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Explain How Your Business Works Using a Bike

The $100 MBA Show

7:03 listening | 1 d ago

Explain How Your Business Works Using a Bike

"Years ago I had the opportunity to run a small manufacturing business. He was my first opportunity at leading a team of people and as I entered the business on the very first day and walked around and met many of the workers. Many of the folks working in the business a quickly dawned on me that most all of them were there simply to do their job in didn't really think much about how the business worked or the strategies. We were GONNA use to make the business better and I wanted to get them engaged in the business and so. I was trying to find a clever way to do that. I came up with this great idea to use a bicycle as a metaphor for a business and so I rounded up the entire team. I put a ache at the front of the room and I asked everyone. What's this pointing to the bike? Some of them said it was a bike said it was stolen property and I shared with them that I this wasn't just a bike that this was our business and if we could understand how our businesses this bike we could tune up our business and make it go really fast and that's exactly what we did over the next seven years. We use to bike as a metaphor for a business and our business grew rapidly. It got incredibly powerful and L. ultimately seven years down the road our largest competitor made a bid to buy our business. So let me take you on a quick lap around the bike because I believe you could use the bike as a way to explain your team how your business works as well? Let's start with the handlebars we steer a bike using the handlebars? So how do you steer a business? You do it with three things one. You have to paint a picture of the future the vision you want for the business it has to be compelling and inspiring so that your team will WanNa come along with you. Secondly you've got to set your performance standards the level of performance that you're gonNA expect and demand from your team so that your customers get what they need and deserve the third piece is you have to have a mission or purpose a passion that your business is going to support that everybody can rally around and support you in that bats. How you steer a business. Now let's talk about the frame. The frame of the bike is what holds all the component parts together everything attached to the frame. So what's the frame on Your Business? I believe the frame on your businesses made up of three major components number one your organization structure or your organization chart. I have three fundamental rules to to structuring. An Org chart one is it ought to be done by function not by person. The second is that there should be only one person in each box. The third fundamental pieces that your org chart to reflect your business as you see it three years in the future in other words. Make it a forward indicator of what you want. The business to look like the second component of the structure is your your position agreements. It's a way to define the job responsibilities for each individual box. The third component of the structure is your accountability system. How are you gonNA on a systematic basis? Hold everybody accountable. Have people take ownership for their responsibilities in the business? Those three components will give you a solid frame for your so. Let's talk about where the rubber truly meets the road on a bike. The rubber meets the road in two places the front wheel and back-wheel likewise and business. The rubber literally meets the road into places in our business. The front wheel of our businesses represented by our ability to win new customers and the ability to win. New customers made up of three components. The hub of the wheel represents the definition of our ideal prospect. We need to understand that clearly. The spokes on the Front Wheel Represent Our marketing strategies. And we have to have multiple strategy. We can't we can't survive in business with just one or two marketing strategies. We have to have multiple so we have a steady flow of leads and the tire on our front wheel represents our selling process the process we use to take customer from not knowing us at all being so comfortable with us that they'll pull out their wallet give us their credit card and buy our product or service now the back wheel of our business represents our ability to serve our customers. I. It's delivering on the promise. We made on the front wheel and so the back wheel we've got to have processes in place to be able to efficiently process the products and services that we promised so we're delivering efficiently and accurately. You'll also notice that there's there are oftentimes gears on the back of a tie back tire of a bike and those are so we can change speeds oftentimes and business whether it's seasonal changes or economic changes we need to be able to efficiently change speeds in our delivery processes while still being efficient and cost effective. Now how do we keep the both wheels on our bike going at the same speed because it's very important that they go at the same speed otherwise we're headed for a crash so on a bike we use our breaks to keep our our wheels going at the same speed? We have one for the front and one for the back or breaks on our business are represented by our financial controls. These are the documents that we use to understand how well were using our funds or resources in our business so if we're not using things like a a profit and loss statement a balance sheet a cash flow forecast and the budget. Then we're not using the brakes properly in our business. We've got to have those and use those so that we're making smart decisions to run and operate or business now on my bike. There's also a monitor on the handlebars that can the tells me my. My pace might cadence my heart rate. How well burning my fuel in business? The Monitor is our key. Performance indicators are. Dashboard the tells us our predictive indicators of how we're doing in the future these may be things like how many prospects were generating. What's our conversion rate? What's our average ticket price? Those things that'll help us predict the future of our business. We need to have a solid dashboard to be able to make that

Keeping Your Dream Alive with Drew Holcomb

The EntreLeadership Podcast

9:20 listening | 1 d ago

Keeping Your Dream Alive with Drew Holcomb

"Today or conversation is with music city icon drew holcomb. And you may remember that. We talked to drew's manager Paul Steal a few weeks ago. But here's the thing you need to know about drew. He absolutely refuses to be limited by other people's labels yes? He's a killer singer and songwriter. And believe me you're GONNA WANNA listen to the end of this episode. But he's used that foundation of singing and songwriting to lay a platform for becoming an entrepreneur. An investor a business owner. The guys creative he's disciplined. He's an absolute anomaly. But all of these different roles and qualities they've come together to make for a pretty remarkable and outrageous life but as you will hear his path toward becoming one of Americana Music Most beloved and authentic figures. It was one that actually started over twenty years ago and it was birthed out of a tragedy. I played music all throughout high school. I was your classic like Gout. The Guitar Planning Life and Learning Songs and having fun just with friends. I didn't write a song until I was a junior in college. I went to a personal tragedy the summer after my junior year of high school at a younger brother special needs who passed away very unexpectedly. I was actually out of the country and music was sort of thing. Kinda got me through it so really for me. Music was this personal sort of healing anchor. Anchor exactly I've no thoughts of doing it professionally especially talented at that time. I don't think so. No no not really I mean I was. I was fine You know I always had a very sort of ernest. Hard-working like plow through it. Sort of ethic involved in scouts and was in the student body organization. And all the things you know at school. I Love School. I always student so I went to school to college with the intent of going to graduate school to study. History on my goal is to write books and be a history professor so that was the dream now somewhere along the way. My junior decided to go study abroad and I studied in Edinburgh Scotland and I didn't really know anybody so I took my guitar with me. You know that was like my main hobby was playing guitar and I just started writing songs like at night. I'd finish my work or whatever three roommates. A Frenchman Franck Thomas the German Dave the Canadian and drew the American. That sounds like the makings of a killer ban. Yes that's right court. What are you studying in? Scotland studying church history so studying sort of like a variety of classes but Studying sort of fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Scotland. Studying the early sort of early Roman church so sort of. Constantine through you know the the break-up of the Roman Empire so just like nerdy stuck just had your guitar with you the whole yet. I wasn't writing songs about any of that stuff. I mean it was informing you know in a way but now I just started writing songs and really. It was diving into that pain because what I knew I was GONNA do. I started writing songs because my senior project at. Ut was an oral history about my brother. So I was interviewing fifty to eighty people. Nurses doctors friends teachers cousins. Who grew up around him in his life. And I was trying to figure out why this like kid. With Spina Bifida made such an impact when he his funeral was like twenty five hundred on my word so I was just personally curious and also just thought it was a great way to sort of put this history stuff to work to do this oral history and so part of that was started writing songs about that. Sorta as a sideline and extending come home from Scotland and start my senior year. My friends start playing songs for my friends. They're like Ayman is a pretty good. You should maybe give this a go so I started looking some gigs in Knoxville. Like at bars and I'd play covers and originals. Invite my friends out and this mentor of mine. Basically told me so. Hey man graduate. School can wait a year to like. It's not going anywhere much to take a break. Do this music thing get a job. See what happens. And that was in the fall. Two Thousand and three and here we are in two thousand twenty. Golly that's crazy so when you started doing it and you were playing in those bars. You couldn't have been making much planning those bars. No it's probably pretty scrappy beginnings for a while. I would assume yeah really four or five years of absolute scrap absolute scrap. Was that whole time where you think to yourself. This is what I want to do with the rest of my life or were you just filling time. During that season I was enjoying sort of the process of seeing the country of convincing by then friend to date me and Mary me I was enjoying the freedom I really found a lot of freedom and being my own boss that was like also and I was like well. That's pretty cool. And then also the same time I was sort of looking at the writing on the wall of the other dream going man. It's like really hard to get a real decent job at university especially as sort of a you know another southern white male just like there's a lot of those PhD's in history saturated market. So I just honestly the part of it I was really loving the business and I was finding satisfaction in putting together the band and the recording process and learning I was growing. I felt like you know all these things. I didn't understand about music. I mean as a kid you get a record and you think Oh. These people just got no room. They've set up. Some microphones push record. And that's what you hear and then you realize that. Oh It's actually this incredibly long and arduous process but very satisfying process and so I found myself enjoying it and just kept going based on my dad. You know I'm just GonNa keep doing this until it stops growing and it didn't. You're still. Here is your idol dip. It was your dad. Supportive or your parents supportive as you were kind of pursuing this dream very supportive. My Dad always jokes. He says he has all these friends that tell him like. Why did you let drew do this? And he's like I let drew do anything you know. He's twenty one years. Old graduated from College Emmy debt which was Nice Ozone. Scholarship makes a big difference in your twenty two years old about. Can you pursue this dream? Well I have all this debt and I gotta get a certain amount of money job or can I like try to do something independently with it of hamstrings you? So I didn't have any deaths and my dad basically told me like. Hey Man if you're gonNa work hard at this your mom and I are in your corner like let's go for it and actually took me guitar shop and bought me like the nicest guitar he could afford and said like this is our send you on your way thing you know. Wow so very supportive stuff had other people say like I wanted your parents. Let you do this crazy thing. Let me amount of adult. Yeah that's right. You don't have to have your parents permission but it sure helps. Psychologically I think to have people that believe in you that in your corner day deal but also. They weren't covering like they weren't paying for you to do they work. They work funding your dream. But they were supporting your. Yeah but I gave me alone ten grand and make my first record but it was expected to be paid back. And did you pay of course? I figured you're probably not still in the payment plan. No I read this in. I think it was rolling stone. That wrote it. It said while working at a Memphis studio in the early two thousands holcomb started playing small bars on weekends and eventually found himself zigzagging across the south in old Volvo Wagon and putting nearly three hundred thousand miles on the car and five years first of all. Is that true very true? John Actually totaled at around two hundred and forty thousand miles and took it around mechanic and he he made it drivable not put another ninety thousand miles on it. That's insane you're going all over and then it says initially. He says he was barely making ends. Meet playing at the most random coffee houses and community college. Lunch hours anywhere. That would give me a little scratch to play my songs. So that's a pretty accurate representation. Those first few yeah definitely and you know some of those college. Gigs were literally community colleges noon and they had these entertainment budgets that they had dispensed they bring you in. I'd bring my own P. A. And severe that set it up in the corner at start playing and literally a third of the room when they realized the somebody was sort of interrupting their lunch would put their headphones on to listen to their music. While I'm playing in the corner so you had to have pretty thick skin letting you know their checks cashed and that's how I was able to afford to keep going so it was complete survival. Did you have moments where you were just like? What am I doing at least two or three times an hour? When I was playing shows seriously though you know sometimes about halfway through that period is when I got married. Ellie was a schoolteacher and then after a year of teaching administered go on. The road means so really my last year of doing a lot of those colleges she was with me and that was so much more fun because we were just getting the car and just laugh at how terrible the experience was you know like. I said they were the gigs paid and that was the right around the time we started having some success with songs on TV and film. This song live forever came out which did really well On. Tv show. Parenthood was the season. Finale montage moment and we got paid enough to get a van and we started getting asked to go on tour other singer. Songwriters. Dave Barnes and Marvis. Are these sort of smaller. You Know Club. Things were also starting to really make real fans and then it became. Maybe I want to do this for the rest of my life. Real to that point it was like this is a big.

