it was. It was an appreciation for each other. That was the thing that was nice about. What did you have to see to the powers that via d. or to get them. I mean they've never done nothing like that. I had to piatra use my ceo and we have extremely good relationship. And i was like. I really want to do this. What you think it nina. He's in his twenties and he was thought it was cool idea who grew up here as per say that was pretty easy to do in nyc. Nike was little bit but then they got into. It was his reading managing expectations of everybody in the right

Jordan Gimme Five Whereas College Dickel Max Ninety Michael Jordan Young Jordan Colton Brighton NYC Nike John Netflix Japan UK Miami Travis JAY Chicago Nina
Dissecting the Rise, Fall and Future of Topshop

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Dissecting the Rise, Fall and Future of Topshop

"What do you think talk shop representative young costumers here in the uk because this was prior to the international expansion. And all of that. But i remember coming to london during that time and it was. It was a destination you know it was a place that people all around the world had heard because it had become kind of representative of that kind of cool brittannia moment and all of the stuff that was happening in the uk at the time. What did young customers feel about the talk shop brand. After after this all of this new activity. I think they felt that it was as unite bill. A kind of a real ownership of it on a at this hour as we great because with because we've sort of created together but like you know it was something let's talk if that makes any sense as a so that brings me to the question. That's on so many people's minds this week as we hear the news of top shop being acquired by a sauce you. Where did things begin to go wrong for top shop in. What was the tipping point where top shop began to lose. Its way well. I think it's a very difficult question to answer. In some ways. I mean young. Fashion is roussel. you have to be constantly reinventing yourself to make sure that you'll always relevant to your customer base. I felt well. You know bennett grain had taken over a two thousand. I had been very clear as soon as he joined the business. I didn't want him today any conflict. Because he wasn't china he was. You know an acid struck him more than anything else. He bought as an insult them again. I had a lot of conversations when he was not a retailer. In the way that i saw a return should be said was sort of capture the margins in the business but then pejorative that time. He then broke kate. Moss and hats off to him. She was a great choice at the time we hadn't wrote any celebrities weeks outlets limiting wasn't really talk shop. It was all about design evoke nelson. I knew that she would be incredibly with the with the talk shop customer base but also knew that it would it allowed to get into top shop if he lied to enter into an stop being apart top shop and i knew that i couldn't work with him. I could. I could do this with my team because we were all incredibly passionate because we understood it. I could not with him. Why not because we just had temporarily different views about everything is was that you basically that the buying decision was that you bought something as cheap as you could possibly buy. A new sold differs much. As you'd be get foreign mike. Philosophy was that you would make sure that you designed on bought something. That was so amazing that no one will be able to resist. It said we will philosophically. We had a very different view. The business so assigned that he took over he i think he felt that he knew young fashion that he could cross the business. And i'm sorry but you know he's he's. He's a middle-aged mom who doesn't have very much retail general certainly didn't ever about young fashion on. I think from that moment on probably He started to make decisions about cultural. Besotted run it in a way. That's a Realize that that a business needs to be constantly. Reinvented that you need. Passion within the union huge passion from everyone involved and if those people are not as passionate Do i really have to do this. then i think it's i think he is very quickly. My feeling was that before he kinda came into it. It was like we were a room full of people together. All of us creating together something. We were terribly proud of. I'm so it was amazing but we were doing it together. I think he his his view much was was a top down management. I'll tell you to do that. You'll do it. And i think that's not just a very very different thing. You know if someone says to me you've got you do that. Yeah i'll do it. But maybe i'll do it but i wanted to very well whereas if i feel on upon something creating something that i will give it everything and i think that's what it needs and needs everything. Is that ultimately why you decided to leave that. You could bring your everything you know what what happened to precipitate your departure. Well just just. Purely the fact that i knew that he he had an end that he would now become involved in social and a half million. Just didn't want to work for that. You know. I didn't have to work for him. You know and also. Let's not forget. I was by that time in my early. Booties and i kind of thought you know what this is. This is young high russians. I am no longer opposed. I kind of grown answer bit. I could do something else better. And i could give everything to another to another type of business. Oppose the other thing that was happening of course during the rise of top jump was also the rise of other big fast fashion houses whether that be zara or you know h inam the other new giant global companies looking back now the companies. That took that as fast approach to fashion are now really being in the the really the kind of the focus of fashion's Climate crisis challenge. You know the all of the training that we've given to customers to buy things cheap by things often and then dispose of garments. How do you see that whole fast. Fashion sector now. Top shop included with the addition of players like a sauce and boohoo. People calling them. Ultra fast fashion. It seems to me that it's this part of the fashion industry. That's most problematic as we think about this. Ten years left before we can get these carbon emissions under control industry that contributes ten percent of global carbon emissions. What's what's your take on that. Now while i you know a lot of people that have accused me of having been one of the False fashion and then sort of turned around and said a watch. Now it's it's not the right thing to do. But i. I never set to to create disposable passion. I says create something that was accessible to you. Know the great things are accessible to a lot of people and it's been on a journey myself in over the last sort of. I guess ten years. When i began to start feeling that this was moving in that. This was wrong that you know that we were that the fashion had lost its value. If you like that would just literally buying things in throwing them away wearing wants to moving because it was so cheesy do that i began to feel seriously compromised by that and began to build that i that i should leave the business and five because i couldn't i couldn't Begging apartment of such an incredibly damaging industry which which we now know that it is and to buffet and we didn't really know not Templeton fifteen years or so prior to that we did pass. We didn't know what we didn't think about it. And i think. I think it's it's very difficult and i always seems to me is certainly in young false fashion that the the they the customer base it is soon of splitting and that you have only sort of what the numbers but but it feels like this little v fifty percents Who recognized that. Passion is a real problem and have moved to depop hamilton. To buy vintage charter shots. Recycling up cycling read cetera. And and yet. I'm still two percent who are still buried addicted to is seriously mean. That addicted took Having things immediately. I think it's very hard to say those people. You can't have that. I think what you have to do is offer some sort of bad but alternative is as exciting or is as as tempting or whatever the sort of the yes away from from from. What is that doing. Because i agree with you. I mean it almost feels like we're coming to an end. Endpoint what. I do take what i am. Encouraged by is the fact that if you nonsense question about ten years ago i would have said that. Eighty percent people was with selected fashion. Maybe ten fifteen twenty percent. We're actually starting to realize that there was a different pop that could travel

Bennett Grain Roussel UK Moss Nelson Kate London China Mike Depop Hamilton
Gigi in Wonderland - Vogue's March Issue Cover Story

Vogue Podcast

09:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Gigi in Wonderland - Vogue's March Issue Cover Story

