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Alice Wu: The New Queer Rom-Com

LGBTQ&A

11:26 listening | 2 d ago

Alice Wu: The New Queer Rom-Com

"I wanted to bring you this brand new conversation that we had with Alice Wu. Alice is the writer and director of the half of it. Now a net Flix and the movie really captures that special period and a clear persons in life. Where you have this attraction this desire you have not needling of clearness in your body but you very much do not yet have the worst language to describe it so you'll hear us talk about capturing on the page and then screen as well analysis first film saving face the now icon ick lesbian calm the just reminder our new season debuts on May twenty eighth you can listen to it on any and podcast platforms and if you do please help us. Spread the word on Social Media. Doing things like that really helps our show continue to grow so thank you so much for that all right without further ado here's Alison. I'm excited to talk because I find your career so exciting because it is proof of two things one that it's never too late to pull a one eighty and try something new. You quit your career at Microsoft to become a filmmaker and also your new film films coming out fifteen years after I and I think that's equally inspiring because there is this myth in Hollywood that you can't take a break that you can't pause momentum. Did you ever have worries about that? Yeah I mean I certainly got into that myth. I thought when I left industry ten years ago I thought I'd left for good. I never thought I'd be back. And I left specifically because my mom had some serious health issues that were acute side. Dropped everything to go to San Francisco to help her with that and it just took a lot longer than expected and I remember the conversation on my agent called me to be like. Are you coming back like what is happening and I just in that moment was like no? I'm not you know because I never went into filmmaking like I didn't get started to my late twenties and I had a different career and then I went to San Francisco. Take care of my mom which was home right like to be able to focus on my family As heading into my forties was felt right and so had I asked you at that time. Would you ever make another film? Your answer would have been like probably not. Yeah I think I in fact I got asked that all the time because there apparently is a very rabid group of saving face vans always very small. But they're very very determined. I didn't tell my second. Film got announced all these people came out of the woodwork. All over the world. I've been waiting for another film and I'm like this is true like I had no idea but a lot of my friends are also there either. Queer or Asians and so I got asked all the time where they'd be like this movie meant so much me winner he making another one and I'd be like probably never like I'd be like you know you never know but I think that time in my life that chapter might be over in at that time that you were a caretaker were you happy and content doing just about you know. It's a hard one to answer. Because in hindsight it's easier to say yes when it's happening. It's really deeply uncomfortable win. Those roles are reversed and granted. It's again I haven't lived at home sensitive sixteen so it wasn't like my mom had been taken care of me in any direct way but emotionally. She you know she was my mom you know. It was very stressful but it also is probably necessary because so why it seems great now is it was a few years of a lot of you know fighting and arguing and and those kinds of power struggles but I think those are the things you kind of have to go through to get to real intimacy and I think while my mom and I I honestly can't could love me more my mom and I don't have anyone more than I love my mom but I don't think we have the most intimate relationship you know because there are a lot of areas we just didn't know how to talk about and now we do when you say. Was it like rewarding. It was but it didn't feel like while it was happening. But in Hindsight. I can't imagine anything that would have been more rewarding in in my forties and I hope asking that is a judgmental but I just think like looking at your story of you know working at Microsoft and quitting her job to move New York City to give yourself five years to make a movie. There's so much motivation and I'm Bishen in that. That then surprises me that somebody could be like content putting all that aside a such an interesting parallels so smart. I think about it that way. I think the reason why I think those two things are linked though is I didn't move to New York to become a filmmaker. I moved to New York to try and make saving face which I didn't think would get made by the way like who thought that movie was going to get made right. Fifteen years ago I went. I wrote that movie for my mom. That's that's sorry that's really literally nuance distinction between the two that you didn't set out to be a filmmaker you set out to make one film. Yeah I wanted to make that bill. We got made but I also think sometimes you know it's similar to I'M GONNA go take care of my mom if you told me during that time especially in those years. You're fighting that like somebody you would have this wonderful intimate relationship. You're my your mom. I'd be like yeah that's never ever happening. That woman is impossible. I love her to death which is impossible right but you do it out of your love for that person similarly and trying to make the movie. I did it out of my deep love for that. I guess that script and just that desire to be like well take a one in a million chance but man if happens. That would be amazing. But if it doesn't I don't think I thought beyond Bat when it actually got me I I really was like you know like what is happening right now. This is not this is a so again. It was a fun but very disorienting. You know I become aware that I am the kind of filmmaker that isn't as much as I love directing I love you know. I think I need to love the projects like I need to love it. Like it's like almost a child for me otherwise you sacrifice a lot like this is not a field. That doesn't demand physical and emotional sacrifices from me right like there's no world where it's like. I'm off making my film and they have plenty of emotional energy for my best friends and my family like theirs. It's literally like a number of months. I'm pretty much checked out unless it's an emergency and not to sacrifice so I kind of have to ask myself. If I'm going to do that for something. Is it worth that sacrifice so you set out to make a film not be a filmmaker? When did you start to identify as a filmmaker has a really good question? Because I don't think it was maybe not until this movie because I always was like. I wonder if that movie was just a fluke. I was such a fluke. It was like a really lovely shoot and I really loved being on set and I think that was when I was like okay. I still have a lot to learn. I've only made two films but maybe I am a filmmaker. Maybe this is something that that I actually. You know. That is somewhere in my blood. Yeah and I think that the half of it walks this really compelling line in terms of queasiness that a main character. Someone who doesn't have it all figured out yet doesn't have the language describe or sexuality. I think what touched me was the respect that the movie had for her and where she's asked in terms of that process in your quickness and you as a filmmaker met her where she was at and. I haven't seen that many films yet. Oh thank you for saying that yes. That's exactly right because I think people sometimes I'll get asked like now is Elliott Elliott. This and what I ended up saying at least seventeen. I don't know what you're like at seventeen seventeen out to myself and I did come out to myself to my senior college and it was painful at once I did. I had crushes on girls probably since the fourth grade like I just deep crush on the same girl all three years of high school and I was not out to myself. How is that possible right? It's possible for exactly the reason you just said which is we. Don't have the language aways to explain our emotions and when it comes to something as scary as potentially ones you know whether we are clearness or even just your sexual identity at all at seventeen. I think just the notion of sex can be a bit terrifying because it's so confusing. Yeah and not having all the answers as very real for that age It's real for any age actually but it just interesting stage of the coming out process to depit. Did you originally set out wanting to explore that when you were writing it. Yes so so. It's it's interesting because I didn't actually a initially and I think this often forms like the kind of things I'm just going to write for myself to direct I realize now that it usually comes from some sort of emotional question that I may have been wrestling with in my life like saving face while the plot is nothing to do what happened to me and my mom. That very much was about you know. Is it possible to have both romantic love and your family together? No not then take way right and now something has grappling with and I think the half of it started as me really grappling with for a whole bunch of reasons but grappling with this notion of what Love was and how you know like as a society we really exalts romantic love right and I think growing up. I wasn't allowed to watch TV. But I was watch classic movies and I was allowed to talk to Chinese soap operas because we weren't allowed to watch anything violent pretty much meant like romantic dramas romantic comedies. So I totally bought into this idea. That like the whole point of those movies at the end these two people hopefully end up together right and once they do. It's like the happy ending like right. Like the whole goal is to find your perfect other half and I think sort of a getting older and realising like The to kind of weird now like in my twenties that made total sense but once I got past that I started realizing it will even if you do find someone who like I want to spend the rest of my life with this person. It doesn't really seem like and then your life just ends in this wonderful crescendo right. It seems like and then life goes on and all these other things come up and thinking about that and realizing that I naturally focused so much on like my romantic partner. But they're all these other relationships in my life. That are at least as important in if I think about like the breakup I've had I've had yes. I've had a couple of really difficult romantic breakup but I wouldn't necessarily say that are worse than some of the platonic breakups. I've had like the breakup that can happen in apparent in a trial right like when a one can't accept the other for some reason. That heartbreak is devastating. The heartbreaks that happened with your closest friends where and those are often incredibly quiet. They're not like we had a fight. We don't talk. They're more like someone move. Someone gets a relationship and then somehow you feel less connected in the less connected and then one day. You're like you miss that intimacy right like there's and because with romantic relationships put a label on it when that relationship and you have to have a conversation but for friends you can just fade

Microsoft Alice Wu San Francisco New York Alison Love Hollywood New York City Writer Elliott Elliott Partner Director
Pirate Myths and Mysteries

