Entrepreneurs

Leaders, dreamers and persistence - listen here for stories on business ventures, the visionaries behind them, tales of failure, and the never-give-up attitude that ultimately leads to success, from audio broadcasts aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from Kill Your 9-5 with Website Rental with Luke Van Der Veer

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:29 min | 2 hrs ago

A highlight from Kill Your 9-5 with Website Rental with Luke Van Der Veer

"Monthly rental fee that we no longer have to work for once everything is set up and producing. Now, in terms of steps, four phases, number one research, we have to figure out which niches in which cities to go after. We want the niche to be really valuable. But we also want the competition in that city that we pick to be low so that we can get results relatively fast. Number two is to build phase. We go out, we find our perfect niche city combination. Now we build a high converting lead generation website. We could use a drag and drop builder like weebly Wix, so you don't really need any kind of technical knowledge or know how to write code, any of that stuff. Number three is ranking. We use SEO, so search engine optimization to move that website to the top of the search results so that any time people search for that niche in whatever city we're targeting, they see our business first and call us. And then number four, rental phase. The website's now bringing in multiple customers a day. So we find a business that needs it, send them all the customers and charge them a monthly rental fee to keep them coming in. So essentially we're renting out the website as if it was physical real estate. The only difference is if you are a business owner, for example, you could just keep the leads for yourself. So this is fascinating. And I think to really bring those four phases to reality, can you just maybe think back on one of your favorite actual website rentals that you done or maybe one of your clients that just really fits this bill? Yeah, I mean, one of the first ones they did was vehicle wraps in Arizona. I'd never even heard of it before, but I was driving just down the road, and I saw a person drive by with a really cool color. And I was like, that's not standard. So I started looking up things on Google to just see, you know, what is this? And it wasn't paint. It was literally a high quality film. That they put on the car, and it'll be two, $3000. And I was like, that's a cool niche. So I didn't really have the process I have now. I just kind of picked a random city. Built a site for that and started ranking for it and people were calling me for this. So I had to find a business owner who wanted those leads. And I just started calling some businesses in the area, made a deal. And they rented it. So anything that was coming in would go to them. I just send all the leads exclusively, and they would just pay me a monthly rental fee. And that thing has been paying me since that one's 2016. I haven't touched it since then. Wow. So this works for really both sides of the equation fire nation. If you have a really cool niche and you have a really cool way to monetize quality leads, especially if you have a high ticket item, like something that you're getting paid 500, a thousand, 5000, $10,000, whatever that might be for the services. Man, can this really make sense quick? Because that's the biggest struggle for people that have a really high quality product or service, is how do I get high quality leads? How do I direct it to the right person, the right place, the right time? And then, of course, on the flip side, just like Luke's talking about, if you have that idea and you build up that website is going to be valuable to somebody, now you go find that person, or if you do it the right way to that person might even find you because that business order might be searching out for exactly what you've created. And then over time, you get all these people coming to you and your contact form saying, hey, how can I be the lead generate receiver on this website? And then you can start bumping up the cost per acquisition and all these different things. So now you're really having this marketplace and this really cool entrepreneurial venture where you're getting top dollar for the leads that you're generating. So what was exactly the aha moment? I mean, was it seeing that car wrap? Was that the impetus that launched you into this or was it something else? Let's talk a little bit about how the idea was really formed. It was the job. I was working a 9 to 5 job wealth 9 to 5 a to 6, really. And human resources and just not fulfilled at all. I'm sitting there watching the clock every day, people I worked with were cool, but I didn't really like the work I was doing. There's a lot of red tape, didn't feel valued. I had no control over my time, so I couldn't see my family as much as I wanted to, or take vacations when I wanted, was underpaid and I just couldn't envision myself working 50 60 hours a week for the next 40 years of my life. To me, that just sounds like a nightmare. And when I got that feeling, I just made a decision. I'm not doing this. I'm going to find a way out. And I tried a lot of different things. MLM network marketing, drop shipping, I sold on eBay and Amazon, affiliate marketing, Facebook ad agency, Google ads, and then one day I came across SEO. And when I saw that, I realized if I can just use this skill set to bring in customers for any business I want, why can't I treat a website like rental property and just become a digital landlord? Fire nation, I love these stories of these aha moments because it's just people living their lives saying there must be something better. There has to be something better. And they look around and not sometimes right away when they break off. Is that something better that completely jumps out of that? I mean, it took me 6 years, like Luke said, he was trying a bunch of different things and didn't work right away. It took me 6 years of trying different things to get to entrepreneurs on fire, but man, it's in that struggle that those ideas have at least a chance to make it happen. I want to talk about benefits. Of course, we've been talking about benefits about these website rentals. But I want to get detailed about how beneficial it can be from website rental

Arizona Google Luke Ebay Amazon Facebook
A highlight from MBA2191 Can You Start a Business With Zero Capital?

The $100 MBA Show

00:53 sec | 6 hrs ago

A highlight from MBA2191 Can You Start a Business With Zero Capital?

"Most people will have the ability to make or have some money like a $100, $500. And believe it or not, in today's online digital world, that's a lot of money to start a business. You can actually do a lot with $500. But today, I'm taking up the challenges showing you how you can start a business with $0. And before we get into the strategies and the tips, let me just share with you an example of me actually doing this. I wanted to challenge myself and see if I can start a business with absolutely no money. And I did it back in 2012. The first thing you have to decide is what are you going to offer? What's going to be your product service to your customers? If you're going to sell a product like a physical product, or a software, you often have to put up upfront cash to create this product. Firstly, that you can sell it or to buy other products like if you're reselling t-shirts or sneakers, it's going to cost you money to get started. So that's not going to work. We're

A highlight from S7 Bonus: Satish Jayanthi, Coalesce

Code Story

01:38 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from S7 Bonus: Satish Jayanthi, Coalesce

"Transformations, but we said, okay, let's do this because the customer is asking for and this is our first customer and so on. We went into that radical for some for some time. In the hindsight, that was a mistake. And that was not part of our vision. We just thought I was an easy path and it was it was not. My name is satis Jay. I am the cofounder and CTO of coal. This is code story. The podcast bringing you interviews with tech visionaries. Who share in the critical moments of what it takes to change an industry and build and lead a team that has your back. I'm your host, Noah lab part. And today I'll teach you on the set out to create the only data transform tool. For you to deliver data today and scale tomorrow. All this and more. On code story. So teach giraffe was born in India, and attended school there. When he was growing up, his mom was a teacher and his dad was dabbling in different businesses. After he graduated, he started working for a software company, which ultimately sent him to Europe, and then eventually to the U.S. 22 years ago. Outside of tech, he spends a lot of time with his family, his two kids, and he loves to play tennis and meet people doing so. As a father, he continually reminds his kids to be passionate about what they're doing. And to do so with a 100% effort. Prior to his current venture, satish was building data warehouses for different businesses and firms in the industry. He saw firsthand how hard it was to bring a bunch of data sources altogether and have them be compatible in a

Satis Jay Giraffe India Europe Tennis U.S. Satish
A highlight from PayPal: Dan Schulman

Wisdom From The Top

07:20 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from PayPal: Dan Schulman

"When Dan schulman arrived to PayPal back in 2014, the company was in a simmering conflict with the big credit card companies. A conflict that was on the verge of becoming a scorched earth war. The credit card companies were angry because PayPal was discouraging customers from using credit cards and its platform. PayPal was angry because of the fees they had to pay to the credit card companies. On the day he arrived as CEO of PayPal, it's fair to say Dan schulman had his work cut out for him. He eventually worked on the plan to create partnerships, which we'll hear about a bit later. But the other thing Dan schulman did was to ditch the standard corporate playbook when it comes to issues of social justice. He didn't play it safe. When hate groups started using PayPal, he threw him out. He even banned conspiracy theorist Alex Jones from the platform and several others who've spread misinformation. When North Carolina passed a law that many saw as anti transgender, Dan ordered PayPal to scrap plans to build an operations center there. In June of 2020, after massive demonstrations against racial injustice, PayPal committed $530 million in grants and funding towards black owned businesses. And in the meantime, none of these decisions have hurt PayPal's bottom line. To the contrary, the company is doing better than ever. Dan says a lot of his philosophy and approach comes from his childhood. His parents were both civil rights activists and from an early age, activism was part of his identity. My mom pushed me around in a baby carriage at civil rights marches in Washington, D.C., my dad was worried that I was going to be the youngest person ever to have their own FBI file. And my dad was also a very courageous activist. This is the environment that I grew up in, obviously your parents make a huge difference in the way you think about the world. And my parents were always about civil rights and social justice. Dan played varsity football in high school, but he admits he barely got into college and didn't know what he wanted to do after. I saw this advertisement for, at the time, it was in New Jersey bell. It wasn't even AT&T yet that said, you know, we are looking for account executives, salespeople, and a salesperson is like the quarterback of the sales team. And I thought to myself, well, you know, I've been successful quarterback, maybe I can do this job. I mean, you say you said quarterback, but you were starting at an entry level job doing sales and marketing. Yeah. An assistant account executive, which is about as low as you can be. Right. At the bell system, it's the lowest level of management. And I was earning, I think at the time about $14,000 a year, which was a little disappointing to me because I wanted 16,000, but I think what really made my career take off at AT&T was unfortunately kind of a tragedy that happened inside my family where my sister died of an aneurysm, very unexpectedly, and it was one of these events that, you know, fundamentally rewires your brain. And it is a very, very, very difficult time before then. I had been very much oriented around my own personal success and it was a lot about me, and then afterwards, I guess I had to take some time off and it was pretty devastating. I came back and my team had really rallied without me and had done some incredible things and I remember having to present to senior management at AT&T, what my project goals had been, how we had done. And I went in there and said, look, we've had incredible success, but none of it is due to me. I wasn't even here. And somehow that whole idea of recognizing how important your team is and giving them actually all of the credit, I don't know if it was coincidental or it was because that's actually how I felt about things going forward, but my career took off at that point. Well, my credit, you know, I wish my sister never died, but I credit her. And what she taught me through that with so much of what's happened in my career, at least afterwards. Well, I actually spent 18 years moving from first New Jersey bell and then to AT&T at the divestiture of the bell system. And I had an amazing career there. Yeah. You know, eventually I was managing the consumer division for AT&T, some 40,000 people in it. About $20 billion of revenues. And so, and I was doing all of that. I think I was 39 years old or something like that. Which is crazy to imagine now that AT&T's consumer long distance service was a multi-billion multi-billion dollar business. I mean, sort of like how travelers checks for a big part of American Express's business at one point, which just seems nuts. That long distance calls were a huge part of the way telecom companies made money. Oh yeah, but you know, it's so interesting to me that I probably that $22 billion revenue stream is probably in the single digit billions now. I mean, that's how much long distance has disappeared. I mean, think about it, not that many people even have a landline in their home anymore. It's all about mobile. But that's what's happening in technology right now. That's what makes the world we live in so interesting. But also challenging because it's moving so quickly. I mean, whether it be, say, ten years from now, the explosion of quantum computing, which is going to fundamentally redefine what processing is all about. I mean, just such a discontinuous manner that it's hard to imagine. And then you've got the explosion of machine learning and artificial intelligence and the explosion in data. And this is why, so many companies struggle to keep up with it. I think the average age of a Fortune 500 company today is like 8 years. And if you went back 75 years ago, it was something like 50 years. It's just that it's hard to keep up with it all. And so in some ways, it's amazing to me that that revenue stream is practically disappeared, but another way is that is that's part of the world

Dan Schulman Paypal DAN Washington, D.C. Alex Jones New Jersey North Carolina FBI AT Aneurysm Football American Express
A highlight from MBA2190 Q&A Wednesday: How do I get more clients into my barbershop?

The $100 MBA Show

01:44 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from MBA2190 Q&A Wednesday: How do I get more clients into my barbershop?