Scotland Drew Business Owner I Love School Emmy Spina Bifida Dave Barnes Sixteenth Century Scotland UT Franck Thomas John Actually Ayman Constantine Professor Paul Steal Golly Edinburgh Ellie Knoxville
reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

How I Built This

7:01 listening | 1 d ago

reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

"Think about the small moments or decisions in your life that actually had a huge impact on how your life turned out. Maybe it was a conversation. You struck up with the person next to you on an airplane. Maybe it was a party. You reluctantly went to only to meet the person you'd eventually marry or maybe it was a decision to stay on vacation an extra day that sparked a new idea for Kevin System. It was a random remark from his girlfriend that made him decide to use filters on instagram for Blake. Majkowski was a chance meeting with a group of young Argentinian who took him to the countryside where he saw kids with no shoes. That one day inspired him to create. Tom's and for Louis Fun on it was a free lecture at Carnegie Mellon University in two thousand. We'll get deeper into the story in a few minutes but that single lecture would lead him to invent to ingenious new tools the I was capture. Yes captures those annoying twisted and blurred letters. You have to type into a website to prove your human and the second one was duo lingo now. The biggest language learning APP in the world which is now getting even more popular because people are looking for new things to do now that they're stuck at home but was captured and duo. Lingo were designed to harness the power of crowdsourcing to solve problems. And I'M GONNA blow your mind here if you have ever typed in a capture or reused dueling go. There's a good chance you've taken part in a massive online collaboration that you probably weren't even aware of and it's amazing. How Louis came up with all this but let's start at the beginning. Lewis was born in Guatemala in late. Nineteen Seventy S. Both as parents were doctors and though he was surrounded by poverty violence in Guatemala City. Louis screw up in comparative privilege and as a kid. He spent a lot of time hanging out at the family business. My Mother's family actually had a candy. Factory everybody is always a Mesa. The fact that I grew up with a candy factory they think it was like Willy. Wonka or something. I was not all that much into the candidate. Self I was into the machines because basically the candies made by these gigantic machines. That bump out I don't know how many thousands of pieces of candy per hour and basically all my weekends. I spent playing at the Candy Factory and I would They the machines apart and put them back together they would be some extra pieces after. I put him back together on that. That would be a problem but what? What kind of student were you were? You were school pretty easy for you. Yeah I was pretty nerdy basically. That was really good at math. Math was just easy to me. I what I would do during the summers is basically get either next year or you know. Couple YEARS LATER. Math books on all the sizes. Wow it kind of came easy but the way I really got good ideas by doing hundreds and hundreds exercises. That's what you do in. The summertime was bored. I mean I was an only child I is. I didn't have that much to do. This is remember this is also pre Internet pre everything. So what was I going to do? Man That's what I did was putting playing cards in the spokes of my bicycle and by jolly ranchers seven. Eleven should math books. So you were. Did you just love math? I mean it sounds like kids. Don't think about their future. They're not like I'm going to study math so I can be in tech one day like unless I've really enjoyed it. I I enjoyed it was it was like a puzzle for me by the way this is not the only thing I did. I mean I I also played a lot of video games Pirated Video Games in my commodore sixty four like floppy disks. Floppy Disk loppy discs. That's right I wanted a Nintendo. When I was eight my mother would not get many intendo. She instead got me computer. Commodore Sixty Four. And I couldn't figure out how to use it but eventually I read like the manual stuff and I figured out how to use it more than I figured out. I could buy other people's video games. And so I became a little hub in my in my little neighbourhood but these were not other kids adults or kind of basically young adults who had a computer and they would come to my house and I would take their games and give them my games exchange so then. I collected a pretty large number of video games but sh- mentioned right that I mean because your childhood sounds pretty nice but but like as a kid I guess or even as a teenager there was a civil war in Guatemala right. I mean we know that today. There's a a lot of violence there. Obviously violence in the US and other countries to but Guatemala's has been particularly hard hit. I mean did it feel dangerous when you're a kid yes it did. There was a civil war pretty much since I was born in seventy nine to nineteen ninety-six. There was a civil war going on the whole time. It always felt dangerous when I was fifteen or so. My aunt was kidnapped for ransom. I mean she was gone for seven or eight days. Wow People's cars would be stolen. I don't every couple of months. Somebody's car would be stolen in my family. Going past seven thirty PM was rare games. You needed to go out in a large group. If you're going to go up at seven thirty PM and I did my house had walls and barbed wire yeah. It felt dangerous. I mean this is one of just one of the reasons I came to the US. Actually I mean I was. After my aunt was kidnapped I thought to myself. I don't WanNa live here. Yeah and I guess you did end up leaving Guatemala for college because you went to Duke in North Carolina and you describe yourself as a like a math nerd in school and and is that what you intended to do like to do something in math. That's what I wanted to become an economic math professor. I was pretty certain. I wanted to become a math professor at the time. I thought the best thing that I can do is really learn a lot of math and I really it and I thought it was futile to learn how to deal with other people. It is interesting because my job. These days is one hundred percent just dealing with other people's problems. I'm just trying to understand the so so by becoming math professor. You thought. Hey I wouldn't have to deal with people I would just deal with facts. Data and numbers. Yes yes and you know I. I'll do math research all day long. And every now and then after class of but whatever that's like a tax That's that's what I thought so all right so you are She gets your degree and you this path to go into academia and you go into a PhD program at Carnegie Mellon Correct and I guess you go into computer science right yes. I changed from math computer science because I visited a math Grad school and what people were saying the professor was saying. Oh I'm working on this open problem that nobody's been able to solve for the last three hundred years and I thought I don't think I'm smart enough if you haven't done it and nobody's done it in three hundred years that's Kinda not for me whereas when you visit in computer science I mean this is crazy thing before like. Oh Yeah I still have an open program yesterday. Well it's a much younger field yet so that I thought that was much more exciting for me. At

Guatemala Professor Louis Fun Math Grad School Candy Factory United States Guatemala City Carnegie Mellon University Instagram Majkowski Kevin System Carnegie Mellon Blake Nintendo TOM Wonka Mesa
Should My Parents Close or Sell the Family Business?

The EntreLeadership Podcast

6:21 listening | 5 d ago

Should My Parents Close or Sell the Family Business?

"With us in Indiana. Hero's welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. How can we help? Thanks for taking my goal day with the great honor to do to The question is about My parents family business They have a small Wine and your shop in Indiana and when the state was shut down they had shut down kind of during the peak of the cases in their county and now as things are starting to open back up. They've been doing our delivery They are debating closing the shop down altogether. They are in a really good financial position. their Employees are really eager to return to work especially now with the six hundred dollars. Bonus ending in July on their unemployment They get a lot of money in tips. They a lot of support from the community. They sell bottled during Cold Water. And the community really likes that shop and it would be really sad for them to River the employees if everyone were to get laid off in the shop where to get close. My Dad's sixty six. My Mom's sixty four They think you know they're very blessed. My Dad came to this country with like three hundred dollars on his pocket. And now he's worth over two million dollars closing it. What would they do with the inventory? they could probably sell the inventory off to other liquor stores really easily even at full price because or near retail. Because like why why? Why would they not sell the shop instead of close it? They they could sell the shock. I get. That was part of the closing so they could sell the shop. They try to sell the shop. They sold the shop two years ago and it was very strange. The personally sold it to was having Problems with Indiana taxes and wasn't doing everything above board so the Indiana government actually reverted the licensed actually original owner them and so they went back and reopen the shop. But my mom's been trying to retire for years because they're in the financial cause to do so. My Dad says because they sold it to. Google doesn't mean selling it as the wrong decision. That just means they sold it to the wrong guy. That's true if they sell it now. My Dad feels that maybe the person who buys it isn't gonNA keep employees on. They've got there. Oh the plays that they have are dollars now. I don't have a manager. They know my mom's manager. Okay all right so it sounds like the ready in the season a life there into sell this and have an exit and said I'm GONNA I'll take less for it but you have to keep the employees for years by the deal. That's a bad idea. Actually I think that finding the right buyer might be the right move for them to keep them safe and then also continued the business. That's a really great idea. These are classic small business people. They love their employees. Yeah they they hire three single moms they you know. They're only making like seven or eight dollars an hour but with tips and everything they they do really well with their families. They were hearted jerks your parents. And they didn't care about their people the only thing blocking them from selling it so people and so they make their part of the deal. Thanks guys going better. I just what you the question I have is. Are you calling on their behalf or because sounds like you said they're thinking about not reopening? It's what I thought I heard you say and I'm curious what you're what you're interested in this. Is it just because you feel for the employees or or you try and help them make the best decision? Where do you stand in all of this because like I haven't been able to sit down with them in months like I'm on the front lines? I work at division in a different city. And so you know I. I talked to them every day on the phone about how things are going at the shop. I think you know. I think they made moves to sell it before. They're really ready to retire. The they put me in my sister at their school. They seized a lot for retirement. Anything ready to go. I just think my dad. Especially with the social distancing isn't ready necessarily to. He doesn't think it's a great idea to start that season of life now I mean woods the tax bonuses and everything coming in right now For people people are like the liquor store has long-line but he he opened at six o'clock in the morning. Fifty people in line. It's crazy so each like. Why SHOULD WE SELL MOUTH BUSINESS? The highest it's been in a year. Well I mean it doesn't have to be now but I you could say you know when business slows and there's a more normal rhythm to the business after the shutdowns are starting to go away. I don't know when Indiana's opening up but you go through those different things and say you know in the fall. We're going to sell it or next spring. We're going to see the thing is. If you've got a target it takes the pressure off and if you just go we're not going to sell it. We're going to operated the well. That's forever well if you say we're going to sell it. We're not going to sell it until this happens. The challenge that she has. She doesn't own the she doesn't work in the business but she's trying to help her parents trying to make a good decision. They were torn between the season a life and the team and in my own business and it's a little weird talking to them. I know a lot about business. I'd lead entreleadership. We talked to you guys all the time trying to give your parents advice and direction on this. It sounds like you guys have a good relationship. You can't really just give them the answer. You got to prompt the conversations and give them options and say hey. Here's something to consider. Here's one I got an idea you know in this situation. What if there's a lot of people in the service industry been laid off restaurant bar managers there some sharp people that need a job right now? I gotTa believe I would be considering looking for somebody like that. Who could be manager in this bridge season? Two days talking about take advantage of this opportunity where people were lining up at eight. Am to get liquor liquor. Sales across the country are exploding. I would take advantage of this. Get those people back to work those single moms that they love dearly get some people stable until he finds the right buyer. But I think there's plenty of people who can manage that store while they stay at home but then you can also negotiate that your dad stays on for a year or two years to ensure the team is taken care of as the president or operates. The business as a part of the deal So you could have a transition

Indiana Dave Ramsey Google President Trump
Guest Teacher Oli Bridge: How to Build Video Funnels for Your Business