"She's perfected the art of living in the spotlight. But motherhood has opened digi hadeed up to a new world and a new set of priorities. I'm khloe mao evoked contributing editor. And this is g. G in wonderland knew that i have that animal in me says gee hadeed relaxed. In bright. from december cold the twenty five year old model is astrid colored quarterhorse named dallas. And telling me about the birth of her baby in september here at her home in bucks county pennsylvania following a fourteen and a half hour labor at her side. Were her partner zane. Malik her mother yulong to her sister. Bella and a local midwife and her assistant when you see someone do that you look at them a bit differently. I probably looked crazy actually. She says a giggle tinged with pride. I was an animal woman. Mallet cut the baby. Click that she was out says gee gee gazing forward through dallas alert ears as we plod through the upper fields of harmony hollow. The farm owned by longest boyfriend. Joseph goalie a construction firm ceo. I was so exhausted. And i looked up. He's holding her. It was so cute. She's in a cropped long as puffer stretch. Czar jeans and warned black riding boots and looks like neither a harried mother of a ten week old nor paparazzi ducking supermodel with her hair roped into a smooth bun bear face and tiny gold hoop earrings. She resembles mostly her teenage self. An equestrian who showed jumped competitively while growing up in her hometown of santa barbara. California what i really wanted for my experience was to feel like okay. This is a natural thing that women are meant to do. She planned to deliver it a new york city hospital but then the realities of covert hit particularly sequestering here ninety minutes from manhattan and the limits on numbers in the delivery room which would preclude yolanda and bella from being present. Then she and malik watched the two thousand eight documentary the business of being born which is critical of medical interventions and depicts a successful home birth. We both looked at each other. And we're like. I think that's the call. Gd says they placed a blow up bath in their bedroom and sent their three cats and border collie away when the midwife expressed concern that the sphinx and maine coon felines might puncture the tub with their claws. Malik ask gee-gee what music she wanted to hear and she surprised him by requesting the audio of favourite children's novel the indian in the cupboard. He downloaded the film because it was one of his favorites too and they spent the early hours of labor watching it together. That's something we'd never talked about. But in that moment we discovered we both loved. Gd says bash family. She then tells me that malik. The former one direction star turned solo artist. Who has famously press shy and declined to be interviewed for. This article likened his own experience of her birth to align documentary. he'd seen in which a male lion paces nervously outside the cave. The lion s delivers her cubs z. Was like that's how i felt you feel so helpless to see the person you love in pain. Doom dula malibu high classmate carson. Meyer had prepared her for the moment where the mother feels. She can't go any longer without drugs. I had to dig deep. Jichi says i knew it was going to be the craziest pain in my life. But you have to surrender to it and be like this is what it is. I loved that you'll monda and the midwife coach through the pain there definitely was a point where i was like. I wonder what it would be. Like with an epa darryl how it would be different jichi frankly. My midwife looked at me and was like you're doing it. No one can help you your past the point of the epidermal anyway. So you'd be pushing exactly the same way in a hospital bed so she kept pushing. I know my mom zane. Bella were proud of me but at certain points i saw each of them in terror says she ducking under a leafless branch. Dow also who've sucking in the muddy terrain afterward z and. I looked at each other. And we're like we can have some time before we do that again. The baby girl named kai digi revealed on instagram in january from the arabic for the chosen one was a weekly. She was so bright right away. Gd says adding that. The baby's heart rate stayed consistent throughout the labor. That's what i wanted for her. A peaceful bringing to the world. Kyw's world has so far remained small. Her mother rarely leaves the bucolic corner of horse country where the hadeed put down roots in two thousand seventeen. Malik bought a nearby farm. The shoot for this story. In early december at a studio in manhattan was the first time g g had left her daughter since birth yolanda took over caregiving duties even bringing her granddaughter along to feed the miniature. Ponies mama and mccoo. Gee-gee has no nanny no baby nurse. None of the traditional celebrity crutches of new motherhood during our interview the baby stayed with her father and zan's mother tricia who is visiting from england for a month to help she decided to completely take care of the baby alone says yolanda odd. And i think that bond is so important. The dutch former model turned real housewives of beverly hills. Alum was my welcoming party. When i arrived at the farm booming. Hello her arms wide on the threshold in. Camo print puffer and boots. I'm proud of her face on magazine but seeing her give birth was a whole other level of proud yolanda says you go from looking at her as a daughter to looking at her as a fellow mother. The natural transitions and generational shifts of new motherhood are at play in the household. It is a family happily influx on the sprawling. Thirty two acre property. The handful of cottages are designated for different siblings. But this summer. When g g moved out of her cottage into zan's house bella and brother anwar graduated to larger cottages leaving. The smallest is a guest house. We're still close by says she but we have our space to be our own little family. She hosted thanksgiving dinner for the first time this year with zero mother cooking the turkey g g. A prolific home-cooked herself made banana. Pi and baked yolanda favourite tatham. Bella occurred over stuffing and spiked apple. Cider in the kubota tv g g got her christmas tree early for the occasion dressing it with personal ornaments. That she and malik have exchanged over the years. The most recent being glass nintendo console a reference to a favor quarantine activity. I decorated fully. Without my mom's help. And i think i did her. Gd says they are tribe publicly known for their closeness yolanda the doting den. Mother gee-gee the fresh-faced protective older sister. Bella the edgier veronica deejays betty and aloof baby brother on war joining g g and yolanda in the kitchen for latinos and cinnamon rolls before a horseback ride eyewitness. These rules confirmed. Yolanda has the sink drinking a smoothie and finishing gee-gee sentences when she grasps for word g g threatens to have a connection if anwar eats her cinnamon roll when he ambles out of his cottage. But motherhood is a new phase and it will be up to g g to decide whether it belongs on the silhouettes of social media. I think she wants to be real. Online's as bella twenty four by phone from new york city but until her child wants to be in the spotlight and can make the decision herself. She doesn't want to put her in that position. Bela who splits her. Time between her. Soho loft and the farm and facetime with her niece and sister every morning says she already enjoys reading books. Aloud that jeeves to read to her including the rainbow fish and the very hungry caterpillar. It's pretty nostalgic. Bella says it could be argued that we are all hungry caterpillars this year cocooning and comforting with hope of emerging bright winged vaccinated g. G wants split her time between her condo and no-ho and the first class cabin of airplanes when lockdowns began she had just returned from walking fashion shows in four countries and discovering. She was pregnant on the other end of covid. She will emerge as a mother. Happily headquartered in rural pennsylvania. Still a supermodel. But one determined to lead more secluded less peripatetic life. I always want to be here fulltime. She tells me. I love the city but this is where i'm happiest furious. Speculation and countless think pieces have attended the question of what this time will mean. Will we slow down flee cities for less frenzied. More mindful life in many ways. Gee-gee the bodyman of such ideas. The sheiks glamorous version yes but also a person drawn to reassessment. It feels like now. I'm in a different place in my life. She says and she does seem genuinely at home

Yolanda Malik Khloe Mao Gee Hadeed Yulong Bella Joseph Goalie Zane Dallas Dula Malibu Jichi Monda Kai Digi Astrid Bucks County KYW Manhattan Mallet
The True Cost of Sustainable Skincare with Tata Harper

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

05:48 min | 3 weeks ago

The True Cost of Sustainable Skincare with Tata Harper

"I feel like there's so many misconceptions in the beauty industry really in the luxury industry in general too. But you know Clean beauty is not elevated enough or clean. Beauty doesn't work as well. And i think what's interesting. Is that you kind of saw those challenges. Or you heard those misconceptions and you're like no. I'm gonna change this right like i love that i'm gonna i'm gonna give it a try because enough you know because i think that now what we need is a lot of consumer products that make our life better deal you know not just like superficially better but like really that they They elevate our quality of life. And from that lance. It's what really kept me motivated and really like we spent like five years creating the harper because the formulas didn't exist. No one knew how to use like natural ingredients to preserve or to a mall. Sify or to again or to stabilize those were not like raw materials were used just for like marketing and And there was not a lot of science around like the formulation aspect of natural skincare and took a really long time to make them happen and also formulate from a different point of view because a lot of natural skinner was always formulated with this idea of minimalism and and a lot of like the first gen natural products. They were created a lot. I by the low hus movement remember that movement that lifestyle movement that is being natural so the fact that the product was natural was actually more important than the even that the product worked ben and data no for skin care. Because you only buy skin care too because it works right exactly. Why you don't like by this moisturizer to save the planet like you buy this moisture is great moisturizer and then you have your charities and other things to do other things but But yeah no i was. I was really challenging. It was almost like with the creation of our company. We talent almost every aspect of being a maker of skin-care not only from the ingredients and the formulas but also by having our farm like what you were saying before the farm has been such a special place for us because a lot of skin care is outsource. The majority of the companies are outsource. They outsource almost every piece of their of their Of their business to third parties whether it's the formulation to labs that a lot of times abusing tons of basis and just you know the smell or the color or the incentive vitamin seen our. We're going to add. Hulo renege on jason or you know things like that but you find a lot of companies that have very unique products and formulas that are really unique so for us it was always very clear that we needed to have our own our end and our own formulation Our own chemists and our own lab so that we can really formulate products from scratch like we like doing and that every ingredient has a purpose and also every single one of our formulas doesn't rely on just one ingredient like we're not like on one ingredient type of company where company that by ingredients from all over the world and use them in the you know in different formulas in very high concentrations. So no i mean. I think it makes so much sense. And i love that you guys and your approach is truly like farm to beauty right. I feel like that's such a Sort of a marketing term that you hear thrown around alongside clean beauty etc. But you're literally you know harvesting in growing ingredients on your farm for some of your formulas So can you explain a little bit more about how that process works in terms of You know like organic farming and how you guys are actively working milan. I mean. I think that's fascinating kodaly so just to clarify one thing. We do bring ingredients from all over the world. Sure yeah we bring ingredients from like eighty four different countries. Okay we have like no self and post limit on like we're just gonna talk about vitamins where we are see company we really curate technologies from all over the world whether it's green tag or you know things from tradit- you know from a lot of tradition traditional chinese medicine you're also bringing a lot of and butters from amazon but anyway so we In the farm. There's a couple of things happening so number one. We have a garden where we grow a lot of Not even a lot. We grow specifically five herbs that grow really well in our soil in vermont in our farm which is a clay soil and those are calendar. La barra sweet alfalfa and kolenda and we grow them in our farm in in our organic farm and we make one ingredient that that That we produce at the farm every single month that basically captures all of the oil soluble nutrition from all of those herbs. And the and it's done in a very temperature controlled process that it's very specific and that ingredient that is called our farm beauty complex goes into almost every single one of our formulas but in the farm. We also have a lot of barnes because it was an old dairy farm converted into a skincare farm. Now i love

Sify Lance Skinner Harper BEN Jason Milan Amazon Vermont Barnes
Jos Neves Unpacks the Farfetch-Alibaba-Richemont Partnership