"The old welcome to the $100 MBA show where you and your business get better every single day with our daily ten minute business lessons for the real world. I'm your host your coach your teacher, Omar's at home, almost the cofounder of webinar ninja, an independent software company I started with my cofounder back in 2014. And today's episode is Q&A Wednesday on Q&A Wednesday as we answer a question from one of you, one of our listeners. If you've got a question you want to ask, just go ahead and email me over at Omar. At one zero zero NBA .NET. Today's question is from Hakeem and Hakeem asks hey Omar I run a barbershop in my neighborhood. I find your lessons really useful, but I got a question. I've been running my barbershop for over four years and would love to learn how to get more clients in my barbershop. My barbershop is doing okay, it's profitable, but I want to do everything I can to maximize my results. Appreciate any advice thanks, Hakeem. Great question Hakeem, because many of our listeners have physical businesses. Brick and mortar businesses like barbershops like yoga studios or restaurants. We still need these businesses in our society in our daily life. They are the backbone of the economy, and business owners like Hakeem, wanna grow just like everybody else. So in today's lesson, I'm gonna give a some advice that will apply to his business, but also any business whether it's a brick and mortar business, online business service, a consultancy business that is stuck and can't break through to the next level. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. Let's be honest, business is notoriously

Hakeem Omar Webinar Ninja NBA
A highlight from RECESSION: A Once In A Lifetime Opportunity To BUILD WEALTH Is Here! | Robert Breedlove

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

07:07 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from RECESSION: A Once In A Lifetime Opportunity To BUILD WEALTH Is Here! | Robert Breedlove

"Do, please leave a review on our podcast. It's the best way to support us so that we can get the show out to more people just like you that want to reach their true human potential. I'm Tom bilyeu and welcome to impact theory. The argument has been that a little bit of inflation is necessary to stoke an economy otherwise people will not consume and there will be no economy. Robert breed love welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me, Tom. Glad to be back. I'm very excited to have you. In any financial crisis, what can somebody do with their money strategy to come out the other side better than they went in? Yeah, this is a kind of a complicated question because one of the things that money is I talk about this a lot on the show is an insurance policy on uncertainty. So by definition, a financial crisis is a time of great uncertainty. So the standard strategy, you know, your grandmother's wisdom would be to save your dollars, save your hard earned cash. But that gets a little bit more complicated and a very inflationary environment where we are inflating currency very rapidly or counterfeiting currency. You throw that out. It's the same thing. So we covered that last time, but it's worth for people that are just encountering you for the first time. Why do you say that what is inflation and why do you call it counterfeiting? Yeah, so inflation quite simply is legal counterfeiting and counterfeiting is criminal inflation. They're mechanically the same thing, but inside of a legal monopoly at a Central Bank, it's called quantitative easing or some other euphemism that makes it sound really good. But if you or I do it, we get thrown in jail. So it's just making more money. It's just a political institution that has authorized itself the exclusive ability to print money. And when you print money, you are stealing claims on wealth from other savers of dollars. So you have first person that I had ever heard say it like that. I always thought inflation was a lot of physics that we needed that things just inflated by 2% year over year. That's just the way that it was. So right now we are in a very inflationary environment. And I would say that's a part of why where I would very much call what we're in right now a crisis. The media is trying to soft shoe it, but I think every day it's going to be more and more problematic and I could be wrong, but I don't think so. Why are we in an inflationary environment right now? Well, we're in an inflationary environment because we just printed $6 trillion in the U.S. over the past 24 plus months, which is what percentage of the total supply of U.S. dollars out of existence. You would have to check the exact data on this, but I want to say it's an increase of about 40% of the total supply. For since what? 1913? No, since 2020. No, but I'm saying the 40% of a supply that started in 1913. So this isn't like, that's correct. So supply issue and starts in 1913. So for the first 108 years of dollar existence, we produced, let's say, again, check my numbers on this 15 trillion U.S. dollars. And then we just increase that by an additional 6 or roughly 40% in the past two years. So if you look at the chart, it's very kind of low and slow. If you on the way up and then one huge spike recently. That's so crazy. I don't think people really understand. But before we go all the way to that, we will certainly get more into that. So okay, we're in an inflationary environment. So how do you want people thinking if grandma is grandma's wisdom is now wrong because of that environment. And so because I really am right now to your point about you want as many options as possible in a time of uncertainty, I am right now trying to be as close to gold buried in my backyard as possible. Yeah, I always feel the need to say, I'm not, I don't actually have gold buried in my backyard. I don't want people showing up. But trying not to be locked up in too many things that are long-term, though full disclosure I do own a very substantial amount of Bitcoin and Ethereum. But for the most part, I'm trying to have my options open. Well, I hope you have it in self custody, at least. Because that's buried in the backyard. Yeah. I'm not. I'm not to the point that you would be happy, but I'm getting close. Okay. 'cause if it's Bitcoin on an exchange or with a custodian, it's not your Bitcoin as we commonly say. Not your keys, not your coin. I don't want to disparage grandma, she's right, actually. You know, holding options in the face of uncertainty is the right strategy. It's just that the tool of optimal optionality, if that's a term, is not no longer the dollar. It's decreasingly the dollar. The more you print new dollars, the more your debasing that instruments ability to store value across time. So it's less useful as a tool of optionality as money is intended to be. And as a nice barbell to that strategy, Bitcoin is or gold, physical gold, is a really nice adjunct because as you debase currency, that would indicate that would basically equal you have more dollars chasing the same amount or relatively same amount of gold or Bitcoin, which would be a higher price of Bitcoin or gold in dollar terms. So I want on inflation though I don't want to leave this yet. It's a very complicated term. People often think prices going up as inflation, which it is. That's a form of inflation price inflation. There's also monetary inflation, which is the expansion of the Fiat currency supply. But the try and the reason I equate inflation to counterfeiting because it doesn't exist without the legal monopoly of the Central Bank. You don't have arbitrary expansion of the money supply outside of a legal monopoly. It just does not exist. So to try and give people a useful analogy about this, if you slice a pizza into more slices, it doesn't mean that there's more pizza available to eat. You've increased the number of slices nominally, but the size and volume of the pizza has not changed. You can not feed more people with it. You could similarly think of money as an option on the global capital stock. And every time you print a new unit of money, you're basically slicing that pizza, if the pizza is the global capital stock, you're slicing it into finer slices or thinner slices. But if I'm printing more pizza, why isn't it that I have more pizza versus but you're not printing pizza, so pizza is global capital. Capital, stuff, machines, equipment, real assets, let's say. Money is just the option, the call option to acquire those assets. And so if I increase the number of options available, what I'm doing is taking away the ability of those saving in dollars, I'm stealing from them. You're stealing their purchasing power.

Tom Bilyeu Robert Breed U.S. Central Bank TOM Bitcoin Grandma Fiat
A highlight from S7 E15: Jeff Grass, Hungry Marketplace

Code Story

07:00 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from S7 E15: Jeff Grass, Hungry Marketplace

"This and more. On code story. Jeff grass had his career start more traditionally as a bond underwriter. Graduating from Wharton and then being a serial entrepreneur. Outside of his business ventures, he's married with two kids and used to run marathons, including one into Athens with his bare feet. When he's not running, he's spending time with his kids and doing their activities. Jeff's current venture started out as a tech enabled platform for office and event catering, which connected their users to incredible chef entrepreneurs. Fast forward, they are now a national platform for top chef made food production and delivery services that includes much, much more. This is the creation story of Hungary. Hungary is a platform designed to connect companies with top local chefs and restaurants to provide a suite of amazing food solutions. So think office catering, snacks, events, things like that. What makes this unique is that we primarily partner with top local chefs that cook out of incubator kitchens, ghost kitchens. So it gives us a way to work with some of the most talented chefs in a given and given city. So you get very, very high food quality. We have hundreds of chefs on the platform, so there's tremendous variety. But cooking out of those kitchens gives us a significant economic advantage versus sourcing food from a restaurant, a traditional caterer. So it allows us to provide very high quality and affordable price also to own the delivery and the service. So it's our team transporting the food from the chef's kitchen to the office and then doing all of the providing a VIP level of service. Tell me about the MVP so that first version of the product you built. How long did it take to build? And what sort of tools did you use to bring it to life? Well, hungry realized a tremendous amount on technology to run our business model. It is very unique in this industry. It has a lot of structural advantages. It gives us, as I mentioned at lower cost structure, by owning the delivery and the service allows us to make it ultra reliable, provide a VIP level of service. And so these are key factors that our clients really value a lot. The challenge of our model is is that we're working with chefs and restaurants all over a given city. And so how do you coordinate and manage the communication communications with hundreds of different chefs and restaurants to serve hundreds of clients all across a given market? And so technology plays a critical role that allows us to run the business in a very reliable, very scalable, very cost efficient way. MVP minus one, kind of the pre MVP was actually building a lot of how we operated in Google Spreadsheets. So we had some of the most complicated Google Spreadsheets you've ever seen because it was really about how do we organize this, how do we manage this unique business model that we thought and we knew would have a huge advantages, but just trying to figure it out. A lot of iterate, super, super fast. And as we started to do that, we then began to build the technology platform. Our initial build really took us about a year, a year and a half to build the initial core elements of what we call the hungry operating system or hungry OS for short. From a technology perspective, we used a react front end. We used Ruby on Rails, primarily on the back end, and it was a SQL database. So just kind of a typical startup, fairly low cost, and just trying to get going quick. With any MVP you got to make certain decisions and tradeoffs, right? And I could probably cherry pick a few things out of what you said, but tell me about those decisions and tradeoffs you had to make around feature cut or tech debt, acceptance, or anything like that, and how you coped with those decisions. The priority was definitely on getting ourselves to market quickly. We're big believers in, let's not overthink let's get something fast into the market that allows us to get very quick feedback and see kind of what works and what doesn't. I think that's one of the real advantages that we have here at Hungary as we tend to not spend a lot of time debating and conference rooms, you know, what to do next. We tend to try to go for it quickly, but it's with an eye towards something fast and simple. It allows us to start learning because we know we're going to learn a lot more with live customer reaction and without our whole focus in the first two years was proving out this business model using technology to allow us to do that in a scalable way. And also with an eye towards building in a way that allow us to replicate this in other cities across the country. So those were some of the key must haves as we were building it. And then it was, you know, obviously, how do you make those tough decisions around which piece of functionality first versus second? And so we prioritize things that help support our operations, because that was the most complex. And then some of the more client facing pieces as well. We'd formed an advisory board of early clients also that so we really tried to be very customer led and having them guide us as to what they needed most and what were the priorities and how do we define an interface that really works well for them. This episode is brought to you by support zebra. Let's face it. Having a world class customer support team is critical in the world today. In fact, it's mandatory. But how do you build not only a scalable team, but one who is guaranteed to hit the most important metrics. Meat support zebra. Support zebra's supports, the world's fastest growing companies by building scalable world class customer support teams for SaaS, FinTech, and ecommerce companies. They offer outsource resources for customer support, technical support, back office administration and content moderation. Their staff is available 24/7 and is the happiest customer facing staff in the industry. There are no contracts, and you get to select your dreams for team. And believe it or not, they have less than 1% customer turn rate. So you could say their customers are happy. Get started with your free consultation at support zebra dot com. This episode is brought to you by air bite. Our world has undergone a massive digital transformation. And as such, every company has become a data company, accumulating more and more data every day. And the more data you gather, the harder it is to manage. In one company wants to change all of that. Air bite. Air bite is the modern open-source ELT standard that replicates data from the long tail of connectors. Air bite wants to give your infrastructure superpowers to collect and move data seamlessly, whatever the tools you use. They do this by syncing data from APIs, databases, and files over to data warehouses, lakes, and other destinations. Air bites ambition is to make data integrations a commodity. Find out more by visiting air byte dot com slash code story.

Jeff Grass Hungary Wharton Athens Google Jeff
A highlight from Personifying High-Performance in All Aspects of Life with Your Physical Conditioning with Dr. John Jaquish

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:28 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Personifying High-Performance in All Aspects of Life with Your Physical Conditioning with Dr. John Jaquish

"Doctor Jake wish, say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with? Hey, good morning mason. Something that, okay, something I disagree with that I feel like is pushed on everybody who wants to be an entrepreneur or a leader. The idea that anybody's going to be able to do this. I work for with Tony Robbins for a number of years. And this is right because we'll have. And one day I was sitting with him, we were having a drink and it was like, I said, how many people do you think you really get to and do? Like at your shows. Because books and tapes and stuff, he has no way to really tell him. How many people really like turned their life around? He says, maybe one or 2%. And I said, no, Kenny. And he said, oh yeah, I'm realistic about this. Because most people, they get charged up by listening. And they have all the right information. And they're so grateful to have all the right information, but they're just not willing to do it. And I have realized the same thing every time I get asked to speak about making sacrifices, the takes to really, let's say, launch a product that's never been seen by the world, a complete industry disruptive technology. I've done it twice now. And. When I say, I had to not pay myself anything for 7 years. And I work 60 hours a week. People just looking at me and being like, well, I mean, like, I would never do that. And I'm like, right. You probably right. You wouldn't. And so I think that being realistic about who's actually knowing to pull the trigger on doing what it takes, that number is very small. So fire nation, I hope you realize that the power of what we're talking about here today, which is personifying high performance in all aspects of your life with your physical condition. And guess what? We're not under the illusion that 99% of people that listen to this content are going to take the direct and amazing action and advice that doctor J wish is going to be talking about here today. But you know what? We're going to get across a 1%. We're going to cross the 2%. And hey, when you have a 128 million total listens of your podcast and two and a half million plus listens every single month, that's actually start to be real numbers. I mean, Tony Robbins gives ten. It's a lot of people. 30,000 people that are in those stadiums that you were talking about. Those stadiums. So those numbers are meaningful and they can compound over time. But I think it is really important to just have that realism. So I'm really glad you brought that up. Because like I mentioned fire nation, we are talking about personifying high performance in all aspects of life with your physical conditioning. So think about this. So unfortunately, when you look like a physical disaster, doctor Jake, which people believe it's a reflection of your business. Can you talk about that? Yeah, there's quite a bit of data, and this came out mostly in the 90s where social psychologists were looking at behavioral psychologists. Looking at things that helped people do better in their business life and their professional life. And being attractive was one of the highest things on the list. Stated a different way, being a good shape. boils down to how long somebody looks like they're going to live. I know that's very strange because you think about attraction and you think what am I attracted to, whether it's, you know, I'm just thinking of the opposite sex. Or is it eye makeup or what catches catches my eye? It's not like that. It's more like people that look healthy are more easily trusting. Like they don't look like they're going to fall apart and unfortunately, as the statistics show us, when you're a physical disaster, people don't trust you. They think you have maybe no self control. Or you're not going to follow through. If somebody who's overweight, 1 may end up thinking, well, this guy can't even control what he puts in his mouth. How is he going to, how's he going to handle me as a client? See, fire nation, what I love about this is the reality that you have control over this type of perception. Because if you're not where you want to be physically right now, guess what? You can get there. You can do what it needs to take to get to a place where you look good, where you feel good, and that will be a reflection of you. And I've said this to a lot of people with doctor J question, I'm kind of curious about your thoughts on this. Because people want to look at me funny like, oh, you can't say that, or you can't really think that way. They almost make it seem like I'm discriminating in a non acceptable way. When I say, I will never vote for a fat person. And I literally say those words all the time. Like, I forget the exact name of that guy. Who's that guy that was the governor of New Jersey forever? Chris Christie. Chris Christie so obese and he was like this wonder king in the political world.

