Entrepreneurs

Leaders, dreamers and persistence - listen here for stories on business ventures, the visionaries behind them, tales of failure, and the never-give-up attitude that ultimately leads to success, from audio broadcasts aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Interview With Kary Oberbrunner

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:46 min | 1 d ago

Interview With Kary Oberbrunner

"Carey. Say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with pain is your friend so so i just i run in circles with people who are pretty intense and there's two pains in life. Jim rohn said it's the pain of discipline or the pain of regrets. One ways ounces and the other ways tons in my world. I believe there's chronic pain that most people live in or there's acute pain that's intentional focused in short term and that's the type of pain we go after. It's just like a tough workout. Little bit of acute pain and it gets Over that chronic. Pain in your life or i fire nation that value bomb. Thank you for joining myself. And kerry today. There is no more to be learned. Here look away not just getting. Obviously we have a lot of fun things to talk about here today. Fire nation and i brought carry on for eight number of reasons that passed value bomb. You just heard one of them. But as i mentioned in the introduction. We're talking today about the elixir for creating flawless ideas. Leveraging superhuman focus in achieving optimal human performance keri. One thing that we've been talking about and i've been perusing through this great book of yours is. That's our lives are full of distraction. They're full of information. And you believe because of this. Our lives can actually become hacked. So what does that even mean. And what can we fire nation due to become hackel in our space john. A lot of people think of a hack as a shortcut have life hacker. You know these types of things bio hacker. Yes yes they. It's almost like this. Ooh i'm gonna find a shortcut thing but actually the definition of hack is when someone or something gains unauthorized access to a system or a computer Yeah so you think about your bank account you think about your computer your smartphone if it gets hacked that's a bad thing and it's when somebody overtakes it john awhile back man i. I wrote a fiction. Book called elixir project about about a future society. Where people's brain get hacked and My audience who's basically entrepreneurs businesspeople. They read it and they said man. This is not fiction as fast and again this came out in two thousand sixteen before we really had a tunnel conspiracy theories and allow going on but the point is this. I don't go that route. I just basically say that entrepreneurs have dreams but there becomes this gap between dreaming and doing is e. So you had you had a dream lots of dreams. You got a new book coming out. Fantastic have read it. It's awesome thank you. You have that dream for a book but then you actually have to write it. And there's this gap between dreaming and doing and that's where most entrepreneurs get get hacks is between idealization and implementation. Yeah and so basically. I did a ton of research into neurobiology science military. And i just said what is the secret weapon of super achievers in every discipline and it's basically this formula called unhappy ability. One thing that. I was really curious about when we were going through. Part of the process is how one actually does become uninhabitable. Because i'm totally understanding what you're saying you know we had this goal may be as ten years down the line or one year down the line or this very specific clear goal that we have ahead of us but between now and then something hacks us and we don't get there so what does that even mean to become uninhabitable to start achieving accomplishing these goals. It basically means closing the gap. So there's this crazy word that a lot of us said growing up as kids. We said abracadabra when we wanted something magical to happen. I don't know if you've ever said apricot times. Yeah yeah so. The words crazy powerful. It's really weird. It's it's it's the most frequent or common word used in all languages without the need for a translation. Basically you can say it in hebrew you can say the english you can say it. In spanish abracadabra and it ended. It means. I create as i speak

Hackel Jim Rohn Carey Kerry John Abracadabra
Productive Action to Grow Your Business

Master Your Coaching Biz Podcast

03:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Productive Action to Grow Your Business

"Hey everyone welcome to today's episode of the master. Coaching biz. Podcast in our guest. Today is agnes rosette and she is a next level. Success strategist to six-figure coaching businesses and she also hopes women leverage their time and go from silly busy to strategic and smart so welcome. I'm glad to have you here with us. Thank you very much for having me and happy to be here so it's also a little bit more about yourself Well i come from a background in quality management so this is actually where i got all that knowledge and experience to bring game systems and structures and processes that leverage the time and not only bring results but actually help you worthless because you have the right systems in place so that kinda that experience kinda have led me to where i am today helping women in coaching businesses in service businesses to to really leverage that time when they are ready to level up. Because when we're at that stage and for me it was the same. You have two choices you you kind of want to level up but you don't wanna get busier so either you do get busy. Are you work more. Or you find a way how to leverage what you already have. So this is kind of my speciality. Where i go into the business i find that weak link or weakling. Sit there are many. And i'm not reinventing the wheel or inventing anything new. I work with what they already have but to make it a more strategic and smart in a way that it truly leverage is the time instead of wasting it great. That sounds awesome. We all could use that so tell me so. Our audience here is mainly newer coaches. And what would be something that you would say. Okay this is. This is really what you have to do to get started to your time. Yeah well i you have to understand. Why do you want to do it because so many women that i have spoken to. They all say. I do want more time. I do want more time. But then when i ask a specific question what would you do too more extra hours a day. The answer is really weighed in. Not really that clear. So would you want to join another project. Do you want to spend time with your kids. Because if we don't have that clarity not gonna reach that goal and i'm sure that relies to any decision that we make so i is clarity. The second one is really. You have to understand your priorities. In prioritizing is a big part of my mentorship Because when you say but everything is important but it's not the case right there are some things are more important than others and that's just the way it is You have as a coach as a service provider. You have your zone of genius right. The it's very easy to tell what it is because you are coaching in that right but how much time you're actually spending in coaching. And how much time are you doing other things like maybe some admin tasks or a bookkeeping and things just around it. Yes they all are important for your business. You can just eliminate them but how much time comparing to your zone of genius like you know the the comparison. How am i choose that. So it's really important to understand. What is the priority. Where do you want to focus. What are those money-making activities that you need to focus more on

Agnes Rosette
How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:40 min | 1 d ago

How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

"Every day were making decisions. Now hopefully take our business to the next level. What do we do with this particular team member. How do we find the best vendor. What colors and fonts should go on the website for next marketing campaign and hundreds of other decisions like these that we have to make every single week. The stakes are high. We can't afford to make a bad decision from the ramsey network. This is the entreleadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves their teams and the prophets. I'm your host. Daniel tardy am i guess. Today is matt bonner match the chairman at fresh technologies and he's done a lot of cool stuff. He's helped star businesses run businesses launch. New business turn businesses around and especially as passionate about helping businesses scale up from the startup stage to be in a big deal. He knows a lot about decision making strategy and how to align our behaviors with our goals. But he didn't start out in this space in fact he actually started out as a successful analyst on wall street. He was making a lot of money at goldman sachs and so. I was super curious to ask them. Hey matt why did you leave. One of the biggest influences in this is a book. That's influenced me tremendously. Was the four hour workweek. The whole tim ferriss thing and so reading that and really thinking about what do i want to do with my life. And and where do i wanna spend my time and and thinking about. I mean in a place like that you can see the trajectory. Stay here fifteen years. I'm back. I if i stay here twenty years on that guy etc and so i could see what the future looks like and all they wanted to do something more entrepreneurial and i had this epiphany i was reading this article on bloomberg about one of the founders of google. I forget if it was larry page or or sergei would basically set this thing. And they've saying you know which everyone is. The ceo at the time and their salary was one hundred thousand dollars and as a first year analyst at goldman. My salary was more than that. And so i read the article and i kind of had. This chuckled to myself as like a twenty one year. Old or twenty two year old. And i'm like. I'm so awesome like i have a bigger seat salary than the ceo. Google and then literally there was a comma and the next half. The sentence was like andy's worth twenty seven billion dollars stock or whatever and so it was just like an anvil like crushing on the head. That was like oh. You don't get wealthy from a salary you get wealthy from having equity in something and that was really. That was a big difference for me that that made me realize that having a having a high salary doesn't really mean it helps but but ultimately ownership equity is really where you generate the most value. So did that. Prompt you to think i wanna start my own thing. I wanna build something. My dad's a very successful restaurant tour and he he had been doing. A bunch of stuff in nashville. And kind of the southeast. Broadly for you know. While i was in middle school high school all that stuff and he was always when i was up at at goldman he was always like a bug in my ear. Hey come back and you know. Help me out. Come join me join me. And so eventually I answered that call in and move back to national got involved with him in a in a company called fresh hospitality which is an investment business. Essentially that invests kind of across the food and restaurant world and scales various different restaurant brands. How big was the team when you joined basically me my dad My brother and one other gentleman whose name was nikola haggas is basically four of us at the time and There for yeah. Yeah and i mean there were there were other. I mean we were essentially almost like a small private equity or venture capital firm and so I mean the operating companies that we invested in obviously had a bigger sure employees based but really that was it at the beginning. And and since then we've built this whole kind of ecosystem and infrastructure of businesses. You've worked with a lot of businesses here locally many that. I've personally been a patron and i remember martin's barbecue when we went when they were a little like double wide trailer out. South nolansville autobody shop was yes barbecue around. And nobody knew who they were. Unless you live like right in that little community and now i mean if if you know martinsburg if you've been in nashville you know martin's barbecue i mean it's just it's the spot that you go if you're a nashville I'd love to hear that story. You know i mean you you you guys. Clearly were part of them you know becoming a big deal and kind of putting him on the map And i know you guys do that with countless other. You know restaurants But how do you. How do you find the martin's barbecue when they're just this little local story and nobody really knows who they are. I mean we're we're at a point. Now where and i think you see this in a lot of different businesses where you get inbound deal flow right and so i mean we. We met pat actually through a A point of sale reseller that we that we had a relationship with was selling terminals and that he's a hey. This guy's got a really cool thing. You should go check it out and so we went and we went and just had lunch. They're checked it out and got to know him and You know helped partner up from from day. One when they were back over that little auto body shop and You know our whole thesis for for how we invest in a company's specifically within the fresh Platform is we have this whole ecosystem that we've developed over the last decade or so of everything from technology to accounting to Real estate expertise marketing the whole the whole suite of services that sit around a business and we go in and we ate we provide them growth capital but we also provide them what we call our intellectual capital of all those different things to help them scale up and so you know we. We plugged that infrastructure in and really helped him. I identify a great site. And that was their store nolansville. That they moved to that was across the street. The kind of bigger flagship store and then started very strategically looking at. Hey what are some other great opportunities for this brand and and really one of the biggest strategic decisions we made up martin was we ultimately decided that we needed to have a presence downtown and to to truly be a competitive player in the in the nashville barbecue space and plant our flag so to speak. We we needed. We needed something downtown in. That's how we ended up ultimately finding the property at martin's we call it rutledge but the downtown martins barbecue and and that's we now we sort of we. We jokingly referred to it as the mothership because it's it's this behemoth compared to the other typical martin stores but it's been a really great opponent of that business.