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:57 min | 6 hrs ago

Jos Neves Unpacks the Farfetch-Alibaba-Richemont Partnership

"We just need to remove all these completely fabricated ideas around online offline. I'd multi-brand more. That's not how consumers alibaba is thought of as a chinese platform looking into the future. Where where does this deal. Take alibaba on a global level. We can bring. We're really good at and partner with others who have technology and capabilities that they're really good at to create an experience for merchants for consumers that cannot be created today in a single entity. Hi this is ron ahmed founder. And ceo of business fashion. Welcome to the podcast. We're taking you back to voices. Twenty twenty for conversation that i have chosen abbot's the founder and ceo of farfetched and mike evans. The president of alibaba will the two executives were on hand to discuss their new megadeal with wishaw. Which has just come to life as of monday because now far fetched is pressed on alibaba luxury pavilion platform last week or fetch reported that it's sold more than three billion dollars worth of goods and twenty twenty up forty nine percent year-over-year and generating revenue one point. Seven billion dollars which has led to the company's first quarter with a positive adjusted ebitda farfetched is still aiming for profitability for the full year of twenty twenty. One there's lots to learn from this conversation. Here's josie novice and mike evans at voices. Twenty twenty Opportunistic stick investment was theme seven in this year's report on the state of fashion 2021 it offered a prediction that companies will begin maneuvering for the post pandemic reality to grow market share and expand their capabilities. But in fact it is already happening. The recent landmark deal with far fetch alibaba richemont and carrying is a case in point. I it brings together two rival luxury goods groups respond carrying who both invested in farfetched. But there's also added interests because riche mont is also the owner bucs neta portait group a major rival too far fetch. Now i'm joined by josie neva's founder and chief executive of farfetched. Who's in some paolo today. As well as mike evans president of alibaba who joins us mexico in this their first joint conversation. They'll help us to understand the anatomy of this megadeal and what it portends for the global luxury e commerce space. Welcome to you. Both josie and mike josie. I wanted to start with you. I you know this is a deal that really took the industry by surprise. Some of our reporters kind of dropped the mic on slack and other places like where did this deal come from. So in the first instance can you just give us a sense of the genesis of this megadeal. How did it happen sure Think the channels of the deal was compensation which you i will never forget about the station with daniel jank and the conversation just understand the chinese online luxury market In both electric pavilion was doing private. China was doing and we ended up staying for a long time much longer than what we expected and what what was clear was while three things first. We think as tech businesses we add technology bathrooms not retailers. And and we really are at the service of the best brands and the best relates to really enable them. We're here to enable industries and that ito's was very very striking because we're not here to replace physical rebuilt for example firefights spotted with physical retail. That's that's what we did since they when we continue to have. We started the future new retail. Very much believe in in how we reinvent the magic Physical retail and. It's the same with alibaba. actually so they. they add enabling tens of thousands of physical retailers in china knocking luxury but in other countries with went single platform. So that was when the second walls china and how combined shining. Fox's we could have a win win proposition for consumers and also for brands and retailers in that in that market and said when whilst the global nature of this deal that we should really join forces to create this vision of luxury new retail new retail his alibaba strategy out mentors retail whilst fash strategy luxury new retail is the combination of strategies. And it's really a movement and and and a suite of products and technologies. That is ready so this is not. Fantasy is not future gazing. This is ready. We are powering Companies already as chanel. For example we solve the future now available to the companies and obviously alibaba in china. So that was how the the the story started. And then he schmaltz has a very close by when she with With alibaba ademi's allow me to introduce a small action. Investment was from carrying from attorneys. So the holding the piano holding company. They were already invests in five Appeals we naturally asked them. While do you think is this a vision from two technologies that really are not seen what industry needs are is it something that you're on your brains would need the embrace on very very much future and so would you help us shape future and we created these steering group where you'll fans won't leave you know we're very honda to have them help us with roadmap. This is what we have is what we're doing. Does this make sense for you. And so so in a nutshell. That's that's the that's out that happens. Okay mic from the from the alibaba side. You know it's you're such a dominant company and china. Something like twenty percent of consumer goods believe are bought through your platform. What was the motivation from the alibaba side to to move into this partnership so run from our side i've thought about it as three visions in emission vision. Number one is the china's days about thirty five percent of local luxury and probably will grow to fifty percent of global tree over the next revived years. Oh huge opportunity brands and consumers and the big luxury houses to pursue that opportunity vision number two was really the transformation of luxury through what i just mentioned which is

Alibaba Mike Evans Ron Ahmed Josie Novice Alibaba Richemont Riche Mont Neta Portait Josie Neva Mike Josie Daniel Jank Abbot China Paolo Josie Alibaba Ademi Mexico Schmaltz
Three Designers In Search of Digital Beauty

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:39 min | 4 d ago

Three Designers In Search of Digital Beauty

"Coronavirus pandemic video has emerged as the predominant medium for telling stories during fashion week with many designers using short films to share their collections but the fashion film is not new. It was an idea that was first popularized by the british photographer. Nick knight ten years ago i had the opportunity to interview nick for the tenth anniversary of show studio his pioneering digital platform for fashion. Nick spoke passionately about film as the ideal medium for communicating fashion clothes designed to be seen a movement so when fashion designer john galliano whoever creates closing its sending movement. Someone could argue that a still photograph of that thing is to some degree compromises designs original vision. I think fashioned actually very poorly served by the media. I think the media don't representative while especially here. In britain i think is even trivialized scandalized under the fashion world. That i knew was a lot more exciting that working with designer like yoji muto you see a world which is quite incredible quite partick and are typically super interesting. I felt that that wasn't getting shun. So rated all associate will part of what just you know. If i can have somewhere. I can talk about what i'm doing and show them doing as i'm doing. It allows people into that world the nets you know. They'll get a better understanding arte fashionable fashions and basil. See that it's really exciting and really a very creative and very fulfilling medium. There's been such a massive sea change in the last thirty years. I've been working. I mean massive. And i think really. It's a question that why started shows. You felt a bit like being the first person in the sweetshop that you just didn't know which way to turn what to do next and still a bit of that. There was so much to do in so many exciting products to do. It's a bit hard to find time to do them all. So it's really a question of you know these things will happen. We are in pro thrilling times. The moment i have three children all in their teens. None of them reading magazines that all on the internet. you know. that's a clear sign to me that the fashion is going to totally change because it has to articulate through new medium. it's been supported by print and very beautifully supported by print for the last eight years hundred years eight years but now it's been supported by another major and it would change and that megyn will shape it in the same way that fashion of jewish shaped by vogue magazine by print so fashion film will be shaped by the internet and show studio of websites hookah to indulgent but it took a global pandemic ten years later for fashion film to really take hold in the industry and now it seems like every fashion designer in the world is trying their hand at it. creating a compelling fashion film isn't just about shooting a video as it turns out it requires a whole new level of artistry and creativity and this season a few fashion designers released stepped up their game and embrace the medium with gusto telling deeply personal stories that reached a new level of creativity in the case of saul nash a fashion designer and choreographer that meant creating a two minute and twenty two second film twist with inc his dance and movement led approach. If you know anything about previous it's always came about liberation of of men for movement and it's quite self reflect story so a lot of my work at the references demand. I grew up around london and that was ready key in this work. It kind of reflects my intentions specifically around my sexuality so that this idea between what you see and the person who's underneath the key for this film was to actually spread the message to not judge a book by its cover actually does a lot of nuances and complexities declare round men. That is kind of clothing. So i think the twist in the film was to was to create a sense of tension fraught the whole film. The audience wonder. What's going to happen. Is that she going to be a fight. But no it some of love and beauty as a gay black man twist was also sol's opportunity to change perceptions as walk into the station the other day and somebody held really tight you into their. How much but little did they know was on my way to the somerset house. So i think those kind of preconceived ideas are pretty much alive in our society. So i i really felt the need to tell the story in this. My partner ethics gobi directed. The film and working with him is regaining process. Because he knows everything about my work. He knows everything about the backstory. But what's really beautiful is he brings a completely different take on it. He comes from needs in the south of france and his experience as a filmmaker comes from a completely different place so when it came to costing demand. I kind of gave him idea of the energy that i wanted from the cost and i did a role play with each of them. Emotion was like the key word when it came to this film. We didn't just want the music to kind of be a skull which is illustrated in the imagery. Which is going on. It was really key that it was driving this story and we really wanted the audience to feel the sense of suspense right up until that moment. When there's the kiss oh a friend of mine. His name is control and he trained to school and he's he's also from london. Sorry i really felt that he he resonated with the theme itself and it was really beautiful to kind of have this pun trump's because it's also key. The music elevates the imagery and it doesn't put back in place on this street and you know it's all about elevating the ideas and progressive forward. So i think he's kind of kestrel touch to the film actually added another layer which i couldn't human nostril. That moment is reflect story of kind of ireland for myself. Like with my friends for many years. Like i was also hip hop doubts that badly in don styles and all my friends who was cooled. Me bro bro. And then there was the shift to a point where introduced into my boyfriend and seeing how they were accepting of it also touched me because i had one idea of how they receive it so i think that that really took me that perceptions are changing around sexuality and i really hope that in the near future it would kind of not even be

Yoji Muto Nick Knight Megyn Vogue Magazine John Galliano Saul Nash Nets Nick Britain Somerset House London SOL France Ireland
Trip Adviser: Psychedelic Wellness Has Arrived