Tony Robbins Jake Mason Kenny Chris Christie New Jersey
A highlight from MBA2189 How To Sell More with a Strong Reason to Buy

The $100 MBA Show

14:35 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from MBA2189 How To Sell More with a Strong Reason to Buy

"And I get on chat, they don't tell me what to do. They just do it for me. Exactly what I want. If you're hosting a website, especially a WordPress website, check out WP engine, and as a listener of the show, you can get 20% off. Just go to WP ENG dot IN slash MBA and use code WP E two zero off. WP engine, the best way to host your website. A man walks into a karate studio. He's interested in possibly taking karate lessons. He's trying to get in shape. He loves karate movies, but he's not totally sold. Until of course, the owner of the karate studio walks up to him and gives him a strong reason to buy. He says to the potential customer, karate is a great discipline. It's a great tradition. You're going to love the physical exercise is going to put you in shape. The camaraderie from all the different students from all walks of life coming together to learn this martial art. And of course, you're going to build discipline, character, and be part of an ancient tradition. All of that is great, but honestly, sir, there's no feeling like walking down any street in any city with no fear, feeling confident, you can defend yourself and your family at any time. The man says, where do I sign? How do I get started? How do I buy a uniform? This is an example of a strong reason to buy. It's a compelling reason. Let's break down why it's a compelling reason. Why it's so strong? And why it's so easy to close sales with it? Well, the owner of the card is you to talk about all these great benefits. And he says they're gray and all, but there's nothing like being able to defend yourself at any time anywhere. All the stuff you talked about before getting in shape, the camaraderie, the discipline. These are things you can probably pick up and are benefits of other places that sell some sort of form of exercise, the gym joining a squash club. The business owner understands that he has competition. These are the competitors, not other karate studios per se, but other options this customer has to the way they approach their physical fitness. But the thing that they can compete with, the thing that makes this compelling is the fact they're going to be learning something that can help defend themselves and feel safe. Feel empowered, feel like they can protect their family. How do you put a price on that? The picture that he painted in the customer's head is so vivid. It's so strong, it makes the customer want what he has. We all need to tap into that for our customers. Yes, we got benefits and features up the wazoo. We have tons of them on our sales pages on our marketing pages on our pricing pages. But what's the compelling reason? What's the reason the so strong they can't ignore and have to buy? This is your job because this is your message to every customer. So cultivating a strong reason to buy is important. Sometimes you're going to need to do it in story reform. Sometimes your business won't have a compelling reason, and you're going to have to create one. Let me give you another example of a strong reason to buy. I saw this from a creator who creates online courses to teach people how to get better at poker. He could do what everybody else does and say, learn how to master poker in 90 days, or get the tips and tricks that the master car sharks in Vegas know. These are kind of nice, but they're kind of lukewarm. They're not really in context of the actual customer's life or experience. Instead, what they did is offer a strong reason to buy. Here it is. Take my course and learn how to win more money and dominate poker night with your Friends. Bragging rights, unlimited. Wow, strong reason to buy. One, win more money. Who doesn't want that? Dominate poker night with your Friends. Most people who play poker aren't doing this professionally at Vegas. They're playing poker with their friends once a week, twice a week once a month. Poker night. With our friends. And as soon as you put them in the context of that, they vision themselves at a poker night with their friends dominating the table. Wow. What all the feelings are feeling in this moment. They're feeling confident. They're feeling strong, happy. They feel significant. They feel like, hey, maybe some of my friends are jealous of how good I am. And then the bragging rights unlimited, wow. Sometimes bragging rights amongst friends is pretty much priceless. So the person that's running this course really understood the customer, put themselves in their shoes and gave them the strong reason to buy, given the context of the customer. Here's a few tips when it comes to cultivating your own strong reason to buy. You're trying to evoke emotion. Whatever you say, whatever you put in your copy, should invoke an emotional reaction. Notice what the Quran example, right? Being able to protect yourself on any street around the world, protect your family. This is evoking emotion. This is not trying to sell them on a logical ROI basis. With the poker, you're making them feel empowered, superior, strong. These are emotions. So take your product, take your service and get deep in the emotions of what you want your customers to feel. But more importantly, what do they want to feel? So for example, at webinar ninja, it took us a while to get to the point where we understood what our strong reason to bias. Where a webinar software. So it's like, hey, we cater to creators and coaches that use our software to do several things. We realized that the thing that our users use our software the most and value the most is to sell their coaching and courses. So they use webinars to be able to run a workshop to be able to get their products and services in front of their audience and sell it. I can easily say something like easily sell your coaching and courses with webinar ninja. But that's kind of lukewarm. It doesn't really evoke emotions. It's not a strong reason to buy a stronger reason to buy is get more students and clients for your coaching on demand with webinar ninja. Most coaches most creators, they have a loan sales. They don't know how to summon a sale and get new customers regularly. This is a pain point that we know because we work with them for so many years. So being able to make a sale on demand, be able to run a webinar and get sales whenever you like, this is strong because they're like, hey, I need more customers. What do I need to do? Run ads? No, just run a webinar. Invite your email list, converts higher than anything else. Knowing this is a strong reason that has worked on my customer base, we use different versions of this when we do our sales webinars one, we sell our product. So for example, when we sell our annual plans that start at $290, we share the statistic that most customers that use webinar needed to sell their courses and coaching make at least their annual fee on their first webinar. That means the software pays for itself in just one webinar and you have it for the full year. And the truth of the matter is, is that most customers make well over that much. We saw that work, so we made it even stronger by saying, hey, run your first webinar on us because we have a 14 day trial and make the money first, meaning make the sales that would be equivalent to the annual fee or more on us, you're not paying anything this is 14 days for free, make that money, make the sales, and then you know it's for free, or it's paid for with the sales you made. So once you find your compelling reason to buy, you need to kind of show in different ways. Give different versions and build upon it, because we didn't just come up with all these ways at once. We experimented, we tried different wording. We tried different sales webinars, different scripts, different slides, different offers. This is over and we do for webinar ninja is about the 89th version, right? We've done so many iterations. And it won't be the last iteration, because we will continue to try to improve. But it's all behind a strong reason to buy. Now, remember, I said, it's emotional. So I know my customers are small business owners. They want their money to stretch. They want things to last. They want to feel like they're making a smart decision. This is a no brainer decision. So I make it a no brainer. I show them how it's a no brainer. I press on that button as much as I can because I know it will equal a sale. For your business it might be different. Your customer might want to feel significant or look fashionable or get noticed or whatever it might be, make sure you show them how your product or service allows them to get that emotion. I got more on today's topic, but before that, let me share with you some of our favorite tools. We all know the power of an email list and growing our email list, but managing it automating our emails, making sure they actually get into the inbox, that's where ConvertKit comes in. ConvertKit is an all in one email marketing platform. I've used a lot of different email marketing platforms. And we use ConvertKit for a reason. It just works. It does what you need to do. It's simple. It's easy. And it keeps improving every single day. Plus, you can start for free. Go ahead to one zero zero NBA .NET slash ConvertKit to get started. Support for today's show comes from a webinar ninja. Know what really sells your product or service, it's not marketing or ads. It's you, your blog, your social feeds, your podcast. These are all ways we try to share ourselves our value and build trust with our audience. But what if you can go even further? What if you can connect with potential clients or customers in a way that's even more personal, more engaging, more effective? Well, that's where webinars and webinar ninja comes in. Hosting a live lesson, product showcase, or Q&A session, is the best way to share yourself and prove yourself to an audience. But wait, you're thinking, aren't webinars a giant pain in the ass? Yes, yes they are, but not with webinar ninja. Women are ninja has one job to make webinars easy for you. It's the user friendly a software ever created for webinars. So you can focus on your audience, not the tech. And here's the best part. You can get started with webinar ninja for free. Every plan comes with a free 14 day trial. And because you're a listener of this podcast, we got a real special deal for you. Go to webinar ninja dot com and at checkout, use promo code MBA. And you'll get 15% off your first month or your first year. Again, that's webinar ninja dot com use promo code MBA for 15% off your first month or your first year. Can't wait to see you inside the software and our community. You actually only need one strong reason to buy. If you have a target audience and you know exactly who you are serving, which is a huge thing you need to get done in your business because it makes your life a whole lot easier. Then this is easy. You only need one strong reason that actually applies to these people. We talked about making a compelling we talked about making it emotional. We were talking about telling a story and painting the picture and showing them how they will experience this emotion. I want to leave you with another unique example. And that comes from Patagonia. The clothing brand. Patagonia knows it's target audience loves quality products. They love something that lasts a lifetime. That's their value metric. Their customers are not huge on latest fashion, right? It's not Gucci here. It's Patagonia. Patagonia understands its customer understands what is their volumetric and its quality. When they advertise their winter jacket, I love this advertisement. It's very simple. It just says Patagonia's latest winter jacket has a name to it I forgot. And all it says is this is the last winter jacket you'll ever need to buy. First of all, it got me curious. What last jacket I'll ever need to buy? Number one, I love quality products that last a lifetime. So that immediately gets my attention. Number two, they understand Patagonia, customers like myself are not big shoppers. They want to go out and adventure and camp. Snowboard and have a great time in the outdoors. They're not really interested in being in malls and shopping all the time. So the concept of me not having to go buy another winter jacket ever again is sounds so compelling to me. What is this about? And when you read the ad, it says, hey, Patagonia, and all its products is backed by a lifetime warranty, meaning if your jacket doesn't work, the zipper is broken, something happens. You can go to any Patagonia store, and they will fix it for free. If they can't fix it, they'll place it. So it's literally the last jacket I'll ever have to buy. First of all, the reason why as a typical cut Patagonia customer, this is compelling in such a strong reason to buy is that I don't have to waste my time ever again buying a winter jacket. I don't have to worry if it breaks down what to do. I could just go to a store, they're going to give me a new one, or they're going to fix it. Number three, this sensible side of me says, even if this jacket is three, four, 5, ten times as much as I think I would normally pay for a winter jacket. It's still going to be worth it because I'll never have to buy another jacket. So you could see why this is such a strong reason to buy. It's hitting all the different emotions of their typical customer. Patagonia could have easily said, we create quality jackets. They're amazing. Look at the technology, our zippers are everlasting our buttons are amazing. Look at all the pockets it has. They're not talking about that. They're talking about the compelling reason to buy that really resonates with their audience. Thanks so much for listening to the $100 R&B show. I hope today's episode was helpful. I know when I learned this concept, it totally blew my mind wide open and changed the way I sold my products and services forever. I hope by me passing on this knowledge this information that I learned from Jim rohn that you too could pass it on to somebody else as well and keep that tradition alive. If you found this episode helpful and you want to show us some love, subscribe and follow the show. This is a great way to send a signal to your favorite podcast app that hey this podcast is pretty good. If you want to do something a little bit extra, go ahead and share on social right now that you listen to the $100 show and send them to one zero zero NBA dot net so they can subscribe themselves. Before I go, I want to leave you with this. The more I'm in business, the more I realize if you're trying to convince your customers you're doing it wrong. What you're trying to do is give them a paradigm shift. Blow their mind wide open with a different perspective. Making it easy for them to make a decision. Thanks so much for listening and I'll check you in tomorrow's episode. Q&A Wednesday, I'll see you then. Take care.

Karate Patagonia Vegas NBA Patagonia Store Gucci Snowboard Jim Rohn
A highlight from How Apartment Therapy's Riva Syrop is pivoting its events business around the economic climate

Digiday Podcast

14:19 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from How Apartment Therapy's Riva Syrop is pivoting its events business around the economic climate