Goldman Ramsey Network Daniel Tardy Fresh Technologies Tim Ferriss Matt Bonner Nashville Nikola Haggas Larry Page Martin Google South Nolansville Sergei Bloomberg Matt Andy PAT Rutledge
Stay-At-Home Mom Starts Bamboo Baby Biz

Side Hustle School

03:17 min | 2 d ago

Stay-At-Home Mom Starts Bamboo Baby Biz

"Thicky weinberg is a momma to based in the uk used to have a corporate job but suffered from post natal depression. After our first child was born she then retrained as a children's yoga teacher in cape local class during her second pregnancy picky had some issues with her hip and back then she couldn't teach anymore. It had to find someone to cover her classes but by the time the baby was born she was ready to do something anything even though she didn't know what one dave vicky was listening to pat plans smart passive income. Podcasts she heard a story about two guys selling products on amazon. The idea of living on the beach with laptop wasn't her kind of lifestyle but having the freedom to work whenever and wherever she wanted that was being an idea sparked to create a brand of high quality baby products that can be used reused and gifted to other families and so when our second baby was only six weeks. Old tiny chipmunk came to life as well. Vicki knew she wanted to create a range of bamboo baby products and use google's keyword tool to research. What would come first. She leaned on baby swallows and used ninety nine designs to find a logo design by. She went to alibaba dot com to search for a supply at the same time. She ordered samples of similar products from amazon to scope out. The existing market wants. Her product was ready. Vicky place the order spent time building her website making an amazon listing. She worked whenever she could which was mostly when the kids snapped and even though it took her about eight months to get to launch. She's glad she did. Tiny chipmunk has become vicki's main work. Bogus bring at least twenty five thousand dollars a year in profit. She doesn't have to work set hours because the business mostly runs itself in fact even though she had to homeschool her kids and cut back on her hours over the past year sales remained steady. Still there have been some challenges. at first. she had no idea what legal disclaimers and other information. She had to put on your packing so she went back to google and ninety nine designs to find a packaging designer but she never received a sample from her chosen supplier before placing the full order. This turned out to be a big mistake because the quality was poor. The cardboard was way too thin and kept ripping which led to products getting damaged luckily option by the time she restocked she could go back in time. Vicky also says she wouldn't have tried to do everything herself nor tried to be everywhere at the same time. Most of the marketing strategy she tried didn't work ended up costing her money and time a better approach would have been for her to focus on one sales channel for example one social media platform and build from there. Fortunately as her business has grown vicky has to nowadays. She doesn't just sell products online. She also coaches other people who want to sell products. She's happy to work on both projects. They feel good. They fit in with your family life. She chooses what she does. She does it for as well as where when. And how as a bonus she's also gained confidence and new connections going forward. The plan is to launch more of her own products while helping other people create and sell. There's no plans to do less one on one coaching. Instead move towards more group. Coaching and courses it all starts with baby steps.

Thicky Weinberg Dave Vicky Amazon Vicky Alibaba Depression Vicki PAT Google UK
Its Time To Rediscover The Serendipity Of Conversation

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Its Time To Rediscover The Serendipity Of Conversation

"Probably noticed in spending quite a bit of time on clubhouse recently and a lot of time trying to understand exactly what an ease the makes clubhouse such a special platform for so many people and a lot of people talk about the secret source being that human connection that you get the one on one connection that you get through voice conversation. And i think that's certainly part of it but i actually think it's something more than that i think. It's about the serendipity of the conversation. It's the fact that you don't know when you have a voice conversation with somebody exactly where it's going to end up and you don't get that same kind of spontaneity that you might get in the text conversations that we're so used to and texting and short messages on all these various missing platforms has been out preferred method of communication for many people for a long time. Now i mean think about how many misses you send to people versus how many actual phone calls you. Think about that. Annoying sound of the phone ringing like who's calling me. Why don't you just send me a message. I don't want to talk now. And with that. We lose the serendipity of conversation. So i actually think the real reason that something like clubhouse zone now and not necessarily just because of the pandemic and i think we'll continue after the pandemic is that we are in need of the serendipity of the conversation the magic that unfolds in a conversation that doesn't necessarily unfold in emails or sms. Other short message type of conversations that we normally have so eric. That's the key. I think we spent so much time in that missing mode. Now we want to have conversations because there is a serendipity an unknown about where it might go a magical discovery that comes out of a live one on one conversation versus just sending messages. What do you think.

Eric
Grady Kerr's Lessons From A Failed Entrepreneur

The Small Business Success Podcast

05:08 min | 6 d ago

Grady Kerr's Lessons From A Failed Entrepreneur

"Welcome everyone to another exciting episode of small biz. Buzz i'm laura dolan and i'm crystal heff and today. We have another fellow keeper with us. His name is grady. Kerr is the customer webinar trainer for our customers here at keep and today he's going to talk about the lessons. He learned from being failed entrepreneur. Grady it's true. I learned avon being great. It'd be an outdoor. i can't wait. This is going to be a great topic. And i just wanna say right from the start. Thank you for being so vulnerable. Vulnerable side that again and sharing this with our audience. I think it'll be a great lesson and not alone out there So i'm excited for it But a couple of things. You're expecting baby number five. That's true baby number five. I've got three boys a little girl and now another little boy on the way in any any any day now any moment now probably literally any moment now folks may hear it here first. Yeah i think we can do it at home. Maybe we'll do it live yes baby. Watch twenty twenty twenty twenty -solutely. Here's one thing we can take away from it. Like your year myers great. I got new kid on the way that. Say the same thing i'm like. Hey i adopted a puppy and a kitten this year. We're doing great so all about perspective. Exactly they're all making me jealous. I need at least two more puppies to make this year balance out so many to be adopted crystal do it. Well laura always handles intros. 'cause i'm a little bit nervous about getting right into it but has it affect awesome. Well should grady's child come. Well we're on this podcast. My payback will be. I will do the altro and i will make it really fun and exciting or grady as well as for everyone. I'm going back. ok. Grady make sure your wife is holding that kid in just a little longer. I will awesome. Well really excited. But i wanted to start off by asking or having you because lauren. I know your stuff all the time. I'll tell us a little bit more about what you as the trainer. Yeah you bet so. One of the initiatives that we've got going on right now is trying to scale our on boarding process trying to scale our customer education process and so i- host to open our series for the company the first one is called new customer webinars and it's designed for customers in their first thirty days. Tell them to get acclimated. Software learn how it works. Learn some use cases and then the second series. I host automation hours and in the automation hours. What we do is we help. Customers have been with us for plus modestly around that area and we on one of our amazing partners. Join us and talk about some more advanced topics really revolving around. Yeah that we've got to automate yet. The most success out of our software not about baseball. I know automation hours. Have come in really handy especially during covid trying to work on their make. Sure that it's functioning need it. Would that be honor now. Is i think when you're working in your business. That's when you're like you're not putting out fires and you're just like everything's just going in years. I'm just following along your day as managing you working on your businesses that outside in approach What's working what's not. How can it be more intentional. I think there's a lot to do right now. Is is pivot is the word. I love the geller. Mantra they saw. Hey i can't do business the way that i was before i've got a pivot somehow and that's really how the automation hours reborn like. We were going to have these going for two weeks as we find the curve and it was going to be done jokes on us. It's still going and so we have to go. And it's been a really really wealth of just good information and actionable content or just people over and over. And we've actually raiders to come and join us for every single session with great And so it's just great those customers out there that know that one of the best can do for your business get educated. Be able to know. Hey there's probably things out there that i don't know it's that vulnerability i talked about the such a failed entrepreneur like we have to be vulnerable in order for us to get better. You go to the doctor and you've got some sort of chest pain in the ass. You how you're doing. You're saying. Ben tastic dot can ever better like you're going to have a hard time. I've actually gone to the doctor with my mom or and they asked that question and she's listed like twenty things wrong with their before we get there and she's like oh he's been really good and i'm looking at her like no. We're getting into this today. So i'm like what about all these things doc looking at her like how could you say you're good with all these example. I know and that's really cool that it that it just took off like that you know you were only planning on having it a couple of weeks and here we are. That's amazing now. Do you see that these new customers have some common issues that that you also have. When you're starting your business i mean. I know we haven't gotten to that yet. So i know i'm jumping ahead. But the reason why people jump into these webinars to fill any kind of needs that they have. I think for me. The the common thread that i've seen is in. It's kind of but the idea of follow up. that's the global. There's different ways that we follow up that we follow up but follow up his always the common theme. It's an idea of something has occurred. And now i need to react to it and i don't do and so helping customers realized that one is that. Hey there's stimuli out there that usually react to and helping you understand how you can react and what tools you have at your disposal calva. Sylvia that reaction

Grady Laura Dolan Kerr Avon Myers Laura Lauren Ben Tastic Baseball Sylvia
Do I Need To Lower My Prices?

The $100 MBA Show

05:14 min | 6 d ago

Do I Need To Lower My Prices?

"So gary in cuny wednesday if his prices are too high does needs a lower his prices for his e commerce store for his Designer cap business whenever we have questions like this in our business one of the things that really shines a light and gives. You clarity is data information. You need to gather hard numbers so that you can make a real informed decision on whether you should lower. Prices are not the first thing i want to point out. Is that Gary says that he had some sales and then things slowed down so he's not sure if they've slowed down because people just don't wanna pay for his caps at the price. He sells a four so the first hard number. We're going to look at is look at your website traffic. You should be tracking. The number of visitors are coming through website on a daily basis You could do this for free with google analytics. You subscribe to this podcast. You can search for several episodes that i Go through in detail how to use google analytics just search google analytics on one hundred on show both google analytics. You can take a look at how much traffic are getting to your website when sales were good a traffic light. And what about now if you have a less now. It's not a price problem. It's a marketing problem. You don't have enough people going to your store. You don't have enough people walking by and looking at your product and it's very common to see less sales when you have less traffic. This is why people trying to get more and more people to the website. They do facebook marketing. They do content marketing. They try to get people to know about their brands. They visit their website because they know more visitors equals more sales. So this is the first number you have to look at because this will tell you. Hey wait a minute. Maybe my prices are fine. But i need to increase my traffic. I need to get my customers at my sore. So what experiment. You could do is run some marketing campaigns whether it's content marketing with some blog posts whether it's through social media marketing whether it's paid marketing through facebook instagram ads. Whatever it is. Get the traffic that you used to get when sales were higher and see if the sales match see if you get more sales with that traffic now of course all traffic is not created equal. You want to try to target the right people that would love your product so this is really important when you're thinking about how to market market to the people that would most likely by so if you run that experiment you can run that for a few weeks you could see okay. Sales are picking up it because more people are coming so it's a marketing issue. It's not a price issue number two and these are any particular order but you really need to look at your numbers. Your profit margins. Some of us. We think that needs a lower prices but especially when you're in retail. That may not be an option okay. You need to make sure that you're making a healthy profit margins. You can't lower your prices if you're not gonna make a profit or reasonable profit to make your business worth it. I know this. Because i used to run my own. E commerce store over a decade ago. I used to run a clothing line. And i knew my margins. I knew i could lower certain items past the point because then it's going to be breaking even though not making any money so for example if you sell a cap for thirty dollars but a cost you fifteen to create in ship and deliver to your customer total cost. You really can't discount much. Maybe you can go down to twenty five but then you're really getting because there are other costs right. You have your only time. You have your website costs inventory and stocking cost all these running costs that run your business. This is why the numbers are so important. You need to know how much your business is costing you. This is why a lot of e commerce businesses get in trouble with their finances or with the financing of the business or the numbers of the business. Because it's not like they're selling one product of the same price they can just say here is the total cost less. Divide that number by the number of products. I have and this is the price of should be so i can be profitable. Every product has a different price. Every product has a different profit margin. So this is why your margins have to be pretty fat to cover any Discrepancies and make sure that when you sell your product you're giving back to your company to pay for expenses and then some. I'm very cautious about discounts. I do not recommend people to make major discounts or major sales where it cuts into their margins especially in retail. But if you do want discount you have to encourage people to spend more. Those are the best ways to run sales or promotions. Where you say you know you get fifteen percent off when you spend one hundred dollars or more. This encouraged at least the customer to buy more product and i know in retail. This is so important. You wanna get things off your shelf because it actually costs you money to have an inventory. Another way to do this is to have some sort of reward program where they can get a voucher for every x amount of dollars they spend at your source of they spend two hundred fifty dollars to get you know a twenty dollars gift certificate again getting them to come back to the sort and use certificate on a purchase so you gotta make sure that it makes sense for you to even changer