Vogue Podcast

07:22 min | Last week

Trip Adviser: Psychedelic Wellness Has Arrived

"The embrace of psychedelics lead to a mental health revolution. At seven o'clock on a recent evening. I dim the bedroom lights call it a reminder to my boyfriend two rows me in an hour with gentle tap and close the door have a great trip. I hear him say from the living room as the to ketamine tablets pressed into the pockets of my cheeks. Dissolve leaving a bitter residue minutes later. I'm flying over water. That reflects a source lewis golden light. Am i the light. The thought triggers a sensation of being stretched like taffy in all directions. It's not my body being stretched have about anymore but the immaterial me moving in tune with the ambient music and my headphones i stretch and spread until at last i've dissolved pixelated at which point two small voice in my head calls out. Do you really think this will help you quit smoking. Last time i was on ketamine i was hooked up to an iv following surgery this time the drug in general medical use as an anesthetic since nineteen seventy arrived on my doorstep cardis of mind bloom a new telemedicine company specializing in cattleman based psychedelic therapy. This was no shady. Dark web deal prescribed by a psychiatric nurse practitioner following an extensive intake evaluation and compounded by licensed pharmacy. The cattleman came bundled with an eye mask hard bound journal and a blood pressure cuff that i was instructed to us before and after dosing to test my vitals the tablets themselves were housed in a mirrored. Shut with the tagline. Attached of your breakthrough spelled out in sleek. Sam sarah fought. I was tempted to post a shot to instagram. But i zoom call with my psychedelic integration coach in half an hour and i wanted to meditate. I welcome to the brave new world of psychedelic wellness after decades. Underground hallucinogens such as cattleman. Lsd silla sabin. An md may are getting a fresh look from the medical establishment. Thanks to myriad studies suggesting silver bullet like efficacy in the treatment of anxiety depression and addiction among other elements. Mda renowned for its bliss inducing effect hence the street name ecstasy is on course to be approved for the treatment of post traumatic stress disorder. Ptsd within the next year or two synthetic forms of silla sabin the active compound magic. Mushrooms were given quote breakthrough designation by the fda in two thousand eighteen allowing for fast tracking of drug trials. Meanwhile this past november oregon became the first state in the nation to legalize silla sivan for medical use in advanced not just on the investors flocking startups like mind med and compass pathways both of which are developing suicide. Sivan treatments in anticipation of cannabis style. Psychedelics boom a mental health. Revolution is at hand. And it's long overdue. According to experts such as frederick street or barrett phd assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at john hopkins school of medicine and a faculty member at the universities. Recently opened center for psychedelic unconsciousness research. The current model for treating problems like anxiety and depression. Just isn't very good. Barrett says patients take pills every day for years and these medications not only have nasty side effects. They often don't even work. But with psychedelics. Assisted therapy. there's the potential truly alter someone's life with just one or two sessions because you're getting it suffering at the source. I'm not suffering exactly but for lack of more technical language. I've kind of been freaking out. Straining to maintain a productive work schedule under lockdown. I fell back into the habit of smoking as irate and soon thereafter the habit of trying to quit. The addiction struck me as fundamentally psychological. If i was hooked on nicotine why did i reach for my american spirits. Only when i was stuck at my desk staring down a deadline but reach for them. I did and the harder i worked not too with the aid of gum apps. Hypnosis you name it the more fixated. I became on the fear that i simply could not write without cigarettes. I was starting to feel truly hopeless when i stumbled across a news item about studies showing that with the aid of suicide longtime smokers quitting cold turkey and sticking with it at rates the put all other remedies to shave two thirds of participants in one reason. Study were confirmed cigarette free. After one year intrigued. I did a little more digging and discovered that ketamine associated hallucinogen that has already legal for supervised medical use including in the treatment of depression seemed to draw out the mind in a way similar to suicide bend by putting the brain in a quote neuro. Plastic state explains julie harland. Md and york-based psychiatrist and the author of the twenty twenty book. Good chemistry they have different chemical properties. Both cattleman ancilla sivan have an ego dissolving fact where you're breaking the mental loop that symptomatic of conditions like depression and anxiety and addiction and allowing the brain to form new connections. She says maybe a little ego dissolution was the answer used as i stamped out another button the ashtray next to my laptop and googled quote. Cattleman therapy new york. The truth is we don't really know how this stuff works. Michael palin author of the bestselling psychedelics primer change. Your mind tells me a leading theory. is that psychedelics. Quiet the brain's default mode network and that opens up new pathways for thought as pollen goes onto explain. The default mode network is where the ego has address. It's the part of our brain where we construct the narrative of who we are and thus the place we get stuck in destructive thought patterns about ourselves that could be. I'm worthless person. Who doesn't deserve love or it could mean telling yourself that you can't get through the day without smoking. Pollen continues either way. The idea is that by muffling. Those thoughts psychedelics. Help you out of the rut. Pollens presi on the science of psychedelics is reassuringly down to earth for years. I've been put off by the drugs. Woo connotations and to judge by the refined minimalist aesthetics of new cattleman therapy chains such as field trip health which has serene locations in new york city. Toronto atlanta chicago and los angeles. I'm not the only person with zero interest in a tied mental makeover. It's all a far cry from timothy leary and the electric kool aid acid test. But leary who. Famously conducted psychedelics experiments at harvard in the early nineteen sixties before he ran a foul of the law in turn helped prompt the criminalization of silla sivan. Lsd does continue to exert an influence. His set and setting theory is a cornerstone of all contemporary psychedelic stated therapy set basically refers to mindset. Going into your journey and setting is your environment explains ronin lobby who co-founded field trip in two thousand and nineteen after establishing the selling canada's largest network of cannabis clinics. They matter as much as the drug. You're taking he continues. You need to be an place mentally and physically where you feel inspired and at ease. Because i've chosen to work with mind. Bloom thanks to their kobe. Friendly process the setting for my four hour. Long treatments was my bedroom to be perfectly clear. I wasn't microdosing nor was eye popping a pill just to see what

Sam Sarah Silla Sivan Lsd Silla Sabin Anxiety Depression Traumatic Stress Disorder Silla Sabin Barrett Phd John Hopkins School Of Medicin Center For Psychedelic Unconsc Depression Sivan Julie Harland Twenty Twenty Book Ancilla Sivan Anxiety FDA Barrett Oregon Pollens Presi Michael Palin
Fashion Crime Alias

Pop Fashion

01:18 min | Last week

Fashion Crime Alias

"And this is pop fashion. Hello lisa how are you today. I am alive and thriving. How're you karn. I'm very excited to be part of this. Fashion news comedy podcast. We're still getting used to how it feels how it rolls off the tongue. It doesn't exactly roll yet. We're just kind of tripping over it but we'll get there we will totally get there. What's going on over there lisa. Well i just found out that my toothbrushes possessed and i can't say the name of the toothbrush because they need to pay us some dollars. So right like their well-known on podcast. They could send me some dollars before. I say their name but after not working for like two weeks it just started working tonight at random twice. When i haven't been in the bathroom so ten seconds before we are about to hit record here this mind-numbing buzzing sound loud and clear from three rooms away. And it's my toothbrush trying to skinner. Its way across my bathroom counter. I think the guests out of your water pipes and have moved. The bathroom. Had just wanna have good hygiene lisa. They're just on tour of my home and my premises.

Lisa Karn Skinner
The Future of New York Fashion Week

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:45 min | Last week

The Future of New York Fashion Week

"All know as new york fashion week the designer at one point in america is somebody back room but they were growing a group equal to any in the world. I felt that american designers like claire. Mccardell out and fine bill bus and people like that. Do be known as well. As as french designers they were equal fresh desires and so i asked some of them become. Come to my office and we just farm the council. The council of fashion designers of american and those number of people become a core of designers if people want to be influenced by eventually new york fashion week organized by the fda became an essential stop on the annual fashion calendar kicking off the collections before moving onto london. Milan and new york but now as with all other live events and gatherings cove it has put pay to the idea of having people squeezed into tightly packed spaces and the future of fashion weeks around. The world is now in question. The york fashion week that has just concluded was virtually all virtual affair the season. Dampening the mood of an industry that thrives on human connection and creativity but as our senior correspondent chantelle. Fernandez reported her recent b. o. f. professional story the unbundling of new york fashion make things have been changing for years with a steady trickle of designers defecting to paris or focusing on instagram to show their collections. Instead now after the pandemic is over not just a few industry insiders have been wondering if new york fashion week has a future at all. As many of the biggest brands have chosen to show on their own schedule from. Tommy hilfiger and tory burch to michael kors. Marc jacobs but one designer who bucked the trend in staged a physical new york fashion week show amid the pandemic is jason wu who i rose to global stardom when he dressed michelle obama for the two thousand nine inauguration ball. After barack obama was first elected president of the united states. I spoke to jason and wanted to understand why he decided to stage a physical fashion show at all when businesses so tough money is so tight stores are still closed. The fashion industry is still suffering. And the us is still grappling with a major public health emergency. I felt like you know if we could produce a show in a very safe manner in a way that is responsible. I do you know really believe still in new york. Fashion week because This was my dream dino to move here you know over twenty years ago and you know i remember back back then was the bryant park. You know and i remember always trying to sneak into fashion shows. I remember like you know when it was like twenty once. He came to like the head. The red showed bryant park. And you know just think fashion new york fashion week A dream of mine to be a part of it. You know now that. I'm in the industry. I feel like it's my job to keep part of it alive. I think even though it's forever changing you know fashion week has become somewhat of a different creature. You know but that happened long. Before the pandemic. I remember my first new york fashion weeks when i was also sneaking into those tents and bryant park in it felt like a really important moment destination and there is all of that energy but then slowly but surely long before the pandemic things began to change. But you know it's this season in particular that i'm curious about because there's all this other stuff going on with the pandemic and the closure of retail and lockdowns and obviously the health crisis. What was the thinking behind doing a show him amidst that and having cut through else i mean i think you know it's you know it's funny. I moved to new york in two thousand one on september fifth to persons and you know than a few days later september eleventh so i would say had a baptism by fire in terms of coming into new york. You know i mean you know that was one of the most dramatic events. I i have an probably whatever experience right. But one thing i have learned is that new yorkers are very tough and you know it is a resilient city it's full of energy that's why chose to veer. Because you know i just. I think you know the city has his way of balancing back all the time you know and and i just felt like it was important that you know we don't forget him on your fashion week in new york. Fashion industry altogether. Being to be very frank with you. The new york fashion week as a whole hasn't been getting as much attention as our european counterparts. Right it's it's very different than when i started like fourteen years ago. You know when when there was a lot of young blood new blood. And i you know meeting part of it right now that i'm not so young anymore. You know but i. I feel like it's it's important to carry the torch a little bit. You know because i do think when everything's said and done right there will still be a very necessary. Need for some sort of a schedule just because you know buyers and international editors they can't they still need to come in and can't come in as it is everyone's already over travel between so many shows globally and. I think there's still going to be very. It's it's going to be more important for us to work together as a group.

New York Mccardell Council Of Fashion Designers O The York Fashion Bryant Park United States Red Showed Bryant Park Chantelle Jason Wu Claire Tommy Hilfiger Fernandez Instagram Milan Michael Kors Tory Burch Marc Jacobs FDA Michelle Obama Paris
S6 Ep4: Jay Blades and his repair shock - part 2