"Attribution because rarely people will click through a QR code and ultimately buy a couch from west elm in the four step journey or whatever it is from attending the event. So because they lose some attribution, a lot of it is really focused on sponsorship revenue still. And using any kind of commerce data that's collected as more anecdotal evidence of these shoppable events working. So she gives some examples of, I believe it was west elm saying that they had sold a few sofas through one of their virtual events that they had done. And while there wasn't direct linkage from one to the other, it was very much time around the event happening. So it was the same sofas that were at the event. So they're trying to kind of crack the code and I think this is especially the case for next year around the convergence of commerce and events in regards to these larger, more furniture oriented topics, but their approach to events is a really interesting one and it's still I think she says about 10% of their revenue and commerce is about 15%, but they're growing both areas are growing. And so we talk about that to a degree as well. Cool. Thanks Caleb. Thanks, Tim. Reba, thanks so much for joining us on the podcast. How are you? I am great. How are you doing? I'm thrilled to be here. I'm good. So I wanted to have you on because I feel like in the past year or so covering apartment therapy. A lot of what I've been covering from you guys is around your events, your experiential, and also how that kind of dovetails with commerce. And I know you guys just wrapped up an experiential partnership with Pinterest that kind of tied in that commerce piece as well. So I wanted to chat with you kind of about how you're converging those businesses, how it ties into Q four, which is obviously a really hot time for commerce. And events too. And chat with you a little bit about what all of those mean, leading into the new year. So yeah, so I guess to kick it off, I would love to kind of hear about this dine by design event that you did with Pinterest earlier this month. So this is those from November 2nd to the 13th, I believe. But yeah, I'd love to kind of hear about how this event came to be and what the goal of it was if it was really rooted in commerce for you guys or if you're trying to get more inspiration for editorial. Emphasis was for this particular event. Yeah, of course. So the genesis of this event actually, Jeremy Jenkins from Pinterest, he runs for the lifestyle team. A lot of the creator program where they work to help the creators create stronger ecosystems and really build up their followings and also sort of express themselves more creatively had come to me. He had been to small cool like yourself was really blown away by it. And the visual discovery that went along with all of it. And he said, are you doing anything special for holiday? And, you know, we're a very stats driven and insights driven organization and we have been doing some research on our audience and what we found was that 90% of our audience was sort of zhejiang their home before every event that they were hosting. 90% of our audience was looking to host more than ever this holiday season because they're sort of heading back home for economic reasons, but heading back home with open spaces. And that most of them were coming to us actually looking for inspiration about what to purchase in terms of this entertaining. So JJ and I sort of mused on this a little bit and this idea of tablescapes and creating this beautiful showcase of different designs came together. The way that we approach a lot of our events is obviously we want another way to engage our consumers. We always want people to be able to sort of touch and feel home products in person because that really is such a big part of purchasing for the home. And then we always want a way to elevate design voices because there are so many incredible diverse design voices out there from a geo background, aesthetic point of view. So that was really rooted in what we do best, which is visual identity and sort of visual discovery paired with utility and that was the beginning of dime by design. So the event itself, as you said, took place from the second to the 13th. We chose to host it at show fields, which was brand new and which was opening up in Brooklyn. You know, it was very much in line with what we do, which is sort of content paired with commerce, was sort of this lifestyle bent. We had ten different designers come in. Each one of them created two play settings with the same theme. We set these up as too long tables. We hosted a series of three different influencer dinners. So each one of these was hosted by a different Pinterest influencer. I apologize. Two Pinterest hosted influencer dinners, one Pinterest influencer hosted brunch. At each of these, we had 20 participants who were largely Pinterest influencers. And then we opened it up to the public. And so we had about 6500 people walk through and experience the entire thing was shoppable. So we had QR codes on all of the tables so that people could scan them and get the products right from there. We also created shoppable Pinterest boards, you know, Pinterest is really facilitating a lot of shopping from its platform recently. So it was a wonderful pairing of the two, we don't have the commerce data quite yet because it just wrapped. What is it now? 8 days ago, but we're seeing huge amplification of the contest content on Pinterest, the all of the creators who created, we actually enlisted another 30 nano influencers who didn't attend the events, per se, but actually created their own idea pin moments that aligned with dime by design. So all of these together had about 85 million reach. We've seen almost 500 Pinterest boards idea pins created around this about a 150 of them are video. And it's just a perfectly merged experience. I think of everything we imp Pinterest believe in and just was a terrific partnership. Yeah, so getting into the influencer side of things quickly because I just want to define what a nano influencer is versus maybe someone who was heading up one of the brunches or dinners. I guess, how do creators factor into this from your perspective? Because obviously Pinterest is top users are really important to them. But from a creator perspective, how does this benefit the apartment therapy brand? And then what are some of those definitions for nano or maybe the creator as well? That's a good question. You know, I would have to ask Pinterest with the exact sort of follower count would be to separate sort of creators versus nano nano, we usually define as people who have a great presence on the platform, but maybe don't have a huge following of a 100,000 or something like that. We apartment therapy has 6 million followers on Pinterest right now, which was very much driven by their introduction of idea pins, which just enables so much more creativity through the platform. And so the top creator is the ones that were chosen to host events and attend the events were typically those who had a slightly higher following, and nano influencers, you know, are still ones that Pinterest is looking to support and incubate in different ways. So those were brought in at a slightly different level. A little bit was also dictated in terms of the presence of the events by geo because not everybody was able to fly in and so part of it was just, you know, who could actually be there and also had a great following. In terms of your question about how it benefited the apartment therapy, brand you know, I think it's really important that we bring forward in a physical way, what we express on our digital platforms. And I think, you know, there are so many benefits to events, whether that's small cool, which is sort of a tent pole, you know, multi sponsor event or a bespoke single sponsor event, like dine by design, like a pop up that we did with Ikea, the sun room in Miami earlier this year. I think it's really important that our audience engage with us in person. I think it's a very connective moment for our audience. And I think the brand to be aligned this way with phenomenal designers with great utility with a wonderful partner like Pinterest was just a terrific brand moment for us. Yeah, and I definitely want to get into small coal, which is I attended that one earlier this year. And it was really, it was really neat. But I wanted to, I do want to get into some of those events that have already happened that we can kind of dig into a little bit of the data from those as well. But I guess I'm curious how commerce and events may be talking at a higher level. How you see those two coming together because it seems like the past few events you've held do have that commerce layer on top, the QR code, method of purchasing products. So to be clear, I feel like correct me if I'm wrong. But for small, cool, you couldn't buy anything in person, but you could buy it online. It sounds like that was the same concept for done by design. So I guess the convergence of commerce come into play and do you see this as a necessary kind of pairing of businesses and going ahead into 2023 when you're thinking ahead to other events, like how important is that commerce piece of it, both for you and also for the audience at this stage? Yeah, I mean, I think that the inspiration, I don't think, I know. The inspiration for small cool came from, I was attending a big home trade show, and I found myself really frustrated that I couldn't buy anything off the floor, that in order for me to purchase something, I would have to reach out to the brand, the brand would have to send pricing and a tear sheet and all this kind of stuff. I would have to go through a designer. And I sort of thought, you know, is there a way that we can create these multi retailer moments? Because nobody is going into a store and purchasing their entire room or an entire space from one retailer. So the multi retailer piece of it has always been really critical for everything we do, because that's how people are consuming. So how can we create these multi retailer spaces that enable this utility piece? You know, everything we do, editorially, via commerce. Hopefully via advertising pairs, inspiration with utility. We're completely driven by that because, you know, we want it to be practical. We wanted to be things that people can really take with them and imply to themselves. And I think giving them easy access to purchasing everything that we show is a critical part of that. So as commerce a piece of it because we think we're going to make $10 million off commerce purchases of these events. No. But I think it's scaling and we're seeing it scale. And I think we know that in order to do it, they have to be able to buy it. And as we look at small cool in 2023, if I can sort of jump ahead, we've pushed it to the fall. Thank you. Thank you for just letting me talk. We've pushed it to the fall this year for a couple different reasons, but the biggest one is that we feel like consumers will be in a more comfortable place to spend. And that hopefully all of the economic uncertainty will settle down a little bit, but as we look at small cool and sort of the evolution of small cool, everything that we did last year, the 12 trends faces, the great VIP party, the shoppable components, that's all going to be there, but we're looking to introduce even more utilities. So utility by having more tips that people can take away from the event, more sort of high and low products so that there might be more expensive pieces like sofas and rugs, which is honestly actually what we're seeing our audience gravitate towards buying like crazy right now on a commerce perspective. But also more low items that they can purchase very easily that might be like a $20 vase or some little tchotchke that they can incorporate into their home. We're also looking at bringing in what we're calling micro moments. So again, with the economic uncertainty, our feeling is, you know, look, people are back home again. We know that they're spending back home again. However, I don't think that they're sort of in that COVID phase where they're like making over their entire apartment or house, you know, trying to just rip the whole thing to the studs and do it all over again and making home offices. But what they are doing because they're home more in their entertaining, more at home, is they're looking to create sort of these small moments within their spaces that can really transform the room. So maybe that's a coffee table moment or a bar cart moment or a little nook in your living room that's always been sort of empty that you think can make it pop. So a big part of the event this year is going to be to have ten of these micro moments, which are very small changes that you can make in your space that will have really meaningful effect on the aesthetics of it and sort of how you feel in it. And then we're also planning to actually introduce a cash and carry boutique this year. So to your point, people can actually purchase some products at the event itself and walk out with it, which we think would be a really nice sort of addition for our audience. Yeah, absolutely. And it definitely a ton to unpack from that. I think sticking with the kind of economic uncertainty too of it. So it's interesting that you're kind of seeing consumer habits already changing in terms of where they're investing in their home, where they're spending your right. They're not really doing as many giant full room makeovers. I think far fewer of those accent walls that people are painting, you know, bright colors this year than there were in 2020. But I am curious from an advertising perspective and the partners that you use in these events. Is there also an ask to delay until maybe the economic uncertainty is hopefully less intense, I guess, like is there also advertiser support to delay the event? Are you seeing more asks for later in the year, one off events too? Like how's the kind of advertiser side of things I guess shaking out from an experiential perspective

Pinterest Jeremy Jenkins Reba Caleb Zhejiang TIM Brooklyn Ikea Miami
A highlight from S7 Bonus: Rob Moore, Churnkey

Code Story

01:28 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from S7 Bonus: Rob Moore, Churnkey

"This episode is sponsored by IP info. IP info is a leading IP address data provider. The tool empowers use cases from attached surface management to optimize advertisements. IP info serves the most accurate IP data available in the market, built by developers for developers. Activate your free trial at IP and foe dot IO. And don't forget to use the promo code code story at checkout. This episode is sponsored by host IO from the creators of IP info. Host IO is a powerful and fast domain name data API, with host IO, you can get comprehensive domain name data uncover new domains and the relationships between them. Get your free account today by visiting host IO slash code story. So we were coming from this B2C world of building a video tool and if something went wrong, it wasn't that big of a deal. Like obviously it's not the best case scenario. But when we started dealing with other companies subscription and billing data, this is in an all the case. The margin for error is practically zero. So even though it was an MVP, our top priorities were making sure that the cancel flow experience for the end user was first class and that there weren't going to be any billing or subscription bugs whatsoever. So a lot of the time on our before release was just spent vetting this, making sure this was a 100%. My name is rob Moore, and I'm the CTO at chunky.

Rob Moore
A highlight from Lessons Learned from Selling Over $1BN of Products Through The Written Word with Stefan Georgi

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:16 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Lessons Learned from Selling Over $1BN of Products Through The Written Word with Stefan Georgi

"Stefan say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with. What's up fire nation? I'm super happy to be here. And something I believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with. Is probably the idea that you need to hustle and grind and live on race and beans and really you want to be on that that you have to burn the boats. There's a great Tony Robinson about if you want to go somewhere new burn the boats, burn the effing boat. So I think you can actually dip your toes in the water and sort of try things out. And then if it's not good if you get back on the boat. So you don't have to burn the boats right away. You can take your time. I love that because frankly, the reality is sometimes you're going to go down a path that's not the right path. And there's no problem retreating going back to the beginning and saying, okay, I learned some things from going down that path. Let me adjust. Let me pivot. Let me strike out in a new direction. And today for our nation we're talking about lessons learned from selling over a $1 billion of products through the written word. And the written word is copy, is another way of talking about that fire nation. So I want to know what professional and copywriters have in common. Absolutely. So the reason best and interesting question is when I was 18, I started playing poker semi professionally. I was a senior in high school that I would go to local Indian casinos, San Diego, trying to make about $200 a day and was successful doing that. It was my first time kind of making money. I'm really making money and doing something that didn't feel like work I should say. And what I kind of noticed from playing poker regularly and continuing throughout my life to play poker is there's what people say and what people do. I'm going to judge people and really interact with people based on not just what they say, but their actual actions. So at a poker table, somebody may act very tell you a different calm and even keel and that the money doesn't matter to them and whatever it is. But when they lose a big hand or get unlucky and their body language changes and they slam their cars down and they get up and they cuss at you. You realize, okay, what they said and what they do is very different. And when it comes to copywriting and persuasive communication in general, it's very similar in that you'll see people who your market may tell you that this is what they want, but if you go deeper and really look at how they're acting, what their actions are, like how they interact with other products, how they show up in the marketplace, like what they're buying, what they're saying on forums and anonymous places like Reddit, you'll notice that what they say publicly and what they really desire want and feel are very different things. So fire nation, there's some really interesting correlations here. Now, one thing that I was kind of curious and I was thinking about this question was, is bluffing? Does that have anything to do with the commonality here? One way I look at that is people will actually bluff a lot less than you think. If you watch professional poker tournaments on television and things like that, most of the time people aren't bluffing. It's very rare that somebody is doing a stone cold, really ballsy cloth, right? We all think that's so sexy to go ahead, nothing, but that's actually very uncommon. And I think that the road of marketing and persuasive communication, copywriting, it's kind of the same thing where people are like, we're very skeptical, but usually there's a lot of truth to whatever somebody who's selling you, usually people are selling you things for the right reason. And yeah, we're so skeptical and our guards up so much. I think it's the same thing with poker where we're so concerned people are bluffing us all the time. Usually they're not. And it's the consumer is so scared that you're bluffing them when you're selling to them, even though you're not. And so I guess the thing becomes how do you overcome that objection in that fear and whether it's in poker and convincing them that you're not bluffing and or that you are depending on what you want, but it also copywriting, how do you get them to believe you? So you believe that all entrepreneurs should understand the principles of direct response, copywriting. First off, what is direct response copywriting? And why do you believe this?