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

4:32 listening | 6 d ago

Pirate Myths and Mysteries

"And for the next week or so. I will be focusing on tyrus during the Golden Age from sixteen fifty to about seventeen thirty and in my ongoing research for these podcasts. I have had a few surprises one. Pirates DID BURIED TREASURE TO PIRATES. Made MAPS FOR THOSE TREASURE. I will be producing evidence of this also. Pirates did make other pirates and English Spanish ship captains walk the plank pick up any book on the Golden Age Pirates. Sixteen fifty to seventeen thirty and it would have you believe that they sailed the Atlantic but in fact when the English began actively pursuing what they call privateers and hanging entire crews many fled attempting to sail around Cape Horn. The southernmost tip of South America but few survived where the Atlantic and Pacific collided strong winds large waves unpredictable current and icebergs challenge every vessel. Pirates formed egalitarian. Orders based on elected officials and mutual trust. They did make some crews of captured vessels walk the plank in eighteen twenty two captain of the British ship. Rudd poll was made to walk the plank when his ship was captured by the pirate ship. Emmanuel before turning himself in Captain Kidd buried his treasure somewhere on long island also around area will discuss Madagascar. He was hanged for piracy in London before it could retrieve it for two hundred years. Fifteen sixty five to eighteen fifteen. The Spanish Treasury Cross Pacific from Alka Poco laden with gold and silver had been caravan across the isthmus there from there. They sailed to new Spain at the time Manila unchallenged until sixteen ninety nine. It was late in that year. That the five masted pirate ship made the run around Cape Hope captain by check Berryman. The Spanish treasure galleon left behind by the rest of the Spanish fleet was just ten days out of port of Al Capone sailing. Lazy five knots for Manila when they were intercepted by another vessel when the peach pulled within five hundred yards of the Galleon and unfurled the Jolly Roger and fired. Twenty two cannon on the heavily Laden. Gallia well that was all it took without hesitation. Captain Fernandez de the Tinian unloaded his sixteen cannons in response and beat a hasty retreat up the coast of North America. No Vashem's speed for the gold. Silver she carried the San. Jose couldn't lose the peach. A Jose carried eighty pounds of gold twenty-six tons of unkown silver and four hundred thousand pesos. For ten days with a damaged rudder Santellien led the peach on a wild chase up. The coast of North America finally anchoring off a rugged coast the captain of peach saw his chance sailed to within a hundred yards the guy and for best effect of short range cannons and let fire twenty two guns in a final show of defiance. The San Jose unleashed her sixteen cannons. And by chance hit the powder storage of the each flowing. This ship to splitters but it was too late for the San Jose sinking by the Stern. Captain gathered the ship's log and perched on the bow made his final entry dated January. Seventeen O one. Half of his crew sixty were lost in the final battle. The remains managed to wrath from the decade paddle to the surging forty degree water toward shore with the sun high overhead. The Sea retreated leaving the San Jose on Solid C. Four on her starboard side the raft high and Dry Captain. Sotoudeh crossed himself as he watched one hundred foot. Waves sweep in from the ocean. The final entry in the log. Read Longitude Forty five five sixteen degrees north latitude one twenty three ninety one and ninety four degrees west with a slight adjustment of just a couple degrees the final resting place of that treasures. Scallions San Jose is just off the Oregon coast off the little town of Nice. Colin perhaps a mile out from the famed ghost forest. You see the last great cascade. Subduction zone earthquake occurred early in January. Seventeen O one. The famous Oregon Ghost florist was once a Sitka. Spruce forest dropped twenty five feet during that quake justice shifting place of pushed. What's left of that forced to the surface? A fascinating side at low tide. Perhaps in a few years if the place continued shift the remains of the treasure. Galleon San Jose may appear on that same

San Jose Captain Kidd Peach Jose North America Manila Captain Fernandez Spanish Treasury Cross Pacific Atlantic Dry Captain Tyrus South America Cape Horn Al Capone Alka Poco SAN Spain Rudd Sotoudeh Cape Hope
The Origins of Pizza As We Know It

Gastropod

8:26 listening | Last week

The Origins of Pizza As We Know It

"The exact origins of ancient pizza are somewhat murky. Modern pizza definitely has a birthplace. Where you begin to see pizza develop and being called. Pizza is around the seventeenth and eighteenth century in Naples. And what people eight back then that they called pizza was essentially kind of bread with topics baked onto it. Didn't anything like what we might visualize now. As pizza researchers the first thing that neapolitans called pizza had no tomato in fact it was east it flat bread with anything that was on hand. You kinda through whatever you had usually because you didn't have a lot of ingredients so it wasn't unusual for people to consume pizza. Which was just you know crust or bread with maybe bits of fish baked on it or maybe herbs that you gathered from the fields on that would look really different from what we think about. Is Pizza today by the late? Seventeen hundreds Italian dictionaries defined pizza as the word that people in Naples used for. What pretty much everyone else called for. Kacha a yeast. It flat bread topped with oil and herbs and sometimes olives and others salty. Good things like cheese and cured meats. Let what about the tomato at least according to Francisco Eastern flat bread isn't really a pizza until it meets one of the most delicious vegetables ever. Oh God it's actually a fruit but never mind the tomato. I had to get to Naples from central and South America. It arrived at the very end of the fifteen hundreds but it took another century before people regularly eight Europeans were initially a little wary of tomatoes. There was some suspicion they were maybe poisonous but tomatoes planted in the rich volcanic soil in sunny southern Italy were particularly sweet and delicious and someone in Naples had the brilliant idea to take these delicious tomatoes and toss them on their flat bread. Have no idea you know who was the first person to do it but I think it was very much the case like. I just mentioned that people could have through whatever ingredients on hand and someone got this great idea of like. Yeah let slap a few tomatoes on top of the pizza and it caught on at least in Naples. And that's actually the thing you have to understand to understand where the modern pizza came from. Is that Naples? In the seventeen hundreds was the third largest city in Europe and also by far and away the most densely packed city lots of those people in Naples at the time were really poor. They live tightly packed in tiny rooms. Multi-storey buildings and they didn't have running water or kitchens and so they had to buy food on the street. They were eating a lot of things. You could buy hot and hold in your hand. This is how Naples developed a very particular food culture. Naples was famous for its street vendors. Who Walked the city and cried out their wares octopus balls cones of fried anchovy smelt from the bay boiled chestnuts. Chunks Zucchini marinated in vinegar. This fun new food called macaroni. Which of course you can hear about both in our macaroni and cheese episode and also in our Pasta episode although actually macaroni was comparatively speaking expensive. And the very poorest neopolitan have that on Sundays. Pizza was half the price and so people eight slices of IT FOR BREAKFAST. Lunch and dinner remember. Naples is a port town and there were a lot of fishermen there many of them eight plain tomato pizza for breakfast before going out to see. Carol says that's why it's called Marinara and immobile vendor would sell them a chunk of pizza or they would go into a pizzeria and eat standing up. The history of these very first pizzas is actually not super well-documented Carroll says pizza was food for really poor people. And that's not the kind of thing that tends to make the official histories so we don't have a lot of evidence left behind by the very poorest citizens of Naples about what they eat when the eight their first tomato pizza we do have evidence from foreigners who visit Naples and see that well all these people are eating pizza and let me be really clear on this that when I come to Naples and witnessed pizza. They do not think this very enticing or interesting food. International visitors had some choice words. Samuel. Moore's he's The guy who invented the Telegraph he visited Naples in the eighteen. Hundreds and said pizza was a quote species of most nauseating cake covered over with slices of Pomodoro or does sprinkled with little fish and black pepper. And I know not what other ingredients it. Altogether looks like a piece of bread that had been taken wreaking out of the sewer even other Italians. If they weren't from Naples they were usually not pizza. Fans in the late eighteen hundreds of woman journalists called Matilda out described these vendors. Walking around with slices of pizza made from quote dense. Does that Burns but doesn't cook and covered with almost raw tomatoes. She wrote that. This would freeze in the cold and turn yellow in the Sun Eaten by the flies also honestly. Most Italians hadn't even heard of pizza. It's such a rich varied cuisine and people in the North or eating something very different from people in the south people in the center. And I think that certainly was the case where you had most Italians who were living in Italy. If they weren't living in the immediate environs of Naples they were not that aware of this dish called pizza even a visit from the queen of a newly unified Italy who travelled south to Naples in eighteen. Eighty nine that didn't help pizzas popularity but it did give one pizza famous new name. The Legend of the Pizza Margherita. Is that the wave of the Italian king on their visit to Naples really wants to try some local street food. And she's not going to go out in the streets and alleys. And you know. Walk into a pizzeria or buy pizza from a mobile vendor. Which is how most the apologists consumed their pizza? Instead her staff found one of the city's best-known pizza makers and the story goes that he came from his cramped little pizzeria to the palace. She was staying at and made her three pizzas one just with oil one top to a tiny silvery fish fry and one with D'Amato Mozzarella and some torn basil leave. Queen Margherita was enjoying a bit of culinary tourism. She was in Naples and she wanted a taste of what the locals eight the local poor people which meant pizza and she quite enjoyed it. Her staff wrote the pizza maker a lovely. Thank you note saying that. The three pizzas were found to be delicious and in return the pizza maker named one of those three pizzas pizza. Margherita the one with D'Amato Mozzarella and Basil. So everyone assumed. Oh they were. The inventors of the Pizza Margherita now. It's highly likely and I and I think it would be the case. That many other pizzerias also made this type of pizza or some variation there up so I don't think they were the only pizza that made it. I don't use the story I don't think about. The story is illustrative of an authentic. First Pizza Margherita Rather. I think it's an important story that tells us something about food at Italian nationalism. I mean tomato sauce. Mozzarella and Basil Is Red White and green the colors of the relatively new Italian flag but even though a local guy got excited about the new national colours. Pizza Margherita wasn't a national dish. Because pizza was still super-regional it took decades more for other Italians to fall in love with pizza as late as nineteen hundred. All the pizza is in Italy. We're in Naples. There had been one attempt by Neopolitan to open a pizzeria in Rome and it had apparently failed miserably. Strangely the next place pizza takes hold isn't somewhere close to Naples. It's across the ocean. He's definitely catches on next in the United States. Remember Naples was really poor even for Italy which was a really poor country so in the early nineteen hundreds. A lot of NEAPOLITANS emigrated to find work and a lot of them ended up in New York City and they wanted food from home so some started making pizza for their fellow Neopolitan. No one knows who opened the true first pizzeria in the US. But you can still get a slice at the place that calls itself the first in the US Lombardi's which opened in nineteen o five. Because they they wind up being the first ones to get a commercial license to help each and again. It doesn't mean that. No one else is producing. Just means that there's some physical

Naples Pizza Margherita Queen Margherita Italy D'amato Mozzarella Europe United States South America Neapolitans Rome New York City Carol Carroll Matilda Burns Official Moore
Bringing Generations Closer Together