The $100 MBA Show

5:52 listening | Last week

Guest Teacher Oli Bridge: How to Build Video Funnels for Your Business

"Dive into the first part of your video. Funnel engine conversion funnels how about using a personalized video respond to a new inquiry on your website rousing just foreign back a regular email. While as we researching the white paper. Last year I found that customers a seventy percent more likely to respond to emails. If the email has a visual of you in it think about it. You'll video that you'll Sunday is proof that you've taken the time for that. Customer and human psychology means a much more likely to reciprocate the effort amherst spongy. How about using videos to get more leads to show for sales demos but dropped personal video in the days of the hours before the meeting will the Denner. They'll see as a real person behind that calendar appointment until much more invested in the process. Meaning they'll be less likely to cancel all how about using video to get leads to attend your weapons just like with sales calls reach out to them personally insisting that impo beforehand means we prime feel comforted eager to show up and support. I'll do this myself. Every weapon run the attendance rates engagement on my weapon is just night and day. Compared to when I was leading ultimate emails you can even use video to follow up maybe off to a trade show meeting or to rekindle a stagnant sales proposal. The crucial fan is by doing things just a little bit differently. I'm putting in just a little bit of extra effort on humanity. You will stand out against the tide of regular emails. That person gets every day and you'll be more likely to come through and get a response. Okay just a little brief signs include here want to explain to you very quickly while this stuff works why. This video worked so well. It's all about this in cool the Activating system. What is this? Sounds WAY IT Personalization in any walk of life is effective largely because of warn shed human physiological mechanism insisting on talking about the retaking activating system. Let's maybe call it the rest for sure. Save a little time. The brass is a network of neurons. Located in your brain stem are good to the bottle. You too much hip in everyday language. Your acts as a gateway deal conscious brain. It filters foundation that you should pay attention to it helps you control the constant flow signals reaching your senses in any given moment. Let's break this down a bit simpler. So when people talk about selective hearing will then really referencing is effect of the rest that is causing you to ignore some of the information being shared with a pad to the other bits. You care about an easy way to understand. This effect is by thinking about what's called the cocktail party effect. It goes something a little bit like this. Imagine you're at a party with dozens of people jumping there by. You'll easily tune out those compensations buzz as soon as someone say something that is of particular interest youth may be name or film you. Just watch your magically tune into that conversation. That's you'll russ were particularly activating system. Activating you'll conscious brain. This is why puzzle is Magden is so much more effective than mass moncton as humans. We all hardwired to respond to it. And you can think of pus nights video as a sort of standard in personalization sation. It taps into customers conscious. Brian and it gets their attention. Okay let's move onto the next pulse. Fuel fifty funnel engine activation funnels his some simple ways. You can use videos to build deep relationships with your existing customers can help out sending a simple thank you video when they buy new product for me. Heroin joy seen countless examples of this bumpy repeat purchase rates by huge margins. Or how about Husni Ni asking for review for your happiest and most engaged customers? Someone's having a great experience if you'll product or you need to do is ask and they'll happily give you that reveal. What about customer said made it to number one on trust pilot in the men's fussing custody by simply asking for reviews Video rather than picking out one of those ultimated post purchase emails Familiar with what about personal requesting a case study from a happy customer Rothen Out Fifty emails a bunch of your customers and crossing fingers and hoping a good case that he can be the law blood if you'll sales process surely worth taking thirty or sixty seconds to record a video the might land really great case study from a customer remember when recording these videos. This is your opportunity to take your customers experience to the next level. I just shown to let them know that they're not just another number in your business so make sure you count him out by name. You've got to do that. Used that name. We just talked about the rough riddick lights rating system. I'm worried about seven potent. Let them know why they support Full business I may be at a puzzle. Touch whether that Spring Newcastle. You'll total into the video showing them something goofy going on in the background. As you're walking the coating your video this has a humanness an openness that deepens the impact of your message using that name and doing cookie things or just being a bit more real and human. That's all about activating doubt raw system and getting access to the brain so just being human with your messages

Denner Husni Ni Heroin Brian
Operating with Mission Focus with Evan Hafer

The EntreLeadership Podcast

3:06 listening | Last week

Operating with Mission Focus with Evan Hafer

"Today we get to talk with the CEO and founder of an organization that has experienced outrageous hockey stick growth like in the first year they generated over a million dollars and in the second year. They were an eight million dollar top line. Revenue Company and that growth has discontinued but in the midst of all that growth. They haven't lost the reason why they started. They figured out how to scale with Seoul. Evan Hafer is a retired green beret. Who LOVES TO THINGS COFFEE IN AMERICA and it was out of these two passions that he created black rifle coffee company a company that has taken the world of coffee by storm while simultaneously maintaining the mission and values that they started with the mission for black rifle. Coffee is to serve coffee in culture. Two people that love America content is kind of the internal classification definition with that but the overarching term. That people can kind of digest is just culture So to serve coffee and culture to people who Love America. That feels like it's a pretty intentionally worded statements. I'd love to jump into some of those words so let's start with a obviously kind of what you do coffee. Yeah why Coffee Evan? I think you know from my perspective you have to be passionate about your profession and I've been roasting coffee and developing different roasts for close to fifteen years now. And you know I think where it started for me. Not to jump into the The origin story. But yeah I developed a kind of a profound love and then eventually a hobby for coffey back in the late nineties was in Seattle and I was working on accomplishing a degree from the University of Washington and then I was trying to become a green beret and as a young man. I think you know finding coffee and then looking at the culture and what's happening around coffey back. Then it really galvanized this interest. And so when I became a green beret and went on and started deploying. I still had the love for coffee right. It didn't go anywhere. It just changed it become became more about. Where are you drinking coffee? And for me it was finding great coffee and random and dangerous places and ultimately when I decided to get out of government service it was. It was a natural progression automatically. It was kind of a planned exit and exactly where I wanted to take my next evolution in professional development. I love that line. Great coffee in dangerous places. It's amazing we asked a bunch of your team in Manchester amount like what they loved about coffee and it was crazy. It was like almost an emotional experience for some of them. I was like holy cow when they use the word. Love like they're not joking around here. They really love

Evan Hafer Coffey Revenue Company America Seoul CEO Founder University Of Washington Manchester Seattle
How to manage multiple side hustles?

Side Hustle School

4:10 listening | Last week

How to manage multiple side hustles?

"Hi there. This is Angela from Toronto. I've been listening to the show. Sincere to and have been listening to the episodes. I originally missed. I was inspired by Erin from episode. Nine Oh six and have started working on publishing public domain titles as evokes my question for this hassle is how to determine how to best use my time. I'm a full time school. Principal and already have an income generating side hassle restoring and refinishing furniture. If I spend time on the books I'm not able to spend time on my other side hustle. How do people handle multiple side-hustle projects? Thanks Chris I'm looking to hearing from you. Thank you so much Angela. So glad you're out there and I for one and impressed with your ability to do all these things especially being a full-time school principal. So this is one of those topics in which there is no single. Answer for everyone so. I'll give you three approaches and for both Angela and our listeners. Maybe just kind of listen to these sit with them and see okay which one is best for me or perhaps is best for me now because it might change over time okay so approach number one is start with many narrow to one so you're new to this world you're experimenting. You've got several different ideas. You try different things all totally normal and over time. What you're probably going to see is that you're better at some than others. You're getting a better response from some of them that others what you learn along the way. We'll informed decisions and make you think. Oh I actually. I don't want to do that right now. Or this other thing is really cool. It's GonNa take off or I'm really just enjoying putting the time in on it so you start with many and then over time you're like okay. I'M GONNA go all in with this and when I say all and I don't mean you're risking your life savings and years of your life. I just mean like okay for the next month or two for the foreseeable future. You're going to make that your focus approach number two is kind of the opposite. Start with one and then add as you go if you can so in this case you work on one project for a while and then you see just like what. Angela doing here. What your

Angela Principal Toronto Chris I
Growth in Turbulent Times

a16z

7:00 listening | Last week

Growth in Turbulent Times

"Begin by describing a typical growth model and discuss how that fundamentally drives a company's business strategy the first voice who here is Brian's followed by Andrew when we think about a growth model. The question is how does one court of users lead to another cohort of users? And how are you answering that question? In a way that describes not only how you acquire users but the actions they take in your product what those actions generate and how you reinvest whatever that output is back into generating more new returning users so within this model you have hypotheses around the who the what the why who were doing these actions. What are the actions that they are doing and why they are doing them? These are all fundamental hypotheses whether you have it written down or not. I think like a very very simple simple shortcut version of this might be something like I find yelp because I searched Best Dumplings San Francisco and then a yelp page comes up. I'm excited about yelled at some point. Some percentage of those users end up actually than leading reviews and those of us get index like Google and then they end up in Google listings and more people find it right. And so that's kind of how one group of users might indirectly than lead to another group of users versus something like linked in which is focused on getting people to invite their colleagues at people that they're meeting through professional networking and is very focused around getting you to send invites and that's a very different type of loop? It turns out that there is like many many many flavors of this. This is kind of like a verbal version when you go deeper. You're actually able to translate this set of hypotheses and ideas into spreadsheets and numerical models for what's actually happening business and understand with lows right. You're operating against this hypothesis right. That hypothesis gets stronger over time. As you run experiments you validate them. You see the data in data kind of feeds the quantitative version of this in this environment. A lot of those hypotheses are thrown out the window. And what we validated in the past might have changed as a result. You might have tailwinds or headwinds right. The quantitative variables behind these things. Either get stronger where they get worse. But the only way that you actually get a decent picture about is by going through each one of these individuals steps asking those squash right once. You drill down into a spreadsheet. What kind of data are you tracking? What are those metrics? Like if you're a travel company right now I think you're seeing very specific metrics Right if you start with the end of the funnel. What you're saying is a number one. There's going to be fewer people actually like booking and converting like if you're expedia our king regardless of whether or not are looking at flights my guess is percentage of people who actually look out the flight versus. Actually Book. The flight like that conversion rate is probably down. You probably have folks that doing research. Because they're not quite sure. Like when defy or the wafted shut the State Department website where I can actually go and then all the way to the demands question of how many people are in that activity versus. I guess. Light if you're you're inside of you know one of these collaborations tools what's going to happen. Is All of a sudden every is going to be sending more invites other users. Because we're the meetings in right now and says results of that all of those metrics go up when it's happening is if you think about the verbal version of the growth model as a series of events that chained together than what you start to realize they're going to be certain steps that are. GonNa go way way up. 'cause the entire growth models like really radically amplify or there's going to be ones that dramatically tempings out and if step one or two is the growth model start hitting a lot of friction than of course. It's just going to get harder and harder because each group of users going to produce fewer and fewer users if you think about it from an acquisition standpoint saint big engagement well. There's a couple things about this though one is that. I've seen a ton of categorical data out there. People saying this is what's happening to be to be south or this is what's happening to this category and I think I specifically founders. Who Probably. Let's do this. The category is interesting. But it's actually not that helpful. Everybody sits on a spectrum of people who are experiencing extreme headwinds class pass for example would probably seen what ninety percent of their business disappear overnight. And there's people who are seeing extreme tail and if you're sitting on one of the spectrums your job is easier the data's clear it's immediate of what is happening and what the net result is but the founders who are in the middle of the spectrum the hard job you actually have to look at each one of these individual steps to understand what might be changing. What might be happening to build specific. Hypotheses of how. Your Company should act and respond. Most companies will need to go back to basics and reassess their businesses from the bottom up if you are a travel company or an in person fitness company. How do you go about completely? Revamping and reevaluating your growth model. How can founders be proactive rather than reactive? I know it's like Old Silicon Valley message of talk to your customers but honestly this is one of those times where you need to be talking to them at least a couple of customers at a couple times. A day founders. Ceos executives the leaders of the team. Because the only way that you're really going to be proactive is going to get a sense. For what is going on in your customers. Lives and how things are changing what questions they're asking and how their behaviors are changing. And by the time that comes through the data. It's just GONNA be too late and so if you WANNA be proactive. You'd have to go back and rely on a little bit of basically founder intuition in the way that you build that founder. Intuition is just by having lots and lots of conversations very close to it. I think a really big thing strategically. That's changing right now. Is there's a whole discussion for flex? Even be the output goal at the moment. I think this is where the growth model overlays with. Some of the financials the company wildfire. You know we've had several years where it's all been about top line growth and you have a lot of companies that are looking for two x three x five outs year over year growth and then the growth model ends up meeting to support that but I think the whole industry is saying okay. Well maybe actually top line growth of that type of several hundred percentage points. Italy is actually not the focus. Is Everything so uncertain you? We have to watch our cash. So then what I've seen in conversations I've been in is then. Your growth models are actually as much about. How do you grow efficiently from a cash standpoint? And so if you're thing about okay. We need five x growth. And that means that people need to invite each other as at a certain rate. And if they're not then maybe you need to make that up with a marketing spent with financial incentives for users to use the product whether that's in the form of free subscriptions or in the form of a lower priced lane or if your marketplace company you might give people discounts that are dropped into. All consumers