Tony Robinson Stefan San Diego Reddit
A highlight from How to Clarify Roles and Get Results with Daniel Ramsey

The EntreLeadership Podcast

04:52 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from How to Clarify Roles and Get Results with Daniel Ramsey

"To all of you who have left us voicemails with feedback on these new segments we've been trying. Some of you are really enjoying them. Love the new segments. Keep them up. And some of you, not so much. I have to say, I thought I was going to like it, and I actually did not. But either way, we want you to keep that feedback coming. We really appreciate it. All right, in our first segment today, Jason Williams will join me to share how role clarity creates focus and a clear picture of what it looks like to win in your role. And then our second segment, Daniel Ramsey will join me to dig into how to create role clarity for you and your team members. So let's get into it. Our first segment is a teaching segment with Jason Williams, vice president of entrez leadership, Jason, thanks for joining me. Thanks, George. It's nice to be here. Always love having you on the podcast. You always bring some wisdom and some sports references. So I'm hoping for big things today. You'll get both. Absolutely. So let's talk about how KRS key result areas create focus and winning in your role. Tell me about a job you had. You have some amazing experiences where maybe a role wasn't super clear. Yeah. So I've had multiple careers in this short amount of life. My first one was an athletic trainer. I was a part of sports medicine team that would take care of athletes. And I did that in the NFL. And I worked in the NFL back in the days in the late 90s and early 2000s when concussions were a big deal. But we were really just learning about the science and you can watch the documentaries and your understand that that was a big deal. But the NFL was telling us one thing and the coaching staff that we work forward telling us something different. And so when you have two leaders, this happens a lot to team members. When you have two leaders telling you competing things, it's really confusing for the team. So the NFL was saying, take care of players in one way. The coaches were saying, hey, these people are really important for me to keep my job. I need them back on the field. And so it was really hard to decide which of those two you go with. You fast forward years into business and it happens all the time. You have, I was a salesperson and I did sales in a way where, you know, I had a quota. So in sales, you carry is pretty easy. Like sell some stuff. But then you have one leader that's saying sell this thing, and you have another leader saying, sell this thing. They've got a vested interest. In either one. Both of them get compensated differently because of what you're selling. And so they're trying to get your attention. It becomes really confusing for the salesperson. What do I spend my time on? What does winning look like for me? It's so confusing it happens all the time. Yeah. That question of how do I know if I'm winning or losing and who do I have to make happy nobody wants that? And it causes frustration that causes some team members to just leave. Yes. As part of a bigger problem of just poor leadership. So we don't want that on our teams. We don't want this chaos and confusion, which is why entre leadership we teach key results areas. So we're going to dive into what it takes to do that in a later in this episode with Daniel Ramsey. But for you, tell me about a time your kra helped you stay focused. On the other flip side of this and not chase some idea that was not on goal. Yeah, the biggest thing that helps a K array is only good if the leader and the team member agree. And so we talked about that a little earlier. If there's not agreement on what this winning looks like, then it's really a struggle. So the times when it's worked, it's when my leader and myself are both aligned. And we have, we both understand and we both agree to. This is what winning looks like, because in those other situations, you have two leaders, and they both think that there are ways the right way. And I'm caught in the middle. So I'm also a three on the enneagram, which some people don't understand what that means. That means I'm a performer. I will just do stuff. You want to win and you want to look good doing it. Yes, and I don't feel things. I just kind of go if there's a problem, I'll just go do something. I'll spend time and activity and not necessarily on figuring out what the right way to do this. I'm just going to activity wins. And so in my past roles where I really get in trouble is I am just doing things and not thinking about it and doing things and not thinking about it. And so I may get a roadblock in part of a key result area that I have. Like maybe my number one is really something that I'm running into something big. And instead of actually spending the time to figure out and going back to my lady and saying, hey, I'm having a hard time with this or trying to figure it out on my own. I'll just go do something different. I struggle with that. And there are many people that struggle with that. And so in the example I'm about to say, I had this situation where I was getting roadblocked. And I was really struggling. And my leader came to me as part of a regular review and said, hey, let's review your carry. Let's talk. And so we sat down and talked about it. And during that conversation, I was able to flush out what exactly am I supposed to be doing with this. This is an issue. It made me slow down and stop. And instead of saying, I can't do this. I'm just going to do a whole bunch of other stuff that my leader would not think is winning. It was because he prompted me and said, hey, how is it going? And I thought, oh, yeah, I have this issue, and together we're able to solve that. I was able to accomplish that, overcome that roadblock and just keep on going. And it made us both feel super accomplished with that. And I got complimented by that because I brought it to him, even though he was the one that prompted it. So I thought it was good. Yeah, well, it's a win win because we both feel the momentum and excitement of we're winning and we're running towards the same thing in the same direction. And when you have that, it creates a great culture. As well.

Daniel Ramsey Jason Williams NFL Jason George Confusion
A highlight from MBA2188 Must Read: On Writing by Stephen King

The $100 MBA Show

07:08 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from MBA2188 Must Read: On Writing by Stephen King

"Can help you become a better entrepreneur, a 100% guaranteed. With my all new $100 MBA live program. Join me for two days live online and transform yourself as an entrepreneur and your business in the process. You'll learn how to build a business that you're proud of and make a very healthy living. You'll learn how to make faster, more confident decisions, how to shape a clear vision and system to journey more leads in sales than ever before, how to have more time for yourself, how to hire a players on your team and how to scale your business so the business is working for you and not the other way around. If you want to make a transformational change as an entrepreneur, in just two days of training, join me live for the hundred army program, go to one zero zero MBA dot net slash live to enroll in our next cohort. Enrollment is now open to act quickly because we're going to be starting very soon. And remember, it's a 100% guaranteed. So if after the first day of training, you don't feel like you got enough value, the value I promised, just let me know and I will give you a full refund. Head on over to one zero zero NBA dot net slash live and sign up for our next live two day course. We also love WP engine. We host all our websites on WP engine, and it's for good reason. It's the best. It's super fast, it's secure, and their support team is out of this world. It's like having your own technicians on call 24/7. Most of the time, when I need something done, and I get on chat, they don't tell me what to do. They just do it for me. Exactly what I want. If you're hosting a website, especially a WordPress website, check out WP engine, and as a listener of the show, you can get 20% off. Just go to WP ENG dot IN slash MBA and use code WP E two zero off. WP engine, the best way to host your website. On writing my Stephen King is a must read. And there's no way around it. Even though this book is a non fiction book on writing and becoming a better writer, there's so many great stories he shares in this book, the subtitle of the book is a memoir to writing. And there's so many great stories that help illustrate the points he's making in the book. Speaking of stories, one of the things that Stephen King talks about early in the book is the fact that everybody can be a good writer and storyteller. They have the requisite talent. But most people don't kind of cultivate that town. They don't work on it. They don't strengthen that talent. And therefore when they try to write, it's difficult, or it's just rubbish. He says that if you want to get great at writing, if you want to feel like you know how to produce great work, it's going to take work. And he says, the best writers do this, the best writers work the hardest. It doesn't come easy, even to somebody like Stephen King, but he adds to this point that anybody can work on their skills as a writer, but ideas that's out of our hands. I think this is such an interesting perspective. He believes that ideas are not in our control. Ideas come to us and they come to all of us, many of us ignore these ideas or don't capture them or don't pay attention to them when they come to you. You're distracted, you're too busy. You're not open. And therefore you think you have no ideas. The best writers are always on the lookout for ideas, meaning they're on high alert. They know ideas will come at some point. And the best writers have a little notepad, they jot down these ideas, even if they're falling asleep in bed or when they just wake up in the morning an idea pops in their head. I don't know where these ideas come from. He's just saying it like it is. But they do come. And you just got to be ready for them. And get his examples about ideas that just came to him out of the blue. He got the idea he jotted it down. He got to work. He implemented on that idea and it was a bestseller. So as we dive into this must read episode, I want to share with you 5 of my favorite insights. There are so many more, but these are my 5 favorites and it was hard for me to choose these 5, but I want to focus on these 5, we're going to talk about them. We're going to unpack them and how these insights can help you as a business owner. The first insight is he talks about your work ethic as a writer. Now, this book is about writing, but you can apply this pretty much anything, including entrepreneurship, creating your sales system, creating your marketing system, hiring team members, all kinds of stuff. Here's that first insight and it's stopping work when things are difficult. Stopping work when it's hard, either emotionally, or what he calls imaginatively. In your mind, the creativity of it all. If you stop because it's hard because it's not coming easy, he says this is a bad idea. It's a horrible idea. Don't stop. He says, go towards the pain. Go towards what's hard is behind that is some amazing stuff, he says. And I can definitely agree with this, especially when it comes to writing when you're sharing some of this kind of difficult vulnerable, even painful. You're hesitant. You're not even comfortable sharing it with yourself, meaning like putting it out of yourself and putting it on paper or on the screen. But once you actually do it and work on it, you start to realize this is actually probably something that I'll consider with some of my best work. And I feel this way about anything in business. When I'm creating a sales video, for example, that's a little bit different than the typical sales video that I've done before. I'm taking a risk, I'm putting myself out there, or I have a different perspective on an idea or a technique, and I teach it in a workshop. Doing the uncomfortable thing sometimes is just what you need to do to get better. So I love this concept of going towards the pain and understanding behind that pain is something great. The next concept concept number two that I wanted to share is that writing, he says, is lonely. Having someone that believes in you makes all the difference. I can not tell you how true this is. Entrepreneurship is very lonely. Running a business is hard and taxing. And many of us we just feel like, man, does anybody get us? We're a bunch of misfits, right? But I can tell you firsthand having my wife Nicole, who's a part of the business, but also just my number one supporter. I have somebody to lean on. I have somebody to talk to. I have somebody who doesn't think I'm crazy. Sometimes just gives me encouraging words and says, hey, you'll get through this. You always do. This is sometimes the difference between people that are successful and not successful. People that have somebody to push them and support them and to really just love them, be there for them when they're vulnerable. So they can make it through tough times and challenges in their business in their life. Now, Stephen King is talking about a life of a writer, writing books is a lonely process and having somebody that just supports you helps a ton. So I highly recommend whether you're married, you're single, you're somewhere in between, is to have a good network of people. I say have 5 strong friends that you can count on. Hopefully one of those people you live with. Your partner in life, maybe a close friend. Maybe even a relative like a mom or a dad or an uncle

Stephen King NBA Nicole
A highlight from Modernizing Laundry with Tumble

Veteran on the Move

04:18 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Modernizing Laundry with Tumble

"Talking to a Marine Corps veteran Scott Patterson, founder of tumble, which is modernized laundry, let's say. Scott got some good things to talk about before we do all that. Take us back to us what you did in the Marine Corps. Yeah, well, thanks so much for having me on Joe. So I joined the Marine Corps three days after my 18th birthday. I actually was going to go to Arizona state and play with lacrosse and be a political science major. But kind of towards the end of my senior year high school, I decided I didn't want to go to college. So I walked into the recruiting office and I said I was only going to join if they let me be infantry. And so he was very happy he gave me an educational bonus and a whole bunch of other stuff. Because I had good grades and all that stuff. So yeah, so I joined the infantry. I actually joined on a reserve contract. This is a very nuance of 2008 when I joined. I joined on a reserve contract I remember spending three years on active duty. Almost immediately. So going through the pipeline, going to boot camp, going to SLI, immediately getting activated and deployed coming back, doing some other kind of random stuff, did recruiting did, I don't know. They had me doing all sorts of random random things. But by the time I got back from Ramadi, I really wanted to go to college. College doesn't seem so bad anymore. College was once so bad. Wrapped up everything with active duty in order to drop back the reserves, joined joined into that whole lifestyle, which was very weird for me. And I went to college. I went to up to Chico at a friend who was up there going to school. And she goes to Northern California. It's a State College, one of the gajillion state colleges and California. And originally I wanted to be a firefighter paramedic, I think, is what I decided on. And so I took an EMT class, and then I, in order to become a paramedic, you have to take physiology. And in order to take physiology, you have to take chemistry. So I took the chemistry class really enjoyed it. And decided to go get my degree in biochemistry. All the while still getting activated and deployed and sent all over the place. Which was a lot of fun to be totally honest. It's a good time. So I got through kind of the end of college solid four years and decided I actually decided I was going to be pre med got kind of the end of college and as you can probably figure out I was pretty burnt out on college. After doing the whole thing. I had an opportunity to go to marsoc went through assessment selection. Unfortunately, it didn't get selected at the end of all of it. So then I kind of returned back and was like, well, what am I going to do? And got a great job at Genentech as a chemist. Making monoclonal antibodies, which are very popular these days. Everybody knows what those are nowadays, right? Yeah. So originally from wa colon antibodies, the only thing that we could get as an industry that I'm approved for was cancer, cancer drugs. And they were very effective. Judd tech did a fantastic job with those treatments pretty widely used. And at that time I was kind of like, yeah, I got a good job.