Kind World

3:25 listening | Last week

Bringing Generations Closer Together

"Welcome to kind world. I'm ESPN Amer. And I'm Andrea Swayed. So yes me mean. I don't know about you. Being in quarantine has led me to talk on the phone more than I have in a very very long time. You are not kidding. Most nights like during dinner. We just leave our phone on like we have dinner with other people and it's a really really good way to connect when we can actually see them. Yeah my friend Landry and I. We used to go to the movies once a week and now we are basically watching movies together but separately and earn apartments and then afterward we facetime each other and we talk about the movies as if we had just watched it together on the movie screen. I mean that's just what you have to do. I mean you just cannot overstate how important technology has been and keeping US connected but I do think our dependence on this has inevitably caused some people to feel left out and someone who knows that all too well is sixteen year. Old Jordan Midler Thank you all for joining us today for our next online zoom class. We have a lot in store. For every Sunday. Jordan teaches a free technology class designed specifically for seniors. It all started back when he was a middle school and his family gave his grandparents a pair of smartphones. He quickly realized they needed just a little bit of help to figure out how to use them. I spent numerous times on the phone with my grandparents and walking them through simple procedures like sending a message of phone. Call sending an email downloading APP but Jordan wanted to go beyond his grandparents. He wanted to help other people of their generation benefit from the tech tools. We have right now so he started teaching a class at a free space in his high school in New York and the class was pretty popular but when everything in the city shut down because of Cova Nineteen Jordan decided to keep teaching this time online. Today's lesson is going to be revolving around online banking. That is something that we're all in a situation that we need to us. I think it's such. It's an enormous service that he's providing. I think it's It's a credit to him and it's a credit to him that he wants to. He wants to do what he wants to do. The people like US people like me. That's Rosalyn Zueger. One of Jordan's students rosalind is originally from Ireland. But she's been in the US for more than sixty years at ninety. She lives alone but she maintains a pretty active social life. This lockdowns been really tough on her. But the skills she's learned in Jordan's class have helped her feel more comfortable using technology to connect more with family and friends. I think that made a big difference to my situation being alone ear. I'm not lonely at all and I know I can. I can zoom in to anybody. I like it any time with that. I find that I can get through today. Jacques get through the weeks Jordan. Says his class size has more than doubled. Since going online. My goal is to be able to be able to spread my classes and expanded in a way that any senior is able to assess the classes.

Jordan Midler United States Andrea Swayed Rosalyn Zueger Jordan Espn Facetime Landry Jacques Cova Ireland New York
Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

Gastropod

8:10 listening | 3 weeks ago

Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

"Used to be covered in these dense wet deciduous forests which is very different from what we see today where really hardly any of this primeval force exists anymore for her book feasting. Wild jeanneret actually visited one of the last tiny slivers of European primeval forest. It's in Poland. And it really is just a shadow of its former. Self Europe's forests were so vast that actually we think that the root of the word wilderness came from descriptions of these places the roots of the words wild and wilderness. I'll go back to untamed animals. The forest was a place. Teeming WITH ANIMALS UNGOVERNED BY HUMAN HANDS UNGOVERNED BUT NOT UNTOUCHED FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. Europeans would go into the forest to find dinner day all kinds of animals wild boar venison there is something called the RMC which is the precursor to domesticated cattle. There was for a spice in moves the animals so abundant here. That really there was no form of hunting restriction it was abundant but it was also really valued killing a huge wild animal and then being able to share it was a sign of how wealthy and powerful you are. King said to have lots of wild game. At all their banquets. Animals would be breezed in rosewater and spices. Sometimes they would be covered in gold leaf and brought to the table hole and kind of carved up in front of the guests so while it was very much a form of status for kings so by the Middle Ages Those Morris. Were already starting to shrink between one thousand. Ad and thirteen hundred thirteen hundred. Europe's population grew by about fifty million people and all of those people needed to eat so there was increasing. Need to cut down the forests in order to grow grain and various crops and then also would was used for everything it was used for building houses and making carts by the fourteen and fifteen hundred. Europeans began sailing around the world. They first set forth to trade and then to stake their claim on foreign lands is colonialism spread across the globe. There was demand for very large old growth trees to create the ship. Masts that were needed and as early as the eleventh century The demand for wood was really threatening the forest where these kings went out and hunted the game meat that was so important to their diets and their status. Gina races that originally European forests had mostly being treated as common land. Anyone could hunt there. But as far back as ancient Rome the elite had sat down laws saying yes anyone could hunt but only as long as they weren't trespassing sort of by Default European kings and noblemen were the ultimate owners of the forest so as European king started to see their game meat being threatened by the need for Forest Land Day set out some very similar conservation measures whereby the king really restricted access to hunting in his forest. This is really the beginning of modern conservation lives whereby people were kept out of the forests. It's weird to think of royalty preserving their hunting grounds and keeping out the poor folk as the blueprint for the conservation movement. But jeanneret says these laws were really some of the earliest forms of environmental legislation forests. Were no longer for everyone to use as they pleased they were just for the Kings. They had very large administrative networks to manage this for so the forest wardens would they would hand out hunting licenses. They would make sure that game. Animals didn't starve winter or in times of drought. Sometimes they would prepare the venison for royal feasts and they would mete out. Punishments punishments were usually for poaching and they were definitely not just a slap on the wrist. If you ignored the game laws you could have a trial by hot iron and if you were found guilty then your eyes would be torn out or you were castrated. So poaching really big deal. The kings went to great lengths to prevent people from poaching and this had an impact on how people related to the natural world around them. The forest said always been wild in earlier centuries in Europe. They'd even been places of spirituality. But at this point the forests started to become scary rather than sacred. The authorities deliberately painted a picture of forests filled with outlaws and rebels dangerous rule breakers people who posed a threat to society with the stories. The authorities told a violent outlaws in the forest. Some of those were based on reality. There were people breaking the rules in the forest but they were breaking them because they thought the rules were unfair and they were hungry for poor people. This was one former getting food. And any time there was an economic downturn hunting would rise poaching would rise in the forests and so people did find it as an active resistance against the sort of forms of power and some of the rebels who broke the rules and hunted in the forest. They actually became folk. Heroes like Robin Hood and his band of Merry men. So Robin Hood was stealing from the rich and giving to the poor but this also came out of this idea that the force were not necessarily landscapes that poor people were allowed to access or use the resources of and so it wasn't active resistance to go in there and to get in game animals and feed yourself on one level. This is a story of power who could hunt and eat the wild game and wendling European forests and who couldn't that it's also the story of the impact that split between rich hunters and bore poachers had on how Europeans thought of wild food and the whole concept of the wild and wilderness. This is a very particular way of thinking of wild meat. As game to be hunted for sport by the elites and otherwise off limits and this is a template that the Europeans took with them as they colonized countries around the world so when the first European colonists arrived in the Congo Basin they sort of carried this cultural baggage of seeing forest as these dark empty wastelands without people so even though there were a long history of human habitation and numerous groups living in the Congo Basin forests. The European comments kind of didn't see them and there was this real sense of Europeans thought of this landscape as Darkest Africa. Take David Livingston. He was a Scottish missionary and explorer. Who is obsessed with finding the source of the Nile? He did a an exploratory expedition across the Congo wilderness. And he described Congress for us as suffocating wilderness and people waste that seem to have an oppressive silence so in May of eighteen eighty five. The you know quote unquote international community. Which is England France Germany Belgium and Italy? They recognize King Leopold the second of Belgium as having a sovereign claim over much of the Congo and five years later these same countries created what was effectively the first international conservation law this lowest passed in the early nineteen hundreds and it was called the Convention for the preservation of wild animals birds and fish in Africa. Local people couldn't hunt or trap or fish in certain areas of the country. The law was modeled. After the way European forests had become protected game reserves for rich people rich people in particular but of course just like in Europe the forests in Africa weren't actually pristine empty wildernesses before there were plenty of people who depended on them. There were a lot of different groups. Living in the Congo forest somewhere. More nomadic hunter-gatherers others were farming communities living within the rain forest but for all of these groups wild meat provided a very essential source of food. So there were all kinds of animals being eaten everything from various kinds of antelope to forest buffalo wild boar monkeys. You know just hundreds of different animals that communities ate in the forest there were cultural. Taboos around eating certain species particularly ones that were long lived and slow to reproduce like elephants which could and did occasionally provide a lot of meat was considered a sacred act to kill an elephant similar with eating bonobos which are great ape. That's very similar to us. There were beliefs that there is a direct link to that ancestral spirit world so all of these cultural beliefs had an ecological basis to really help conserve animals that had large social complex social groupings or were slow growing and thus thunderbolts over

Kings Europe Congo Forest Robin Hood King Leopold Congo Congo Basin Poland Africa Rome Jeanneret RMC Darkest Africa David Livingston Gina England France Germany Belgium Belgium Congress
Eating the Rainbow: Why Color Is Important To Food