Google Facebook Gary
How Being Yourself Makes You a Better Leader with author Minter Dial

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

06:01 min | 2 weeks ago

How Being Yourself Makes You a Better Leader with author Minter Dial

"I want. say congrats on your latest book. You lead how being yourself makes you a better leader. What was the motivation for this book. So just like in the same idea. Be yourself how do you do that. And how much of you should you bring into work. We talk about authenticity transparency. But is it about being radically transparent. Radically empathic and radically you totally you. So that was the question. Mark ahead in my mind as i launched intas but actually i started writing this book in two thousand and fourteen and at the time i wanted to be like the book of my life like everything full out work personal and everything in between and it took me a long time to Stu and come up with this line which is hopefully to change the way we lead a not just in business but ourselves because in the end of the day. If there's is huge lack of engagement oversee the previously to books haven't exactly figure that out and then to understand how we can bring more of ourselves feel engaged fulfilled and up bullshitting ourselves at work. Which hopefully has knock on effective leading everybody else to want to be with you. Yeah i mean. Starting in two dozen fourteen. Roughly six years was their their moment where it accelerated for. You does seem like a long time. But i know other books. People have written not you but other people could take ten years fifteen years sometimes so. I'm just curious if there is an unlock moment for you. Well it's great. You know like those more academic papers need lottery such things like that. No this was the actually. The thing that happened here was sort of blocking moments Blocking tackle i had. I went off to croatia. At thirty thousand words. I was like all excited came back wife about it. I've really got a big slug of all of us. Had something happened. And i had actually three big loud bazooka moment blocking me or changing the course of my direction which included a call from the television station. Pbs saying hey mental. Your story so great. Let's put on television and clearly. That wasn't part of what i was thinking and and i'm busy doing something else. Meaning internet this actually takes preference so i then put on hold when off that one and then a friend of mine killed himself and that kind of took on another path and then so i've had these different things that have happened anyway. I would say that the walk. In kensington park with a friend of mine who had been published kogan page was the catalyst to getting contact with them and they said awesome. Great idea really. Love it and next thing you know. I had a publisher and that happened of course before the old pandemic started. We'll let's get into started down this path. And i stopped you apologised for the rabbit hole but i wanna to talk about what you mean by you lead. You talked about authenticity radically being yourself. Tell us a little bit more about what you mean by. You lied so i. I generally feel that everybody has leadership potential and but a lot of times. You sort of like won't take away the responsibility and this listen to orders. And i feel like if there's such disengagement at work something is not happening so the of initial premise. Is you lead you and you need to be master of you. Which essentially means at its heart getting to know who you are and what matters to you and so often we go through life. Allan where we're doing what we're supposed to do getting the title on the business card getting extrinsic ideas doing following in my father's footsteps or not as man whatever and we're not actually in touch with ourselves and this is a particular challenge when you're successful often mail. You just think that this is the thing and so the one. I'm trying to really griffin to is to be in check with who we are as an individual and then once we have that established we get rid of some of the chips in the shoulders. Were more cognizant when we're being emotional and irascible and disagreeable and and potentially more vulnerable and then we can definitely model a behavior that the rest of the team might follow through with got it and i mean those sound like great things to do like just a better know myself to be more aware of my own tics and talks. Yeah why is this important for leaders. Do you think well on one hand. My feeling is that leadership is still wonky. If not a terribly wrong and the other hand i think that is much as some people want to be authentic. It's they're not sure what they're being authentic about and why they're doing it so very quickly you can be put off the course you can be doing something because you think it's good to do because it's like there's the narrative being sustainable development is great. Let's do it but there's no real hook anchor back into who you are as we end up doing so many things because it's good to do. Oh that sounds like a really smart idea let's do that and by justifying rationalizing all these smart ideas. We actually ended up frustrating ourselves. Because we're going to not get to want to get too so i feel like the issue is. We've all been to university a lot of us or you know educated and were reading even if you haven't gone university it's fine but with intellectual curiosity we we kind of think we know ourselves because we have that arrogance may be pretension says i want of course i know myself. I'm fifty six allen. God dammit you crack question me on who i am but i think we have this sort of absolute ability gloss over the details. I'm an executive powerful. And i'm excited. I'm confident on curious. I'd fine but that kind of describes everybody at some level to sort of leggings generic concepts that you want to project but who are you deeply inside and if you're excited about sustainable development can you not attach it to something that's more relevant to you for example or hopefully i'll have one day grandkids. Well i'd like for them to live in an environment where okay well. That's at least a more personal hook as opposed to the intellectual size that it was going to help our customers think that we're better people.

STU Kensington Park Kogan Croatia PBS Mark Allan Griffin Allen
interview with Jessica Lessin

Skimm'd from The Couch

03:57 min | 6 d ago

interview with Jessica Lessin

"Jessica thank you for joining me and welcome to skin from the couch. Thanks for having me carly. I love listening to this podcast. So i'm thrilled to be here. I was saying just as you got kinda miked up. Its feels very weird to be on the other side of interviewing journalists like you but we're going to jump into it which is first question. I'm a standard question. Skim your resume. I wanted to be a reporter For as long as i can remember and had a series of internships starting in high school at my local newspaper where i wrote about why there were so many nail salons and how they could all stay in business so didn't really have a sense of supply and demand back then but was interested in in poking my nose around i then interned at the associated press the boston globe and the wall street journal and clung to that internship so that they would not let me leave the building and convince them to hire me so i worked as a tech reporter at the journal for eight years covering everything from the rise of online video to apple to google yahoo the rise of the internet. If you will that be took me out to san francisco and then after eight years at the journal i loved covering the tech industry and it seemed to me. That tac was disrupting news in very very fundamental ways most significantly. It was getting publishers obsessed with online advertising and traffic in a way that i felt was really lowering. The quality of news content and so i launched the information as a subscription business to swing back to quality over quantity and i guess seven years in We have one of the largest newsrooms of tech reporters around the world in her breaking major stories every day. We're going to dig into so much of that. But i'm curious. What would people be surprised to learn about you. I think probably many many things. But probably that i never ever ever thought i was going to start a company i actually remember grousing to my husband. You know maybe a decade ago. Why is everyone leaving. Big company jobs to start a company in the world be better if they were adding their talents and energies sort of into the traditional system. So i i. I think even wrote a story at the journal about like you know. There are too many entrepreneurs or something to that vein but you know lo and behold eventually you catch the edge and i think the world is just made starting a company so i was gonna say appealing but as you know carly times is quite tough Be anything appealing but it just felt like there was a huge opportunity and i went for it but it was quite a swing from sort of being very down on entrepreneurship to becoming one. You mentioned in your skin of your bio that you began your journalism career at a young age and went onto the crimson while. You're harvard We're able to turn internship into a job at the journal. I think that the one of the most popular questions that we get asked. How do i turn my internship into the full-time. What is your advice on how to do that. Don't leave the buildings that was really my advice and so i kind of lucked out. Because i was working on this big project. It was on the salary data that the government was putting out it a once in every year report about what was having to wages across a huge number of jobs and i had planned a really big feature with my editor on this and they push back the release date and so i said i i got it right this story you know you don't wanna miss this big feature in the journal you had an approval process for big features in the had been approved and all of that and so you know my internship was supposed to be up august whatever. The data was coming out first week in september and i just sort of made the case to literally extend my security badge access

Carly The Boston Globe Jessica The Associated Press The Wall Street Journal The Journal Yahoo San Francisco Apple Google Harvard Government
Seeking Refuge On The Open Road

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:57 min | Last week

Seeking Refuge On The Open Road

"When we reached bob wells. He was camped out of the grid in his white. Gmc savannah van in the middle of the california desert. Some twenty five years into his experiment in mobile living. How did this whole journey start for you. What was your life like before you discovered this this lifestyle while i was either very very lucky or very unlucky depending on your point of view it was the winter of one thousand nine hundred five. Bob was living in anchorage alaska where he'd worked for over two decades in a union job at safeway saint job. His father had worked until his retirement. At the time bob was going through a divorce and after alimony and child support payments. He says he was no longer making enough to clear his rent. He was desperate and that is when he noticed old beat up box banned for sale on the side of the road for fifteen hundred dollars and he decided he had to go for it. That was all the money. I had left in the bank. But i had to have a place to live and so i bought it and That night through a backpacker. Sleeping bag. Down and i began my van dwelling adventure in the winter and the cold van and i That first night. I cried myself to sleep. I literally cried myself to sleep. Or when you're going through a divorce you you cry yourself to sleep on a pretty regular basis ends but sure just of course greatly compounded here. I was homeless bomb living in a van on the streets. And how much lower can my life get. But bob done a lot of camping in his life and you had to make a small space cozy and after a few weeks eat figured out how to cook and stay warm deal to bed and cabinets used his gym membership to shower. Figured out how to make it sustainable. And the money. He was saving on rent. Meant he didn't feel like he was always on the knife's edge it slowly and subtly shifted from. I despise my life to. This isn't really that bad to hey. Every month i keep the money and put it in my pocket to. I kind of really really liked this. And that's the way it's been every sense. Was it difficult at all to kind of switch. Grand narratives about What trajectory you're supposed to take as a productive member of the economy absolutely it was a traumatic transition you know. We are trained from birth to death. Our purpose in life is to be good productive citizens and so it made me question everything i had done. Exactly what society and told me to do. I'd gotten a job. I wanna house. We'd had kids. I was following the american dream to the best of my skill level and ability. As i could and then i was forced into living what society told me was the life of total failure homeless in the van and for the first time in my life i was happy well that raises a lot of existential questions and when i looked around at all the people i work with work eat sleep. Working sleep work. Eat sleep. I said what society told me it was not true. I've finally found a way. That's happy for me. Let me try to understand that. My life and for the life of others a few years later bob had saved up enough to quit his job at safeway and by supplementing his union pension with seasonal stints as a campground host. He was eventually able to take to the road as a full-time nomad in two thousand five about a decade. After he moved into the van. Bob decided to pay forward. Some of the techniques developed the started a website called cheap. Rv living the serve as a kind of resource for other people interested or in many cases forced to move into a vehicle. I started the sole intent of letting people know there wasn't on alternative. You didn't have to live under the tyranny of the marketplace and the way to do that was to eliminate your biggest cost in life. Which is your housing with cheaply. Live frugally and then you can live well for a long time the site just kinda mosey too long picking up you know few page views here and there in two thousand eight happened. Bob says in the wake of the financial crisis. He was inundated with desperate messages. Have lost my job. I we moved in with my family now. My family is lost their job. Now we're all losing our own. What are we going to do. And that was the question. I got over and over and over again. Even after the economic recovery started to pick up the number of inquiries and page views and people in the community continued to grow. Fueled partly by the rise of social media. Bob started his cheap. Rv living youtube channel in two thousand sixteen and has since become just one of many popular nomad influencers but unlike a lot of the glossier more glamorous content associated with the hashtag van live crowd. Bob's videos are all about helping people struggling to keep their head above water financially and they're filled with the nitty gritty details of living behind the wheel. Today we're gonna talk about heat today. We're gonna talk about taking showers. The topic of today is poop. You can cut your behinds. Not one of them. You want that thing to be clean all the time. Bob also does these little interview profiles of people living in different kinds of vehicles cars to trucks to buses. Welcome back fellow nomads. Today we're going. Meet a new friend of mine. Joe sale load everyone relax. They're really out. There doesn't look like there's a bunch of people out there. Yeah thank you that video for the record. Two point five million views and counting. Bob says his videos have become so popular that he's now making more money than ever before. I think eventually the second break but it gets great reviews on amazon which is why i'm recommending ads in affiliate marketing. Help him bring in over one hundred fifty thousand dollars a year. Bob makes enough to have two full time assistants helping him with his work and because he says he never plans to live in a house again. He makes a very healthy profit. I'm make much more money than i ever thought. I could possibly make in my life. And i live in a van. My expenses are pretty darn low with that extra money. Bob started a nonprofit homes on wheels alliance to support people transitioning into living in their vehicles. They've started to outfit and give vance to people in dire need of a new vehicle. And bob says he saving up to buy a plot of land for an in person resource center. It isn't clear how many people are living on the road at this point. But in two thousand ten when bob started this annual gathering van and car dwellers in the arizona desert called rubber tramp rendezvous it had a few dozen attendees by two thousand and nineteen. They had an estimated ten thousand people show up and as a central node in this growing community. Bob has had a kind of front row seat to the massive disruptions of the past decade. And he's watched as certain demographics have borne the brunt of those changes. It's a surprisingly large female. Contingent older women in their sixties and seventies. When they were girls they were told get married. Stay home raise a family and so they never go up so sturdy and then now they're living on five hundred to eight hundred dollars a month so skirt and he cannot live in this country on five hundred two thousand a month so sturdy and live in house and you just can't do it and so they all desperately needed the solution as well and i told them all. If you move into your plan you can live reasonably well on that. You won't be rich but you won't eating dog food and there's hope bob says he has seen an uptick in views and inquiries about van dwelling over the last year. But so far he says the stimulus checks and the nationwide moratorium on evictions have slowed. The number of new nomads. Still he says as the baby boomers continue to age into social security and as the effects of climate change intensify bob expects the movement towards van life to surge and he sees it is his mission to try to help however he can. I've got a string of lifeboats. And i want to get as many as i can into the lifeboat and i think the hammer blow of two thousand eight really put a crack in people's confidence and i think when you combine that with this cheers a natural disasters and the epidemic. I think people are just going to be abandoning the american dream in droves. That's all i'm trying to do is get people out