Marine Corps Scott Patterson Lacrosse Ramadi Scott Arizona JOE Chico State College Northern California California Genentech Judd Tech Cancer
A highlight from How to Build Your Brand and Grow Your Business from the Inside Out with Rachel Gogos: From the 2019 archive

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:51 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from How to Build Your Brand and Grow Your Business from the Inside Out with Rachel Gogos: From the 2019 archive

"Rachel, say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know. Hey there John and Heather fire nation. Super psyched to be here today. So an interesting I was thinking about this and you already know this about me, but I am a 100% Greek and so is my husband. And one fun little side note about us is add our wedding, which took place in Niagara Falls Ontario, the band from my big fat Greek wedding. What? Was our band? Come on. Now, did you watch the movie and you were like, I need that band? Or did you watch the movie and was like, that was our band. No, no, I watched the movie, but it wasn't like I thought, oh, I have to have that band one day. I just, I'm from buffalo, New York, our wedding was going to be in that area anyways, and we had a lot of out of town guests. And I wanted to hop the border and have people experience a Niagara Falls. And one of that particular band just happened to be based in Toronto Ontario. So we thought, why not have them? They sounded great in the movie, and we figured they'd really make our wedding a blast and they did. So totally cool. I love that story. Ever since I saw the movie old school, I was always like, I want that band from the movie old school to come and sing at my wedding. Who knows? Time will tell. Kate, if you're listening, anyways, fire nation, as I mentioned in the intro, our audio masterclass is all about building your brand and growing your business from the inside out. Rachel and I have known each other for years and years and years. And she is so good with branding. That's why her business brand is brand ID for obvious reasons. And so she's going to be an amazing person to chat about all things branding with you and I today and Rachel. What exactly is a personal brand? And how does it actually differ from just your typical corporate or regular brands? Yeah, great question. People always think a brand is just their logo. And it's not. Their brand is so much more than that. And when it comes to a personal brand, I like to say it's a combination of three things. It's a little bit of your reputation. A little bit of your essence or your DNA, your true personality. And the third part is marketing and not just the marketing tactics, but actually the feeling that somebody feels after they've interacted with your brand. You know that feeling when you shop in a story, you have a great interaction at a restaurant. It's that vibe or that energy you infuse in someone when they've come in contact with you or your business. That's how I describe it. So fire nation. We're talking reputation. We're talking DNA. We're talking personality. Can you maybe go through and give an example of each one of those three and how that can actually operate within a brand? Sure. So I'll just take myself, for example, because in particular, the past year I've spent a lot of time thinking about this is I've been infusing more and more of my personal brand into our business. But again, going back to that Greek culture that I mentioned, we are known as a culture to be very hospitable. And so our reputation is a web agency is to be very hospitable and to treat our clients like family. In fact, that's one of our core values. And again, families are really big part of the Greek culture. So our reputation that's out there is treating people like family, treating their businesses like our own. And also that part reputation in part essence or there's a little bit of a blend there, right? Because our DNA or essence in our reputation are very much intertwined. So part of my core values is integrity, our reputation is a business brand is being of high integrity. And it's something that most of our clients will comment on, especially when it comes to money, right? They say brand AD spends their money, it's our own money, and that's very much true. And then the third one you ask, the third part of the cocktail, I call it a cocktail sometimes. The marketing piece, we try hack that our marketing leaves people feeling that familiar peace with us that connection to us. And we try that by sharing some of our team stories or blog posts we write. We have our whole team share blog post. So again, we just want to really increase the connection that people feel with our business and brand. Fire nation, going down the process, what is your reputation? What is your DNA? What is your personality? It's you're bringing to your brands. What is the ethos you're embodying in this?

Rachel Ontario Niagara Falls Heather Buffalo Toronto Kate John New York
A highlight from NEVER DO THIS AGAIN! - This Is Holding 99% Of People BACK From Success! | Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

07:06 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from NEVER DO THIS AGAIN! - This Is Holding 99% Of People BACK From Success! | Tom Bilyeu

"Almost everybody quits. At everything. Yeah. They all give up a new year's resolution. They all quit. The big goal in their life. They all quit. I'm getting emotional right now. People quit, dude, it's so heartbreaking. Gentlemen, we're here to talk about habits changing life getting unstuck. What do you have for me? So I'll start off with what are the most common things you see people do that holds them back from success. Ego is a big one. In fact, that is the biggest, you need a self correcting mechanism. So at the beginning, we all suck. Doesn't matter what you're doing, whether you're a little kid, whether you're deep into your career, when you're embarking on something new, you're going to be bad at it. You need to leverage what is the more I push for success, the more I realize everything is just a scientific method, recontextualized for something. You have a guess, you try something, you fail to some degree, you assess what worked, what didn't work, you then reformulate your hypothesis and try again. The problem is, if you think you're amazing and in failure, it hurts who you are and your sense of self, you don't want to see the truth. And you will hide the truth from yourself extraordinarily effectively. Or you just won't try again. Oh, that didn't work. Not because of me, it didn't work because of some other thing, and you'll externalize it. The flip side of that coin, though, is if you take everything on yourself, oh my God, I messed up. I made a mistake. I'm stupid. I'm wrong. I did this poorly. This didn't work because of me, then you won't try again because you've just completely deflated yourself. So you have to walk this weird middle ground of having an ego, but making sure that your ego is based on something that makes you stare nakedly at your inadequacies. And the only way to do that, that I have found is to identify as the learner. So most people want to be right, good, smart. In fact, let's talk about Nietzsche. It's all will to power. Everybody needs to have that thing where they're like, because of this, I am a badass. This is why somebody at a toll booth or whatever flexes their muscle or somebody at the TSA have recently traveled and people want to flex their muscle there. Because you need something that makes you feel like you have power. Will to power. As you look, I am brand new to each other. I don't want to make it sound like I'm a scholar here. But it was the first thing that allowed me to understand what's happening in culture right now. Which is people fighting for ideas seem to me self evidently self destructive. And I could not understand why they would do that. But once you realize that, oh, if I can't beat you in open competition, then I just want to tear you down. When you realize that that need to show that you are powerful to make progress to strive for something to be able to bend the world to you in some way, then you realize if you can't make that will to power serve something that's high functioning in terms of pushing you towards fulfillment, you're going to be in a self destructive spiral. And so that's where most people live is they are running the scientific method of hypothesis they try something, but when it doesn't work and it won't, what do they do? And if at that moment, they realize, oh, I have this need to solve this to move forward to make progress, but I need to do that in a high functioning, self aware way, and the best thing that you can do there is see yourself, okay, I'm the learner. I want to see what I've done wrong. That is my will to power. My will to power is improvement itself. And to do that, I have to really accept the things that I'm not currently good at. Most people can't do that. Most people are stuck in the psychological immune system of I want the will to power, but I'm going to lie to myself, assume that I'm good, right, better, faster, stronger, and for that all to be true, anything that is saying that I messed up or I'm bad, I have to knock down. And that's where people get into self destructive loop. Instead, you need to be asking, what can I do differently? That would be more effective. So I think I'm good at staying at my inadequacy. I got that part. And then now I'm looking at I don't have the will to power. And so I think sometimes I get to what do you mean by that? Because you do every the will to power is innate. Meaning you want it, you want power. You want to be able to look at the things in your life that you don't like and change them in some way. So I want to do that. And then because I'm inadequate right now, I get that frustrated feeling of like, God damn it, why am I not, why am I not able to execute at the level I want? Why am I not sticking to the habits that I want to stick to? And it's just, you know, sometimes intellectually know the answer, but then I just get a frustrated with, I'm not there yet and sometimes it can be like it can be almost like paralyzing. So what do you think? So it's interesting because you're letting something very useful, spill over into not being useful. So you, the reason that you've had as much success as you've had is because it's never enough for you. You're constantly frustrated. You want to do more. Like when I think about how much you do, it's very impressive. You hold a lot of things. The reason you hold a lot of things is because it's never been enough for you. You always want more. You always want to get better. So that's good, right? That ambition has led you to where you are. My ambition has led me to where I am. But sometimes it feels pathological. I feel like I'm too ambitious. I want too much. And it drives me into this corner of taking on, like, everything, everything. And whenever I think about the remedy, and I think, oh, I would tell somebody else, do less. I don't like that feeling. I don't want to do less. I want to get stronger. I want to do more. So you want that. That's nature going, hey, I need you to go out and fight and do really dangerous things, right? If you think about yourself from an evolutionary standpoint, dude, so boys and girls read about history, okay? I'm becoming obsessed with history. Humans are murderers. Murderers, dude, we kill. We rape, we pillage. It's crazy. In all of us, is that animal. Now the question is, why would we develop that from an evolutionary standpoint? Because for millions of years, it was read in tooth and claw. It was so hard to stay alive to go out to get food. At the risk of derailing your answer, reading the book, the empire of the summer moon was transformative for me. It may be the book that made me fall in love with history, like just completely and totally. Because I realized the world used to be completely untamed. And that the great plains of America, which I had heard people referred to, but never knew what it meant. There was a part of America that was so flat and there was basically nothing there that they referred to it as oceanic. Meaning that it was like being lost at sea. It was just so big, so expansive, so open, so nothing

Nietzsche TSA America
A highlight from The Entrepreneur's Playbook for Expanding Wealth, Freedom and Time with Jim Dew: From the 2019 archive

Entrepreneur on FIRE

03:24 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from The Entrepreneur's Playbook for Expanding Wealth, Freedom and Time with Jim Dew: From the 2019 archive

"Jim say what's up to fire nation and sure something interesting about yourself that most people don't know. What's up fire nation? I'm excited to be on here. What a great podcast and a great group. And I appreciate being on here with you, GLD. Thanks. So something that hardly anyone knows about me is when I transition my first job I was a math teacher, which a lot of people know that. But in my transition before I went into wealth management, I did door to door sales for about 18 months. Man, I'll tell you so many people who have made it in this world started off with door to door sales. And I have my theories and I'm kind of curious what you think, Jim. But you learn how to bounce back from no. In fact, you learn just how to react well to a no, because you're going to get a lot of those door slamming your face. A lot of nose, a lot of no answers. And you can come back stronger than ever. That's a true sign of a future successful entrepreneur. What are your thoughts on that? I agree completely. I put a little spin on it and that is that I think I learned courage from doing door to door sales for 18 months. So I know the fear of rejection is a big thing, but for me, it just came down to courage because many times in my career, the 24 or 25 years after that, I have felt like that gave me the courage because I think to myself, okay, this is going to take some courage, but it's not as hard as walking down a stranger street. And knocking on some stranger's door and hoping they're not going to yell at me or slam the door in my face. I love that spin because I can honestly say that I look back at that as well. When I was 23, 24 years old, I wasn't knocking on doors. I was knocking down doors as a platoon leader in charge of four tanks, 16 men in a war for 13 months. When I look back, I'm just like, okay, that took courage that showed me what courage was. And so now when I'm going to ask Jim to be on my podcast, that's not nearly as scary as some of those things. And I have the courage to do some of that stuff. Love that analogy. Can I just say to that, thank you for your service. Thank you. I really appreciate that. My dad's a World War II vet. He's going to be 94 years old this year. He was in a combat area in the Philippines. And I just wanted to tell you that because when I saw your history, I really respect that type of risk and courage and people like you, young people around the world doing that for our country. Well, I appreciate that appreciation. And next time you see your father, give him a salute and say that's from captain Jay LD saluting you, the veterans that came before him. I appreciate that. I love that. Yes. Thank you. So listen, fire nation. As I told you in the introduction, we have a killer killer masterclass today. Beyond a million, the entrepreneurs playbook for expanding wealth, freedom, and time. Such a great topic. So let's just dive right in, Jim. To talking about the structure that billionaires use, that we, as human beings, as entrepreneurs, as fire nation, can adopt to better manage our wealth. Yeah, so it was a secret for about a 150 years how billionaires would structure their wealth management. Lately, when I speak to groups of entrepreneurs, more and more I've heard of it. But the term is family office. So I'm sure you've probably heard of the same family office before. Let me give a quick definition for those in your audience who haven't heard of it. A family office is where a very wealthy family will hire all the needed professionals to manage their wealth.

JIM Captain Jay Ld Philippines
A highlight from The Steps to Business Success with Clay Clark: From the 2019 archive

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:37 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from The Steps to Business Success with Clay Clark: From the 2019 archive

"Clay, say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know. What is going on there, fire nation? I have 30 chickens, 14 cats, north of 40 fire extinguishers, and I've had enough day quill today to kill a small goat. No wonder why you haven't moved to Puerto Rico yet because that is a lot of baggage my friend, this going on there. And fire nation clay was actually last on entrepreneurs on fire. Back in 2015. So it's been over four years. So there's been a lot going on in your world, brother. I've been keeping some tabs, I've been being filled in by my team here, but share with fire nation, the new projects that you've been up to since we last chatted. Well, we have a men's grooming lounge chain. It's kind of like a haircut meets country club called elephant in the room, and we just opened up three additional locations in the past 5 years, a two in Oklahoma City, and another one in Tulsa. And we have thousands of members. It's a membership based model. That business is doing well. And I released a new book called search engine domination that we're selling a lot of copies of right now on Amazon. And my wife and I, we just bought 39 acres that has a pond and a Lake where we're in the process of building camp Clark in chicken palace. And I just finished my camp Clark and chicken palace here, but I'm now expanding from 17 acres to the 39 and we're going to start hosting our workshops there as opposed to at the office building where we currently have a big old 20,000 ft² facility. So exciting. You have so much stuff going on. It makes me feel so lazy, but looking back over your journey clay, you started your first multi-million dollar company, not just million, not 6 figures. We're talking multi-million dollar company. DJ connection dot com at 18 years old. So you are very successful at a very young age. What do you attribute that early success to? Well, I stuttered as a kid and that wasn't good. And I had to make to mimic the show dark, but I had some abuse that happened at a very young age and then my parents saw what was happening and stopped it, but it happened, you know? And then when you stutter, you get made fun of. And so I think you take your bitterness and you can turn it into bitterness or turn your bitterness and turn it into, you know, Eminem songs. And I became a DJ. And so I kind of dressed like Eminem kind of acted like Eminem, but I was very, very good at DJing. And I just had this mindset of like, I'm gonna prove everybody wrong. And I had one mentor. His name was uncle Jerry, and he had eyes that looked like a raccoon, and I was living with him because my dad's parents passed away in an unexpected turn of events. And so my dad's an only child, he's down in Waco, Texas, taking care of the home, and I get shipped up to Minnesota to live with this uncle Jerry with the raccoon eyes. And uncle Jerry, I didn't know it, it turns out John Lee Dumas turns out he's super rich. I didn't know my uncle was rich. And so he told me if I didn't get up at 5 and feed the chickens, I couldn't eat. And I thought, well, let's play a game. Let's play the game of chicken about the chickens. So I decided to not get up. And then he didn't serve me breakfast. And he didn't serve me dinner, and I thought this guy's not kidding. I developed this thing called a work ethic and Jerry had the thing. If you have time to watch TV, don't do push ups. So my parents shipped a fat kid to Minnesota who was lazy and when they came to move to Minnesota due to financial reasons they found a very physically fit kid who worked very hard all the time who had been taught the art of the grind from my uncle Jerry. So fire nation, I believe this will be realized that you could instill these habits in your kids and your family and your loved ones. This is not something that you are stuck just because you may be fat and lazy one day one doesn't mean you need to be fat and lazy day two. Like it literally could start today. And man, I just wonder how many times you've actually just said thank goodness for that situation because there's obviously created the person that you are today who is literally the least lazy person that I personally know. You've just done so many things and I kind of want to get into your most recent thing, which is your book search engine domination because it's all about dominating these search engines, but where do most people go wrong when it comes to that specific tactic? Well, most people have allowed the process of optimizing their website to become overcomplicated. And they end up hiring a search engine optimization firm that tells them that optimizing the website is more complicated than designing a nuclear submarine or drawing a blueprint for building a professional football stadium with a big retractable dome.