Founder Google Yelp San Francisco State Department Brian Expedia Andrew Italy
Millard Drexler: I've Learned That Growth Is the Enemy

The Business of Fashion Podcast

3:55 listening | Last week

Millard Drexler: I've Learned That Growth Is the Enemy

"The first question. I just wanted to you to ask you you know. How did we end up here? That so many of these big American retailers find themselves in a position where you know there are teetering because you know the the companies that seemed to be surviving seemed to be seemed to be kind of getting through at least up until now are the ones that were strong going into this crisis. But many American retailers were already Suffering before this all started and this is kind of become the kind of final you know the the proverbial Straw against the camels back so talk to me a bit about how we ended up here in the first first thing I'm GonNa say is Speak to a lot of people every day to work and do whatever most people will say. I have no answer to your question. I mean I have one opinion on how he ended up here with. Most of us don't know what the other sides could look like in my own opinion on and I think statistics There's been for twenty years or so to many retailers too much inventory and I think what's happened because of a corona virus in one short sue. What probably could've happened ten or fifteen years ago. Too much out there to choice to inventory drove down prices drove down margins increase of price. And they're well if you look at Tj. Max I think the biggest most profitable department store in America if not the world and they have a great merchant account rich wanting running at night. I think the great were cheap or is also part of it. I think this just too much square footage for human being in America. It always has. That's one thing. Lack of creativity I think is another thing although with too many stores into choice of what you get is just a deflationary trend in retail nights. We've been going through that. Very simply stated is too much assortment out there too much goods not enough special. Not Enough unique. Lots of commodities Amazon certainly influenced a lot of this and that's life end so could add twenty or ten years ago because I always ask the question an I didn't know none of us knew about this while some people that Bill Gates I guess sold coming is what you do. Then you've named companies if solemn so didn't exist would you miss them and there was so many no. I will miss them if they weren't here anymore. Now what's happening is a lot of going away either. Unfortunately because they have no cash they're running out of cash in. They might be good at what they do and the rest. You just won't miss them and the balance sheet was week when you say their balance sheet was weak you mean they were heavily indebted right overly indebted or plus an I. Don't you know right now? Sitting with all these empty stores with huge Will push people over the edge if they might have survived longer than they probably would discount. It cleans up the landscape of Aqua Lung. Markdown companies and others who sadly will go away because you know maybe they just undercapitalized. And they might be run. Creatively have nice goods. The the report cards not in yet. I don't think it's close to being

America Bill Gates Aqua Lung Amazon MAX
Jennifer Justice, entertainment exec and founder, The Justice Department

Skimm'd from The Couch

6:06 listening | Last week

Jennifer Justice, entertainment exec and founder, The Justice Department

"I loved what you said about figuring out what it is about you. That's different regardless of how you grew up or your circumstances. What was that for you? And when did you start to figure that out? You know it takes a while. You're like there's no in there telling you you're great and you deserve to be here and I would see people reacting me in a different way and it took a long time it took. It took some therapy at took an executive coach really to be like you have these patterns in your life and I started seeing that when I talked and advocated for people all. It was different than other people doing it. I was really doing it from a place of I knew it was the right thing to do. And even though there were financial benefits it wasn't just like being an activist. It was really advocating for people who deserved what I was asking for an almost getting a lot of that. Push back on it. I was like okay. I'm really onto something. Because if they're just GONNA capitulate than obviously wasn't asking for an off and so it kind of drove me and I knew that that thing was that I was really good at advocating and really good at marrying art and commerce. When did you start getting into the world of US editions and entertainers? So I mean even when I was in Seattle I was hanging out in the grunge scene. You know we didn't know the whole world was paying attention even though we all these bands have been signed and not albums out. It's small in comparison to New York and so I just identify with most of them from my background. You know and they weren't college educated. Are I WANNA jump into Jay z? just lay some groundwork hair. Where was Jesse his career? How old was he roughly us about what he just recorded? The hard knock life hadn't come out yet and so she was probably what twenty eight twenty nine and he'd really reasonable doubt volume on and he was about to release hockey. It's right before he becomes a superstar. Yeah what was your first meeting with him. Like I had been a fan of reasonable doubt which when I interviewed at Carol Grade on and they're like how do you even know who he is? You know because it's an amazing at that point as many copies as it has now and then we had to go to a meeting. Def Jam which was a tiny company at the time and I'm met him for the first time walking in so only seen a picture of him and I didn't realize how tall he was and hoskin skinny was. Are you like Mr Carter? It's nice to meet you or like Jay Z. No he liked leans over in the introduces himself. And I always like. Oh I'm your day. What does he yeah? I'm Jay now it's like I'm your new attorneys. Oh you're jj you know. And that's what we're not does he call you. J. J. Yeah J. J. my good friend Jay. He's famous for being an incredible businessman. He is known to be Astute at identifying business opportunities optimizing for them and obviously doing really well and making money. How did you get him to trust you? He knew that I was fighting for him. You know that really cared about what his assets were how he should be treated and I just saw really early on. I mean hip hop wasn't even on you. Know live telecast of the grammys. At the time they didn't even have a billboard chart separate for it and he came out breaking all these records you know he just saw how much you know. I fought for him and cared about making sure. He got what he deserved. I'm just fascinated. What was your lifelike at this point? We're you going out with these guys every day all the time all the time. How does that work? When you're the lawyer going out with them at that would make me like very very anxious. Yeah so I mean look. I listened things. You don't get involved in the entertainment attorney right. So there's no company in the ministry that is open before ten. Am there's no reception. Nobody's answering the phone before ten and then a lot of shows are at night so it just is you know what I mean. And it's just the way that the business works the you know. There are a lot of us running around together all the time they were in it and it was a lot of fun. How old are you roughly at this time? Mid Twenties like a young kid. Yeah but you're US superstar lawyer superstar lawyer. How did you ensure that you were respected as a professional while also socializing with your clients and I'm GonNA assume maybe not the most professional settings board room at night? How did you find that balance? Well I didn't to be honest with you. I was just going along because all the guys were to right and I was like well. You know it's fine everybody else's out and then there was a shift actually and I started to realize that one client in particular not any of them that I've mentioned and he's in a little bit of a different genre Saami outlet at night and was like I don't like my lawyer being out late and I was like okay but I was with your male lawyer and you didn't say anything about that that's when I really started to see because again I didn't have any mentorship so I didn't know that women are treated differently in Business. I didn't know there were glass ceilings and then all of a sudden I was like. Oh there's a double standard and what was your reaction to that at first I was like. Oh my God you're right. This is awful and it was like wait a minute. No this is not cool because I'm in the same room with other male attorneys other managers. Other you know accountants. This is the music industry music. Entertainment Law. We're not curing cancer solving world world. Peace here so it was very eye-opening to me when I think about some of the people that you've worked with even early on whether it's Mark Ronson obviously Jay Z. Back in the day and then you know to what he is today and beyond say specifically talking about those people it's a mix of creatives who have strong business intuition. How do you think through when there is a creative idea that super compelling but the business around it just doesn't necessarily make sense thus the thing it's like the creative and the business half to meet and if they don't then you know whoever it is my clients they have to make the decision? Do they want to fund it? Is this a nonprofit that you partner with a museum you have to do the math and give them all the options? What could really be the outcome? Is it you paying for it? Is it finding philanthropists to pay for it or returning in this into a real business? And that's my job is helping them Mary. Art and

United States JAY J. J. Yeah J. Jay Z. Executive Seattle Mark Ronson Jay Z. Back Hockey Carol Grade Mr Carter Jesse New York Partner Attorney
How Many Moments In Time Have You Already Missed?

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

3:27 listening | 2 weeks ago

How Many Moments In Time Have You Already Missed?

"How many moments in time have you already missed this current cove in nineteen crisis? That we're all going through is a unique moment in time. It's one that is going to create a lot of pain and suffering for a lot of people but will also create a lot of opportunities for those that are able to see it and then willing to act upon it and the reality is though. The most of us won't do that if you don't believe me just think about all the missed opportunities all the mist windows of opportunity that you've had in your lifetime that you haven't seized for me. I started thinking about it and realized the Internet. I missed the Internet. Nineteen ninety five was really the launch of the consumer Internet. And I was in my early twenty s in those days I could have been. Ideally positioned to take advantage of that. I didn't You can go further with the Internet and talk about Social Networks. As a whole and in general every one of those social networks represented different opportunities tick talks the latest one. Of course if you were early on tick talk and you got to beat attraction you would probably be a beat of an influence. So there's a lot of moments in time that they to be seized that a lot of people just don't act on you can talk about the dot com who you can talk about all of the various natural disasters. We've had CE`NAMAS BIRD-FLU EVEN Terrorist Attacks World Trade Center bombing. Those things laid to opportunities. Some people took them a lot of people didn't because at the time they don't look like opportunities. Bitcoin is another one. Bitcoin is having today. Now if you had a board of a few BITCOINS and I'm not talking about investing all of your life all of your savings but if you had taken maybe your ten percent fund and put that towards Bitcoin. At the time then you'd be sitting pretty pretty right about now right now. Face Moscow's an interesting people are looking at face masks in the West and saying that's just for now after that we won't be wearing face masks anymore so I don't want to get involved in anything related to face masks but guess worn in parts of Asia facemasks just a part of life and so there's a very good chance that face masks will become a part of life in the Western world. So if you're in a waste in Western economy right now and there's an opportunity to be involved in something around face masks on suggest it's probably with a fly. I don't know how it's going to turn out but nobody does. I think the point is that oftentimes we sit back and say oh man of missed opportunities. I wish I was alive when that happened. But guess what you've been alive when so much other stuff has happened and you've just decided not to act on it for whatever reason so think about this opportunity now. I'm not saying that the farm on I'm not saying pull your money into any of these crazy ventures that come up but it's maybe not a bad idea to have a little bit of a five percent or ten percent fund that you just play with and it's not just money it's business opportunities if you've got a chance to go and work for a company now. That manufacturers safety equipment is probably not a bad bit because you'd have to believe that something that's GonNa continue for wall in my not but if you get some good experience out of it it's not going to be a loss anyway. If it's a win it could be a substantial win so the point is think about the missed opportunities that you've got think about the moments in time that you've already missed. This is a moment in time. What are you going to do about