Gastropod

6:01 listening | Last month

Eating the Rainbow: Why Color Is Important To Food

"Nadia Bernstein is a flavor historian. You might remember her from our episode on flavor called Saver Flavor. If you didn't hear the first time you should go check it out and that episode we talked about how flavor is mostly taste plus smell. But actually Nadia says. That color affects the flavor of food. To more than you'd think when people are served sprite. That's colored Brown. They think it's Cola. This trick even works on famous wine. Critics give them white wine colored red with food coloring and most of them will think it's red wine and the wax poetic about its berry notes in nineteen thirty six. A Scottish Baker tried to this experiment with jellies among his own staff. He was trying to find kind of like a worker in his factory or workers in his factory who had reliable senses of taste so he gave them For instance Redd died. Pineapple jellies and green died a lemon jelly and tried to find the people among his staff who could correctly identify the flavor even though the color contradicted their understanding of what the flavor should be and he was actually surprised to find that very few people could pull this off. Color can change the perceived flavor of a food so much that it actually becomes inedible. There was an experiment in the seventies where people were fed a meal of steak fries and peas and the light masked the color of the food but then that color masking light was turned off and normally was turned back on and the steak was blue. The fries were green. The PS were red and the subjects got sick to their stomachs one puked but it's not. The color is traditionally being more important than other senses. When it comes to food after all vision is just one of the ways our senses of to figure out what was good to eat in the past. When you were deciding whether to eat say a beach you might smell it and feel. It's weight in your hand as well as look at the color of skin to see whether it's right you wouldn't just judge with your eyes. Even though color has always been one way that our brains of made sense of what we're about to eat foods appearance started to become particularly important over a century ago so late nineteenth early twentieth century when all kinds of foods or foods packaged or produced in new ways. Right in distant factory is rather than at home started to appear on the market and the question with those was not. Just how should these new kinds of foods taste but also should they look like by the late eighteen? Hundreds America's foods gape was changing. Really as you've heard US talk about this before. But this was the time of the rise of industrial food processing and manufacturing and then thanks to Refrigeration Aka. My Life's great passion. Food was increasingly shipped long distances from where it was grown to the people who are going to eat it. All of that meant that people didn't see food growing or picket or hunted themselves. They might not have had any way to know what something should feel like when it's ripe and so they had to rely even more on the look of food and they were soon helped out by another new technology so people had been using printing technologies but the important change was the invention and increasing use of color printing which became a popular in the nineteen twenties and Nineteen Thirties. In the United States. I know is a lecturer in economics at Kyoto University. And she wrote a book on food and color called visualizing taste how business changed the look of what you eat. Her book tells the story of how color became increasingly important over the last century. And how big business? Actually shaped our expectation of what? The color of our food should be hand in hand with the rise of affordable color printing. Came the rise of national magazines and these magazines were filled with full color ads for food and distributed from Costa Shining Coast. So consumer ads say in New York City and in San Francisco. What looking at the same image in the same. Carter around the same time food. Packaging became more common. Yes we did an entire episode on that to called outside the box and then cellophane was invented so now packaging was also see through of course cellophane meant you could no longer touch or smell your food before you bolted it but you could definitely see what color it was like. We said we'd always used colors one of the ways. We figured out what food should taste like. Just think about the color of a ripe strawberry or the disgustingly blue steak or the white wine. That was tinted red but now with this new long distance package food color was everything and then finally one less technology was invented a way to actually measure color new machines such as the spectrophotometer could evaluate the very particular and specific color of food and so they replaced the subjective and individual judgment of some random person is suddenly. You could actually scientifically say whether your apple was redder than the apples from upstate than that is Inkatha. Kara allow traders to communicate easily and also give them the standard for reference to great the records to produce in processed food products and so the more perfectly uniformly red apples could get a higher grade which meant a higher price. These tools these spectrophotometer as and color grade charts. They were all part of the process of making something as inherently variable as food fit into a modern industrial assembly line kind of system what feed manufacturers and the research industries that support them are aspiring to do is to quantify and measure and control all of the sensory properties of food in order both to guarantee standardisation. Right to make sure that every oreo every can or bottle of orange crush that rolls off the assembly line is indistinguishable from the previous. And from the after but also not just to standardize but also to optimize right to create flavors that are memorable and perhaps even irresistible that kind of create the the sort of maximum amount of

Nadia Bernstein United States Apple Redd Costa Shining Coast Kyoto University Lecturer In Economics Baker New York City America Inkatha Carter San Francisco
Created during Spanish flu, jingle dress dance now helping First Nations people cope with COVID-19

Unreserved

10:42 listening | Last month

Created during Spanish flu, jingle dress dance now helping First Nations people cope with COVID-19

"The cove in nineteen pandemic women and girls across north. America have been posting videos of themselves performing the jingle dress. Dance it's a dance. It has historical ties to another pandemic from one hundred years ago way. People in the United States and Canada tell a similar story about the origins of the jingle dance tradition. They cite a young girl being very sick her father after having a vision about a special dress and dance associated with it gate. The little girl that dress. She began dancing in the new jingle dress and survived that was University of Minnesota professor. Brenda Child on the origin story of the Jingle Dress. Dance Brenda is a member of the Red Lake. Agip way reservation in Minnesota and she's been doing some research into the history of the jingle dress. She joins me from Minneapolis to tell us what she discovered. Welcome Brenda thank you so much. What did you find? Was the origin of the Jingle dress. Dance or I was really surprised when I started doing the research. I couldn't find a single photograph of what you would call. Jingle dress before Circa nineteen twenty in the United States or Canada. And I thought. Wow you know as a historian. It occurred to me that something very big had happened. That created this new healing tradition a century ago so when I started doing further work into it. It seems that it was the big flu. Epidemic of Nineteen nineteen very similar in some ways to the global pandemic were experiencing today. And so the story whether it's told in Whitefish Bay Ontario or central Minnesota on them lacks reservation. Both of them name a little girl as being the first jingle dress dancer and the girl was actually survivor of the global pandemic of a century ago And there was something else going on at the time as well as this Influenza pandemic there was there is this law. I guess outlawing I indigenous a spiritual holiday so that really added to to the power of the dress right. Yeah it was. I like to say that the jingle dress dance was a radical tradition from its origins because in the context of the United States the Indian office in Washington had outlawed ritualistic dancing on reservations in this kind of infamous dance order of one thousand nine hundred twenty one but it is true that the jingle dress dance emerged during a moment when these kinds of traditions were being suppressed on reservation communities and so in that sense the jingle dress dance was sort a radical tradition from its beginning very cool. Is there a history of new? Data's being created out of Specific need or issue that needs to be addressed in our communities. Well I mean I think we have a tradition of new dances being created. But this is the first dance. I traced to a kind of global epidemic. And what's interesting to me? Is Most of US know that Indian tribes in North America? Ever since the coming of Europeans experienced many different kinds of epidemics and pandemics and smallpox and what the jingle dress dance sort of shows me is maybe this was a way that native people had of coping with these earlier generations of epidemic says. Well how is the jingle dress itself connected to healing? I think most native people know that the jingles themselves argued with kind of healing power. Ojibway people think of spiritual power as being passed through the air and so sound is very important in that world view. And so if you've ever been to a powwow and you've had the wonderful experience of listening to many Jingle dress dancers dancing together you know. It's a really interesting sound in that it's a tinkling sound. But some people have described it as almost being like a summer rain or or voting sounds of a rainfall what we learned this past year. My students and I at the University of Minnesota were putting together an exhibit for the Malek's Indian Museum thinking about it being the hundredth anniversary of the Jingle Dress. Dance tradition and we had an opportunity to look at dresses through the decades and so from the Twenties Thirties forties fifties and more recent years. And what we found. Is that the jingles over the years. Where made of different materials we often think of. The Classic Copenhagen Snuff Can Lid and that has been a consistent material that our people have used to make jingles but we also saw dresses with Prince Albert tobacco cans. We also saw dresses made from baking soda cans early. So yeah so people. American Indian women and women in particular have been very creative. We had one early Dakota dress. That had a jacket. Both of them with jingles and the skirt and jacket were made of drapery fabric. Wow it sounds like a jingle dressed dancers were kind of contemporary in that they were able to go with the styles of the time they did and in fact some of my favorite dresses are the first ones from the collections at the Minnesota Historical Society. They're often black kind of Slim dresses that resemble the flapper dresses of the Nineteen Seventies. And so it's surprising. And that's sort of one of the things. We wanted to show with the exhibit that in many ways. The Jingle dress dance evolved through the decades. There isn't one consistent style but the jingles are what they all have in common a lot of the dresses from the thirties and forties. We found had long zinc zippers. Up The side showing that they were probably purchased in department stores. When you and then we're embellished later with jingles and that's something that may be would surprise some of us who always say you know you have to make your own jingle dress or you have to have it made for you. Because in the nineteen thirties and forties women sometimes purchase them and added the jingles. Later I imagine many people think that Powell dancing has been around for hundreds of years. But as you say the jingle dress dance and the dress itself is relatively new. How do people respond when when you tell them that? I like to talk about that idea very much. Because many people can only see indigenous people as historic people. I know we have that problem in the United States where sort of viewed as always in terms of the past and so with the Jingle dress even though the Powell tradition is older than the jingle dress dance shows me. Is that native people and Ojibway people here in the Great Lakes were part of the making of the modern world. And who would've thought one hundred years ago a century ago that this global epidemic that people experienced all over the world would go into the remote communities of the Great Lakes and be very devastating and that women would respond to that epidemic. By you know I always say it's like applying. Sav to wounds that they were able to kind of create this new tradition. That is still with us. A century later. Wow now you mentioned earlier that you helped curate and exhibit at the Mill Lack indie museum in Ohio which took a look at the history of the Jingle Dress and was organized for the one hundredth anniversary of this dance. What kinds of dresses did you have contributed to this exhibit from some some of the you know the the dancers out there well. It was really fun because we started the exhibit with the idea that we were going to bring historic dresses so that the community could kind of look at what I mentioned earlier. The how the dresses evolved over the decades but then what we also found is there almost became like a second exhibit because women wanted to bring their own shingle dress into the exhibit as well and. I think the one that is photographed. Most often is one where it belongs to Vanessa. Northrop from the fond laco devoid community in Minnesota and she turned her police uniform into a jingle dress. And that's a very powerful dress When people see it another favorite is the one I mentioned made out the Baking Soda. Can lintz and that was from our spiritual leader from Kind of central Minnesota and Wisconsin. His name is Lee Staples and he asked if we would like to have his mother's dress which he's still had Lee himself is in his seventies so he brought in his mother's very beautiful dress and we that to the exhibit as well. Just a beautiful sight to see yeah. The exhibit is called the BOSCA. Uganda good day. The Jingle dress at one hundred and as I said it will be having another season. Hopefully when the museum reopened again later this spring it. It will be there for the summer months as well. Now you may have noticed over the last couple of weeks. We've seen women and girls posting videos of themselves dancing Jingle online in response to cove nineteen how does it make you feel to see indigenous people turning back to the Jingle dress dance as a dentist healing? Well it makes me feel great. It makes me very happy to think that another generation as being inspired by this tradition. You may have noticed early last summer that Google had doodle in the middle of June about the jingle dress dance and it was the first time that Google had commissioned a native artist to make a doodle and I thought that was a very interesting thing to happen in the last year too. So what's interesting to me to the timing of these particular events because who would have thought a century after the jingle dress we'd have another global pandemic and just at the time we were remembering that history so strongly that we would have a similar kind of episode in the midst of our country and any in our communities so the timing of. This is all very interesting to