BOB Bob Wells California Desert Safeway Anchorage Alaska Youtube Arizona Desert Vance JOE Amazon
Create Killer Content that Gets Bums on Seats, with Ben Lifton

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

08:14 min | 3 weeks ago

Create Killer Content that Gets Bums on Seats, with Ben Lifton

"Me just start off this conversation because content kind of sounds obvious to a lot of us an yet content. Yeah craft content. What what we talk about. Because some people have no idea when we say christ great content. Greg i we are united way creating tapped your platform for you communicate to your community with. That's basically will comes in. Its continues anything that you create as a professional as a film This as as stein's wherever you are you're creating content to communicate to your community and your fun on social media or google mail on emails for example side. It could be images videos. Podcasts britain articles. your santeria. The actual design of the interior not crabbie's contact like it needs content in. It's not just an empty talks so everything is contact when when you start to realize the opportunities round creating amazing content for your brown's the a just an obstacle endless linnet basically you do see. Sometimes people will. I've heard he said. I dunno what content to create content in everything. We do wherever you know. We took in your bums on seats getting into e. You've got to really identify what it. What is your message. I guess before you go out that we content then exactly and then is making sure that when you off when you do your take. For example wind duty professionals suspecion always asks. Are you communicating to consumers to a client or you communications heritage easy prize. Mary very very very different. And that defines which direction you go in. I guess we've where you can guy. We content pretty much. I think that that is very slight roots. And any any topic. Eric schmidt come to everyone can create content but the the difficult thing is creating engaging content that fox conversation stocks an immersion the Get stop following for example on your social media to ditch that current stars and movie to begin with you. i'm not takes time and be creativity to content create and it was. It takes a lot of of dedication to 'cause it's not nice success in your to create engaging like binge while the context. I'm gonna like this conversation lot today. This row vice straight or they send you know from from a personal point of view that were heckled live and we kind of always been narrow on social but it has been learning process for me. And i know what i'm getting riot times and sometimes eats i think when i talked to experts like yourself bent on this subject. The one thing that probably you would say it is planning content rather than just winging it is not acceptable because there are days where missing. I haven't got a plan. But i think that kind of works. He sent on my phone. I'm ready to go with them. What's your take on that. That's where you're just explaining that all of the fact that your sometimes gang an idea when you find the having debt and that's because you become confident as a content creates because you can see. I do not asking what that would have been appointed some somewhere Walk on our way back to my to we. Brilliant as the keys so pathak plan prevents historical phones. I not enough. Why that's going to quote in. What am i Contented planned posts fix the six page. I love that. It's so good. Isn't that nineteen i really. I really do agree with it. Because i'm a big believer. I've always been a big believer in quality over quantity announced monday night will wayside saharan easy prizes. Like i said harry shovel contact with a completely different game when you uranium content on your account a piece of content out on on instagram Outtakes will convince without How as a e mail in my knees western current client base dugout. He's content out. Use your town and you start to walk out okay. What makes different communities. What means different positive community pick. I'm creating content for example. May i know the higher level creativity really while Migrate my rails ions It's a it's a little bit more like a monument pledged events stuff. I do my Grid rails Occurring yards rtd based ash whereas some my stories behind saints which genuinely believe. Anyway that's interesting so again you approach in is interesting here because y- y seeing that story says grit and grit tends to be the polish side. An against the stories is a bit more rule risk. It's kinda now it's there. It's exactly right yeah. I think that there is why tend suggest haraguchi price just to get into the rhythm of being big. That confidence is to break down a little bit to think i can't. Instagram is a multi multi multi platforms multiple english Multiple stories with john muslim rule behind the scenes. As i say shove him personality all hyphen sire iranian stories tall enough. I'm not stories Avenue grid at ways thought is an i. I like to see people think of as you pull failure. United saying you a model in you're going costing costing your costing for shades and you. You're you're not so. Instagram grid is and to give the analogy of you should is wayne greatest hits ooh knifings Real love. it is already a love you put in that nightmare anyway. I found her a very hot lady. Right she's got she skinny. Hey look we often see. Minks ask rails as on new video platform fence around and just like rails tiktok his. The video only on youtube is longer for com temperatures. Your your suggestion the Long contact united education based skills based like breaking things down pace content similar to itt bay side when you thought to break down just to summarize it it stories. The song will personality grid His satirical finding brielle's as transmissions speedier video. vcr tiktok video video. Youtube long contents are actually adding real violent with with education usually and then emails while unit. That's that's more of us. Breeding community these peak where he would have signed up to rating. They might already in existing client in our notch about your funnels. Isn't it a

Stein Harry Shovel Eric Schmidt Greg Britain Pathak Brown Haraguchi Google FOX Mary John Muslim Instagram Saints Tiktok Long Contact United Education Wayne Youtube United Brielle
Mikes Exciting New Business

The EcomCrew

06:46 min | Last week

Mikes Exciting New Business

"Bryant so like i mentioned at the top joined by two good friends and now business partners mr michael janice from e com crude dot com and build l. andrew from elements brands dot com looking forward to diving into the deal and talking through it and before we get soon gritty wanted to give a disclaimer. One thing. we're not gonna do. It feels a little strange mike. I know you are really transparent with what you do. Bill you are as well traditionally have shared everything. We decided not to show the name of the company that invested in partially in large part. Because we have a lot of investors here in just out of sensitivity to them partially because we want to be can sensitive to the to the seller as well but kinda love to be transparent and usually usually are but needs to be a little bit more just a little bit more sensitive with the name and the details of this company. So that being said i wanna walk people through can how the deal came about how we structured it Some the closing challenges. And can i get an update on how things have been going since we closed and mike what originally the seller who is someone that we both know how to relationships with reached out to you and i to talk about selling and kind of morphed into potentially. Hey we should take a look at this. What was it that you liked about the deal. Mike and then maybe bill you can share as well kind of from the outset. Yeah i mean for me. It was just knowing knowing the person. So i knew that i was getting full. Transparency mean whenever you buy business offer any website or platform you always have to worry about. What is the the cellar hiding. And so no we know was talking to the seller before they even contemplating to us like i felt like we have an inside track on the margins. Really good in this business. There's some some secret sauce. Defensibility that i think that you know is is really appealing and so that's kind of how the whole thing how the whole thing started once. They decided they didn't want to sell. I did bring up well. Maybe that's something we'd be interested in and so it's kinda hold the whole thing together. Yeah that's similar to the thing that i like to which is kind of does all come back to the seller. I knew this person pretty well for few years. Also and the thing that i knew about this person was that they had great systems. They were really a kind of festivus. Entrepreneur had everything documented. And this was out when we got the tax returns and they tied to the penny or almost almost exactly to the penny to the company's financial records. So i knew that this person was running a tight ship because i knew who they were and that was baird out during diligence. So for me. That was that was an important thing as well. I'm thinking back to the original conversation. Now that i had with them and the only thing that was kind of going through my mind because you just mentioned bill like they run a tight ship. You're always for things that you can approve upon. It's like when a businesses like really running. Well it's not really the thing that i think that we look for typically right. We're looking for something where we can fix something. That's broken in some ways. But there was a few things that they just feel comfortable with or didn't really want to to mess around with them. One of them was sourcing from basically from china and so they're buying things from suppliers in the us. That are the things from from china. So i thought oh well. There's a opportunity there. I saw some opportunity in. Seo stuff where. They just wasn't their biggest focus. They were focused mostly on on the amazon staff and so it was kind of thinking through things. Okay while the parts. That i don't necessarily want to deal with neo the the operational stuff where i'm not necessarily going to make any improvements to it. We can take that stuff over and let it continue run smoothly but the things that i think that we can add our secret sauce or or knowledge to are wide open spaces and so that was the only thing that appeal to me. Yeah that was kind of the perfect combo in this business. Right there was there was really tight systems for the things the business was doing. But this seller kinda said look you know. This businesses optimized a lifestyle business. I really like my lifestyle. I have a great one the seller gave us a list and they said on day one. You should do this this and this and we saw a. Why didn't you do those things and seller says. Be too much work. You know. I make enough money. You know i'm happy is great and this kind of sounds ridiculous but i see this on elements. Brands deals as well as you know. People are making six figures a year and they're happy right so that was sort of the perfect combination. Usually the people who are on cruise control are not very well organized and so the downside of of lots of stuff to improve that you've also got shore up the basic operations but this was a great combination that the seller was super buttoned up. Kind of on the things that were in their wheelhouse and had just consciously not pursued a bunch of things that we real excited to pursue. Yeah i remember having a conversation with the seller during diligence and diving into advertising and some of the advertising was returning a pretty good good level. And there's a lot more room as well. Why why didn't you just bump up spent here. It was working well. And and i i just think she hadn't wasn't something that she had the pan west or inclination to do and so it's tons of opportunities for growing the business. Yo things i liked about it too is a checklist. I had on the espn capital front for businesses to look at good margins which is important. This one has that repeat. Business is a big one and ahead. I think really strong business. Thirty percent plus of people. Reordering a boring or unsexy niche. And it's that is. I think you know i like that. I like niches. That are not super glamorous. more money in their often. The only thing that scared me was the amazon concentration and it had most the sales come from amazon but the thing the only thing they gave me comfort there was bill like you said that history with the seller knowing how risk adverse they aren't how cleanly in from a white hat perspective built that business gave me a ton of at least a lot more comfort on that front. I mean you can be comfortable with all you want but like amazon. You're still in amazon's pie and so remote or whatever and this was the concerns me like even going into this. But i think that's something that we all accept as as amazon sellers. Hopefully this isn't the thing that they target to amazon. Basics thing or disrupted in some other way. it's always a little bit scary but it also goes to thing that i'm excited about. Which is your. They were not necessarily focused on their own website. As much as i think we're going to try to be. We'll see how how this plays out a lot of times. You know as a buyer business you have like all these dreams and they don't always play out the way that you think they will. But i'm pretty confident that efforts in just kind of digging into things after talking to the seller now for pull last couple of weeks. There are some pretty big opportunities to at least lessen. The amazon risk factor. It will never be fifty fifty or anything like that in terms of website sells damas on at least we can get more more sales through our