Moscow Asia
Learn Pivoting Strategies To Help Grow Your Business

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

7:44 listening | 2 weeks ago

Learn Pivoting Strategies To Help Grow Your Business

"Lauren is a bestselling author and a regular podcast. And today she's one of the Nice Guys Lauren. Welcome to the Nice guys on business. Podcast thank you. I like being one of the Nice guy especially as a lawyer. It's not often with guys. That's that's a reputation that doesn't proceed you because you actually are a very nice person very patient in the beginning stages here while we worked through some technology challenges and you actually not only. Do you know what you're doing but you did it in Nice fashion so thank you for participating in that part of it. Thank you for helping me now. I know better for next time. I didn't even realize that I wasn't didn't you? Think my microphone properly That's okay. I'm podcasting Hammer. Everything looks like a podcasting nailed to me so whenever I look at. Here's somebody that might have qualities standards that Of of sound quality. That might not be quite up to snuff like hey. Do you know that this is what's going on right now? So pardon me for putting my two cents in where I probably wasn't deserve so Larne. Your timing is perfect to come on the show today because one of the things that you do which is your specialty is really that pivoting strategy idea. So why don't you share a little bit about how you fit into? Today's really confusing world with everything you know. People being behind the scenes people shuddered So why don't you share a little bit about why you privy pivoting strategies are so timely right now sure thanks a lot. Doug so first of all. I'm glad you can't see me because I'm making funny expressions so I'm glad you can't see them but so I'm a international legal expert and business continuity strategist and when all of this started happening. I realized that I needed to pivot my business lightly and what that means is I have a system that I created called. Scale up checkup. Seven point inspection of a business at cover. Seven areas and one of the seven areas is funding capitalization another one being legal and compliance in another one being Business Planning and then of course there's a whole range of others but the point is that those three kind of Mesh together into this whole mess and I call it a Bala Gun Guide in Hebrew and Polish and Russian. For that matter means a big mess. And all of what's going on right now both personally and professionally in our world is a big bowl gun and we have to wade through it and so I realized that there was a need for me to step up. And take one of my seven Elements my seven essentials foundational elements and FIND SOLUTIONS FOR BUSINESS OWNERS. That were struggling and most of us are struggling. Maybe not those of us in online world but even in the online world people like like like us for example we have to pivot to speak to business owners differently. We have to pivot to know how to network differently. We have to pivot ourselves and our businesses to restructure and reorganize. And as we're doing not. I realized that there was a need not only for funding but to help companies that where it struggling with figuring out how to pivot. Here's an example. Yesterday photographer join my facebook group and she wanted to post and of course. I'm reviewing all the posts because there's a lot of promotion going on and she wanted to post about how she's struggling. And how can she keep her photography studio open so I said to her? Have you considered doing virtual sessions to help people learn how to do photography at home? Have you considered creating courses? Have you know I gave her four or five? Opportu oppor options. And she's like I don't want any of that. I'm like okay. Well I didn't even really know what to say. I said I'm really sorry. Like I felt terribly because she's just a closed book and she wants her photography studio with people coming another guy a hypnotist. I said to him. Have you considered doing? Obviously everything's about virtual sessions right now. Have you considered doing virtual sessions? I said have you considered a group? Have you considered? He said my client. Just WanNa see me in person. I'm like okay that those are those are closed closed minded people that aren't really going to be successful a pivoting because they're not even open to it however people like you and I realize that there is demand for services. It's just changed. It's a new normal whatever that might be when this is over and if we can successfully pivot our businesses and support our clients through those permits than our clients can be successful and we can as well and I think that that's really important to understand so a lot of people are struggling with financial issues and how to support and capitalize. The business part of why being well-capitalized is so important when you're setting up a business and it's just a crazy crazy time and I think that if we support ourselves in our clients we can help them build success which in turn translates to our own success so pivoting they call me the princess a pivot and I really love finding solutions. Every single business has a solution available to it. Whether you're willing to listen or not. It is another story. I can control that. It's like the twelve step program. We can't control what other people do. We can only control ourselves right totally so and you strike upon a really interesting chord because you know there are some. We've all been you know inside for the last month or six weeks or so in trying to yeah trying to figure out how our business actually pivots and I look at our space in the podcasting space and just think man things have been busy. I mean people have been calling people very interested in hearing and the idea of somebody just saying my clients want to meet with me face to face. Yes I know that and I would like to have a million and a half dollars in the bank and the reality of it is right now. We're just don't so. We have to work within the environment that we work with. What do you say to somebody that? Or maybe don't know what is the expression to the teacher will appear when the student is ready. What do you say to somebody that that just for the sake of? Just this is the way I want it. This is how it's always been. I'M NOT GONNA change. What do you say to those people because they have to wake up become conscious at some point? Don't they well they do or they're going to perish and that's why getting my group or Perish. The don't mean them physically. I mean they're businesses. Okay so I'm immigration corporate expert so I specialize in helping businesses come into the US and expand from the US but from all over the world so we have an added dimension to the challenge because the people are clients immigration lawyers. And I work with tons of them. I'm I'm an adviser to other immigration lawyers because a lot of immigration lawyers don't completely understand or one understand the business side of things so the these clients are here there on business visas right. They have not only is their business at risk their whole visa and ability to stay in the. Us is at risk and some of them are still not willing to pivot and you talk to them. And you're like what if your business goes marginal. You're dying okay. You're done and they just are not open to listening and unfortunately I wish that I had a dialogue to have them but the reality is it's kind of like when somebody doesn't realize the value that you're offering to them and choose to work with you in a sales environment or in a in a network environment or whatever that they are very closed off and now those are the people you just can't help you can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink and I can only we can only do so much to open doors and at the end of the day if people are not willing to go through them. There's there's really not a lot we can do and I think I finally realized that I kind of have to back-off walkaway in order to to let them figure out what they want figure out. Maybe they'll come back when they realize. Hey I've got no choice. Because at the end of the day they really don't

United States Business Planning Lauren Larne Facebook Doug
I Want To Sell My Books. Do I need a Website?

The $100 MBA Show

2:02 listening | 2 weeks ago

I Want To Sell My Books. Do I need a Website?

"So today skewed any Wednesday. I was asking. Hey I want to sell my fiction books. Do I need a website? Can some strain on Amazon? I recommend having a website having a presence online You can still saw Amazon and you can actually sell them on the book on your website before they go to Amazon and you can control that path and they can go straight to Amazon off your website via link. You can also sell your books if you want yourself if their books and you can use a platform like Podesta to do both your web presence your website as well as your e book sales now one of the things a lot of great authors. It do. Is they sell packages with their books or they sell other products that your audience would be interested in on their website of say for example you write fiction books. They're mysteries. Maybe you're really good at the whodunit type of John Mara and you WANNA sell. Maybe an animated series. I know there's a lot of authors that do this where they basically create a mini series. Be a ten parter with ten different stories and it's a video series. They just sell it as a package. And it's just an animated series. They get an animator to come and make some animations and they do a voice over the author actually does a voice over over the animations and then they sell this over and over and you can do this podium and sell access to these stories and a lot of readers love this because they are wondering. Hey what does Dr Smith look like the one from the novels I love and you can put a face to the name with the animation and then the voice overs in the intrigue in the music a lot of different products can be sold off your website because your readers love your books and that way you can expand your revenue and you can then continue to have that funding to continue to write great books. That's awesome of that business when you make more sales when you make more revenue allows you to have a little bit more freedom a little bit more creativity to make great books or to make great products or art.

Amazon John Mara Dr Smith Podesta
How to Hire and Scale For Growth Without Sacrificing Culture

The EntreLeadership Podcast

5:26 listening | 3 weeks ago

How to Hire and Scale For Growth Without Sacrificing Culture

"So tell me a bit more about that application. It's lighting for emergency equipment. Services is that did I get that right. Make the white lights go on fire trucks? That's our primary mission today. Okay make about twenty five percent of the white lights on all new fire trucks in the US fantastic. So who are your? Who's your customer? Who Do you actually sell to kind of everybody? We have to sell the fire departments every fight trump bill in the US is snowflake. They're all different in the department specs. How they want the truck built so we kind of sell to them. We work with them who we actually sell to the fire. Truck manufacturer when the truck's being built so we kind of have to have a relationship with the truck manufacturer the dealer and then the fire department themselves. Got It okay. Did you guys start this business? Did you buy the business? What how did you guys get involved? Our building flashlights in my garage had been living in a school where we met just kind of enjoying life and one of the things that came mother was looking for something else to do so. I joined the local fire department to learn what was happening and realized that there were million dollar firetrucks all throughout the United States. That didn't have even though they had an unlimited budget by the trump is still didn't have enough flooding to their job. So I started building some small flashlights little things and then the business grew and now we're producing much more sophisticated technologies for much more specialized customers but started in the fire station. This is my favorite kind of story. I think business starts so many ways but I mean here's here's a guy like. You're a volunteer firefighter. You see this problem and you're going. Why can't we have more lights? We need more lights and Shirley. Somebody's thought it was like but nobody had thought of it and you just decided to solve this problem fantastic. The crazy thing was like their companies that have been doing this for a hundred plus years in all of our competitors are very large very old companies and there was no looking at it from a creative modern spin but the decorah working with an led is only been useful on the fire scene for the last ten years. So hundred zero companies had no experience in the tech being used today and we very quickly spun into it and I've developed attacking cameras developed the culture customer relationship. And it's really been a great partnership to the business while I'm inspired. So how long have you been doing this ten years so yes started in two thousand ten okay ten years and then how's business going right now? You mentioned you're scaling up and there. There's a lot of trying to sounds like catch catching a title way with the Tea Cup. A little bit a lot of things going on right now in the world that are causing your business to be one of those that's having to rise to the occasion coming into this year where you guys out in revenue or eight half million so it's not huge company by any means but we're we're about seven employees an eight and a half million in revenue. So it's a little excited. I'm a skinny side of employees by like those ratios. I mean you guys are you guys are really leaned. That's good yeah so we need to. So what's the big challenge for you guys right now? We know we need people. We don't want to make bad highest. We are inexperienced at managing. Because obviously we were with both thirty years old so we haven't run a business before Ohio people so we don't WanNa make bad choices. We want to get really good at hiring really quick. So we're trying to take as much information as quick as possible so that we can hire really well gir- the team and then keep going on this growth mode right. Okay good. Well I've got good news and bad news. The good news is you guys are so healthy. And you're killing it and you have a great niche and your revenue and your ratios of revenue to team. Size you guys are really stable and you have a lot that you need to hang onto. Don't want you guys to lose the growth that you guys have had and a bad hire could really screw things up. So you're absolutely your concern of of hiring the wrong person a very valid one and I see it a lot where businesses your size when the huge opportunity. You're trying to scale up to you. Just start hiring people quickly. Anybody that can fog. Amir you bring them on board and it alleviates the pain and it actually gets you even more lift short-term because all of a sudden you can say yes to new contracts and get more work done but then at six to twelve months you realize. Oh my gosh wheat. We gave away our soul because we brought in people. That really aren't us and now they're creating problems and causing issues that are bigger fires. They use that as a as upon. We're talking about you know they're creating bigger problems than you're going. I wish we could go back to when we had less people into this. A bit slower. So I want us to be moving towards hiring great people as quick as possible but I also know we can't be looking for a microwave here because as soon as we microwave culture and we we compromise in who we hire That that really is something in a year or two years from now we always regret. And what do you have an rhythm relationship? But we have an advisory board that setup. It has really really bright really talented minds that help the help. Kind of guide the business as we're expanding. Some of the minds that are on that board have run. You Know Tim. Plus billion size. Companies huge companies seventy two thousand employees sized companies and as we're trying to balance explosive growth mass market customer experiences in an executive management. The recommendations were here we. Are you know higher higher higher you you will not be able to get fast enough out in front of the market became higher but our market is so much smaller selling to a general market. There's only there's only so many fire departments in the five thousand made every year. So how do you balance that need for rapid expansion and big picture looking versus that need for cultural? You know Appropriateness

United States Decorah Tea Cup Shirley Ohio Executive Amir Advisory Board
How Joanna Vargas Built a Beauty Empire with Her Hands