Jingle Dress United States Minnesota Brenda Child University Of Minnesota Canada Minnesota Historical Society Powell Twenties Thirties Great Lakes Minneapolis America Professor Agip Smallpox Google Uganda Red Lake Dakota
The economic impact of covid19

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

3:53 listening | Last month

The economic impact of covid19

"Of this morning. Twenty two million Americans had filed for unemployment. And that's just a number that have filed so far the economic impact of the corona virus on the. Us economy is almost as big a topic as the consequences of the virus on his population. Unfortunately there is enough disinflation to make either topic confusing. Today's podcast. I'm going to lay out some numbers and made clear the difference between recession a depression to understand the immensity of each. We need to look at some numbers. The population of the United States is roughly three hundred twenty nine million the thirty point two million small businesses in the US comprised ninety eight percent of all businesses. Fifteen million are self employed and that number about nine million are unincorporated total employed in the US as of this podcast. Roughly a hundred and fifty eight million and keep in mind. There are millions that are Solo Entrepreneurs. A recession is a gradual decline of the economy. Did curse over at least six months in one thousand nine hundred seventy four. The Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics gave a more in-depth dictionary type definition. This included that there needed to be a one point. Five percent decline in Gross National Product or the total value of all goods and services produced in a given year plus foreign investment and unemployment needed to reach six percent or higher on the other hand. A depression is an extended recession or serious decline in the economy that lasts for years for depression to be in effect on employment rates. Need to rise about twenty percent and there needs to be a significant decline in gross domestic product among other factors in short a recession is simply short term economic trough but a depression is a recession on steroids since eighteen fifty four. The United States has experienced thirty-three recessions. And only one depression so depression is a long term recession with twenty percent or above unemployment politicians bat around the number of unemployed like a ping pong ball. Some people think that to get these figures on unemployment. The government uses the number of people collecting unemployment insurance referred to as you I- unemployment insurance benefits under state or federal government programs but some people are still jobless when their benefits run out and many more are not eligible at all or delay or never apply for benefits so those numbers that I announced the beginning of this podcast twenty two million on employed is woefully low. So quite clearly you. I- information cannot be used as a source. Complete information on the number of unemployed with the shelter in place mandate many states as well as the closing of all businesses except grocery stores and pharmacies to corona virus. You can be assured that the number of unemployed is going to soar no doubt above twenty percent recession or depression. It would seem that. With a high number of unemployed that the economy would be affected and consequently decline and that would leave the deciding factor recession or depression determined by the GDP which has gone up for the past three years and how long it takes for the unemploymed to become employed once again how our economy will rebound is us unpredictable as the final impact of the corona virus all the population recession or depression. Who knows but at least now? You have some facts to go

Depression United States Self Employed Bureau Of Labor Statistics Commissioner
Why stories matter now more than ever

Unreserved

8:22 listening | Last month

Why stories matter now more than ever

"Can act as a comfort. They can explain transport record or act as a warning. They can help us. Imagine other worlds and futures the stories we take in have an impact they shape our inner and outer worlds and now maybe more than ever before stories matter today on unreserved in the time of the corona virus how indigenous people are looking to stories to deal with this challenging time. We're in a moment. That feels unsettling uncertain. Even scary. My next guest says this is why we need stories now more than ever Daniel. Heath Justice is the author of why Indigenous Literatures Matter? He's Cherokee and a professor and indigenous studies and English at the University of British Columbia. Daniel joined me from his home on the Sunshine Coast. Daniel Welcome to the show. Thank you so much. I am really honored to be here now. The last time we spoke your book why indigenous literatures matter had just been published and now we find ourselves in the midst of a pandemic. Why do you think indigenous literatures matter now? For so many reasons I think one of the main ones is stories help us carry on and indigenous peoples. Know what it is to face the end of the world many many times And I think our stories give us a lot of guidance that way and also speak to a life beyond the despair of the now How do you think literature can help us through this difficult time? I struggle with a little bit. Honestly it does it in a lot of ways. I think one way is to is to remind us that. There's something beyond the now but I think also just to articulate the the really mixed emotions of dealing with a time of real uncertainty and flux and chaos indigenous writers have addressed these issues. Well not just in writing but through story since time immemorial and I think especially since fourteen ninety two those have been really important testimonies of survival and reminders of where we come from and what we've struggled through and also a measure of hope for what what might still come When you think about the importance of stories You mentioned this briefly. Are you thinking about more than just written texts? Oh absolutely unthinking. Our traditional stories on thinking of our family stories The Dreams and fantasies and imaginings of of worlds that haven't yet come into being or may never come into being. I'm thinking of poems and songs. And all of the ways that we articulate our being in the world Past present and future. So what stories are. Are you turning during this time on turning to a lot of nonfiction actually You know so much work as in fiction and poetry. But I'm engaging a lot of philosophy about kinship and being in better relationship with the living world and thinking about what this time means in terms of of how we how we exist in relation with one another both in the positive and the negative ways. I think it's important to read both of those kinds of stories What about within within your own cultural framework understand there's a Cherokee story about how disease entered the world? There is an that has actually lingered with me. The Turkey story of how does came into world. Was that in the early times. Humans were very very fragile and very weak and the animals gifted their bodies and gifted themselves to humanity as their young species to help us survive so we didn't have claws. We didn't have great teeth. We didn't have for to protect ourselves so animals gave of themselves and sacrificed. Because we were. We were young and vulnerable but as we became more powerful we forgot those lessons and so we started to become much more abusive and we started to kill animals beyond our aid and finally the animals came together in council and each of the animal chiefs cursed us with disease as payback for the abuse that we had brought them in the in hospitality that we treated them with. And so that's one part of the story. That's how disease came into the world but this is also a story about how medicine came into the world because in council around the animal chiefs where the plant chiefs and that. He took pity on us. They also understood that we were very young and we were very ignorant than they had hoped that we could do better and so they gave us medicine for each disease that the animals cursed us with. And that's a pretty significant story in Cherokee tradition. It's a it is a story about. How generous the plants have been to us but it's also a warning that if we mistreat the plants. There's nobody to help us then. So it's a reminder that we have to be accountable for the way we treat our kin both human and other than human and there are consequences to not being in good relation with the world and that story has kind of been resonating in my in my thoughts and and thinking about what. What does it mean now to be in better relation in a world that is so out of balance a very powerful story what about other storytellers authors? Is there a book or passage that you've been finding helpful that you'd like to share with us? There's a passage in Leslie. Marmon SILCO's storyteller where she is talking about a story telling contest between a group of witches. This is before before fourteen ninety two. And they're all sharing these really horrible stories and in one of the witches who is unknown to the others shares. A story and it is so horrific. It's the story of colonization it's so terrifying and so terrible and the passage goes so the other witches said okay you win you take the prize but what you said just now. It isn't so funny it doesn't sound so good we are doing okay without it. We can get along without that kind of thing. Take it back. Call that story back but the witch just shook its head at the others and they're stinking animal furs and feathers. It's already turned loose. It's already coming. It can't be called back and that may seem like a very grim hopeless story for me. I actually find that a pretty powerful reminder that we have to be really careful especially in this time of of anxiety and fear what are we. What are we sending out into the world that we might not be able to take back and what is being sent out into the world by others. That is going to be very hard if not impossible for them to take back. It's not just about us. It's about the other people especially people in power. What are they? What stories are they putting out into the world that are going to wreak havoc on the world? I think it's really important to to think about those sorts of stories and those warnings reminders while we're also thinking about the ones that are very incredibly hopeful and so somebody likely and Simpson in her book. As we've always done toward the end she has really really powerful the powerful paragraph. It's just a few lines. I wanted to share. Indigenous futures are entirely dependent upon what we collectively do now as diverse indigenous nations with our ancestors and those yet unborn to create indigenous presences and to generate the conditions for indigenous futures by deeply engaging in our nation based grounded normativity we must continuously build and rebuild indigenous worlds and then she wraps up that paragraph by saying I don't want to imagine or dream futures. I want a better present and I think that for me is a real. It's a real call to accountability to call to love You know she talks about the colonial love. I'm finding that really helpful hopeful right now. We do have to think about the future. But what are we doing in our present as

Daniel Cherokee University Of British Columbia Heath Justice Turkey Professor Sunshine Coast Marmon Silco Leslie Others Simpson
A Tale To Warm The Cockles Of Your Heart