My Wardrobe Malfunction

06:16 min | 2 d ago

S6 Ep4: Jay Blades and his repair shock - part 2

"And went to buckingham new university to study criminology. i've studied criminology. And my first year I had a module of philosophy. And i kind of fell in love with philosophy because it was all about thinking it was all about power. And how you would not commit at just. The different forms of things in the thinking and philosophy is beautiful. As far as i'm consent so robin going to the reason. Why is because i wanted to challenge myself first and foremost and then I was not great at school Let's go with no qualifications. But thank you went to university to see if i can get some qualifications. And i called them up and i said well i wanna come there and study and said i what you want to study and i said i don't know what can study until you interested in. I like fashion and a grew up in an era had a crime. So i figured you about crime and there was like okay. Well you could studied textile design which is around fashion and choosing textiles for the future. And so and so for all you could study criminology. And i said ooh was criminology. And goes who chronologies the study of crime and white people in poor areas do crime. Wow that's the one for me. So i remember going along and learning about it but why sussed is that. Most people studied criminology. Will go into development of crimes. That have studied more chromosomes and so forth. I wanted to give back. I want you to change things from the narrative that was already seen. If you look the black population. The black population problem free percent of england and they make up roughly about things about eighty percent of the prison population and there is a high proportion of exclusions of young mouse from skull which then can lead to criminal justice system and so and so for me. It was like whoa k. Five missed knowledge than what i need to do is give back to those guys to show in areas. A different way of doing things and i met my ex wife at university. We started on debating on how we can make the world a better place in. We was fortunate enough to get some Opportunities to what attends police to to put some of those rights wrong And put some of the thinking. I had into practice and the beauty i can say is as a ninety five percent of the time of the projects that we did were all successful. No one really wants to do crime. Everybody wants to community family to be better. And if you give them an alternative and say look. You can't do this. You'll often Those people i would say ninety five percent of the people change their behavior their activity and get me wrong to five percent. Who've they wanna do crime they wanna do not things and that's why we have. The police have the criminal justice system etc but the majority of people if you put a definitive in front of them i don't think they want to absolutely right so So that yes said that will makes it will make sense is past your journey. Which is led you to way you ought today studying criminology and philosophy and it makes it make sense in in your your life path but when you when you off to walk i she was basically a breakdown when you have a homeless. How did you when you came out of that. Hatchet your atchoo change to clothes and possessions. I mean you more kind of like -tective of your possessions knobs amuptated i've possessions. I'm probably protective of my clothes. I've always been the same way since eleven years old. The army tom of everglades let was that breakdown and staying in the same clothes for a week. Not washing really makes you appreciate water. Soap and deodorant. Because even i was. I would walk somewhere and then i'll turn back or you stop and then you just get this. Waft that comes to you know who is that. You look as you look around you. Who sacked eighth. That's not good and then you you constantly awoke him and you can smell. It's almost as if you're smell is another person. It has a presence and the presence has. I didn't really like it. Might my hatch you towards them. Mclovin has been executive signed. Full fortunate for me gerald. He's into fashion his business. His business mind in faction. He has a lot of clothing stores. So hidden salt map was nothing and it was everything to me because it was the i needed to rebuild my wardrobe. I needed to make sure. I stepped up to the standard. I knew i was at by was not displaying it by wearing the same clothes for a week and not often for a week so all that needed to be sorted out quick and has your chest style if all because i mean. I love the way dresser. It's it's kind of tailored is beautiful and kind of slightly nineteen twenties. Nineteen th of two is kind of working man will most exquisitely tailored so we just like that before. Has this evolved since being on television is is kinda vote and thank you for that compliment coming from you because you are the kind of when when it comes to star you official to i'm jay. Fuck fuck all is how to make a big tits. Looks

Buckingham New University Robin England Mclovin Army Gerald JAY
Frank Rod-or-Die!

Brandi Glanville Unfiltered

00:53 sec | 4 d ago

Frank Rod-or-Die!

"Media art. I'm bringing them in. Are you ready to insure or will do that after we can do it after what dude after do you want to do before. Let's do it now. he's in. Yeah let's do it. Tell me i want him to be able to hear this. Oh you do show. I bring him in now then. No i just want. Can you not hear it. No you can't hear us right now. I just feel like it would be okay. He can't hear us right now. Here nano from straw hut media this ren glenn bill on okay is on. Today's podcast excited. It is supporter

Glenn Bill
S6 Ep4: Jay Blades and his repair shock - part 1

My Wardrobe Malfunction

05:46 min | 5 d ago

S6 Ep4: Jay Blades and his repair shock - part 1

"The i'm susanna constant high and this is my wardrobe malfunction the cost. That's all pros and nothing about close if that makes any kind of sense. This is the fourth episode of season six. If you haven't found us before scroll back through our previous guests at your hair tan france on his wedding thing sacrifice stacey dooley on shivering her skirt off dance no on his indiana jones hat. Of course but let's get on today's guest. He's a modern furniture. Restorer up cycler eco-design a- presented on the hit. Show the repair shop and money for nothing and now j. and domes fix its j. late. Oh of all my amazing guests. So far i think jay is the most particular about his and he has an extraordinary life story to in fat. We talked for so long that we've split this episode into two parts so let's grabbed. The handles opened my wardrobe doors. And find out. What's in san nine so my asked today is someone who if you haven't seen and fallen in love with or you've been living under buddy rock. It is the wonderful j. blades. Modern furniture store cycler. Eka designed up unpresentable Show the repair paschall and also money for nothing and now john don's home fix. Is that anything. You're not doing jay when it comes to home improvements. Thank you for having me. First of all of river goes to hungary improvements. I think of almost gonna cover this. Probably about free most shows that i'm doing this year that will make me have the whole holistic approach to solving has that i had a look at your Website jae ho and kind of actually in my bathroom at the moment. Because i know my buddy kits the on doing host schooling. So it's the only factory. I've got left but i love. I love antique furniture predominantly. I just wore you doing to really kind of mainstream. Bisa furniture is quite extraordinary. And i love the way you paint a little red tape on one of the legs of the chasma fabrics using who does allies. Not you is it the the kids you'll mandatory basically a mentor in as many kids in my workshop as i would like a love the kids i mentor. Moment is done via zoom or phone calls The designs i come up with. I do some of them. When i'm in the area in my workshop but of posters that just knock out the word for me basically because Sometimes when i'm filming. I'm filming probably about five sometimes six days a week. The repair shop is quite intense. And then i have light money. Nothing on top of that. So i might do free days on money for nothing and then another free stroke six days because it's one mole of the free to fall. 'cause it's a traveling value as well as why need So it's quite quite intense. I don't get that much time to be in the workshop. But when i'm in the workshop do law stuff in there. I don during the Tate i have a biscuit and then just get creative of somebody. I love it above. Is that your favorite place to be in your workshop. More than in a studio or anywhere else site you'll sanctuary. My century is my workshop. My workshop is one of my most creative places to be in the world at been loud to places but when i'm at the workshop the first thing always do i put maceio avocado two days and i just put on the music and our stop bouncing and when i don's I lose public. Sometimes i'll lose about an hour. And then i get into it and when i get into it You until the for up on the back of my neck. And i'm not that's the one and then sometimes i desire to do something and it doesn't look good. No one gets it. But i learned from that design and most designs. I do you mentioned about the the paint on the bottom of a of a leg or buts all of those came from mistakes. So i love making mistakes and well. We certainly learned from them back. You have. I mean out of a now. Something like the forty guests. I've had my wardrobe malfunction. I've had everyone from non roaches trainee and things are dress but having kind of looked you up and read more value. I don't think anyone is obsessed with close as you. I'm i've been obsessed with close toes about eleven years old And it all started from my. I got this second. Cashmere jumper from one of my uncles loved. It absolutely loved his jump as sell beautiful And it just looked beautiful when you had it on. My mom decided to wash it and when she washed it. It came out the size of an action. Man and vowed eleven. I sits among mommy. Please do not wash anymore of my clothes. I'm going to take care of it. She looks at me really. And then ever since eleven i've been washington press in Unfolding my clothes I'm really looking off to the light. You laugh as almost as if that is the last piece of clothing. I'm going to have an.

Stacey Dooley Paschall John Don Jae Ho JAY Susanna Indiana Jones Hungary France SAN DON Washington
Planet-Friendly Diets: How to Eat for a Healthier Future

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

07:25 min | 6 d ago

Planet-Friendly Diets: How to Eat for a Healthier Future

"Vegan diet delicious meatless recipes and more. Hello hello everyone. Welcome to the new episode of good together and today we are talking about one of my favorite topics. If you guys remember One of my goals for last year in this year. One of my big sustainability goals is to eat less meat. We have learned. Hopefully you've been falling as our discussions out social conversations. We have learned how much impact negative impact meat. Especially rodney has on the environment. And yeah. this is kind of my personal goal is to cut. My misconceptions annual also. Probably have heard stole about these a before. Right on apple. Podcasts and official is at planned forward meal delivery service right now. It's mostly on the west coast today. I'm talking with this. Co co-founder sheree angry. And she has a very interesting background. We'll be talking all about meatless midland meal eating less meat inflexible erin diets right brightly. We're all about being flexible being realistic in terms of hallway approaching sustainable living lifestyles. And that's why. I'm really excited to talk to siri about that. She also besides being co founder and ceo of this. Oh she also has. Beige did environmental signs of wallace's Very curious about at so. Why don't i stop talking and sheri. why don't you introduce yourself to our audience. Tell us about yourself. And how and why. You started diesel crane. Yes happy to and thank you so much lease on so to be here Says you mentioned my name is sherry. I am the co founder and ceo. This'll my other. Co founder is actually my husband asked for a merry team somehow still married but still married after working together for over seven years now but Yet prior to this as you mentioned. I was actually in the academic world Researching various dimensions of environmental science and especially the intersection between climate change. Air pollution and food I've actually been really passionate about or that. Environmental science ever since. I was exposed to it by an incredible teacher back in the eighth grade. And i followed that passion all the way through college and Phd and then some years behind But eventually decided. I wanted to do a little bit more than than being the academic world where you know i felt like the pace of change. Just it felt a little bit slow and Astronaut lot about how two of the greatest challenges of our generation are growing health crisis and and the climate and environmental emergency really pointed to a common solution around eating more plans an eating less meat and yet despite the our passion for despite our knowledge about it we really hard to to eat that way consistently just like many others because the obstacles are are really. They're hard right. You don't time to figure out how to eat this way. It's difficult to find time to cook. You don't know how to make it taste good. It's expensive all those reasons around taste and access and convenience and affordability so That's really the challenge that we set out to solve this all is how can we make it really easy but also really delightful to follow a healthy plant based and and planet friendly diet And that's do we do it by delivering delicious ready to eat Healthy plant forward meals to your doorstep everything from breakfast lunch dinner healthy snacks and juices and we hope that by by doing this and providing really delicious food at that intersection of convenience and health and sustainability we. We can make following a plant based diet or plant or a diet. Really easy to do when something to enjoy as well yeah. I can't agree more with you. I think our listeners again have already heard me talk about these cell and can y. I decided to try myself with lauren. F course have tried it and that's exactly as you said right like myself especially over the last year right we all Leaving during the pandemic where all cooking a lot. I have been quite successful in the in terms of cooking at least more vegetarian meals vegan. At something i haven't mustered. I'm over besides the typical avocados right like a very obvious vegan or just like salads for example. I have it has been a challenge for me to create delicious as you mentioned delicious and flavorful a ton of spicy food allison's role the heard me talk about that like looking for very flavorful dishes and yet it's been such an easy switch for me like just get a Again you can get diesel meals once a weeks. I think three times where we are even more often. But it's just such an easy decision and then it also inspires me to try this meals rights. While i can actually eat this amazing delightful Vegan wall or a noodle dish and stuff like that will look dog about. you know. This'll you guys say plan forward. And that's because you have both vegan vegetarian n protein-based meals iraq so you you do offer digital subscriber school or mac track one. Yeah and it's it's an interesting. I was just talking to my friend. You know she. She's not necessarily into super into sustainability. And i was talking to her about the associated while if they have meat yet good for me because like you know there are people who can't imagine like not eating meat in yeah so anyway celestial. Goodbye flexes -tarian diet. That i mentioned that the beginning Folks obviously around the world especially in the. Us continue to prioritize their health and do their part to slow the effects of climate change which is great news. But what is the behind the rise in popularity of this diets. Why popular shoe. They be popular. let's talk a bit about that yet. Sure they're really great question and and you're right it is. It is getting more and more popular. I saw a recent study that showed that nine in ten americans are looking to eat. More plants in over half are looking to reduce their meat Consumption and it's really great and are open to trying some of these plant based meat alternatives which is awesome. And and you know just for some context. We've seen this at our own customer base over the last five years especially so right now around. Seventy percent of our customers are on fully plant based rans and only around thirty percent or even a little less are are choosing a sustainable meet. Add on option like you mentioned the five years ago. It was the almost the exact opposite which i found. Really fascinating to see how that's shifted over time with the rise of the plantation and the flexibility and movement and i think even more telling is the fact that even though right now we have about seventy percent of our customers are on these essentially vegan plans only ten to twenty percent self identify as vegan or vegetarian so that they are really part of this flexible -tarian movement as well. I guess i think at a number of things are driving this. It's It's like you mentioned. People's expectations are on. Food are changing. It's not just a to be tastier convenient. It has