Latina to Latina

9:58 listening | 3 weeks ago

How Joanna Vargas Built a Beauty Empire with Her Hands

"I have read about your early morning routine and found it very inspiring. Can you tell me about your early mornings? And how you develop that habit as you and I Both know it's challenging when you have kids and you're working and you don't try to find time for yourself. It's you know you have to be highly scheduled and I've always been an early riser. And so instead of just waking up early and just sitting in bed I decided to make it into a bit of a moment for myself which I found has really helped me tremendously in terms of stress management. And just making me feel like I did something good for myself every day so I wake up quite early and I do sit in bed for a little bit and just look at what's happening in the universe and then I get up and Do a pelleting class which really helps me manage stress. And kind of invigorates me and Gets my day started nicely with some fun music and some dance vibes. You like me a busy mom. What is the bare minimum? We each need to be doing to have good skin. I like to point out people that good skin has nothing to do with your DNA in has everything to do with your lifestyle. The bare minimum would include getting enough rest Exercising and eating not be on a diet but eating things that will give life to you and then on the skin-care side. It will be washing your face before bed wearing sunscreen every day and then I think sort of an essential ingredient in your arsenal would be a vitamin C. Ideally a vitamin C serum for day to help protect your skin against sal mutation and sun damage. You know you could wear it under makeup so those would be sort of like the bare minimum perhaps in exfoliating once or twice a week I bear is also my maximum John. That's how much of one's skin do you think is about what you were putting into your body verse. What you were putting on your skin. You know I'm an ESA Titian. So obviously I believe in product I believe in Facials butts I think. Fat Your Skin is like maybe seventy percent what the rest of your life looks like good products are really important but I think people discount completely how important it is to be healthy in your life. It's such an important part having good skin and controlling breaking out controlling dryness controlling how we age. Obviously I had to learn this as I got older. I'm I'm turning fifty this year and I feel like I understand a healthy lifestyle so much more than I did. When I was young I was so much more willing when I was young to kind of be like. Oh you don't have good skin and in my case. My mother had darker skin than me and I always wished I had her skin. I got cursed with this. You know fair skinned with freckles in Malaysia. And you know we all have our things right and I think when you're younger it's easy to pick yourself apart and when you get older you realize there's so much you can do for yourself some to make yourself look good and I. I think that my skin looks better than it's ever looked even though in my late forties so you do look I just for anyone listening so they know that skin is is is glowing. You grew up in Princeton. New Jersey went to University of Chicago studied. Women's studies is also a women's studies major so I love and Jersey quarrelsome and photography. What did you plan to do with that? You know? I moved to New York with that dream of being a fashion photographer or an art photographer of some kind. I did get jobs in that field at the beginning in the first years I was here. I just really realized very quickly that my personality I was not. I was not made for that lifestyle. I was not made to be a freelancer. I was very shy. I was very quiet. The idea of self promotion embarrassed me and just being on set. I just felt so stressed out all the time and so going to beauty school was sort of like while. Maybe I'll do make up. Maybe I could be a part of the Industry. Some Way and In a different way and when I got to school I really fell in love with the idea of taking care of somebody and that one on one. You share with me. What what's troubling you and I'm going to help you fix it and to this day. That's really what I love about my career and that's why I still do So many facials and I'm still in the mix Because I just love it this Chew Lak- Nice to have you on must be a special reason. Yeah Yeah you know. It's a special reason since I like to be behind all right so when come to beauty decided to come on board. I guess you rushed volunteer to try the products as I know I did. And it's the first time I know but I've already been using the coconut cream for years so I figured I wasn't going to miss a chance to try out sister products. I liked the photo you sent me the other day. You hear literally good and that was just after one shampoo and conditioner. My girls were shiny and smooth man. And my Komo's not full of my own hair after detangle that in the shower even in pictures is coming through. Your hair looks shiny and hydrated and just so healthy things. I really appreciate that. You let me send you those about the chained. So how many products are you using? All told right now. I've got four so I'm using the shampoo. The conditioner believing cream and they can tell you. What my favorite is the wave first of all that name is everything but I love how my waves on my Carl's just are fuller touchable. They're less frizzy. I mean I sound like an ad but let me tell you well you can enjoy the benefits of the gun through beauty haircare line picking up your favorites at target ordering from target dot com. You worked at new organic spa and with a dermatologist. Had those experiences shape your thinking on skin care? I learned a lot about ingredients at the organic spa. I also felt like the stress was more on aromatherapy there than anything else and it was very hard to clinically help. Anybody I also learned. I don't like Enya as much as other people may have. And so me. Getting a job with a derm was kind of like okay. I'm not going to do this. Who Am I and so working there? For the time that I was there was the opposite end of the spectrum. It was somebody who was really passionate about product and beauty which is great But where do I fall in this conversation? I found that I really thought less was more and I wanted to show people that you don't have to turn to invasive things in order to get your skin to be what you wanted to be. And so that's really how I developed my voice however it took you a long time to tell your parents that you were working as an institution and that this is what you were going to do why I think perhaps other people who have immigrant families can relate to this in some way. I'll just speak for myself and I have found that friends who have had immigrant. Parents have related to this concept but really my parents did not send me to school so that I would work with my hands. It's really that cut and dry sometimes for people. Mom definitely knew that aestheticians existed. But I don't think that anybody was happy with that choice in career. They wanted me to be a lawyer or a doctor. Those are pretty much. My two choices. I think that my family would have been proud of me if they could see now what I've accomplished but Definitely it was a hard conversation and it was many years after that I still had to listen to while if you have become a lawyer like your brother Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah. So you know it is what it is. They just had a different world view. And I think one of the gifts that I have in my life is that I'm really good at seeing things from other people's perspectives. Even if they're not my own and I understood what they meant they just wanted what was best for me. It was very dramatic when I was young. But now you know I I really. I really get what they were

New Jersey University Of Chicago Malaysia John Princeton Komo New York Enya Carl
"My Business Partners Are My Parents"

The EntreLeadership Podcast

7:13 listening | 3 weeks ago

"My Business Partners Are My Parents"

"Go to Tommy in California. Hey Tommy welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. How can we help? Hey guys thanks for taking my call. Sure what's up? I'm twenty own fifty percent of my wedding business. I run Business Day to day and my parents. Both of the large decision split the other fifty in twentieth century. I hit by the wildfires causes to close temporarily and then the downtime overweight for permits. I'm going through all our processes and costs and in that. I'm realizing my parents. Since they're not part of the day they don't understand what our customers warrant but they still try to impart their decisions that the final one Mike hire subcontractors and vendors without my knowledge. They've talked about how they want to be part of the business in a way where they're just asking how the businesses doing and not part of the decisions. So my question is I want to have the discussion about the process of buying my parents out over time eventually beneficial way so. I don't even have to have that conversation and I don't know how to put a dollar out to the percentage. Tommy I'd be curious to hear from Kim's thoughts on this too. But you're twenty eight years old. You're in a business that it sounds like you're partners with your parents. I I want to zoom back for a second start with D. Is this what you love and really want to be doing when you're thirty five or did you kind of drift into this thing? 'cause MOM and dad are a part of it. Oh this is absolutely will God has for me. I love waking up every day. Do what I do okay. Good well that's good. So what do you? What do you want to be true in a year from now as it relates to the way that mom and dad are evolved? Not Evolved aside. Sounds like you want to buy out and have a clean break. I have a great relationship with my family. I think the problem is It's mostly my dad. Gets a little too involved and so I don't know by your was buying a percentage or something that there is a little bit more. I am more decision on that but I I just that's kind of what I came up with. A positive will want to deal with that after you are paid a base salary for managing the business. Nothing but then how much profit is left a year About six hundred while you're profitable six hundred so they're taking about three hundred. You're taking about three hundred profit correct after you were paid a salary. Correct okay all right. So the business is worth roughly four to five x of that number. That's the value okay. And and so. They're they're half they're three hundred is worth somewhere around a million one point five million two million five somewhere in there. Okay all right now the way I would do it is. I would just propose that you give them. X. Percentage of the profits until you reach that number and it would be excessive fifty percent okay. Okay are agreed by out. Number is whatever was agree to number. And I'm GonNa give you eighty percent of the prophet until we hit that number if you can live on twenty percent plus your salary which you ought to be able to do. These are incredible numbers. Okay and so if we said eighty percent of six hundred That's like a half million dollars and if it's a million five three years later you're clear so you need to agree on a price but the price generally small business will sell for somewhere around twenty to twenty five percent rate of return to the investor which means the cap rate is about four x or five x okay of the net profit and their portion of the net profit is fifty percent understood. You right is that correct. That's correct. Yeah the the problem is you got to heads and anything with two heads is a monster. Yeah that's what you're discovering so you need. Ya and with this buyout. They lose the right to interfere operationally. I'm curious what do you think the chances are they're going to go for this? You feel good that they'll they'll go for this idea. What Dave just laid out? I think the conversation it would And when we started anyways definitely where I was really wanting to do this and they were willing to help And I and they wanted me to run everything do everything but they still want to put their fingers in either. Really got hurting. Why can't ask a good question? Dave gave you some great mechanics on the valuation of business and how you would put a proposal together for the buyout but you may want to have a few conversations just from a relationship standpoint before you come in and start talking about the buyout and the timeline for that to happen just so that everybody. I mean you don't WanNa look up and in a year from now the relationship that you have with your parents that has great has gotten really rocky because how you approach this was to transactional and it doesn't sound like you're going to do that. Sounds like you guys are on a good track of the. There's a couple of things to do that being a founder of a business. Your Dad's not actually the founder. You and him founded it together with his money he got you started or whatever And then you took it and ran it and and grew it. But they're you know always honor. Their position is inherently always honor their position in the business. And thank be falling. Grateful for what you've gotten for this point and that's how you always start a conversation like that and and and then you say and you know our original purpose was for us to get this thing running and so now the natural evolution of this dad mom the way for me to continue to honor. You is to buy you out and so I want to give you a large percentage of the profits against a buyout number and caused that to happen. But that's me tipping my hat to you and saying thank you and I appreciate you and I love you and your been incredible and it's the natural evolution of this just like when you were raising me mom and dad. You didn't want me to live in the basement till I was forty and this is I'm starting to be in your basement now. Well that's true. Yeah you're giving them a metaphor of some kind and says it's time for me to grow up and grow on and you and you have to let me go. I have to move out. I'm getting married. You know it's kind of thing and so th there but they're getting some psychological value out of interfering and you need to take that away from Jim well and just be patient. I mean when I was twenty eight. I would want all of this to happen in six weeks. It's okay if it takes six months definitely. There's a very big point. Yeah I think what Dave just mentioned on. The psychology is huge. Tommy and then what Daniels said is true too if they resist this a little bit. You need to relax because you told us all unequivocally I mean you couldn't get it out fast enough that this is what you were created to do. So guess what you're getting to do it your twenty eight. Let this thing cycle out. Your Time's coming. Yeah but don't but it could be gradual but it does need to see incremental progress with the end in mind that everyone has become starts to be an agreement with

Tommy Dave Ramsey Founder California Mike KIM JIM Daniels
How to Run a Business on Amazon.com - Tips and Tricks From the #1 Leader in Marketing Products, Robyn Johnson

Entrepreneur on FIRE

5:46 listening | 3 weeks ago

How to Run a Business on Amazon.com - Tips and Tricks From the #1 Leader in Marketing Products, Robyn Johnson