Mr Michael Janice Mike Amazon Bryant Andrew Baird China Brands Espn United States Damas
How to Grow a 6-Figure Business in 6 Months

Entrepreneur on FIRE

03:47 min | Last week

How to Grow a 6-Figure Business in 6 Months

"Christine. Say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with fire nation. I am so excited to be back with j. l. d. and each one of you and i believe that the hardest part of growing sicker business. You love is allowing it to be easy. Doesn't have to be hard but we were taught that it does right. We're taught to be really good employees and so what our brains to try to keep us safe when we start dreaming about getting not first traction in our businesses. That's what makes it hard not the fact that you're not capable. I mean. sometimes. I ask myself like what is the path of least resistance here. Why am i making this difficult for myself. Like what feels light. Not heavy. And i'll tell you fire nation. I am keeping all the things they feel light and feel easier in my world right now and i'm releasing the things that feel heavy feel hard because it doesn't have be difficult and we're talking about a pretty cool topic how to grow a six figure business six months working ten hours a week and i just want to talk about the realistic -ness of making six figures working ten hours a week. Break that down for us christine. Yes this is all about simplifying like you said what feels light right. You only need two things in order to have the foundation of a six figure business like you need a clear niche and you need an aligned. High ticket offer providing some kind of service whether as a coach as a consultant as a service provider freelancer marketer. Virtual assistant opium social media manager. One of those things. That's all that you need in order to be able to start going out and offering it you need to things. Fire nation a clear niche and that clear niche aligned with a high ticket offer of some former service. That christine was talking about right there. And what's really powerful that for me. Is i see a lot of people today. Saying john like man. I want to launch podcasts. Like interview entrepreneurs of that and listen entrepreneurs on fire fails if i launch it in twenty twenty with my same skills that i had in two thousand twelve i. I won in two thousand twelve because it was a niche. It was void. I fill ditz. And that's why that one got traction. So what is a specific niche. The can be clear and defined for you. Fire nation that. How can you weave in an aligned like that word aligned. High ticket offer of a service that makes sense because right now man. I'm c. n. Christina kinda wants you to chime in on this because i'm seeing a lot of people doing things the wrong way which is like they're working so hard for these like really low ticket offers and just you know having to get like a hundred thousand sometimes even more than that of the sales of these low ticket offers for it even to add up to any kind of meaningful money and like every sale is tough like it a lot times. I found that a low ticket sale because sometimes even be harder than hydrogen sale. And we gotta get into that kind of specifics too. But what do you think about this. I completely agree. I have like a what not to do right. And it is literally what you just said. Don't write a book or start a podcast. I don't download every freebie and try to piece together. A business plan from them. Don't create a bunch of low priced products and start offering them all and also like. Don't tell yourself you don't have enough time because it's almost never time problem. It's a clarity problem. Like if you knew what to do you would just go do it already. Which is why if you know what to do. You can do it in ten hours a

Christine Christina Kinda John
Are Fear And Shame The Biggest Motivators Of Buying Behaviour?

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Are Fear And Shame The Biggest Motivators Of Buying Behaviour?

"Another little insular picked up from tilbury. Dell's book the seven laws of direct marketing. I'll put a link to till's website in the comments below so you can go and check him out but this idea that much of al behavior is subconscious or unconscious is not new similarly when it comes to buying behaviour. The idea that much of our buying behavior and purchasing decisions are driven by emotions rather than rational thought is not a new concept either. That's something i've spoken to you about before on this show but what i found interesting until this book is when he talked about shame and fear being of the biggest emotional drivers when it comes to purchasing decisions. And it's still suggest if you think about the fitness industry. The beauty industry the dating industry the pornography industry. Even all of these industries are driven by. Shame i don't fit in. I'm not pretty enough. Not good enough. That's what is driving these industries. That's the emotion that's driving people's buying behavior and when it comes to fear or we're living through fear right now with this covid nineteen situation. The insurance industry The medical industry the wellness industry even the the wellness industry is being driven by fia. It's not that we're being but we're running towards getting better where running away from getting worse and as till suggested these book we run much harder when we're running away from something with the we're running toward something and so think about your business through the lens of fear and shame being motivated for your customers to make their buying decision and if you understand that and accept that then what you can do is start applying. Better your your marketing to make sure that you've got the right products and services for them but particularly or messaging to make sure that your messaging is trying to trigger those emotions of fear and shame because that's what ultimately is driving people's buying behavior. It's an interesting thought. And i actually think it's got a lot of merit.

Tilbury Dell FIA
Guest Teacher Benjamin Schneider on How to build and scale a digital marketing agency only with remote workers

The $100 MBA Show

08:52 min | Last week

Guest Teacher Benjamin Schneider on How to build and scale a digital marketing agency only with remote workers

"A marketing agency is one of the best ways to build wealth. Why because a lot of people don't understand it's easy to scale of course it's hard to scale if you're doing the work but the point here is that you don't do all the work you hire other people. Great talent designers developers hardworking people that you can get them to do certain tasks work on the projects that you get hired to do an reap the benefits now. Ben's going to break down. Show you who to look for the mistakes people make but i'll be back at the end of the episode to tie things up and share my takeaways but for now take it away. Ben guys welcome is bench neither. I'm an entrepreneur from germany. And i own several businesses and one of the business i do is having an online marketing agency. So that's what we're going to talk about today. My topic is how to build and scale a digital marketing agency. Only with the remote workers. I've been working with remote workers for around eight years and i'm the owner of chop mafia dot com remote work platform. So you can go in hire remote work beer and that came from my digital marketing agency because our online marketing guy. So i have my own ecommerce store and out of that ecommerce store people were asking me. Hey ben how are you doing this. Can you help me with that. And all that kind of stuff and out of this. I created or found my digital marketing agency so our facebook ads did more than two million dollars for clients in zales with facebook ads but the problem was by selling companies. These facebook ads. They do not only need the facebook ads. they also do need landing pages. They need google ads. they need. We deals for youtube. They need graphics for youtube or graphics for ats graphics for the website. All that kind of stuff. So i was realizing. Hey if you're selling facebook ads. It's a good business. But companies need more. They need a full service solution and they want to have a full service solution because they do not want to have usa facebook guy and another one for google ads and another one to grade sales funnels. They want to have one agency one person to talk about their marketing stuff and outsourced that so by realizing that was thinking about. Hey how can. I build an agency like that. Because i'm only a one man show in the half other businesses to manage. And i'm quite good at facebook ads but i have no idea about google ads or some other stuff like billing websites or developing some stuff stuff like that so i need people for this. Hiring people from my country from germany is quite expensive so if you would hire a designer for example that custody around three thousand dollars a month so basically. It's an euros but yeah three thousand dollars a month. That's quite the same so this was too expensive for me okay. That was just not possible. So i needed to have another solution and then i came on the idea. The possibility to hire people from the overseas from the philippines pakistan india countries. Like that. why. Because these people were a lot of more cheaper than the german guys. So i was starting with that was trying that and some positive experiences some negative experiences but in general it was good in general it was working so i need to find myself a way to find people who are fitting into my company and were having a very high quality and this was the key to build and scale might digital marketing agency. Because as i mentioned i wouldn't have been able to hire three four five german guys. That would be just too expensive. But i was able to hire some people from the overseas so i started with hiring a designer and i would recommend you guys this. Start with hiring a designer. Why because definitely there's no company in two thousand and twenty one who do not need a designer in their company because you have so much posibilities to spread content out there and that's why you definitely need to have a designer but the other advantages that designer does not need to have any log in credentials or access to any sensitive data or something like this you can just give them a few pictures and title or anything like that and tell him hey. Police creamier facebook ads. Spanner out of that. And in addition to that you see the result immediately with a developer. If you're another developer guy you have no idea if this wella per is good if this is fast or anything like that but the with a designer you see it easily you see easily on. The result of this design is good or not that he take around one day for this or one hour as fast or not so. It's very very easy to start with with a designer as a remote worker indefinitely you need to have one in your company. I just proudly recommend that so our starting also they designer and this man helps me to improve my facebook ads because we have awesome designs. But before i did all designs and all the banners and all that stuff by myself. And i'm definitely guys not a designed so you can imagine how tremendously the quality was improving by that guy so realizing hey this was working with the design guy. I get one step ahead. I hired someone for google ads. I hired someone for wordpress websites and stuff like that. So i was not only able to provide high quality to my clients with that remote working guys. Some accompany hours able to widen my portfolio. So i wasn't the for the branding out there. I was still the facebook. At sky in the facebook ads marketing like a guru and sold my book an amazon bestseller and stuff like that but then the back end i was able to sell them not only facebook ads but google ads and landing paycheck and a new website and email marketing. And all that stuff as well. Because i have a team right now and this is very easy scalable because if you're found a way and we come to data and a few seconds if you have found a way how to hire good people and not being scammed by people and really knowing that this people half good and high quality output you could easily repeat that hiring process and scale your business with that. As i mentioned. I've created more than ten million dollars ten million years in sales for my clients. This was only possible with having team. So how did you do that. You got on dot com on my platform if you would like to check this out. Fourteen days for free and create a shop post. We have only. Id verified user skies this very very important also. Go hiring on another platform. Feel free to do that but definitely do only hire people who are ide- very fight

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January 2021 Income Report For Entrepreneurs on Fire

Entrepreneur on FIRE

00:43 sec | Last week

January 2021 Income Report For Entrepreneurs on Fire

"J. l. d. here with the january twenty twenty one income report for entrepreneurs on fire. Our gross income for january was a hundred and ninety eight thousand six hundred fifty seven dollars our toll expenses. Were just a hair over. Twenty one k for total net profits in january of one hundred seventy seven thousand five hundred and ninety nine dollars for a crazy close difference between january and december of negative one thousand and twelve dollars in giving us a percentage of net profit over gross revenue of eighty nine percent. We almost that magical in almost unhittable ninety percent plus mark which we've only done twice in eight years

Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:41 min | Last week

Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

"Et. al say was up the fire nation. And what's something that you believe about becoming successful. Most people disagree with many believe nothing. In order to be successful. You need only passion for good idea but the reality is much more ashen is one. Listen gregan except enough in order to be a real success through. I really do need passion for the idea. That's obvious determination. Focus and patients most successful business. People who have been more abuses. I'd be there are many obstacles. one has to overcome great something new. You know especially if you are the first thing that feed over. The cost of my life is great. Tree comes owning the factory business which is a former finance. Each company was unique in the first of its kind in the seed amount of projection. One gets from new ideas. These enormous one doesn't believe in his or her idea. More than one hundred percent simply wants work in any new ideas. I you have to educate the market which is very hard are always suspicious affinity new then you have to persuade the investors. The people around view and the list goes on and on. You feel you're going up in most of the times you'll be a low and the loneliness is very hard to accept. Stein goes on in get more experienced. Then it becomes easier and you learn to build on and fix your mistakes from the negative remarks. Along the way you'll be enriched for capricorn's like me into his naturally because rare. Houston it's always about enforce. There's a lot that i want to focus on throughout this entire interview fire nation. But the one thing i wanna pull out about. What a alger said is patients. I mean all of them were brilliant but patients. It is such as something that today. I see more than ever people. Just don't have an seems like the younger generation. The less patience. I have so many people all the time coming up and saying. Hey john like. I've been doing this for two months and i'm not seeing any returns. Think any success and like it's been two months. Where's your patients. Where's your persistence. Wears your you gotta keep at that thing. Fire nation so in doing some research on ual. I saw that you were chosen to be a mentor at the harvard. Business school of. I mean this is top of the top. Why were you chosen. I was invited to comment there at harvard. Business school interpreters enterpreneurial program during two thousand thirteen. I spent on her the per person recognized and identified the Me after by lifestyle Lecture action lecturer. I approach the Was approaching the podium and the right the way after are presenting center students raise their hand. Us meet who is interpreting. Though i had my lecture plan i wanted to follow with students entering pro in prague improvise and said without hesitation that was born today or over the world is it potentially becoming in their furniture but the system. We live in prohibits most of them to become one why because of the barriers that society puts in front of us when the baby was born starts to crotone tone touching breaking things. The current say. Don't do that then. He's babies go through nursery and school and approach daily by new regulations of what they could or couldn't do then that news when they grow and enrolling through diversities and then it lasts. Even when they get married they fiend. The rules are filed on them. The handcuffs are placed on their hands and brains is additional rules imposed or their lives better directed in buxton through what they can't do this. Fact of life interferes in some Sometimes sabres independence and free thoughts of many of us. So my advice to you all. I said to be group is right. Now get hold of the keys. And i threw the keys to them. Release the handcuffs. Allow your brain to think without restrictions feel free to go with any idea thought you may have even if it seems ridiculous or unrealistic at the moment. Thank your dreams to the limit and interpret noor within. You will erupt like the genie out of the bottle. One hundred forty students stood up and they're up with laughter. I knew then but they got the message. I love that genie in a bottle analogy. I mean fire nation. Can't you just picture that. I mean it is such a great analogy. It's so true and it's something that you need to be striving towards and forward

Gregan Harvard Stein AL UAL Houston Prague John United States
How to Turn Your Instagram into a Money Making Machine with Zach Benson

Entrepreneur on FIRE

03:22 min | Last week

How to Turn Your Instagram into a Money Making Machine with Zach Benson

"Zack say what's up to fire nation brother and share the interesting about yourself that most people don't new. Hey what's up. Everyone super excited to be here. So most people don't know that. I was actually adopted so i was born in south korea and then adopted by my parents in iowa so pretty much grew up in iowa. Lived there my whole life very interesting stuff my man and now you're over in korea as we speak which is cool that again. It sounds like you're in the next room via skype. So just lovely saaf even though it's four. Am your time and four pm my time so we are exactly twelve hours apart and fire nation. I'm gonna share a little more info about zach because we were actually just reminiscing about the old puerto rico a mastermind days back when we used to have a bunch of awesome people come and attend a great event and we had zaka speaker one year and he came and crushed it and then now we hit the casino afterwards and zach continued to crush it on the roulette wheel. I was playing a little blackjack. I looked up to some screaming over by the table. And you just hit your number right on top my man. That was pretty impressive. Yeah the good old days. Good times it was weird. Because i arrived at the airport and at that time. They had the roulette real as the baggage Low yeah so. I basically said all like okay. I'm gonna call my favorite number and it landed on my favorite number which is number five And then i put like all my money i guess. Or whatever on number five kazue's like to to a Closing we all this crazy. Red five further win. And i'll tell you what fire nation when you can call numbers on a roulette wheel at thirty seven to one. Odds are you're making thirty seven hundred dollars every dollar you put on. That's what you call them. Money making machine. But guess what zach knows how to turn your instagram into a money making machine so first and foremost listen. It's a new world that we live in so how realistic is zack. To make income from instagram lot of near exciting features have been rolling out on instagram. so it's it's really cool like before this I was actually just last week. Will actually last month. I've been in mal dev's entire month and some of the hotels that i've been sina costs over thirty forty thousand dollars a night. So not only. Do i get to travel the world for free and sale all these hotels immediately. Celebrities and say l. Tells that like will smith stays that but these hotels pay me to come and promote their hotels. And it's cool. So yeah i'm doing it. But then also a lot of brands and companies reporting a lot of money into influence marketing so influenced marketing is now fifteen billion dollar inch industry and more and more brands reporting a lot of money on instagram. Pain these instagram influencers to promote their products on their instagram vida walls because it drives traffic and it drives customers.

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Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

Entrepreneur on FIRE

08:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

"Now. We are talking about africa. I wanna know john paul. Why why do we need to keep africa on our radar very interesting question. So one one thing that keeps me. Loyal to entrepreneurs on fire is the quality of stories and experiences of ultra preneurs. Who've made it that's one big reason. Why listen and. I'm also sure that's why many people listen to the show but interesting is what being on entrepreneur means that you're able to live in the now and also prepare for future so it's almost impossible to think about the future and nothing about and here's why when you look at the population of the world. Africa correctly has the youngest population of people. Right now sixty percents of people on the continent of the age of twenty five. So this is more or less looking at china. Before china became china up to date china more or less the second biggest economy in the world the factory of the world and all of that so you can imagine that people who saw china. The china became china. Actually the ones who got in on the meat of the game. So that's exactly what africa represents but more importantly there have been events in the past couple of years that have put africa in the centerpiece. The very most the most recent one which is very interesting is covid now all the time most companies have built their supply chains around china and south east asia but then when it hits it was obvious that supply chains with very vulnerable. And if you're going to diversify your supply chain. It's impossible not to look at africa if you're looking at affordable label if you look at them. The truck symmetry of the continental either north america or europe. And what are the means. Most countries on the continent either speak english or french and these are more or less global line. Which is you're going to penetrate any of the big markets and. It's really now happening. Because what the chinese are doing is the chinese. Market is starting to specialize in advanced high-tech stuff. I most of those low cost production that brought business the whole of storing from america. When are beginning to see going to places like vietnam. Bangladesh and other countries in southeast asia. But then you cannot forgo a population of one point three billion people which is what africa presents and what we're seeing is some companies setup accretions within the african continent places like rwanda at the opium ghana senegal. And what they're doing is they are preparing. These guys are digging for the future and one interesting. That's happened in the last four years in america. Is the people in africa. So in america when you think about africa the image that comes to mind is charity and philanthropy. Africa needs. Needs help and help and help. So the approach of the americans this time and even europe has been to help africa give africa aid. Give them all of that. What the chinese are doing is they're coming with more or less trade and business and things. What africa needs really because you have this population of very young people enterprising people. I mentioned that sixty percent of the world's uncle beats at arable. Land is in africa so in most parts of the world with maxed out the land space. Yes we're doing. We're using technology and other means to increase the yield on the land. But when we're talking about virgin space. Federal land arable land. Most of it is still in africa. Still cultivated and we're looking at a global population that is set to double back at least by the time we reach two hundred fifty or more according to the un and if we do not keep pace with globe with population growth would amount of food were producing then the world is going to be faced with serious threat of hunger so these are just a few examples of why africa needs to be on your rita. Yes so thinking about now. It's great but you're thinking about the future you need to remember that even before could hit five of the top. The top ten fastest growing economies in the world when africa. These are not really things. We've seen the mainstream media. Why i'm happy that chain. Is that the approach of the chinese in africa. Doo controversial is a big difference. This guy's coming here boots on the ground and they're dealing with the market. The previous relationship with africa has been to deal with africa's governments give african governments money for age and they develop africa unfulfilled years. It's never happened instead. It's helped enhance corruption. A sense of entitlement and dependency so most of the problems never get so because that's free money free money fluent in from europe money flowing in from north america so what people like us exist to do is to show that the people we should be voting. For with our money is the entrepreneur's they're the ones who have the incentive and the motivation to really solve africa's problems and guess what's global money starting to call me and i'm sure many ago minova listeners. On on on entrepreneur no stripe the big global player in in payments strike just acquired an african company. Niger company for two hundred million dollars. That's a major exit and it's stories like this that are starting to prove that africa is not a charity case. Africa is opportunity. The programs are trying to solve through eight. Actually need to be solved through entrepreneurship and the process. We create more jobs more wealth and greeted big happier world john. Let's talk about what you see as the most interesting opportunities that exist right now. I mean you talked about a lot of opportunities. I love how you really are hammering home. The fact that entrepreneurship is what is going to turn africa around and really bring that continents into the as we move forward into twenty twenty one and beyond but specifically what are the one or two most interesting and fascinating opportunities in the business world that you're seeing right now. The first interesting one is more or less. I talked about it earlier. In terms of africa's potential to produce food because right now we're looking for the next food basket of the world and one interesting that africa offers is the or what's we've we now know as superfoods so for example there's a grain that's grown in west africa. It's a green code for new now. This green is so rich in cultural significance for example when the tombs of ancient in jim ships are more or less opel excavated amongst other materials. Like honey. and things like that four new for new f- who is one of the greens that it that the ancient egyptians actually put in the the pyramids in the borough chambers of dead feroz. That's tell you how important it was back. Then this is like one of the longest growth one of the greens has been grown the longest in history almost five thousand years now. The reason why new is important is when you look at the american market and european market more or less developed world and you see how important health and wellness is this all about eighteen. Organic food. Gluten free food and things like that you announced that to see if like for new is actually superfood but in africa is grown by people in africa eating by people that i start to see what america has done with them a green assira like we know what which is more or less breakfast zero before quinoa became like a blockbuster serial in america it had the same profile as phone. You in south america. So what we're beginning to see. Is they celebrate to ship in. New york is named spear pm. He's now taken for neo his packaged. It's not just in its physical formats but in the narrative that used salads and last year. I think it's early this year. It got the national distribution across the united states in whole foods. You know to distribute this kind of food and new just one. I know listeners may be familiar with moringa which is another superfood. it grows in the wild in africa. We really take you for granted over yet. But then we've sent entrepreneurs coming here and repackage it into something that selling like a lot because it resonates resonates with the health and wellness movements the big trend going on in the

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How I Built Resilience: Michael Horvath and Mark Gainey of Strava