Chicken Palace Eminem Jerry Puerto Rico John Lee Dumas Oklahoma City Tulsa Minnesota Clark Amazon Waco Texas Football
A highlight from MBA2187 Are Funnels Better Than Websites?  + Free Ride Friday

The $100 MBA Show

04:33 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from MBA2187 Are Funnels Better Than Websites? + Free Ride Friday

"We don't just drive traffic to the website. That's a real waste of money. We actually use a small little funnel that we create, which sends them to a landing page that allows them to give us their name and email address in exchange for some value. And we have a dedicated funnel for the ad. That's hyper focused. And in this case, funnels are really powerful because I do want the customer in this situation to go down a prescriptive path because I'm running a specific ad for specific people and I know exactly who I'm targeting, so therefore I know exactly what to provide. Brilliant, right? And funnels are fantastic for those. It allows me to optimize my ads, allows me to get more bang for my buck for my ad spend. Allows me to increase my conversion rates. All that wonderful stuff, right? Now if for any reason somebody wants to check me out, they can go to my website and they could see everything that we offer, but for the purpose of the ad, I want a direct traffic, I want to send them to specific pages and specific calls to action. This also applies to any direct calls to action that are not ads, like, say, for example, you're writing a book and you want to give extra materials like workbooks or cheat sheets or worksheets, right? It makes more sense to set up a small funnel with a very easy to remember URL like X dot com slash worksheet. And they go and they can find a way to download that worksheet, give their name an email address, and then you can nurture that lead through that little mini funnel versus sending them to X dot com slash worksheet. And that's just a page on your website. They can easily be lost, click around, leave the page, get distracted. So when you want someone to take a direct action, I mentioned the example with a URL being mentioned in your book. But this could be also if you're being interviewed on a podcast or you're sharing materials on stage at a conference, you want to send somebody to a very targeted page with no distractions that allows them to go through your little mini funnel. Now the question a lot of people ask us, well, okay, Omar, I get it. This makes sense. Keep my website use funnels, strategically. I like it. Do I need a separate software to run my funnels in a separate software to run my website? Well, it depends on what you're using to run your website. The vast majority of people that run a business have a website that they can customize. It's on WordPress. For example, or they're using a website builder like Squarespace or Wix or weebly. And if this is the case, you could probably customize the pages to create your own funnels. Now, remember, a funnel is just a series of pages and emails and links that tie together. It's not proprietary software here. You don't have to buy a piece of software that creates funnels. You can create your own. Just like you don't have to go to McDonald's to eat a hamburger. You can make your own hamburger home. Once you know what's in a hamburger, a bun, a patty, some lettuce, some tomatoes, some cheese, throw in a couple pickles. I got myself a hamburger. Same thing with a funnel. So you might have just a simple page with no navigation menu with an opt in box so they can give their name an email address. That leads to a thank you page or a confirmation page. They then get an email that then shows them where to get the freemium that you gave them like the ebook and so on and so forth. So one of the best ways to build your own funnels is just to analyze the steps in the pages and the moving parts are involved in a funnel that you enjoy. A funnel that you like. From another company, from another business, and obviously there's different kinds of funnels for different kinds of purposes. And this is what I recommend to my customers is that you can build your own funnels inside of your own website if you know the steps. And if you Google the call to action, let's say for example, you want a funnel for an ebook. Just Google funnel for ebook. What are the steps? You can take a look online. People will outline it for you. And you can just take that outline and construct your own funnel inside your website or have whoever's running your website do it for you. And there you go. No need for two pieces of software. It's all in one place. You get the traffic going to the same place. You can manage everything in one place. And yeah, there's a little bit more work on a few more steps, but it's not like you're creating a funnel every 5 minutes. You're probably have a few key funnels in your business. You set them up. You optimize them, you tweak them. That's pretty much it. Pretty simple. I got more on today's topic, but before that, let me share with you some of our favorite tools. We all know the power of an email list and growing our email list, but managing it automating our emails, making sure they actually get into the inbox, that's where ConvertKit comes in. ConvertKit is an all in one email marketing platform. I've used a lot of different email marketing platforms. And we use ConvertKit for a reason. It just works.

Omar Mcdonald Google
A highlight from How To Create A MORNING ROUTINE To Achieve Your MOST AMBITIOUS GOALS In 2023 | Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:18 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from How To Create A MORNING ROUTINE To Achieve Your MOST AMBITIOUS GOALS In 2023 | Tom Bilyeu

"Let us dive into the very first question. This one comes from Louis Christine in being. This is from the connect inbox. Do you follow any morning routine if so, what does your morning routine look like and what is your thought process behind doing each of these actions? Okay, here it goes. First of all, your morning routine starts the night before. So go to bed early. Now, I used to say that like a religion I was in bed by 9 p.m., but now my schedule has gotten a little out of whack. We've got a new piece of content. Called real impact, by the way, for anybody that's into film and TV and the mindset that you can glean from that. You can go to YouTube dot com slash impact theory studios and check that out, but that routinely now has me seeing movies at far past my bedtime. But I tried to go to bed as close to 9 as humanly possible every night, save for the weekends, and in that I sleep without an alarm, so I wake up when I wake up, the reason that I do that is because I want to get as much sleep as I need. So I'm all about cognitive optimization. So I'm not somebody who sets the alarm to make sure that I'm up at four in the morning, but when I wake up at four in the morning, I'm a very happy camper. I usually get, it used to be between 5 and 6. I'm now getting between 7 and 8. I have no idea why it changed completely randomly and as far as I can tell without reason. But I wake up when I wake up, I give myself ten minutes to get out of bed and I do that because I'm lazy and my inclination is to lay in bed so I need a bright line that says I get out of bed immediately without wasting time. So I'm out of bed and out of bed in ten minutes or less, I put my gym clothes next to my bed so that the easiest answer is to put my gym clothes on. In fact, I'd have to make a conscious choice not to, which thusly would trigger in me a lot of conflict, emotionally because it is my identity to immediately go to the gym to work out again, partly for cognitive optimization and then also for longevity for health and for aesthetics. But working out, I think, is incredibly important. And I actually think that for anybody that wants to achieve something extraordinary in their life that the third thing that you need to focus on is mindset. The first two are diet and exercise. Followed by mindset. So I hit the gym. First and foremost, immediately after the gym, I meditate, and the reason that I do that is because I want to practice going from the sympathetic nervous system, which is fight or flight, which you're triggering in the gym, through the heavy exertion, your heart rate is up, your breathing is shallow and rapid. And the idea is to very quickly switch over into the parasympathetic nervous system where you're getting into rest and digest where you're calming all of that down, you're slowing your breath, your diaphragm breathing into the nose out through the mouth and really calming everything down. And I think practicing that transition is very important. And so that's why I do them back to back, but then on top of that, just meditating for any reason I think is really important. And doing that gets you into a calm and creative state, which is where all of your anxiety, all of your stress is drop down to zero and I also think that we think on multiple levels, you've got the thinking that is truly you hear the voice and the words articulated in your mind, but you also have below that where you have the notion without the actual words and I think either below that or beside that you also have just sort of an emotional level of thinking where you're feeling whatever is going on. And I think that you want to quiet all of those down so that you can truly get into that calm creative state and I really feel the difference in my brain, which is why I think that meditating is insanely important. And I think much like fasting, it's really where you want to not be taxing your metabolic processes and it's not that I think there are a lot of studies out there that show that doing that increases the efficiency of your mitochondria and a whole host of other benefits, including insulin sensitivity and on and on. I think that there's a very similar effect that happens when you meditate where you're literally fasting from thought or at least you're trying to get out of thought and into that calm creative space for as much of the time that you're meditating as possible. You're going to find that your mind wanders is just what the mind does, but you really can quiet it down quite a down. I think in quieting it down, there is some effect I don't know what the actual neurological effect is. But the effects of that what you feel is a deep sense of calm, relaxation and it's incredibly powerful for them having your most potent ideas and biggest breakthroughs. After I do that, then I do what I call thinking, which is leveraging that state to then process through in a very conscious way, all of the things that I'm dealing with in my business or my life. And I won't go into too much detail and think it, but basically allow yourself to actually think we're in meditation trying not to. And then after that, I read, which I think is incredibly important. I think you should always be learning. I think that's really, really important to have in great ideas to solving problems, whatever it is to getting better. You need to just always always always be learning. And then after that, I have a list called important things and I go through my important things list and that is literally just a list of the most important things I could be doing for my business and the reason that I keep a list is because I don't ever want to waste time in a transitional moment trying to think of what I should be doing or focusing on. I want that list. Also, studies have shown that journaling before you go to bed simply by listing the things you need to do allows you to sleep. And so this may be one of the reasons that I have such an easy time falling asleep is I know everything that I should be working on. Everything that I've thought about is not only written down, it's in priority order. And so there isn't a cycle of my brain, like remember, remember, remember, which I think is part of what keeps people awake. So there you have it. That's my morning routine after that, then I get ready and I often read, by the way, because I do audible books while I'm getting ready, I read through, making my first meal, which comes after all of that. And there you have it. That's my morning routine. And I think behind it. All right, next question is from Daniel breeze. Hi, Tom, I go to bed at 9. My man, alarm at 5 30, shame on you. It's still not enough sleep get more. I've want to wake up without the alarm. Any tips on how to feel rested with less sleep. I have absolutely no tips on how to feel rested with less sleep. My only tip is how to feel rested,

Louis Christine Youtube Daniel Breeze TOM
A highlight from The Surprising Psychology Behind Risk Taking with Bobby DeMars

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:20 min | Last week

A highlight from The Surprising Psychology Behind Risk Taking with Bobby DeMars

"Bobby, say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with? Hey, thank you so much for having what's up, fire nation. Boom, boom, shake the room. You know what a lot of people disagree with success. People think that success is about money. And success really is a mindset. I always say success is a choice. And that doesn't mean that you just have to will it into reality and you just gotta want it enough. Look, at the end of the day, you have to get lucky, right? And I had to find success as the happiness of the people that are in my life. So if my wife is happy, then I'm a successful husband, if my kids are happy, then I'm a successful father. If my investors are happy, if my employees are happy, then I feel like I am a successful business owner. And so yeah, the bottom line keeps you in business, but at the end of the day, you have to wake up motivating you have to wake up happy and making sure everyone around you is happy and loved is an important part of it. So that's really how I define success. I love that definition. In fire nation, that might not be the only thing that surprises you today. Because we're talking about the surprising psychology behind risk-taking. Bobby college prepares us for a lot of things. Parties, early morning classes, late night cram Sessions, but what's something that college doesn't prepare us for. When it comes to starting a business. So I went to USC, I was in the business school. I was also there on a football scholarship. And I was also in the film school. So I literally had, I got up at 5, we got home at 12. And one of those hard things. And I thought every day was going to be this inspiring thing that taught me about real life. And it really wasn't because starting the business is basically starting something with extreme uncertainty and it's stressful. And I never once had a professor that told me about the stresses that were going to come with waking up at four in the morning. We're anxiety kicks you out of bed. What it's like to ask friends for money. What it's like to ask strangers for money one O one. nothing related to that. Or, you know, just what's going to happen when you're going to see get obstacles and hurdles and things that you can't see along the way. The sensation of having an important meeting with investors where you feel like your business plan and the budget and the lifeblood of actually starting to think you want to start is on the line. Business school gives you a pedigree to a certain degree of having accomplished a status, I guess you could say. And I'm not saying don't go to college. Yeah, you kind of want that pedigree. You want a little bit of credibility when you're talking to people, but you're going to learn about finance, you're going to learn about marketing, and you're going to learn about operational behavior. You're going to learn about things that you may not even be doing in life. But they're not going to tell you about that gut punch that you get sometimes in the morning. And a lot of people think risk takers are always intelligent people. And I think we all have these friends around us that are successful. We're like, how did Randy do it? He's not that smart. Well, Randy took a risk, Randy actually got up and did something. There's something I call the 4% where if you look at a population, you might say, okay, about 20% of the people out there are risk takers. And if you look at the population again, you might say, okay, 20% of the people out there are creative or intelligent enough to be successful. They're not the same people. So if you're looking at all the risk takers, the 20% of the risk takers out there, 80% of them really aren't that creative or intelligent. It has everything to do with the fact that they took the risk. And yes, luck plays a role. You got to put enough buckets out there to get them out of water that you need. rains. You can roll the dice and not come up lucky at the end of the day and you have to be emotionally prepared for that and be okay with that. And it's better to have tried and failed and tried your best than to live with regrets later on. A lot of value bombs already fire nation because this is the reality. There's a lot of things that college will not prepare for. When it comes to starting a business, because starting a business is stressful. And we've been talking about this already, but I want to get more specific Bobby about some of those stressors. You know, at the end of the day, innovation is hard, change is difficult. Whether you're growing as a company, you're growing as a person. Hey, look, if it was easy, everybody would do it, right? And I remind myself of that all the time, raising money, asking people for money is not a fun thing when you're looking at, wow, these people are determining my long-term success. But when you're meeting with people, they're not investing in products or ideas. They're usually investing in people. So if you go into a meeting and you're desperate, I'm telling you, people can smell desperation. You're not going to get that money. When I was starting blind barrels, one of the things that I did is I floated the idea out with friends and family to just be like, hey, what do you think of this idea? Am I crazy? And out of the 15 people that I ask 14 said, man, if there's a chance for me to invest, I'd love to invest. And that was great validity the idea, but then it also created this whole, oh my God, I know these people. I got to talk to these people for the rest of my life. You know, my neighbor across the street, who invested quite a bit of money. I tried to talk them out of it.