Sheree Angry Co Co Sheri Rodney Erin West Coast Sherry Wallace Apple Lauren Allison Iraq United States
Sarah Flint and CEO Mary Beech: 2020 was the year we built the foundation to really scale

The Glossy Podcast

04:30 min | 6 d ago

Sarah Flint and CEO Mary Beech: 2020 was the year we built the foundation to really scale

"Being for tuning into the glossy podcast. I'm your host. Jill man off in today i sit down with the leaders behind direct consumer. Footwear brand thera flint founder and creative director sarah flint and ceo. Mary beach. When i think of sarah flint i think of fabulous and very comfortable heels but according sales of high heels were down more than seventy percent in two thousand and twenty. So i wanted to ask sarah and mary about the pandemic's impact on their business and their ability to shift gears to match shoppers. Changing man's a welcome to use. Sarah thank you jill. Hi welcome mary. Hi hi how are you. Thank you both for being here so mary. I know that you are a newer edition to at the sarah flint team. Let's start with you. Sarah tell me what was gosh. What made you decide. I need to bring in a ceo. Somebody else to help me run this business. Yeah so like. So many founders. I found that as we grew bigger and bigger that i spent less and less time on the elements of what i love so much about the brand i had much less time to innovate work on product. Far less time with customers and one of the things that a a mentor of mine taught me early on was that you should know the things that you're good at as well as things that you need more help with and i found that as we scaled while i was great with the big ideas and being scrappy there were really a lot of processes that needed to be put into place not my strong suit and we were growing to a point where i really wanted to have someone with inva- team who had done this before who had built this kind of a business in the past and i met mary in mary. That was twenty twenty nineteen jet holiday. Two thousand nine hundred and lucky. Mary joined us about a week before we went to work from home. Oh my gosh. I thought so. It was march april time period. Mary flint you come from kate stayed. Cmo ep at probably more of a corporate structure Yeah what was the draw. When i left kate spade. I was looking for a brand that was responding to all the changes in consumer behavior that i was seeing when you're in the marketing role. You see what customers are doing. And honestly i thought that meant leaving fashion. I thought i would be taking a detour into a new category of business. And then i met. Sarah and i realized sarah flint is the brand in the fashion space that is responding to the changes in consumer behavior. And not just doing it once. She kept doing it she. Sarah looks at where the hockey puck is going is. She definitely is always questioning the status quo so she had asked. Why do luxury shoes have to be uncomfortable. And she addressed that and then she asked why are they only made dress up occasions and not for the every day. Why do they have to be sold at wholesale. When i see all my friends Shopping direct to consumer. And then there were just some really practical things that i think being in corporate america as he spoke to are important to me Sarah flint enjoys incredible customer. Loyalty fifty percent of our customers. Come back for a second purchase within two years like that was amazing to me as a marketer We have a really high lifetime ban a strong underlying business metrics so it all just made sense. And then lastly. I've been at some of the best lifestyle brands out there. I feel so proud to have an opportunity. Had an opportunity to work at places. Like ralph lauren and kate spade and i saw that sarah has what it takes to be the next great american lifestyle brand so i thought i have to be there Smaller not i have to be there. Yes definitely when a dig into what it means to be a lifestyle brand. I know there's been some category expansion. But i definitely want to focus on sarah. I always think of you when i think of the pivot to direct to consumer. I feel like you were one of the early players. That did that and i feel like that. Probably set you up for a more successful twenty twenty. How would you describe that the benefit already being there. Yeah i think you know it's interesting. I really feel like the last twelve months have moved faster towards a business model that we've spent the last few years perfecting you know whether that be a movement away from wholesale of focus on digital focus on sort of fewer better things and sustainability direct conversations with

Sarah Flint Mary Thera Flint Mary Beach Sarah Mary Flint Kate Spade Jill Kate Hockey Ralph Lauren America
Zelda Wynn Valdes, an interview with Nancy Deihl

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:00 min | Last week

Zelda Wynn Valdes, an interview with Nancy Deihl

"People in the world. We all have one thing in common everyday. We all get dressed. Welcome to address the history of fashion a podcast that explores who what went of why we wear we are fashion historians and your host cassidy zachary and april callaghan so cast. I'm not sure if you and i have ever actually spoken about this boat for but do you happen to be a fan of this series overlooked which is published in the new york times. I actually have no idea what you're talking about. So we share okay. Well it is such a brilliant concept and it was created by a pen naughty. Who is a journalist. Who was working at the obituary desk at the new york times back in two thousand seventeen and she started to take no about how many messages they were getting from readers. Asking why the new york times bitchy aries didn't cover more women and people of color so lo and behold she decides to do a little investigating and found out that some pretty darn significant historic figures never received an obituary in the times. And i'm talking about people like journalists and activists item wells ada lovelace who many considered to be the first computer programmer and even the poet. Sylvia plath never got an obe it in the times so amy decided to write this injustice. I guess i guess that could be a pun right right right and in two thousand seventeen. She launched the series which is called overlooked. And this is to tell the stories of prominent women and also persons of color whose deaths were never reported by the newspaper including the subject of today's episode. Zelda wynn thou does who's overlooked entry we are able to report was written bypass dress guests. Dr tennessee ford and dr ford's quotes today's guests. Nancy deal who wrote a chapter on zelda for the book. She edited the hidden history of fashion. Which i believe you also contributed to april. Yes i did and so. Today's episode is a little bit of like a sort of infinite loop connecting past and present. Guess where's the urine is own projects and even our own education. As nancy deal was also one of our professors. We were in grad school. So it's just one big happy family here today. Yes and today. Nancy as the chair of art and art professions at new york university where she was formerly the director of the nyu costume studies program. Aside from the book she will speak to us about today. She's also co author of the history of modern fashion a really wonderful survey of fashion history from fifty up until the two thousands in april. That book came out exact same year as fashion the arte push wa i remember seeing her and her co author there at one of our book events so And some of our listeners may recall that we have recommended this book before on trust so we are so pleased that nancy finally joins us on the show. Nancy welcome nancy. Thank you so much for joining us today. Undress ct slowly to see you. You and i have known each other for many years at this point but haven't seen each other since the pandemic so thank you for joining us today. It's pleasure to be here. Thanks for asking. G received two. Yeah so today We are going to talk about the career of the quote unquote uptown. Modise zelda involved as who is just one of the women covered and the book that you edited the hidden history of american fashion rediscovering twentieth century women designers and i have to say this was such a fun project so before we get. Zelda would you tell us a little bit about the impetus behind the book. Sure i would say that. It began during a conversation with one of the editors at bloomsbury at the annual symposium. The cost society of america in two thousand fifteen which took place in san antonio texas and mentioned that i thought bloomsbury publishing topics related to american fashion. So the editor basically on the spot challenged me to propose something and ethic conference. I felt i had attended a number the presentations about american designers who had notable careers in their own time but were largely forgotten. So that really sparked my interest. And i told her i wanted to do a book about that and literally at lunchtime hombres winner. Round all these presenters and asked if they would be interested in contributing to a book project then of course afterward there were other people that i solicited as well to develop the project so the point was that there would be enough information on each one of these designers to really right like a good chapter but they couldn't be so famous that there had been a lot of scholarship on them at that csi conference in two thousand fifteen. I had risen. Zelda wynn valdes so of course was pivotal to the project. Yeah and i of course contributed the chapter tina eliezer episode on her so listeners. You can go back and check out that episode if you wanna learn more about her but there's so many wonderful stories in the book there's really kind of new information on the ever elusive. Jessie franklin turner who is really known for her teague. Downs kind of like lounge wear during the nineteen twenties and thirties. Then there's also fear benenson you know who was also known as countess alinsky and she was born into wealthy family who was forced to flee russia during revolution and alertus has fought contributed a chapter on vicki -til an american designer who was working at paris in the seventies and eighties and these designers aren't necessarily household names any longer but like you said they were very very well known during their day and so was our subject today. Zelda win and correct me. If i'm wrong but she never received any formal training as a fashion designer. Can you tell us a little bit about her early life and how she came to be working in fashion. Sure you're absolutely right. She didn't receive any formal training as designer. Zelda win was born as zelda barber in chambers bird pennsylvania in nineteen o five and she had a middle class upbringing she attended los local schools graduated from high school in nineteen twenty. Three and i was lucky enough to find her high school yearbook. And i just wanted to say that her yearbook picture includes the caption a merry heart may a cheerful countenance Is up be every step because all the reports of her person on in interviews Accounts of people that knew her said that she was super friendly and other she was reserved to is like a happy calm her son and during her childhood she studied music and learned to so from her grandmother and from her grandmother's nacre. And i think it's important to just know the presence of dressmaker on in just a middle class household because we don't really think about dress makers our world but this is like a fantastic institution. i think. Actually we should bring back. Dressmaker is a little bit more. But just because you had a dressmaker didn't necessarily mean you were particularly wealthy. People wanted nice clothes especially for special occasions but bhakta alta barber. It's true. She didn't formerly study fashion design construction on an after she graduated from high school around. Nineteen twenty three should move to white plains to help in her uncle's tailor shop took to that type of business on her uncle had a really z. Business he had male clients end