Gastropod

7:16 listening | Last month

A Tale To Warm The Cockles Of Your Heart

"We drove about an hour south to visit the Manchester Research Station where Jodi Tuft and her colleagues are based for the untrained eye. Us is just a random collection of buildings that a federal facility tucked away in Manchester Washington. Which is a semi rural area? Not too far from Seattle but really this is the heart of where shellfish research and restoration happens in puget sound. We walked into one of the buildings with Jodi and her colleagues Stewart. Disease them cockles. Right now Stewart is going to open up this kind of funky basket jovic purse. What's going on here so? Yeah these are a handful of cockles. That are roughly one to five millimeters and look like tiny little pebbles. Yes these were from spawns. That happened in early summer. June baby cockles are adorable but it turns out. They're not that easy. To produce at least in a federal research facility has robin found out when she tried to find examples of research on local cockles. Nobody had ever tried to breed them. We have some magicians on staff here. Who are really good at breeding shellfish and so we collected some cockles. Brought them back here. Nothing happened there was no magic. There was wonderful people doing great work and just a whole bunch of cockles sitting in buckets of water and they were not making any debacles. But even before. Jody and the team tried to get the cockles to spawn. They had to make sure they had healthy. Cockles and Vivian. Says that wasn't so easy. Either because some of the cockles had cockle cancer and they determined that they had a communicable cancer neoplasia. So they could all be brought into the hatchery right away. So they had to be quarantined for two weeks in a lab about fifty miles away and kept in a each individual in a separate bucket while they were tested for neo plays see even shellfish have to be quarantined. We really are all in this together. After quarantine the cockles had to be tested to see if they were sick sound familiar or generally there were enough tests but it turns out when you test a cockle for cancer. Sometimes the stress makes them spontaneously released all their spawn in a last ditch attempt to leave a baby cockle behind. And we certainly concerns that we were GONNA do a great job screening for Neo pleasure and then we will have spawned Oliver Cockles. And then that would be that because once a cockle spoons it takes months before it's ready to make babies again. Luckily the cockles did not shoot their load and that was in part because the team had another magician on staff with a very gentle touch to get the blood. They needed for their cancer tests. She was kind of kind of got the nickname the the cockle vampire because she was so good at drawing blood. After the cockle vampire had done her thing all but five of the cockles tested clean which left Jodi and her team with thirty cockles to make babies from this was their brood stock and then the fun really began so we tried. The first time around failed tried again failed. Maybe we could call it. We learned not failed but yeah we failed. They didn't produce anything and then the third time around. We brought them in and use a technique. That's pretty common. And other kinds of production of shellfish other commercial techniques and injected them with Serotonin and they they were off to the races and this also took a gentle touch because the scientists had to inject each cockle by hand in the gonads with a personal shot of Serotonin the Cocco Viagra test to make things even more interesting. Jody and the team had to set up a group sex situation because cockles have a tendency to fertilize themselves. It's actually called selling so. Yeah so the the the cell thing which your face is not making it easy for me to laugh but you know we're professionals here. We are such professionals that we are going to say it again. Just for the GIGGLES. When a cockle does the baby making thing by itself that's called self ing And that's because cockles are actually hermaphrodites. The same animal can be at different times either male or female so if a cockle is alone and it releases eggs than it can release sperm next and fertilize its own offspring. So the thing that comes from the Hem afforded expanding of the cockatiels also great sentenced to get to say is it can be a challenge for maintaining genetic diversity if a cuckold creates thousands of baby cockles. And they're all exactly the same genetically. That would not be a good thing as jody. Says there'd be basically no genetic diversity so with the group sex tank and the cocoa Viagra injections the setting was finally right and the result was cockle. Babies about a million baby cockles. Many of which are out with partners out squamish now growing bigger. Bigger bigger the took all those cockles and put them out in the shallow water of the sound in a floppy an acronym for floating up Weller System. It's sort of like a nursery for clams that is outside so there's water flowing through twenty four seven so they have food all the time and oxygen all the time and that's where they are right now once the baby. Coco's get to about the size of a quarter they can start living where. Coco's belong in the INTERTIDAL zone. We thaw that. They would have been ready by now but they're growing very slowly. There's not that much food in the water right now. Although they're not dying they're just kind of waiting waiting for spring waiting for the big phytoplankton bloom and I think they're really going to start to grow soon. Some of the cockles they raised. Were extra tiny stragglers. Those were the ones that Jodi and Stewart had in the building to show us. We wanted to see them jump. Coco's don't do anything on demand. Apparently okay let's see. Oh Yeah I just I don't. They're not opening and just the shells. The shells are beautiful and I have a whole bucket of shells that the I will show you in a bit because as exciting as You know five millimeter baby cockle is it's not exactly a meals worth now. We only looking at it. You can imagine what they'll look like when they're big they're miniature version. I mean the crazy thing about looking under a microscope is they. Do Look back at dinner. No one's really fun to see. Miniscule baby cockles under the microscope but we really wanted to know was. When will they be ready to eat? So that's the question we keep asking are. Biologists are constantly hearing from us. So when will they be ready? When will they be ready because people talk care about like medicine in terms of food as medicine and Sometimes people say I need to feed my Indian and it's that old school Indian ancestor piece inside you. That really needs these foods. These sovereign foods that we've had since time immemorial to last time I had cockles was about three months ago but that it had been about two years because I just don't Wanna eat them before we can save them. But we're had to have some gotta feed Indian sometimes

Oliver Cockles Jodi Tuft Jody Coco Stewart Viagra Manchester Research Station Seattle Manchester Washington Neoplasia Cancer NEO Robin Vivian Weller System HEM
The Great Toilet Paper Shortage

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

3:56 listening | Last month

The Great Toilet Paper Shortage

"The great toilet paper shortage. No I'm not talking about a toilet. Paper shortage caused by the corona virus. Won't get to that in a minute. I'm talking about the shortage of Nineteen seventy-three. This was a time of shortages. Many areas oil scares great economic. Stressors kept Americans on edge so when herald the FROLIC a Republican congressman at the time? Put out a press release warning the public about a possible and in no way imminent toilet paper shortage and night time comedian. Johnny Carson echoed the press release. Well put people on edge and I've got digs out quote from Johnny Carson. He's doing his stand up monologue. You know we've got all sorts of shortages these days but have you heard the latest. I'm not kidding I saw the papers. There's an acute shortage of of toilet paper and now that's an exact quote from Johnny Carson. At the time he had twenty million viewers the ground had already been laid for troop Hanoch amongst consumers carson simply ignited the spark for full blown madness. Millions of Americans across the country flooded local grocery and convenience stores. Totally wiping them clean of all toilet paper. One consumer told New York Times that after hearing it on the News Day. Bought an extra fifteen roles. Another woman asked her party guests to arrive with the roll of toilet paper and again I remind you this was all taking place in Nineteen. Seventy three for a few must toilet. Paper continued to be a rare find. Until like most short-lived trends the fizzled out in the aftermath. Carson was hotseat receiving a large portion of the blame for fueling the shortage. Myth Carson issued a sincere apology to viewers and again this is a quote from Johnny Carson. I don't want to be remembered as the man who created a false toilet paper scare. I just picked up the item from the paper and enlarge it somewhat. There is no shortage. That's a direct quote from Johnny Carson Nighttime Comedian back in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy three. At this point in time the damage has been done and Americans were passed all the potty drama most people would place the blame on Johnny Carson for causing the T. P. Panic but is he solely accountable even before Carson's joke on the Air Americans themselves are partially to blame for the self-induced toilet paper trauma. Can you blame them? These people were used to shortages of everything from oil to that true panic stem from a blatant rumor. Could it be a deja Vu today? The Washington Post reports a run on roles with both Costco. Another supermarket. Chain stripped all but clean even Amazon's physical stores appeared to be down to single rolls of Toilet Paper The New York Times similarly reported from a whole foods supermarket in Somerville Massachusetts where shoppers had to be limited to two packages of toilet paper. Each lease they strip the store bear. There was no shortage of toilet paper. Nineteen seventy three or today. Nearly fifty years later no shortage. There is a quote that applies to the story that you might be familiar with. Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. The quotas most likely due to writer and philosopher. George Santayana it expresses the sentiment. Ably that history repeats itself it that is true then. We simply need to pay attention. Still we all eat sleep and poop and are driven to take care of those basic

Johnny Carson George Santayana The New York Times Congressman Costco Washington Post Writer Somerville Massachusetts Amazon
March Madness: The Sandpaper Scandal

Sports Criminals

3:38 listening | 2 months ago

March Madness: The Sandpaper Scandal

"March twenty fourth. Two thousand eighteen is now one of the most infamous days in the history of Cricket. But it wasn't because of an incredible player controversial officiating it's because somebody committed a be most brazen acts of cheating the sport had ever seen and it was all caught on camera. Welcome to sports criminals of our cast. Original this is the twenty ninth episode in our March Madness. Special this month were counting down the top thirty one sports scandals from nineteen ninety. Two Thousand Twenty. I'm Carter Roy and I'm Tim Johnson and today's episode. We're going back to two thousand eighteen and a scandal known as sandpaper gate in rocked. The cricket world in shock fans and pundits alike when you see images of white-clad gentlemen playing cricket. It's hard to imagine. Any of them are capable of cheating. The sport is so proper that some games even feature a mandated. Lunch break in a twenty minute pause for afternoon tea but it was during one of these breaks that Australian cricketeres hatched one of the most notorious scandals in the sport's history March twenty four. Th Two thousand eighteen was the third day of a four match series between Australia and South Africa. The teams were nodded at one. A piece with South Africa was starting to pull away if the Australians did mount a comeback. They were in serious trouble desperate to gain edge on their rivals. Some of Australia's senior players came up with a plan team. Captain Steve Smith notice that the Africans were struggling with balls thrown with reverse swing akin to a knuckleball pitcher in baseball to give the ball movement Smith and Group of players decided to rough it up a bit on his way. Back out to the green fielder. Cameron bancroft grabbed piece of sticky tape from an equipment bag and stuffed it in his pocket when no one was looking. He grabs some dirt and stuck it on the tape creating sort of homemade sandpaper the next time. He got the ball. He used the tape to scuff it. he wasn't as sneaky as he thought. Tv cameras captured the whole thing and casted on the jumbotron for all to see. Bancroft tried to hide the evidence by quickly stuffing the tape down the front of his pants with the cameras. Already trained on him. It was too late. They replayed the close up of him hiding it in his pants then they replayed it again and again in slow motion. He had been caught red handed. Once play concluded for the day Smith in Bancroft confessed to everything as punishment Smith and vice captain. David Warner were suspended. For twelve months Bancroft was banned for nine though many made light of scandal known as Sandpaper Gate. It left a dark stain on the Australian cricket community. It created such a national controversy that Prime Minister Malcolm. Turnbull even weighed in. He declared to the whole nation. Who HOLDS THOSE? Who wear the baggy green up on a pedestal. This is shocking disappointment. Since then Steve Smith and the other disgraced cricketeres have served their sentences and return to the field. It's safe to say the fans and TV cameras will forever keep a close eye on.