"Just dive in Robin and start talking about seller central first off what is seller central for those people who aren't super familiar with Amazon. And why is it? The most common way to sell on Amazon on Amazon. Everything kind of looks like one big united platform but on the back end. It's actually split into several different places so like where you sell your journals is Katie p. That's a little different there seller central where you sell physical goods on Amazon. And then there's vendor central where you sell goods to Amazon and while vendor central has a lot of benefits can be really great especially. If you're a large brand you have to have an invite in. Amazon has not been inviting a lot of people so for the majority of people. If you're not already on vendor central seller central's going to be where you go anybody can sell on seller central and so it's it's the place where the majority of people who sell physical goods are going to sell their products so fire nation. I think there's a lot of things you need to realize recognize when it comes to Amazon. I mean it's a behemoth it is massive and there's a lot of people that have been doing seller central in different areas within that for so many years it is critical that you get content and you learn from the tips shadows and tactics from the best. And that's why I brought Robin on here today. So what Robin do people mostly get wrong when it comes to understanding Amazon's fees? I mean there's different size. Tears different category selections. I know personally from I and experience because I actually do seller central. I actually ship my journals to Amazon. They sit there at the Amazon warehouse and then they are purchasing distributed from there. So I've been having to deal with size tears. I've been having to deal with quote unquote expired inventory or long-term inventory and I think it's just a whole bundle of wax and a lot of people don't even know or understand before getting into Amazon and a lot of cases because they don't understand it. They do a lot of things wrong at the beginning. That really hurts them. Long term as far as keeping that net profit at a at a good solid play so break that down force so when it comes to Amazon. The Devil's in the details. Really so you really WanNa get into the fee breakdowns for your particular platforms. So whether that's Katie. P vendor central seller central on central fees are kind of broken down into a couple of different pieces. The first is going to be the referral fee. The referral is based on a percentage based on the category. And you're GONNA WANNA look at that category that you before you create that listing on Amazon. So if you put your category your product and category eight versus category be. It might be the difference between paying an eight percent. Were fee paying a fifteen or twenty percent refer so knowing that is really important. Different categories have different and specific price points. So there's like for example in the grocery category there. They run promotions occasionally. So if your product is at fourteen ninety nine you're charged eight percent and if your products charge fifteen dollars that might be charged. Fifteen percent and those those promotions will change over time but knowing that the referrals fees makes a big difference and then there's the FBI fees which is fees. The Amazon charges for you to send your item to Amazon Amazon. We'll take that item when it sells. We'll send it to the customer. The handle any customer service that covers shipping to the customer the pick and pack fee any customer service. And that's going to be based off of the size and weight so when you're having your products developed you really WanNa have those sized. Here's that are available on Amazon. Right there on your desk and you WanNa make sure you give yourself at least a quarter of inch maybe a half inch depending on how precise your factories are in the way that your packaged goods are so there could be a difference. Where if your product is just a little bit over that eight inch mark they your go from three to eight dollars something along those lines so you WanNa make sure that your products are not only. Take that into account when you're creating the products but you make sure that your products are measured correctly. You can if you're not measured correctly you can request was. Call the Cuba scan to get those chains and low credit. You back the difference in those fees if you can show that's the right size and then there's also storage so there's thirty day storage fees which are X. amount during q one two three and why amount during Q. Four so usually during Q. Four. It's going to be about five four to five times more than it is the rest of the year. And if you leave things in there a really long time then Amazon's GonNa charge you a lot of money because they don't Wanna be your storage unit. I mean that's a key thing I wanna really just hammer home for you. Fire nation that. I've had to learn the hard way. Unfortunately because you know I like oh I have these journals like you know. The best thing about books is that like they don't expire like they don't grow like they don't like mold like cheese like they're not gonNA actually go bad so to speak you know especially if they're store correctly which Amazon does do but then all of a sudden I was just like Oh if I send them like ten thousands and it takes me like five years to sell ten thousand than like years two three four and five like my long term storage fees. Keep going up and up so I actually use a separate warehouse to actually store the vast majority of my journals. It cost me four hundred and eighty dollars per month for like the sixteen Palettes of over thirty. Five thousand journals haven't stock four hundred eighty bucks a month at this warehouse because this is what they do and then when I need to. I'll send a thousand journals at a time to Amazon because I know that could sell those the four to six month timeframe to stay under that long-term store so you just have to know your numbers. You have to understand the referral fee. Like I love how you said that Robbins beginning that you could be paying potentially five to fifteen percent more than you have to be if you just didn't pay attention and shop around the different categories that your product qualifies for and that's so huge that so

Amazon Katie P Robin FBI Robbins Cuba
Truth, Perseverance and Determination with Darick Spears

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

8:08 listening | 3 weeks ago

Truth, Perseverance and Determination with Darick Spears

"All right. Derek can get. Oh Yeah Oh yeah Nice Nice first of all let me say thank you so much for taking the time out to talk with us. I know you're busy. Business owner entrepreneur. There's about a million things that you could be doing right now but instead you're here with us what the enterprises so for that we say. Thank you I thank you for having me. I know you're busy. Which a podcast and everything you do business. I is good. We're able to get a second sit down and check so thank you. The second thing I like to do is to ask you to tell us about yourself now when I say that. Feel free to go all the way back to the day. It all started or you can start more. Current Day tells about yourself. I'm a regular guy. I'm their experience from working with Gossen. Never been a milwaukee. It's funny when I assign of Laki. People think that we live on farms or something. We live on farms of a city. K- grover the city bre lower impoverished areas. You know would have rich childhood and I do allow struggle in life so to me you find yourself as your lowest points or when the fire is testing you guys fired Pure golden pressure makes diamonds. So that's when I found myself. So that's just the kind of a introduction who I am from a free spirit and a free spirits out there. We kinda bide to a different beat life where he would like to be boxed in the light suggest. Follow the norms without asking the questions of. Why why's that? Why do we have to birth to when we finally find ourselves we have to follow this system of doing things go to school? Let the teacher teach this. But it's all things out there you can learn at as well you know what I mean is. I'm that spirit person so that's accessible pitcher. Getting one thing you said is we. Don't live in farms. I'm located in the Greater Milwaukee area and for people who are listening who are located outside of Milwaukee. There is a beach in Milwaukee. I know that might be shocking to you. But there's a beach Milwaukee which was here. I mean a year. We have a definitely walking's buried segregated very crime oriented but the world is a ghetto group. War said it better. That's what they outdoors ghetto. So it'll be the world is getting so it's true but it's a lot of stuff here. Data Guide is so if you had to pick one thing. What would you say your favorite thing to do? Is My favorite danger. Do Is Talk Guy. I talked to God. I WANNA do I walk around. You might think I'm talking to myself but sometimes I just to do that because I just always done. This is our child. No one told me how to do that. I use is literally always been fascinated with

Milwaukee Greater Milwaukee Derek Business Owner K- Grover Gossen
Design and Comedy with Meg Lewis

The Futur

6:25 listening | Last month

Design and Comedy with Meg Lewis

"Mentioned something about infusing comedy. What does that mean? How's that applied? Or how does it manifest itself in your work? Did you study Like performance art and things. I got when I was a kid. I wanted to be a comedian. I grew up so I think as I did a lot of comedy and acting camps when I was a kid. I did a lot of Improv. I learned very early on how to think improvisation really and I learned how to act on my toes and become very witty and I think the most important thing that I learned when I was a kid was to observe adults and realize how many things adults took so seriously and I thought as a kid that adults were just so boring and I just didn't to be a boring adult when I grew up so I think as I got older. I learned that I had additional skills outside of comedy that I really wanted to utilize and I just became really interested in design. So it's been a challenge for me throughout my career to kind of take all those things about myself that I love. That seemed so separate in not related to one another light comedy and design and try to blend them together into one career. Because it's definitely been a little bit easier for me to have a job as a treat skill as being a designer than breaking into the comedy industry of never really even tried hard to break into the comedy. Industry has just been so easier for me to work as a designer and get paid and have a little bit of income supporting the comedy. Work that I'm doing and you know there is a low level Low Bar when it comes to comedy in the design industry so my goal now is to just take traditionally not necessarily boring but dry topics and make them funny and finally you know. Bring some lightness into the things that we have to deal with as adults. That could be a little bit more. Lighthearted I'm here for that Now just out of curiosity I don't WanNA spend too much time on this. But have you gone to like open mic things where he just go onto the stage and do your thing not yet? Oh skirt that scares me alive. I generally have a common fear that everybody hates me rejection. And I'm so scared of that and I think having to see that I love hiding behind a computer so much like to hide behind a phone or a camera or computer so bad and that way I can kind of judge everything myself see it from all sides. Think what are the critics going to say before I do anything and before I release anything? I'm just so used to that. From working with clients and as designer I think of it from all sides and make sure that I have all my bases covered and I think it's just so it's I'm a super vulnerable person but the idea of being on stage in being judged in real time for something I'm not one hundred percent comfortable with really scares me. Wow what I'm hearing from us. There's this kind of opposing energy economy if you if you will like this performer. Somebody who likes to make people laugh and have fun and you said like Improv. Acting and all that kind of stuff. And there's this other person who. I would describe as more teacher digital graphic or visual artists. Where we just? WanNa be by computers on talk to me To look at me because I'm weird and awkward and so how do you resolve this in your mind? I think that's where the magic is. Truly because I think for a long time I wouldn't let myself both. I was wondering the other. And that's you know that's what labels due to us when we're labeled as a designer. We know what we're supposed to fall into when it comes to that label. We know the kind of person we're supposed to be and I was pushing to be that person for a long time and you know I let the comedy thing go. I let those aspects of my personality just kind of go because I didn't identify didn't feel comfortable identifying myself as a comedian. I didn't feel comfortable or like I belonged in that industry and so it was a hard thing for me to slowly realize that if I take these things about myself that seems so unrelated and I push them together into one career then I can actually do something. That's unlike anybody else's doing I can be. I can redefine what a designer comedian or a performance artist is and I can just truly offer the world something that no one else can and that has that has been very very exciting for me. The seems like almost like a perfect segue to talk about fulltime. You but before we do that. I talk a lot about the narrative the narrative the story that we tell ourselves the voice inside your head so when you said like He. That felt uncomfortable weird. I'm not supposed to be doing this or that. And the labels that you apply. Do you know what that voice sounds like in your head and do you know where it comes from you know. I think it comes from years of my whole life. Growing UP OF BEING TOLD THAT. I'm supposed to look and act and be a certain way and I think labels can be very empowering for a lot of people or they can hold a lot of people back. I think it depends on the label. And what you want to be identified as and for me my whole life you know thinking about what a woman is supposed to be in what comedy looks like for women and girls and and what. I wanted to be doing and telling jokes about and how that didn't match up and so I spent a lot of time feeling a lot of shame about who I was and what I really wanted to be doing. Based on what people expected of me and the examples I was presented in the world of a woman or a graphic designer comedian looks and sounds like and so that voice in my head is just like always constantly barking over me. If nobody else is doing that people are GonNa think you're weird. You're going to be doing something that people have never seen before this very scary. What ARE PEOPLE GONNA say? People are definitely not going to like this. And that's generally what replays in my head and it's taken so much practice of pushing through voice because I've realized in pushing through the voice getting over that and pushing further past what the voices telling me I can do and actually following through doing the thing. That really scares me. The perceived outcome. I have in my head of what's going to happen that horrible incident. That will happen if I do this thing. It never happens. It's always a fraction as bad as I anticipated to be in once I started to realize that the perceived outcome I had in my head of what would happen never happens it made it so much more exciting for me to keep doing it over and over again and keep pushing in realize areas that I had been holding myself back. It pushed through them.