Zelda Wynn The New York Times Cassidy Zachary Nancy Dr Tennessee Dr Ford NYU Modise Zelda Ada Lovelace Callaghan Sylvia Plath Cost Society Of America Zelda Tina Eliezer The Times Jessie Franklin Turner AMY Benenson
The Many Lives of Guy Glanville

Brandi Glanville Unfiltered

00:46 sec | Last week

The Many Lives of Guy Glanville

"Wait so do you feel like you're a different person. Yeah okay well. I can't wait to see how this interview is. Your dad goes then try. And here's the thing on the phone. He's fucking hilarious and we get him like where he feels like. There's pressure is all little bit deer in headlights. Oh well what we're going to see mick but hopefully this fall off his chair in collapse another long. We're talking to him because shit happens to like that. It really would he so he's still recovering from. Because last time we talked to him he had had a heart heart surgery so he's still recovering right. Yep so we're checking in today to see how that's going because last time we just

Mick
Re-Dressed: Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:52 min | Last week

Re-Dressed: Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

"Upwork is how looking for new podcast. You do not want to miss under the influence. I'm your host. Joe piazza and taking into the depths of the mom internet. A place that preys on some new mothers while also minting millionaires instagram ruins women before time influencers certainly feel the pressure. Could i have a baby and not share it. I'll come to months to graham. It's not for influences. It's under the influences. Join me dive down this rabbit hole and find out how the commodification motherhood is driving a lot of us to the edge of our sanity listened to under the influence with joe. Piazza on the iheartradio app. Or wherever you get your podcast dress. The history of fashion as a production of iheartradio Verse seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. A podcast where. We explore the who. What when of why we wear. We are fashion stories and your hosts abra callahan and cassidy. Zachary dresses thurs. I know that you will join april. And i when we say that we were both very sad to hear about the fact that miss mary wilson passed away last week at the age of seventy six years old. Yes i was a little heartbroken. I texted you right away. And i was like. Oh so of course miss. Mary was a founding member of the iconic american singing group. The supremes she was there at the beginning of the group in the nineteen fifties and was the last original member in the group when it officially disbanded in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven and she went on to a career as a solo performer motivational speaker author and perhaps unsuspecting archivist. Yes because miss. Mary took it upon herself to preserve the supreme sartorial legacy and her collection of the group's stunning performance ensemble served as the foundation of her two thousand nineteen book co authored with mark. Bego supreme glamour and april. I mean we feel so. Honored chose celebrated fulling episode of dressed with miss mary herself. She came on last season of course to share with us her incredible stories behind the supremes singular style she truly was an inspiring and wonderful woman whose legacy will undoubtedly live on for generations to come. Thank you for joining us stress listeners. In this listen back at our time with the one. The only miss mary wilson. We are super excited to have miss. Mary wilson with us today miss mary. Welcome to dressed. Thank you so much. And i'm glad to be with you. Yeah of this is truly an honor to have you here today. And i have to say i have not been this excited about a book in a very long time. I've i've read a lot of fashion history books and this one is is so beautifully written. It's so beautifully illustrated so many stories so much love and friendship and of course there's so much fashion in this book. It's such a beautiful mosh to your time in the supremes and the clothing. That was part in parcel to that experience. So i'm curious. What inspired you to write this wonderful book. Wow well it was fairly easy. Because i had already written books about the supreme so therefore you know it was one of the things will. My research was not as it didn't take as long because i had so much research from the other books. And you know writing about the supremes and our biography and and talking about how much we had accomplished and our career was a pleasure to actually sit down now and do something not just write about the book but do show pictures and and and the looks and what was behind the singing which was more fashion so it was really a lot of fun. Sort of demonstrating what we did in not just on recording and the music but how we look at how he felt when we were certain count and so was all about the gallons per gallon down to just like we were onto all those years and many of them are in your personal collection cracked. Have i think in the book. There's over twenty four sets of matching onstage on sambas so not just one of the dresses but all three of the dresses. How did you go about comprising this collection. Well First of all we supreme florence ballard diana ross and i would always travel and when we came home from the road we'd have to store the gown and then of course by new gowns or designers with bring us new gowns and some of the old account that we made perhaps worn on television We went to store them. And they accumulated who Throughout all the years right And as you know florence was no longer mcgrew. Diane was no longer in the group. And then we had the seventies supremes And i became sort of like the keeper of of everything and the manager of the trains and all those different things. So i accumulated the gown because of that and whenever anyone would leave As you know a couple of them. Did i ended up with all these counts because no one can take the guy. No one can take the gal with them. You know we the supremes as a group paid for them. And that's how. I ended up with the majority of the gals. Now all other gallons should be in my possession but The reason that i can't tell you how many i have is because many have been not just lost and i won't say stolen you know things have just disappeared. And then some of the places we have them stored you know. I don't i couldn't figure out where everything was stored inside. All these years asked the supreme i have just been Trying to recover those downs that are not in my collection but it really is my collection. Because as i said when i left everything was left to me also should say that even though they were left to me and i had bare instead of three Sometimes i ended up with just one but all three gowns were overset were supposedly with me. And you're still like you said you're actively tracking are still tracks. Some of these pieces down. I saw a. I'm not sure what the name of the tv show is. But it was on bbc where this woman found one of your costumes in a garage sale or something of that like in london. Well the thing about it is. We've bought gown that. Some of the fans have called or emailed me as mary. Guess what we have we think. Come down on. Stay on ebay. We would to get together and email each other. And i'm look at them on that couple of fans actually bought on ebay and got them for me The ones that you're speaking of in london. The young lady was traveling in I think it was france. And she saw this Sale like garage so we call them garage. They all fear out there. I think the boot sales or something like that and So she saw this beautiful down and She when she bought it she didn't realize it was a supreme count so after she bought in and she saw the label. It had my name on

Mary Wilson Joe Piazza Abra Callahan Iconic American Singing Group Mary Piazza Zachary Miss Mary Cassidy Ballard Diana Ross Graham JOE Mark Mcgrew Diane Ebay London BBC France
Let's Guac About The Impact of Avocados

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

01:02 min | Last week

Let's Guac About The Impact of Avocados

"I've been sleeping on their new sustainable sheets for the past eight months trait. I recommend them as thousand percent every week. I wash them and put them back on the bed right away. There might go to sheets all of my other sheets. Even the ethical wants taking alone break after hearing you rave about them for so long liza. I finally got a chance to try. Their new eucalyptus comforter. So i'm a weirdo. I really like having a comforter on my bed all the time. even we have a heat blasting. I haven't woken up once hot while i was using this one from sheets and giggles. It's a great ethical and sustainable alternative to the down comforter. We used to use. That's now sitting on our guest bed. Another thing i love about cheetan. Goals is that they don't use plastic packaging and the materials don't use pesticides so kind or animal and insect fronts. They also blend a tree for each. She said that his salt and that passionate about giving back. They give ten percent off to costumers who old sheets to homeless shelters and they have donated over forty thousand dollars

Liza
The Fashion Gardener: the life, work and legacy of Ken Scott by writer and academic Shahidha Bari.

Gucci Podcast

03:05 min | Last week

The Fashion Gardener: the life, work and legacy of Ken Scott by writer and academic Shahidha Bari.