How I Built This

06:14 min | 2 weeks ago

How I Built Resilience: Michael Horvath and Mark Gainey of Strava

"But before you want to ask you about the business model Is free to use. There is a paid subscription side to it. it's a freemium model. A lot of brands uses. Dropbox is a great example. We had drew house on the show and think he said something like three or four percent of dropbox users actually pay for the product. But that's more than enough to make it into a profitable business. Tell me a little bit about your business. Because they don't think you advertise on the app. Right we don't we focus on building things. Athletes love to us and are really glad to pay for an tell their friends about that's the aspect of our subscription offering and it's a number of different parts of the experience that you get when you when you subscribe that make it even better And so by focusing on building things that athletes love that builds a great business. Yeah mark yeah. I know i think michael hit the nail on the head. We really like this idea of having just one customer that we can focus on and that is the athlete for us if you sweat. You're an athlete. It doesn't matter what pace you run. It doesn't matter how hard you out. If you're going out and walking the dog on sunday afternoon put it on strava. That's fantastic for them in and for us and so. That's the idea is to focus on that athlete. We love our free members. They're contributing great content and activities and and being part of the community but our focus is to convince them that there's something here worth paying foreign investing in and together. We're going to build over the long term. Npr's a great example as public. Radio's greg sample because we offer all of our content for free and we hope that people will voluntarily contribute to stations and i think almost ten percent of public radio listeners. Do they voluntarily contribute to their station. But it's a social contract is like we kind of hope. Most of you will in that model works. I know you can't talk about because you're privately held and you don't talk about financials and so on so forth but can you give us a sense of whether the business model works i mean. Can you talk about whether you're you're profitable yet. you're right. It as a as a privately held company. It's not something that We share what we can tell you. Is that when we focus on things that athletes love. It really does make for a strong business and so we have. We have starting point of mark mentioned. That customer is is the person who wakes up every day wanting to be active. And we wanna help them. We want to bring joy to their lives in the movement that they do. That is the basis of this twelve year old old company. We started with a team of six of us with an idea that it didn't have to be big. It had to be great. It had to make meet something meaningful impact in people's lives and we're here twelve years later and growing and thriving. It's been a fun journey. And we're really looking forward to the next twelve plus years a lot of folks watching our early stage entrepreneurs small business owners and they look at people like you for advice. So here's a question that i left to to hear your answer on You have investors. You've raised tens of millions of dollars in those investors at some point one a return on their investment so you have resisted advertising on the platform. But you've got tens of millions of eyeballs on your app. I mean you've got a lot of people who who use it How do you resist the pressure to run ads because at that would be an easy way to to clear some cash. It's we watched social dilemma recently guy and you know this notion of if you're not buying the product you are the product and i really. We believe deeply in that thesis. As we're we're convinced that there's a capacity within this fit community to continue to support and grow this business whether investors are excited about. Its we've not felt that pressure from the outside Do we believe that there's opportunities for diverse finding kinds of services. We offer over the next again. Ten twenty years of course but we really are stuck on this principle that you need to understand who your customer is and stay focused the only to add that you also get to pick your investors so for entrepreneurs out there as it is really important to aligned. What you see is the vision for your company with who you're bringing in to help you grow it. And we picked our investors really carefully on that regard. Let me ask you a question about privacy. Okay i'm one of these people who has like twenty burner email accounts and i use that for pretty much everything i sign up with even though i know that doesn't matter because my iphone knows who i am but i've got this this ring here that tracks my sleep. So they know me. It does concern me. Because i i really am worried about privacy. I know you guys had a feature called fly by that you you now allow people to shut it down. Basically allowed you to you. Know when you're passing by somebody you could see. They're running route. And how do you deal with this question of privacy because people are becoming increasingly aware of how important it is to maintain privacy so you. I mean for better or worse. There's a lot of information that is you know that that's on the app that is revealed on straub. You're absolutely you. you hit the nail on the head. It's it's a. This is very important to us. Because it's very important to do the athletes on strava. So we take our athletes data and the privacy of that data very seriously and we are working all the time on trying to make sure that we're providing the right set of tools and understanding of how to use it in the way that you want to. You can use it in completely private mode. You can open it up to a larger circle and you can be completely out there in public but the important thing is making sure you can educate people on how they wanna set that level of privacy for them and for their needs and thinking ahead. So we've done a lot of things over the years and we're never done it's like it's a constant constant pursuit of making sure that people understand how to stay in that mode of feeling. Good about the information they are sharing and we can go some things that have very specific things. Like how do you educate people on and experience that they may not have really understood yet. When i joined so you have to continually remind them that the privacy settings are there and and think ahead and that's why for example making fly bys something that you have to opt into was really important to us so that someone who joined may not even understand what that feature means wouldn't inadvertently be

Dropbox Drew NPR Michael Straub
John Hunter from The Frozen Rope Podcast

Rotated Views

07:24 min | 3 weeks ago

John Hunter from The Frozen Rope Podcast

"Let's jump right in man to frozen rope. Let us know who you are and what you do. My name is john hunter. I am thirty years old from northeast. Philly i'm a union glazer by day but i am a podcast. Her by night a baseball podcast about three months ago during the world series. I decided to go for it. I never I always wanted to do it. But i just. It was weird. It was like a couple of years. There was a couple of years where i was just telling my brother like i wanna to do this. Like this is what i to do. And then you know just life happens or you. Just you know procrastinate on stuff and it just just ended up not happening. And i mean it's kinda crazy. I'm probably the only person you've ever benefit benefited from the pandemic. I decided like all right. Well i have nothing else better to do right now and i just decided that his by like all like the microphones already had headphones off but like my wife already had. My wife has a mac book. And i was like all right. Well why don't just get into it. And i'll do it. And then the world series happy. You know what this is what. I'm going to start it i. I was sitting on headphones stuff for like two months before i even recorded an episode and it was just like it was crazy. But that's pretty much how it all started. So how did you come up with a name the frozen ropes. Explain that all right so the frozen rope a frozen rope in its own. Right is a a line drive or a a like in basketball. It's considered like something that just like shack is. He just threw the ball pretty much of the rim. And that's like for baseball. Like i remember the first time i've ever heard the term. It was vladimir guerrero was playing. I think for the expos at the time and he threw a lot. He threw a liner from from the right field right to the catcher and the and the announcer was like that was a frozen rope and i was like i like that and then it became my gamertag on like xbox back fox three six and i was an like then it just over the years. I was like you know if i ever do one. If i were to go podcast the name of it will be the frozen row. Podcast and this has been since i was like. I don't know maybe like twelve. Thirteen new podcast. Ball's probably if i ever do something the frozen rope lock. That's also again all right so so explain a little bit about the process right three months in. Obviously you had the name. Since you're twelve yeah What about the logo and things like that. So the logo was pretty simple. Is the major league baseball. i mean. hopefully they don't come after me for infringement or anything but it's a. It's literally just a baseball. The baseball symbol. The major league baseball symbol with headphones on it and it started off as being red white and blue normal. The normal one and then. I got affiliated with media. Group called the buzz and they were just like you know we. We don't wanna get hit with infringement. They're like so. What can we do here. And i was like. I mean you could change the color if you want to your color scheme. And that's what they did. They changed it to their scholar. Scheme ended up working out pretty well. They put the ball in the headphones. And it was just completely just change. Everything about it so it was. It was pretty cool. That's awesome so explain a little bit about how you got connected with the buzz okay. So the i'm in like this. I'm a nerd when it comes to baseball. So i'm in a sports group simply just pretty much baseball. It's called sports chat but it's really not just baseball pretty much on a why they don't just change it a baseball chat whatever so it started off with that and then there's this guy like you know i told him i made episode or two and he's like oh give let me let give it a listen so he gave listen and he was like he's like you know me and my body just started a media group not too long ago with another group and the guy some. I went nuts so they just decided this move on from that it ended up being where they just were like a baseball podcast because they have like five. They'd five podcast on their thing right now and before me and all five of them were either for them. Were wrestling podcast. I don't know why you need that. Many good for them. And there's a guy who's actually from like england who's on there which is pretty cool. It's pretty cool. The way they do it. They're a great group of guys and it's pretty cool everything and then there was a guy. Then there's some rain on. I think there's a soccer program to that. They're trying to generate right now. Trying to get more people to watch and on anyone. You guys are in a soccer. But if he's argo try that and then Then they different stuff on there but it was pretty cool the way that it kind of came about and then i told them that i wrote. I've be right little articles. I've written articles for guys know the tattoo dunphy. So dunphy is a friend of mine. I've known for a long time. But i went to high school with a grade school. I believe too. And like i've known for a long time him in this other dude joe that i'm friends with a started a base. They started a podcast and stuff called like deep fly and they do a bunch of stuff for their own media group. So they asked me. Would you want to write for our so. I was doing like little baseball pieces for the phillies. And i would just write little things for them and it ended up being pretty cool. It was it was like a cool experience. So i get myself into that type of realm like i always wanted to do something baseball related. I didn't care what it was like i. I'm way too small to play and to old to play so it's just got past that and i was an in so i kind of looked on the other side and i don't know it's just something that i was always into so it all worked out well so so explain a little bit about So to download An episode from the frozen rope. What what can they expect. What some of the topics you hit Things like that So one thing i always. I'm a red sox fan. That's the start off. And i always tell people baseball fan. I red sox me and second. There's i never really ever wanted to do anything as far as just saying like i want to cover one team. Yes there is. Because i'm very diverse. When it comes to the sport. I know pretty much. I don't want to brag. But i know a lot i know i know pretty much everything enough to make my own podcast and be confident with the things that i say. Yeah so i feel as if when you go on there. You'll see someone who's not biased. You'll see somebody who you know truly cares about. The sport gives a good input on my thoughts. In how. I how. I look at the game. Yeah i got a guy the other day. Text me one of my friends from the from the union. Us just like it's crazy. It's like he's like. I feel like i know the game. He's like but you like no it and he's like he's like you. It's almost like i give him like a managerial like input. Like i've been around since i was like nine. My dad was a head coach of saint joe's prep. He was a great baseball player. I've been around the game my whole life and then it just you know i. It just been something that i've always been in love with. I told my wife. That's unfortunate. You are probably my second. Love will always be my first and she just tells me she hates me for that. But it's funny. it's just it's just. It's just how it's always been baseball's always been there you know and so it's i always wanted to do something with it and you'll see somebody who just did something with

Baseball John Hunter Vladimir Guerrero Expos Basketball Soccer Ball Dunphy Wrestling Red Sox Phillies England JOE Saint Joe's Prep
The Power of Humor

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:18 min | 3 weeks ago

The Power of Humor

"Jennifer occur a named by donuts or a professor and lecturer respectively at the stanford graduate school of business. They've just written a book called humor seriously so gentle. Why don't we start by well. Why don't you start by telling me the value of humor in the workplace. I in leadership when people use humor at work the are twenty three percent more respected and are seen as more competent and more confident. It doesn't even need to be good humor. Just not inappropriate humor. The bar is so low and for employee retention employees. Read their bosses. As having a sense of humor any sense of humor they were to be fifteen percent more satisfied and engaged in their jobs and even in sales studies show that people pay on average eighteen percent more if the seller includes a lighthearted line as part of their final offer like my final offer is x. And i'll throw in my pet frog again. The humor doesn't have to be good and just anything. So what do you think is the cost of not using humor. If you're recuperation well not only would it reduce creativity it also reduces engagement and retention so the koster significant All right so. I was thinking to myself as i read this book. If i was a corporation or a senior manager in a corporation and i was thinking i was wondering what the return on investment might be and i think touched on a couple of things. Creativity better relationships with clients productivity. Is there any other other any other things that you could think of. That would provide a decent return on investment for an investment in humor for companies. So just to be clear you want more than retention innovation leadership selling products. You want more from us. Pat coty. we'll give you another one. We'll give you a health that the cost of of health mental wellbeing physical wellbeing are enormous for companies and humor actually makes you not only healthier. It makes you live longer so one. Large-scale norwegian study conducted over the course of fifteen years. Found that people with a sense of humor. Happy thirty percent better chance of survival if severe disease strikes and they live eight years longer so laughter literally makes us more physically. Resilient has bottom line effects for companies. I know. I've met so many people in my career my careers in fact who are just not fans of humor that like look i just wanna do. My job paid and go home. But how do you deal. If you're a manager. How do you deal with someone. Who has that kind of vibe and feeling about them. Well you're hitting on one of costello's biggest pieces of advice the former. Ceo of twitter. Dick says if you wanna have more humor at work. Don't tell jokes. Don't try to be funny. Just look for more reasons to laugh. It's this idea of actually being human not about being humorous And this is the reality is right now that this is more important than ever because you know our work is much more technology mediated and therefore the harder it is to be to bring out our humanity and a sense of humor at work we subconsciously adopt to our medium and we're constantly communicating through technology. It's easy to sound like a robot so it's more really in a way it's more by sense of humor than being funny absolutely and it's also about being more generous with laughter so not trying to be funny just looking for moments to laugh generously and the entire texture of life changes when you're able to live this way And another thing that we try and tell people to do is to try and create small moments of joy for someone else and especially. If you're having trouble finding it in your own life right now just looked to create a little moment for someone and it can be a really small gesture not a joke by changing your virtual background to a picture from fun shared experience or You know leaving a nice posted on your fridge for the person that you cohabitate with But this focus on creating joy for someone else help. Take the pressure off. You know. I need to be funny. I need to look funny myself. And it's more about. How can i focus on someone else in. Elevate them