Bobby College Randy Bobby USC Football
A highlight from MBA2186 How to Market During a Recession

The $100 MBA Show

08:26 min | Last week

A highlight from MBA2186 How to Market During a Recession

"Into it. Let's get down to business. Let's be honest, business is notoriously difficult. But I can help you become a better entrepreneur, a 100% guaranteed. With my all new $100 MBA live program. Join me for two days live online and transform yourself as an entrepreneur and your business in the process. You'll learn how to build a business that you're proud of and make a very healthy living. You learn how to make faster, more confident decisions, how to shape a clear vision and system to journey more leads in sales than ever before, how to have more time for yourself, how to hire a players on your team and how to scale your business so the business is working for you and not the other way around. If you want to make a transformational change as an entrepreneur, in just two days of training, join me live for the hundred RBA program, go to one zero zero NBA dot net slash live to enroll in our next cohort. Enrollment is now open to act quickly because we're going to be starting very soon. And remember, it's a 100% guaranteed. So if after the first day of training, you don't feel like you got enough value, the value I promised, just let me know and I will give you a full refund. Head on over to one zero zero NBA dot net slash live and sign up for our next live two day course. We also love WP engine. We host all our websites on WP engine and it's for good reason. It's the best. It's super fast. It's secure and their support team is out of this world. It's like having your own technicians on call 24/7. Most of the time, when I need something done and I get on chat, they don't tell me what to do. They just do it for me. Exactly what I want. If you're hosting a website, especially a WordPress website, check out WP engine, and as a listener of the show, you can get 20% off. Just go to WP ENG dot IN slash MBA and use code WP two zero off. WP engine, the best way to host your website. Many businesses slow down or even stop all their marketing during a recession. They just say, hey, I don't want to spend money right now on a tiny budgets and marketing needs to go. I'm here to tell you that that is a mistake. The recessions are some of the best times to market. And it's the businesses that utilize recessions that come out of a recession, the market leader in their niche. Cheaper to market during recession. There's less competition. There's less noise. You can lock long-term deals when it comes to advertising and marketing that can serve you even after a recession. But even with all that, you need to make sure you're doing your marketing right. Your messaging is right to your customers during this period of time. Generally, when you're marketing to customers, whether you have a B2B or B2C during a booming economy, marketing to advantages and benefits, and even ROI and growth, if you're a B2B, are usually the avenues that people take when it comes to their marketing, their ads, their messaging, their copy. During a recession, it's all about value. People want a good value. Does this mean you need to change your product? No, it just means you need to show how your product is more valuable, how it's actually a smart idea to buy now. Remember, during a recession, people want to be wise about their money. They want to make smart decisions. They want to feel like they're doing the right thing. They're more conscious of how they're spending. So you need to fulfill that need. Make them feel like, hey, this is a good deal. And you're getting a lot more than you're paying for. So how do you do that? Well, it's all about showing the value. It's all about showing what your product or service actually does for them in comparison to the price. So for example, if you have a software tool, maybe your software will help them replace a few of the tools they already have, saving them some money. Maybe you're a service that can actually do the work for less money than they're doing right now. Outsourcing to freelancers or employees. Or maybe your customers are consumers, and you could show them how your product lasts longer than the competition, meaning that you don't need to buy so frequently you can just buy your product in a last much longer. I did this with my clothing line. Our products were not cheap, but they're really good quality. Our dress shirts started at a $100 each. But my dress shirts lasted longer. And were machine washable so you'd save money on dry cleaning. And I actually had a picture of a $100 dress shirt from Macy's being washed 30 times, and my dress shirt that I sold in my ecommerce store, being washed 30 times. And mine looked brand new versus the other dresser that I got from Macy's look like it's ready for the trash. And they say a picture is worth a thousand words. And this showed value. This is how I changed my marketing during a recession. The show people, hey, pay $100 now, but you won't have to pay over and over and over. I also focus on products like dress shirts because it was easy for me to show value in that way because people use dress shirts all the time. They go to work every day. I knew firsthand because I was an English teacher at the time I was building this business and I had to wear a dress shirt every day because it was a suit to the university I was working at. So it's a product they're going to have to use versus me trying to push cuff links or ascots. That's a little bit of a luxury item. And they're not going to use that every day. And it's hard for me to show value. Sometimes recessions are a time for you to allow certain products to shine by flexing their value in the long term. One of the strategies I highly recommend is getting in front of the fact that it is a recession. And people are trying to look for value and just get in front of it and say it in your marketing. So if you're running a deal where people are going to get significant savings, if they sign up for a year or two years, say so, say, hey, lock in this incredible price for two years and save X amount of dollars every single month. These are dolls you can use during an economy like this. Boom, value, people buy into that type of marketing because it screams smart purchase. Another tip that I recommend it comes to your marketing when you're writing your copy or your sales copy or you're creating your videos or whatever it is is to get in front of the emotions. During your session, people start to feel a little bit depressed. They feel like they can't enjoy life as much as they used to. So address that and say, hey, just because times are tight, doesn't mean you can't enjoy life or enjoy your work or enjoy whatever your product is about. Treat yourself while getting a great deal. Language like this taps into the actual climate and emotions that are going on, people resonate with it because they can see themselves in that language. And once people start seeing themselves, they're open to hearing what you have to say and agreeing with your solution. Next, market your risk reversal. Risk reversal means your money back guarantees your free trials, your refund policy, whatever you do in your business to say, hey, if you don't like it, you can cancel, or you can get a refund. This needs to be in the forefront of your marketing. Make sure you emphasize this on your sales pages in your ads even. Why? Because people take longer to make a buying decision during a recession. They want to make sure they're making the right choice, they're not sure money is tight, and they just feel like they can't afford to make a mistake. So if you make it a no brainer and say, hey, there is no way you can make a mistake because if you don't like it, we'll give you your money back or you can try before you buy with a trial. Emphasizing these risk reversals that you have in your business shows a customer, the risk is all on you. You're taking on the risk they have no risk. You can take your time in making a decision during the 30 day money back guarantee period, or during your 14 day trial. This releases the pressure valve and allows them to feel like, hey, this is not the end of the world if I buy this. If it doesn't work out for me, if I don't like it, I can always refund it or cancel. Now, of course, your job is when they do buy is to win them over and make them feel like, hey, I don't want to cancel. I don't want to refund. This was actually a great buy. I got more on today's topic but before that, let me share with you some of our favorite tools. We

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A highlight from S7 Bonus: Juan Soberanis, Beacon

Code Story

08:03 min | Last week

A highlight from S7 Bonus: Juan Soberanis, Beacon

"Story. The podcast bringing you interviews with tech visionaries. Who share in the critical minds of what it takes to change an industry and build and lead a team that has your back. I'm your host, Noah lab part. And today he'll won sober honest is leading the charge to give you a secure way to find your people. All this and more. On code story. Back in 1986, Juan soberanis and his family got a personal computer for the house, a Commodore one 28. He asked his mother if he could take it to his room and taught himself how to program and of course he did some gaming on it as well. This was the genesis of his career path. Outside of tech, he has kids in their 20s and spent a lot of his free time hiking and being outdoors. Wanna spend working with startups for quite some time. At one point in his career, he became a contractor doing mobile development. Through a number of contracts with a specific investor, one found himself as the CTO of a startup, pitching an idea for what is his current venture. This is the creation story of Beacon. There is what I call the rise of consumer privacy tech. And that's driven by apps like telegram, signal, duck, duck, go, and a brave browser. And together, those apps have about 700 million monthly active users. And what's that that's done is it's created a lot of demand for high security location sharing in order to find your family and friends. So we're working on bringing that to market with location sharing with end to end encryption to ensure that people's location data can not be sold, tracked, abused in any kind of way. From anybody. Even for me, with access to the database, I can't see people's location data. It's just all gobbledygook because it's encrypted. So that's what we're working on. We intend to be the gold standard for location sharing security, much like signal is to messaging today. I worked for startups for a long time, and I live in the north bay and San Francisco Bay Area. And the commute was very long. It was maybe three hours a day total, and I just got burnt out in the commute. And so one day I decided to become a contractor. And I contracted for a number of years worked from home. Got this contract through word of mouth. It was very small. It was about a weeklong contract. It was to bring their cross platform code, building and running on Android. So I got that work done. One week turned into a two week contract, and then a month, and then that turned into a yearlong contract, and then they brought me on full-time permanent. And this was for a very small startup basement in the north bay. There were some personnel changes and time went on, and eventually long story short, I became CTO of this small startup that was, like I said, in the north bay. And then after a year or two, that that startup was failing. So I pitched the investor on an idea similar to this. And he decided to invest in the company and I became cofounder and CEO of this company based off of that history. Let's dive into what would be the MVP. Can we put that first product you built? How long did it take to build? And what sort of tools did you use to bring it to life? So the previous startup that I told you about that I was CTO of, we were working on AWS technology, right? And that technology is amazing. I mean, there's so much you can do with AWS. But it is also very complicated. So we had a great engineer out in England who knew how to do all the DevOps and all the AWS ins and outs. And we had about maybe three full-time engineers. Working on the project, you know, QA developed the usual. It turns out because we needed to pivot because we really needed to go fast and we needed to reduce our burn rate. We could not use AWS anymore and do all that at the same time, reduce our burn rate and be able to pivot quickly. So the technology decision that I made going from the one startup to the next was to move away from AWS. And use Firebase. And that was only because I could reduce the team size and a client's developer that is the app developer me could also do the server development because Firebase is so approachable. By and large, it what it did is it we reduced our burn rate. We went from three engineers down to one. I was able to give it the technology pretty quickly. Now, it took about three months to get to our one and VP. And that was just from one and a half engineers I would say. And we learned quite a bit after that. And I would say that we did a pretty significant pivot from one to two, which is what's in the marketplace today. And I would say from one to two was another three months. So with that MVP, I hear the timing here, you went about it. I'm curious about decisions and tradeoffs you had to make. Maybe it's feature cut, technical debt. Those types of things, but digging into those decisions and how you coped with those decisions specifically. The biggest tradeoff has been quality by far. And when I say quality, I mean from top to bottom. So in terms of stability, we're pretty stable. I mean, if you look at the crash numbers and whatnot, it's pretty stable considering. But I just usability, you know, just like little glitches here and there and animations that aren't that don't exist that should and things like that by top to bottom. I mean, UX, graphic design, all the way down to the code. And that's because we need to move fast and we need to experiment and see how the market reacts. Without investing too much into the feature sets that we may just throw away. So we're kind of an experimental phase improving out the top level messaging and the market position. It drives our QA engineered nets because we have a kind of a backlog of bugs. And I was like, yeah, yeah, next version next version. Today's episode is sponsored by Mabel. 32% of customers leave a brand after single bad experience. Yet as teams adopt agile practices, testing gets left behind. Bug slip into production, or there's a massive rush to test code before it reaches prod. To build and ship high quality apps quickly, you need a customer focused testing strategy. And that's where Mabel comes in. Mabel is the intelligent test automation platform for quality engineering. With Mabel, you can focus on quality, not fixes. Everyone from developers, automation engineers, manual testers, and business stakeholders can build, execute, and maintain customer centric test. Check them out at Mabel dot com slash code story to start testing your web application for free. This episode is brought to you by support zebra. Let's face it. Having a world class customer support team is critical in the world today. In fact, it's mandatory. But how do you build not only a scalable team, but one who is guaranteed to hit the most important metrics? Meat support zebra. Support zebra's supports, the world's fastest growing companies by building scalable world class customer support teams for SaaS, FinTech, and ecommerce companies. They offer outsource resources for customer support, technical support, back office administration and content moderation. Their staff is available 24/7 and is the happiest customer facing staff in the industry. There are no contracts, and you get to select your dreams for team. And believe it or not, they have less than 1% customer turn rate. So you could say their customers are happy.

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A highlight from Finding Your Sales Transformation Through Podcasting with Collin Mitchell

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:24 min | Last week

A highlight from Finding Your Sales Transformation Through Podcasting with Collin Mitchell

"Light that spark fire nation, jail D here, and welcome to entrepreneurs on fire, brought to you by the HubSpot podcast network with great shows like I digress. Today we'll be breaking down finding your sales transformation through podcasting to drop these value bombs, I have brought Colin Mitchell into eo fire studios. Colin is the host of sales transformation is currently cofounder and CRO of sales cast as a four X founder. He is passionate about sales entrepreneurship in podcasting. And today for our nation, we'll talk about sales transformation. We'll talk about how podcasting changes the way you sell. We'll talk about creating a revenue on a podcast and a big thank you for sponsoring today's episode, go to Colin and our sponsors. Looking for a place where you can experience live interactions with your audience, then speak easy is for you. I'm loving creating daily content on speakeasy. And I know you will, too, visit get speakeasy dot com to download the app and go live today. Success story hosted by Scott D clary, is brought to you by the HubSpot podcast network. The audio destination for business professionals success story features Q&A keynote presentations and convos on sales marketing and more. A recent episode on how to protect your business in times of crisis is a must listen. Listen to success story, wherever you get your podcasts.

Colin Mitchell Colin Scott D Clary