"Vision blossomed. Like the very flowers. He loved until his death in nineteen ninety-one now thirty years later. His legacy of bold and fails flower prints blooms again with the romantic floors of gucci's collection. But what is it about scott style that makes it so endearing. And how does someone who grew up. In the american midwest become such a mainstay of mid sixties milanese design. He was born. George kenneth scott in fort wayne indiana in nineteen thousand nine hundred and his father. A photographer and traveling salesmen had died. When scott was twelve leaving the family impoverished so the young scot set to work dressing store windows after school. It was the modest art. To what would be an illustrious artistic career throughout the fifties sixties and seventies. He was dressing the most beautiful women of his time from jacqueline onassis. And monica viti to twiggy and audrey hepburn ben war again scott dress when she was very to graft by william cline in nineteen sixty seven. The dress is an unexpectedly beautiful mix of pastoral and primary colors an array of soft moves apple greens and sunflower yellows in a floral print. So that it looks like a geometric pattern bias to swing in daringly mid thigh in length with flared sleeves. The dress makes happen effervescent with her impishly cropped hair. Her arms raised above her head and leg kicked up into the air. She cooled it. How bad dress and she said that she loved wearing it in it. She is liberated and mischievous and yet still refined to almost painfully her elegance. But how did an extraordinary dress like this one come about scott started by studying at parsons school of design in new york where he graduated in nineteen forty one the artistic orthodoxies of never really suited his more adventurous impulses. He was more interested in the imagined. Culture of modern art drawn to the color field paintings of mark. Rothko the graphic style of marc chagall and a vivid expressionism of paul klee. He identified with those artists and that instinctive sense. That color could be a way of feeling a profound way of understanding life. He idolized clay in particular. Who had innovated khalil's wheels and developed a complimentary color theory based on a six part rainbow. Color possesses me. Klay once said it will possess me always color and i are one color also possessed scott in the nineteen sixties just as it possesses allesandro michaela in the twenty twenties and fiscal two. It was fashion that enabled him to realize exactly what color could off to parsons. He found work an upholsterer and textile designer dressing shop windows and backdrops

American Midwest George Kenneth Scott Scott Jacqueline Onassis Monica Viti Audrey Hepburn Ben Scott Dress William Cline Fort Wayne Gucci Twiggy Parsons School Of Design Indiana Apple Marc Chagall Rothko Paul Klee New York Khalil Klay
S6 Ep3: Dame Sheila Hancock and her Salvation revelation

My Wardrobe Malfunction

06:49 min | Last week

S6 Ep3: Dame Sheila Hancock and her Salvation revelation

"Hancock. How are you nihilo. Ri- anybody else. I don't understand this horrible situation. But yeah i'm fine. Have you been vaccinated yet. Yes yes i have twice. But i'd be more nakata's include rheumatoid arthritis laudable immune injections and things and they warned me that possibly. They may cancel out. Vaccinations so i still have to be very careful said. Yeah and i know. They're doing clinical trials about that now so when she's now they've only beating jetting healthy people in the tests. So now we're going to see how it effects all the people with area shallowness and you a you alone or do you have someone someone with you. Now have a load. I'm eric difficult. But i am supposed to be delivering a book which i have done it. Also looking at blank pages. Oh my goodness tell me about it. dan i have the about. I must say it does affect your mind. Doesn't it really this whole situation fat. But i'm usually meeting girlfriends and having you know i'm working working. How dishes then. He's spill ron work really. I mean that's my schedule menagerie. I have no shit not on how to do. I just i wanted to around. Do you find with the writing. I'm starting like you with your third. Worst biography on my third novel. What would think Goes all of this. Is the perfect time for you to stop. I mean it's always something else to do. I did what you so right. The something in the identify what it is. I just can't find the motivation. All the will to do and osho i usually. I have a house in front of a very primitive house in france. And that's where i usually right. I mean i've written five books so far in and this is my fifth and i go was written down there where i very. She -cluded on my neighbors. But we don't interfere with one another and not phones me very much because they think on holiday and invite i'm no. I haven't been there in saas march whereabouts in france's it should Lose in know. i know really well. We we used to have a little house in. My parents did in Needed me mossad. Which isn't so far away. But i remember clues. The amazing antiques. Further up sorry as elsie enough. So it's just sort of sensor the antique nation. I live in funding village and hamas. Yeah i'm not. I can't get that cheesier awful awful. He'll on jewel nationality really mission. At so with you're right. I didn't realize that he or she written five books. If you told okay you can have writing acting. Which one would you choose. I out now. Yeah ching hai ching. Just not to be with my mates. Visit his writing. And i get anything to be uninspired had actually i will be made. There's something share juden. Well go up. I miss terribly. Also the fat union going when you get old. It's very easy to get into the trap of talking about nothing but hip replacements yuna rheumatoid arthritis noi in my job i be young. The headed poed with that. I find i'm he about other things with them and i missed. I missed saying and i miss my young grandchildren. I assume just today with one grandchild who's in cardiff the moment at drama school and we had a good old mode and it was love. But i do want to be with them. It's not the saying these wonderful stat known as god knows how people survive without it and we would have survived without him. You name the be dreadful the isolation and how you get the message across mind you so much. The messages lies. We might be better off without Yeah i sultani. Our situation is but we you were you kind of fame wins technology before this has locked lockdown kind of forced you to become an expert ish. Well it's been hard. It's been hard work because like anybody my age. We didn't even have computers. You not be no calculators or any other six so now i am much more into social media than i was. I mean i didn't i os rodrigue moulded. I thought it was rather boring the idea when when you can meet people faced of h. Wia i used to go out with some of the companies occasion. I was working. They be looking at their phones or photographic. Or something. And i used to say. Don't say be here now okay. That's not us now. It's funny but it is bonkers is colorful. I find with my children who probably simmered similar ratio grandchildren. Not the elder ones now. They've kind of grown asked my youngest daughter. She will have a friend when we were allowed to in the in the being the room together talking aplenty funds to each other's i own say you'll next door to her. I know i mean you know outta. We said that is how thank heavens you know. That's the way that meeting them. Eight with all the naming la otherwise not have any place on. Would they in education very involved with education and What what's happening in schools is terrifying on mutual. So confused teaches on. Works of their aussies is really really targeted worrying. Simpson the future. We've got me going out Yeah i think. I totally agree with you. I think it's the most important thing is to to get out salted. But i'm so you've just been honored with a damehood haven't you use. I bred someone that you said. You absorbing the tone of dame's for goodness sake. That's what i d. I d rather feel that. I'm not so i never i taking me completely by surprise

Rheumatoid Arthritis Nakata Ching Hai Ching Hancock France Eric Elsie RON DAN Drama School Hamas Cardiff LA Simpson
Drest founder Lucy Yeomans: 'There's been a massive shift in how luxury brands speak to consumers'

The Glossy Podcast

05:20 min | Last week

Drest founder Lucy Yeomans: 'There's been a massive shift in how luxury brands speak to consumers'

"Thanks for tuning into the glossy podcast. I'm your host. Joe man off in today i sit down with lucy yeomans creator and founder of luxury fashion game dressed and former editor in chief of puerto magazine and british. Harper's bazaar i wanted to ask lucy. How twenty twenty gaming boom has impacted her business and to what extent luxury fashion shoppers and gamers are one in the same welcome. Lucy is an absolute pleasure to be here. Thank you for having me looking at dressed. I have to say. I used to play with paper dolls. This feels unfair. It's like that but souped up to the nth degree right you've got actual models candice have fine precious -ly on these gorgeous background shot all over the world gucci and far-fetched have signed on to show off their collections and to give budding stylus fashion enthusiasts. This experience that somewhere between collage from vogue. And i'll magazines and being on set in milan. You got this off the ground october. Twenty nine thousand nine. Is that correct. Yes so we launched in october nineteen Which was amazing right out to market with dress gucci us all each partner But it's interesting in gaming. We probably went slightly too early for most established the most establish gaming companies. So we've really been using the last year and a half radius to make sure that with developing the game with strong features with each rating more time. It's one of the most exciting things. I think about being not being space. I'm used to being somewhere where you develop an app and you move on and you come back to it. Maybe three years later in gaming we are changing the products. Every every two weeks with its rates omega honestly looking at how the uses the styling deb chain features they knocked now we look about details unwise it and then And then we we're by sixteen out changing it. I'm leaving it on. So we actually have by really periods of development head of us for the next six months which has begun soon evolved strength. And so yeah. I would think that maybe fashioned Which is around the corner is maybe a big opportunity for styled books is that is that big for you. Guys as well yeah. It's really exciting. We mirror exactly what's happening in the fashion calendar or in rich as we know is everything from fashion months to award ceremonies to kitchen festivals always elements which sadly at the moment when we're not able to joy enjoy in real life so nice to be able to kind of dip into these worlds virtually but again wonderful for everyone to fail to access these events and feel like they're part of it as well so fashion for us is big. This is why we've actually just put together this supermodel covid challenge. So we've created amazing templates with covers and cover lines each of our supermodels. We have in game. The tally body nova arena. Shake precious louis. Candidates in amman ham. And basically we've enabled us to come and always create their march covers in and be inspired by a what's happening in the real world with the vogues in the bazaars and the als ik cetera and so this is all happening during fashion week with special sam night. Fashion week has coming in so we always. We always responding to what's happening in the real world. We actually had a posh just before. Christmas which was our first venture into a movie partnership for drugs. We've had lots of fashion partnerships. But we did a partnership with wonder woman which was with warner brothers. Wonder woman which was really exciting. And we work with lindy. Hemming sues the costume designer for wonder woman. And we brought in all the amazing costumes that she had both the kind of the more costuming elements like the simple white dress to calcutta whereas the what scene is in one of where she wears is white. why it's rather seminole and kind of beautiful. We also brought in the classic. Wonder woman costumes in the kind of gold metallic jumpsuit. all these of different elements and view is came into the game. They watched the trailer straight from the train. They were you know they were kind of. They landed in this kind of amazing women challenge and so it was really fun working with a big movie studio a movie premiere and we actually possessed an amazing survey with the our all of our players and they absolutely loved it. They loved having access to these exclusive items they. They felt so immersed in in the movie. And i think what was interesting is that we found for wonder woman plays on average will spending two minutes watcher two three minutes watching the trailer and then there was spending seventeen minutes actually engaging and creating their own alerts and we brought in all the backdrops from the movie the etc so the so many things that from real life that we can create in game. And that's what's exciting because it's this beautiful buchler space where we can keep. It exclusive make exquisite elements from real life that we can do that at scale and in a really nice of sustainable way which is exciting. Yes definitely a dig into those partnerships before we go there. Talk to me about yes. The far fetch bat partnership. And i know that the items are available available for purchase often through farfetched through the brands themselves.

Lucy Yeomans Puerto Magazine Lucy Candice Harper Milan Gucci JOE Amman Hemming Warner Brothers Lindy Calcutta Buchler