Stanford Graduate School Of Bu Pat Coty Severe Disease Strikes Donuts Jennifer Costello Dick Twitter
How Founder Craig Groeschel Built Up Life.Church

The EntreLeadership Podcast

03:11 min | 3 weeks ago

How Founder Craig Groeschel Built Up Life.Church

"Many organizations like craig's don't always start out with a master plan but the good news is. This is something you can learn along the way we started Twenty five years ago in a little two car garage on a very snowy sunday with about forty people and we kind of expanded from there to some different places built a building a few years later and we were. We were kind of on the front end. experimenting with doing video teaching and go on multiple sides so we were Either the first or one of the first churches in the nation to just kinda start plowing background. And if you fast four twenty five years as of today. Our church meets in thirty six physical locations. Where in eleven different states have a great team of people tons and tons of volunteers that are actively engaged. And then we're super aggressive digitally as well doing a ton of online ministry and normally what you would think of in social media and such to to outreach but also real vibrant online Kind of church service that meets a bunch of times during the week with people all over the world. I could imagine that when you started that. You didn't necessarily see everything that you're doing kind of those let's get going and and then we got to keep up with vision as we go along. Did you become a leader in response to what was going on or have you always had a bit towards leadership you know. That's a great question. So i was. I played sports growing up. So you're an athlete as well when when you're an anytime kind of extracurricular activity you kind of stumble into leadership whether you're following somebody or whether you're doing the leading so i had a started to recognize the times on the field where i might assume a leadership role that When when there was a vacuum and then oddly enough when i started The church in my mind. All i had was a pastor pastor so there was a metaphor for that would have been like the shepherd that takes care of the sheep and looked at jesus scripture. That's what i saw was Person who loved and cared for people. it was an honest until a few years end that i took a different lens and started to realize that A pastor or shepherd could also be a really good spiritual leader and it was really interesting. When i changed my lens and started looking at jesus not just through the eyes of someone who cared for people but he actually led people. It was revolutionary and It kinda brought something. I think that was inside of me. But i didn't know that was there that now you know love talking about as much as anything and it translates good leadership good leadership in church and a for profit and nonprofit in family Anywhere you go. And i think Leadership so important. So that's why you know. I'm a big fan of what you all do. Autrey leadership podcast the The conference we have coming up is just a great investment in in leadership and we. We know that everyone wins when the leader gets better. And i appreciate your investment in me and all the other leaders around the world helping us get better.

Craig Shepherd Autrey
Grow Your Business With These Part Time Hires

The $100 MBA Show

04:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Grow Your Business With These Part Time Hires

"I hire an executive assistant. A virtual assistant somebody that can do your ten dollar tasks. What are ten dollar task swell. These are these little nitty-gritty tests that you are doing right now. That are wasting your time. That are not really worth much. They'll actually bring in money into the company. You should be focusing on ten thousand dollar tasks as the founder as the person that's behind the product. You're the expert. You need to use your genius to bring in the big bucks. You shouldn't be using your time doing admin work we're talking email scheduling taking notes updating blog posts. All you'll finicky things that anybody could be trained to do. If you don't have an executive assistant already you could definitely get one and you could start time twenty hours a week for this job position. I recommended shakeout all my jobs up. H this is a job. Board based out of the philippines can get some really good talent for part time higher for this position. Three hundred dollars a month is the ranger looking at peanuts. Compared to the amount of time you're going to save they're going to save you twenty hours a week. Imagine what you can do with twenty hours extra week to bring in more clients more customers build better products. Do more live webinars make more sales. This is what you should be focusing on. Not adleman work. Okay so i hire executive assistant. This is going to relieve you of all the little nitty gritty stuff and focus on the stuff that really brings in the money. Higher number. Two a part-time content writer are fulltime content writer. Connor on our team was part time in the beginning and he was able to fill in some gaps and the reason why i recommend a content writers. Because they're able to write you. Blog posts are able to write you a scripts for your video. They're able to create your social media. Snippets what all these things have in common. They're all marketing activities that are going to bringing customers. That are make you money. And all they focus on is writing great copy to sell your products or services. You get the focus on creating a better product in great copy. Great writing like a blog post. That's evergreen is going to bring you traffic. Seo is an investment right. It's something that you're gonna reap the benefits for years to come okay. Their work will equal dollars. Okay now content writer is a little bit expensive because they are a high skilled job but you can get some really good writers and some of them were via a word count or per blockposts or per hour. You're looking around Fifteen all the way to thirty forty dollars an hour to just get started and you can start with ten hours a week and move up fifteen twenty as you see fit a gray site to Find somebody who works remotely to help you With this position is we work remotely dot com is a good job site for this type of work is usually a tech site or tech jobs but they also have content jobs. Upwork is also a good place to look for somebody in this area next a customer service agent now. Any customer service asian. You know you may not have that many customers with that. Many customer service requests a great customer service. It goes a long way. It helps you. Keep your customers and get return customers. But i also want you to find if you're gonna make one higher that's part time find somebody who is really going to focus on dealing with delinquent turn delinquent payments a lot entrepreneurs leave a lot of money on the table where they will follow up with customers. That have failed credit card. The don't renew their credit card information. They forgot to update their Their credit card information in their account. When it's time for renewal for baby their membership or their annual access to your community just simply they just need a personal touch to get them to update their information many. We'll just ignore this. And they're leaving thousands. Maybe even hundreds of thousands of dollars on the table off delinquent turn and if you have somebody dedicated that just goes to your stripe account or goes to your back in and says okay here. All the filth payments these are all the customers that are attached to an email each one and reach out to them as an update their credit card information so they can continue to get all the benefits of your products and services an individual email from an unreal. Person makes a whole lot of difference and this is low hanging fruit. Easy part time higher Again all my jobs up h is a good place to find that person. There's also a service. That can do this but i know they have minimums in terms of how many customers or how many failed payments but check them out. There called greedy at greedy solutions dot l.

Adleman Philippines Connor SEO
Dr. Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas: "Humor creates a window into authenticity and trust."

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Dr. Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas: "Humor creates a window into authenticity and trust."

"Cheddar. I'm really curious. Because one of the first example he said was she was kind of living this double life she was. You know this serious business professional by day and had this you know literally humorous lifestyle by night and weekends at. I'm curious gentlemen like in your studies. How common is that not necessarily common that people have you know a improv career on the side. But how common is it that people turn off some of their personality within the workplace. Such a good question you know with our students in even executives that we teach we find it know it to be incredibly common. In fact i would say that. Youtube seem to be exceptions to the rule. I think the only story is not only communist. I think there's a lot of reasons for that. We often believe that certain characteristics about ourselves like our sense of humor having some levity or even smiling or being a human have no place in the workforce because if we take our work seriously we should take ourselves seriously in a book. We dive into these four deadly myths associated with you mark and if you put the word deadly in front of it makes it sound more cornets. That's just a little scientific for you guys but the first one is you know the serious business daily math. That here's somebody has no place in the in the workforce or any place that takes yourself seriously but research shows that even just laughing has unparalleled effects on our chemistry and our behavior so it literally when you laugh together. It changes the chemistry of your rain to make you more prime connection more creative and more resourceful and more resilient stress very cafe at i in. It's really important to me to be around people that i can laugh with and i know you talk about it. Believe it's four different types of humor that that you sort of. Can you tell us what the four r. I wanted to gauge where we fit. Carl wants to know how funny she is. Yes of because. I have no problem saying i'm funny okay. The only described humor types. And then i'll take a whakatane now and carly all right. So we've got four humor styles the standup the magnet the sniper and the sweetheart so standups natural entertainers outgoing not afraid to ruffle feathers to get a laugh. Like to roast like to tease big personalities next is the magnet similarly outgoing but magnets tend to keep things positive warm uplifting. They avoid controversial. Humor the radiate charisma. They're the ones buying around of drinks at the bar while laughing next. We have these sniper so snipers are a little bit more introverted. And their style. Tends to be edgy sarcastic nuanced. so it's sort of they say they have an acquired taste and they're not afraid to cross a line in pursuit of laugh so really good at zerorez and with deadpan delivery. And then lastly we have sweetheart so again. A little bit understated in their delivery earnest and honest they again tend to use humor. That's more uplifting that brings people together. They would never make someone else the target of their job if they thought it might hurt feelings but they're not the ones that want the limelight and they're going to be on stage so those are four. Okay so this is. This is a best gas carly in the back of your mind. You should be thinking what you jan. Y'all as you should be thinking. What partly thing i got it. Okay all right so this is our best. Guess jandiyal you are likely a sweetheart and carly is part madinat and parts neighbor. Okay and when i say we i mean alex. Alex told assist so out on our team. Yeah alex get off camera. You need to be put on the spot now. Alex's terrified now yeah. I think that what's interesting about. This is my humor in the workplace is very different than my humor. I said i. I was gonna say that my humor style. Four the podcast or in the office is probably more sweetheart. But i think in in reality. It's definitely more sniper. Yes that is true. She's like midwest work muir bjork and carly. I don't know what this falls into but like any like seventh grade boy. Category link found. You guy humor okay. You always say that. Like i say that i like to eat like a child like i twelve year. Old boy Gushers stuff like that. Okay i think i am sniper. But i think at work i've probably do straddle i actually don't know which i'd straddle i think either stratas sniper in stand up or sniper polystyrene stand up. I would agree with that. I mean how often is that when you guys come across this. That humor types vary depending on what the audience yacht that. This is common actually at super healthy so in particular. it's really important to recognize. There's a powerful relationship between humor and status and so what we find. Is that as people get higher in status. Your humor style needs to shift and this is because one of the principles of of comedy is never punched down. Basically never make fun of someone who's of lower status than you and when particular we find for people who are senior executives in organizations is they tend to have more teasing biting edgy humor outside of the office but when they come into the office they really have to use humor. That's more uplifting. Because if they don't that people who are more junior on their team might take it the wrong way or might have hurt feelings so we often find that that's the case especially with senior folks and then the reality is just like anything else the appropriateness of what we say at home versus what we say at work is different. You know we have different responsibilities. We have different relationships with our colleagues than we do with our families. And so it's it's actually really good that you're not making all the jokes around the boardroom that you are around the dinner

Jandiyal Muir Bjork Youtube Alex Carl Carly Midwest