Cameron Bancroft Steve Smith Sandpaper Gate Cricket Australia South Africa Australian Cricket Community Turnbull Carter Roy Prime Minister Malcolm Baseball David Warner Tim Johnson
Hook, Line, and Sink-Her, a History of Fishnets

Dressed: The History of Fashion

9:26 listening | 2 months ago

Hook, Line, and Sink-Her, a History of Fishnets

"Mechanization of textile production as you know what really kind of signal the beginning of the end. For many of these handcrafted industries like lace knitting and simple sewing because these things increasingly transitioned to being made by machine and the latter two are the means by which the majority of people socks were saying sewing and knitting That's how most people socks and hosiery were made for centuries upon centuries and we just want to say that we've received numerous requests to do an episode on knitting. But I think you and I kind of intimidated by this topic. I know it's a huge. I mean it's just a giant giant topic. Yeah knitting and there's actually entire podcast just about knitting. Yeah it's very true and and just diving into this topic as you know just for this past week or two. It's very clear that this could be an entire. The history of knitting could be its entire podcast because its existing cultures around the world for hundreds if not over a thousand years ancient Egyptians appear to have been some of its earliest practitioners. I guess there's a there are extent I don't guess I know. They're extent knitted socks dating to the third or fourth century. Ad So well they also at the Vienna have really helpful instinct quote unquote history of knitting essay. I think we'll probably post a link of that somewhere. And they tell us in this essay that there is evidence of knitting goods being produced and circulated in Europe from the fourteenth century on so knitting was used in the production of men and women's hose at the time and we have to remember. We're not talking pantyhose. They were not fully fashioned. They did not have a crotch. These are two separate garments one for each leg and foot and as we can imagine and I'm sure many of our listeners who knit can relate. Haning hose was a labor and time intensive process. So you would think that people might have been a bit relieved when the English clergyman William Lee invented the first mechanical knitting machine or stocking frame as it was known the sixteenth century when he created it but alas they were not they are actually quite pissed well and like with many modern technical innovations. This is all had to do with the fact that many people's livelihoods were depending on the old way of doing things right so in this case the hand niggers the knitting industry exactly and so when lease machine that had stockings were presented to none other than Queen Elizabeth. The first herself she rejected them for this very reason. She reportedly told him quote. I have too much love for my poor people who obtain their bread by the employment of knitting to give my money to Ford invention that will tend to their ruin by depriving them of employment and thus making them bakers and from this moment on lease stocking frame and its subsequent evolutions. Were incredibly controversial. You just have to look at the protection of stocking frames act. Seventeen Eighty eight which rabbit hole people go. It's fine and the destruction of stocking frames act of eighteen twelve to realize that people wanted these machines. Gone that go away. They would not lease machine might represent one of the first examples of mechanization of textile production. But it would absolutely not be the very last you know. His invention was first major stage. In what would become the textile industries wide revolution that transformed the ways at textiles and dress reproduced. To this very day and these some of these other inventions include devices such as the cotton gin the card loom and ultimately the sewing machine so these machines like so many textile innovations of the industrial revolution. They would transform the industry but they would also displaced thousands of workers in the process and by the end of the Eighteenth Century. Lease stocking frame was being adapted to produce lace. But it would be John Heathcote. Bob Monette machine that is credited with perfecting it. Heath Coats machine produced plane net lace which we might refer to as tool today. April this is where stocking production and technology begins to go way over my head. I can guess because we have a ton of like textile trade industry publications in the collection at fit and they have like all the machines and diagrams and scientific information mean that this is like hardcore science. We're talking about. Yeah and there's a lot a lot of innovation happening in the knitted hose industry in the eighteenth late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries so it was a bit overwhelming and you know this because textile and specifically stocking production was incredibly integral to the British economy economies of the world over so there are these highly detailed reports about its development throughout the nineteenth century about the development of knitting technologies and netting technologies and there are a lot a lot of developments as April mentioned in the eighteen forties. Commissioner was appointed by Queen Victoria to report on the State of framework knitting industry and he produces a densely packed. Sixty five page report. Sixty pages complete no with not only the history of the knitting industry but in the country but also a quote list of the various kinds of machinery made use of in manufacturer of hosiery and lace with the names of Inventors From Fifteen Eighty Nine Aka. William Lee. We just spoke about two eighteen forty to eighteen forty three the present day so needless to say by the beginning of the nineteenth century the list which spans hundreds of years at this point was quite extensive and includes everything from lease stocking frame and Heathcote Bob an ATM machine to numerous others including casts quote machines for Lang. Hair and Jose remade wigs. I think I I think I need to know more about this and even eighteen. Oh three a fishing net machine but apparently it's failed being made by fishermen cheaper than by machine at this point so I guess the point would really trying to drive home as that lace and lace net where being machine made in the early nineteenth century and by eighteen forty five. There's a journal. Being produced by Pennsylvania's Franklin Institute and they reported on the modes quote of Work Fabricating Lace and Framework Knitted Manufacturers introduced from foreign states and this included machines for round fingered gloves from Madrid in Spain. Figured Work Shawls and quote unquote nodded hose without seems from. Leone and Barcelona and a quote cylinder particular machine for making fancy net hose and that came from a sound sturdy little bit. I think I'd take layers a needle. Okay okay but still just say but these these were not fishnet nets right. They're not for catching fish or fish. Net Hose No. They're not and I'm at but I am actually happy to finally share things to these evolutions and laze technology and eighteen eighty nine. We find the very first use of the term. The actual term fishnet in Harper's bazaar in relation to women's dress and they write the fashionable diesel returned from Paris bringing down with many new features gowns of India soaks Chinese crepe a fish nets and leases. But I did not find the use a fish net in relation to hose or stockings until over twenty years later in their nineteen twelve fall fashion number the trade publication dry goods reporter reported on a quote. Black Vallejo's of pure silk in a fish net pattern but they assure the readers at the hose were not intended to wear next to the skin but to produce novel effects when worn over white or colored hopes so from the very first introduction of fish net hose into women's fashion. We are already seeing these associations with eroticism. Yes you know. And they're kind of scared of that association right because they assured their readers again that quote. The new fishnet hose that we illustrate in this article has been shown to newspaper representatives. And some of them have used it as a subject of humorous articles. Conveying the impression that it was to be worn next to the skin. You know so this erotic potential of this garment is literally illustrated in this article. There's kind of the irony of it because they have this woman modeling this novel. Hosiery and April. We see her ankles. No what are we GONNA do. Candle shock and awe article continues on quote. The hose may never become a big seller on the market but the effect produced by them. Is Novel any store? Having at least a single pair of them for exhibition purposes could attract unusual attention to their hosiery department. So that's hilarious. There were basically like saying Ou. Come look at these scandalous stockings. You don't have to buy them. We're not really selling them right right. And I mean. It remained a novelty throughout the teens. Basically until nineteen twenty and this is where we see a more widespread acknowledgement of what the dry goods reporter calls the quote Unquote fishnet effect. In

William Lee Reporter Europe Queen Elizabeth Bob Monette John Heathcote Heathcote Bob Vienna Queen Victoria Heath Coats Barcelona Commissioner Jose Vallejo Leone Paris Madrid Spain Pennsylvania Framework Knitted Manufacturer
March Madness: Donald Sterling