Must Read: Stillness Is The Key by Ryan Holiday

The $100 MBA Show

8:01 listening | Last month

Must Read: Stillness Is The Key by Ryan Holiday

"A lot of people here. The title stillness is sticky. And you think that your some sort of you know Buddhist monk that has no emotion that's not really Producing modern things in the world. Maybe a little bit old fashioned. No stillness is a sense of calm intercom that we often experience when we're in the zone. I remember when I was playing basketball competitively when I was younger. There's a sense of stillness. When things are just going right the game almost slows down for you. It's like everything becomes a little bit easier and I'm running up and down the court so it's not like I'm not moving. My body armor not being active. It's an inner stillness. It's a sense of common sense of confidence that you have. You can be an extreme action taker and still possessed stillness. That Ryan talks about now. If you're listening to this podcast you're like you know what Omar I'll have tried to meditate. I try to really habit. Stillness it's just not for me. This book is not about meditation. It goes way beyond that. It's more about how to make an informed decision. Whenever you're not a high stakes game situation. He gives countless examples. The one I remember off the top of my head is President Kennedy making really tough decisions during the Cuban missile crisis and how he exercise inner stillness to make sure he made the right decision and saved a lot of lives. He also gives examples from Steve Jobs and other modern day entrepreneurs so normally at the end of this kind of episode St Episode. Until you read this book because Xyz. I'M GONNA get in front of a renowned. Say The reason why you need to read. This book is because as an entrepreneur. You're constantly making decisions on a daily basis job as the leader of a company and you want to make sure that you're making more right decisions that wrong decisions and we often make wrong decisions when we're flustered when we don't have that peace of mind when we have that anxiety when we have that sense of imbalance we WANNA make sure that we're constant making clear headed decisions with a bigger small because they all have some sort of domino effect in our business. This is the main reason why this book is Worth Reading. Because of that fact alone you make decisions on the daily right always if your state of mind is not in the right place. It's GonNa Affect those decisions now. The second big reason why you need to read this book as an entrepreneur is business is stressful and you need to learn how to manage that. Stress can't get rid of the stress as long as you're in business you're going to have stress. But how do we manage it? How do I make sure it doesn't affect our personal health if we don't take care of our personal health and manage stress? No-one will okay. And if you're in bad shape your businesses in shape. You are the captain of the ship and the ship goes down when you do so understanding how to manage that stress especially in that moment when you're in that stressful moment is important in this book gives you incredible insights but thirdly this book is more about wisdom than actual you know having some sort of zen attitude. How do you become a wise person? Somebody who really has a ritual a routine of really gathering the facts and making the right decisions and make the right judgments about what's going to happen in the future and I feel. This book really covers all three now. I want to tell you this book is a how to guide is not like a common stillness and wisdom for dummies. You know it's not a ABCD now you're wise. No and if it was that way everybody would be wise. Be So simple. It asks you to ask them two questions of yourself to reflect absorb the information. This is not like a book you can zoom through you read. You think you ponder it takes some time to get through a chapter because forces you to think about how does supply in my own life. Am I doing these things? One of my caught in these traps that type of stuff. I found it very helpful to read this book before bed puts me in a great state of mind kind of good a bed with a little bit more wisdom a little bit more communists and I wake up the next morning. Ready to take on and implement the stuff. I just read last night. One of the big takeaways early on his book. Is this idea of having an empty mind and living in the moment The best parallel abyss example. Gibson's book is like when you were child when you were a kid and used to play outside. You didn't think about tomorrow. You didn't think about yesterday. You just thought about that moment. You just enjoyed the moment. You lived that moment whether you're playing tag or playing baseball with your friends or whatever it was when I was a kid I used to love to draw on the color and I remember clearly when I was doing those activities. I was just really interested in seeing that drawing. Come together or coloring in coloring book or that page in the coloring book now I was just enjoying it in the moment and just seeing it all happen. I didn't think about. What did I draw yesterday? I didn't think about what am I gonNA do tomorrow. And that whole worry mind was never there. And he's encouraging US and giving us some techniques to get back to that because that's when you're really living when you're enjoying the present moment a lot of us entrepreneurs we always are looking to the future always looking to what's going to happen next week next month. This quarter rig ahead or goals or targets all that. Kinda stuff right. We can't help but do that. We're we're goal driven and I'm not saying to stop it completely but I'm going to say that don't always do that. Give yourself time to enjoy the moment. The moment that you're in right now building your business for me. The moment right now is recording. This podcast episode. You know I have the privilege of having the ability to get up and do a podcast and have been doing it for six years of growth an audience and it's great to share what I've learned and and Hopefully help other people and most of us. We don't really take the time to think about that and really enjoy every day. Every moment that we're doing our thing in our business building our business making calls writing emails getting on webinars creating sales pages whatever. It is really appreciating that most of us are thinking. When is this going to be done? What's next what's the next thing to do? In my opinion it has to be a balance. You have to think of the things you have to do in the future otherwise. You're not going to get anything done. You HAVE A to do list. But when you're doing the to do's be president at to be president a moment realizing the moment. Hey I'm privileged to be able to start a business. This is not feasible for some people in the world. You'd be able to do this to have the finances to have the time to have the ability to have the opportunities that we don't realize is if you know the English language and I'm assuming you do because you're listening to this podcast you are privy and you are made available to so much knowledge on the Internet books that are published in English or Sony. Books that are not translated in other languages Especially the things that just get published brand new books on a subject and you get that edge. That's a blessing. It's incredible so by doing that by living in the moment you tend to have more gratitude and that's why generally children or more happy okay. Now of course that's not the case for all children but if you look back on your kid you were generally happier because you weren't worrying about the future or dwelling about the past you're like hey things are all right. You know. I'm eating my Peter Murphy Jelly Sandwich and watching some cartoons and You know and you just were happy in the moment and this is a really important point. I know I'm I'm harping on a lot. But because a lot of entrepreneurs were building rebuilding or grow or try and make more money. We're trying to build our revenue and all that kind of stuff is great but we enjoy. The journey happens is at ten twenty thirty years ago by and we say hey the best years of my life I spent doing. What did I enjoy that? I actually appreciate it. Did I recognize that? Those are the prime years of my life. Time flies by okay so let's make sure that we live in that moment.

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What To Do When Things Go Wrong

FlashCast By PDB, With Phil Di Bella

8:14 listening | Last month

What To Do When Things Go Wrong

"Today's topic. I WanNa talk about when things go wrong in what to do so a lot of questions come in and say of course a lot of my podcasts slash castles positive Rebecca. Good things on all the rest of it end of had loved. Come through and say that's a good at obviously. I've had some great lock. Things have gone. But what do I do when things go wrong so Great thing for me to address had to give it some thought To make sure that have lighted at In a way that people can understand in under the ten minutes. But I'm so he's he's a bit of a process of Guthrie when things have gone wrong in the past and of course it always talk about the journey. Not a destination and distancing is all about vision and dumb. Obviously the journey is all about planning and being able to pivot and as we know in lost. The journey doesn't always go smoothly. Halley ever will always go smoothly. I'm guys lately with probably pushing had enough. So he's a good way to be prepared or what? I've done When things have gone wrong what do I do? The first thing is always expressed problems. But I don't Miss my Tampa now that's how Said that's easier said than done but what I've always tried to do is keep the emotion away from the problem in a good way to do that is to get a piece of paper and pen and actually clearly articulate the problem. Surat the part of the problem down on a piece of paper. I'm really hurting. The actual problem is I'm a talk about putting some stocks. Not Fines CITRONEN. Do this quite early is always the best thing what best expressed the problem and the best way to express the problem clearly without losing tempa is to actually get a piece of paper and a pin and write down what you believed. The problem is in. It'll become clear the second thing is. I like to talk things. I'd like to talk to obviously confidants. Close friends advisers elected. Talk to my wife has been obviously my best advisor and closest advisor to me but what I make sure do is that I'd done drag them into the line of fire talking to someone and getting clarity and dumb. Asking for clarity is a completely different thing than boding with mark problem or dragging them into the problem because I find that if you drag them into the problem. You're actually getting the clarity that you're seeking but rather talking to the people around you Than I understand it. Then you've clearly articulated what the problem is number two guys with number one. They obviously express your problem. But then talk to the people closely. Rangoon if they can yom. You've clearly identified with the problem is I'll be able to clean understand it but be very surely dragging them into it. And of course we've been calling on the other side of that in the past week. Let other people dragged into problems so. Make sure that we don't do that. Get Opinions on solutions but Darnold of decisions for you and that's something that happens. A lot is obviously we want to get the pains of on solutions. But sometimes they're expecting people to make decisions for us. And that's something that I was got against is elected opinions. Unclogged often. Said people feel remind. Choose what would you do if I was in your shoes but I would do but I don't expect people to make the decisions for me They're not in a position he doesn't know what you know and obviously looking at a different set of eyes is good and helpful but not saying what you're saying so it's great to the opinions on solutions from others or what they would do but don't expect them let them make the decision for you. Number four is try to solve the problems. But don't beat yourself up if you can't. I always talk about how you doing the best that you came at the time that it's happening with the resources that you have to always trying solve the problem. That's of course what we're trying to but as much as we sometimes trying to solve the problem is complex solve that it doesn't mean that there's no answering it doesn't mean that we beat us up. It means that we keep spinning that Rubik's cube until we can fold find the best solution but a good way to to benchmark. This is. Am I doing this. I can't at the time that it's happening. The resources that I have number five is meet the issue head on. But don't dwell on it so you need to tackle the issues again. Talk about putting on spots not fine the ability to try and find that there's a problem or an issue straightaway or deal with the STRETO. He's always going to be better than letting it fester but again. Don't dwell on a find in the work of enduring Dr Spencer keeps talking about mind and heart coherence and that the buddy wants to take to the Pasta. The mind needs to take you to the future If you dwell on it you're going to be reading the Pasta and we don't want that you need to meet the issues head on Dwell on them forever. You need to get into that in-space of food thinking you need to conquer that problem in the move on you need to be living in the future so the body thinks you've achieved that right now and that's where you right in the spice number six is give you social spice from the problem. If you need to figure it out but don't run away from it so whilst money yourself some spice schmunity working on it rather than in it but don't run away from it at times of saying that people have a problem. We get significant rather than working on it. They separate themselves completely and then never actually put that faraway output that far APPs and festers infested it becomes a raging blazing off you at times. You're going to need some spice from the problem to figure it out but you don't run from it. It needs to be sold because it won't be solved on time and number seven is taking seriously when things go wrong but that gets enjoy yourself and I said it's a lot is Cobb Life is a journey and the destination is will be left with memories. And that's why I talk about. Life is measured in moments whether it's personal professional or family loss is measured in moments and we need to make sure that whilst problems a serious in Kane become seriously deal with them we got to remember to have some fun and celebrate the wings in celebrating the wings is something that I find is very very important and a lot of people. Forget that Tom's because if not celebrating the winds than at Brian is always burning in an area that is about what's next. What's next and we not getting that? Brian adherence. We need that. Brian Hubka here. We need to make sure with constantly celebrating. A wins appreciating where we are where we've come from and what we need to do to get better so as a city might Tonight or haven't had a lot of problems. A lot of things go wrong but have had things go wrong in the seven things on outline the things that I've done that along the way to try and help me get through the problem. Of course everybody has different personality. Everybody deals with things differently. This is not a second. This is my view. This is what's worked for me You take these seven steps and add your own or I mean. Some of them will will change into the white suit. Indicates that getting the result it's all about getting to that distant action whilst we might take a different journey. I'm such a recap march seven wiser expression problems. But don't do business egotistical emotional to control that ten bucks number to talk to your friends get their opinions but done drag them into the line of fire number three get opinions on solutions but make sure that no one else was making the decision by yourself. Number four is try to solve the problems but dumpy yourself up. If you can't number I you doing the best we can at the time that tiffany with the resources that you have a five. His tackled as issues head on. But don't dwell on them forever number six yourself some spicy if you need it but don't run away from the problem. He wants so self and number seven finally is whilst you need to take them seriously. Don't forget to have some fun. We need to have fun and as I said. Lock is measuring moment so to the listeners of sending messages about how? I DEAL WITH PROBLEMS OF WEXFORD POEMS. Bamdad sentenced to help you again. It's my perspective tight. Those many light them change them pennant. Pipe Asia Best Friend. Done at the sixty and seventy thousand votes. Got Three Room where you need to be. Get that Brian and hot coherence. So that we're operating in the future but conscience about the president right now. Don't let that pass tycoon. Take you back into the negative member mistake to there for us to learn and not mistakes unless we were paying two three times so when something's going wrong tackle it hit on be prepared in go out and beat. The bishop can be until next time. You've been listening to food. Bella and this is flash house by PAYDAY.

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What can I do with an email list?

Side Hustle School

3:14 listening | Last month

What can I do with an email list?

"Something for sale and that's okay your customers actually want that