Sports Criminals

4:13 listening | 2 months ago

March Madness: Donald Sterling

"Listen free on spotify or wherever you get your podcast warning. This episode includes sensitive descriptions of racism listener discretion is advised especially for listeners under thirteen in April. Two Thousand Fourteen seventy year old Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling called his mistress. The Steve Yano. He had seen something on instagram. That made his blood boil a picture of her and L. A. Lakers legend Magic Johnson but sterling wasn't mad at Steve Yano had posed with one of his crosstown rivals iconic players. The problem was the Johnson was Black Sterling. Chewed out still beyond for almost ten minutes. He had no idea. Those ten minutes would change his life forever. Welcome to sports. Criminals are cast original. This is the twenty fifth episode in our March Madness. Special this month were counting down the top thirty one sports scandals from Nineteen Ninety to two thousand twenty on Carter Roy. And I'm Tim Johnson in today's episode. We're going back to two thousand fourteen and the downfall of the La Clippers racist owner Donald Sterling. Although he made a lot of money from owning the clippers. Donald Sterling made the bulk of his fortune in real estate as a landlord. He was the subject of numerous lawsuits accusing him of housing discrimination against minorities during these proceedings. Sterling's racist nature was laid bare. He told employees that black tenants smell. And Attract Vermin Hispanics. Just smoke drink and hang around the building in Koreans will pay the rent and live in whatever conditions I give them. The married father of three was also sued on multiple occasions for sexual harassment. But with the help of a high priced and highly effective legal team. He managed to emerge relatively unscathed however after not. Enzi released the recording his phone. Call with these veon. On April twenty fifth two thousand fourteen. No lawyer on earth COULD HELP HIM UPSET THAT STEVE. Yano had posted an instagram photo of her and Magic Johnson. Sterling told her. It bothers me a lot that you want to broadcast that you're associating with black people. Don't put him on instagram. And don't bring him to my games. Unbeknownst TO HIM STILL. Yano had recorded the entire conversation. The recording confirmed what most people around the League already knew. Donald Sterling was racist scumbag however he had never faced disciplined from the NBA before. But now that is true. Nature was caught on tape that was about to change with NBA players contemplating boycotting playoff games to protest. Sterling's ownership commissioner. Adam silver had to act on April twenty ninth. He Finds Sterling two point five million dollars the maximum amount allowed silver also banned him from the NBA for life and a few weeks later. More than three quarters of NBA team owners voted to force sterling to sell his franchise. The decision was a long time coming. From man who heckled his own players was named the worst owner in sports by the New York Times and Forbes magazine and whose team had amassed the lowest winning percentage in all four major American Sports Leagues Between Nineteen Eighty one in two thousand fourteen sterling. His lawyers tried to fight both decisions in court but they were rebuffed at every turn. Despite numerous countersuits and objections sterling was forced to sell the team to Microsoft. Co-founder Steve Balmer. Since Sterling's departure the basketball world has done. Its best to erase his racist legacy under bombers leadership. The clippers have gone on to become one of the best run franchises in the NBA. Ahead of the twenty twenty

Donald Sterling Steve Yano Black Sterling Clippers Magic Johnson NBA Spotify Los Angeles Steve Balmer Nineteen Ninety Steve Adam Silver Koreans Bombers Harassment Basketball League Microsoft Carter Roy L. A.
Introducing Season 2: The NRA

Gangster Capitalism

3:06 listening | 2 months ago

Introducing Season 2: The NRA

"I'm standing in a crowd of twenty thousand people at a gun rally some dressed in camouflage wearing tactical gear and carrying very big guns and a lot of them are talking to me about the NRA. It's the same everywhere I go. I've been to rallies like this one gun shows and even board meetings and it's not surprising that people are talking about the NRA but what is surprising is what they're saying. The money is not being used very well. There's a lot of overspending and they're taking money from gun owners and using that kind of wind their own pockets. I am a member but I'm second guessing that at this point. I'm definitely disappointed in you. Know at some point it'll be exposed now more than ever. The future of the nation's most powerful special interest group is uncertain but one thing is clear the NRA has big problems. I am tired of dancing around this you would you please get to a microphone. Please tell us what the allegations their Hubris made them think that it was never gonNA be uncovered because they've been doing it for so long and it's all right there in black and white. It was just like this. Incestuous gangster trainwreck dumpster fire. I fled the cult before they put us in line to drink the KOOL aid. The NRA will soon have its one hundred fifty year anniversary. But this past year has rocked. The organization like none other members and employees alike are defecting and they're ready to talk. I'm driving down interstate. Sixty six and I see the building and I feel like some kind of spirit inside spoke to me and I said this is where you're going to work every cell within you feels as if you are fighting a mission. That is God's mission that you are fighting for the heart soul of America. We do one thing and we do it better than anyone else we stand we fight and by. God we win but in this big game the a lot of people getting rich on is it legal. Is it not as ethical as it not it just stirs in sodomy that this is not right for America? It was one of the things that prompted me to go

NRA America
The Story of Sam Hurd

Sports Criminals

3:13 listening | 2 months ago

The Story of Sam Hurd

"Two thousand eleven Chicago. A black escalade cruised through the rainy night pulling up outside. A Morton steakhouse the car backed into a space beside the entrance and man stepped out. He approached the restaurant confident. But careful wary that someone might recognize him. His name was Sam heard wide receiver for the Chicago bears if the wrong people overheard his conversation tonight. His football career would immediately come to mind. Welcome to sports criminals. Apar- cast original. This is the twenty second episode in our March Madness special this month where counting down the top thirty one sports scandals from Nineteen Ninety to two thousand twenty. I'm Carter Roy and I'm Tim Johnson in today's episode. We're going back to two thousand eleven and the arrest of wide receiver. Sam Heard in July of two thousand eleven twenty six year old Sam heard signed with the Chicago bears as a free agent. The reserved wide receiver was known as a humble and God fearing man. Good player with a heart of gold. He was dedicated to giving back to the community donating significant portions of his earnings to local charities but only a few months after joining the bears. Everything came crashing down at around seven thirty five PM on December fourteenth. Two Thousand Eleven Sam entered. Morton steakhouse seated at table fifty four. He waited patiently for his guests to arrive to men entered one of them. A man going by the pseudonym. Havi air carried a cowboy hat in one hand and a white bag labeled happy birthday in the other. The other was a short man who was going by Carlos also not his real name. The men introduce themselves to Sam and sat at his table talking in hushed voices. The conversation lasted for seventy seven minutes and it was all recorded. The happy birthday bag contained a kilo of cocaine wrapped up under a small pile of tissue paper at the end of the conversation. Sam picked it up. As Sam stepped out of the steakhouse. He was surrounded by policemen arrested. He had been caught in a sting. Operation Heard was cut from the bears two days after his arrest though he was

SAM Morton Steakhouse Bears Chicago Escalade Nineteen Ninety Apar Football Carter Roy Cocaine Carlos Tim Johnson
Who's on the front line?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

3:34 listening | 2 months ago

Who's on the front line?

"Who's on the front line of the corona virus politically? Who knows so? Let's take a look at the medical frontline. What is the front line by military definition? It is where the heaviest fighting takes place. The front line. In relation to the corona virus consists of fifteen thousand nursing homes consisting of one point seven million beds occupied by one point four million patients five thousand retirement communities and approximately fifty million seniors living in the United States. That's what makes up the front line back to the original question of who is on the front line. Although I can't right off the doctors in sheer numbers it is the nurse and the certified nursing assistant that will slow the onslaught of the Koran virus. We looked at the numbers of nursing homes. Retirement community says well as a total number of seniors which dance it about fifty million to do battle. There are two point. Eight six million registered nurses and one point five million certified nursing assistants and then of course we have thousands and thousands of doctors who the math and you end up with a combined total of nurses and CNA's at around five million treating potential fifty million victim so corona virus. And this is before it's come out. That younger people can be vulnerable. We're seeing moves generally considered to be those sixty five and older talk about overwhelmed. Worse case scenario that would be ten million patients per nurse. But let's put this into perspective the CDC estimates that up to thirty one million Americans have caught the flu this season. That is the regular flu season with two hundred. Ten thousand. Three hundred. Seventy thousand flu sufferers hospitalized because of the virus and again we're just talking when I say that we're just talking about the casual flu season. That happens every year so far. The new corona viruses lead to more than two hundred and twenty thousand illnesses and more than nine thousand three hundred deaths but that's worldwide. That's nothing compared to the flu. Also called the influenza in the US alone. The flu has cost an estimated thirty six million illnesses. Three hundred seventy thousand hospitalizations and twenty two thousand deaths. Now that's just our regular flu were used to and that was just this season. And that's what the Center for Disease Control Prevention said. The scientists have studied seasonal flu for decades so despite the danger of it we know a lot about the flu virus in what to expect each season in contrast very little is known about the new corona virus and the disease it causes dubbed. Koga nineteen. Because it's so new. This means Kobe. Nineteenth something of a wild card in terms of how far will spread and how many deaths will cause why because we have no vaccine for as of this. Podcast the nurse. Cnn Yes doctors holding their own on the front line however it has been reported by all three healthcare professionals doctors nurses and CNA's that they are under an ill-equipped Liking Dad's respirators and even swabs to do the tests not to mention a lack of personal protective gear. Indeed this one doctor said the current situation is like sending a highly trained soldier to the front line but not give him any bullets for his gun. How this battle will go only well-equipped doctors nurses and CNA's will turn the

Influenza CNA United States CNN CDC Koga Center For Disease Control Pre
What happens during a lockdown at San Quentin?

Ear Hustle

1:47 listening | 2 months ago

What happens during a lockdown at San Quentin?

"So happy to be back. We got so much to talk about but dammit we are far behind. We are seriously behind schedule. And it's not our fault though this summer when we were supposed to be getting ahead of our new stories. San Quinn went on lockdown. You'd never know when it's GonNa hit but lockdowns do happen even here. In Sunny San Quentin lockdowns happen when the administration deems there's a credible threat to the safety and security of the institution like when keys. Go missing or they're looking for weapon either way a prison wise search begins and we prisoners or stuck in ourselves. Can't go to class can't go to the yard. Kengo to our jobs for three weeks. Nigel as you know here. Hustle was on ice. Oh I know because I couldn't come in you and I couldn't communicate and basically we couldn't do a bunch of the interviews for season three but for first episode. We're going to take that lemon and you're gonNA make some lemonade bomb as lemonade with a gang of sugar ear. Hustle is about what it's like to be imprisoned so our first episode is about what is like to be in a prison lockdown and as soon as that summer lockdown was over. We started recording. I love Graham crackers. Banana and peanut butter and Jelly sandwiches and a lot of other guys man. They really talked about food. During the lockdown. I mean a lot or you know one day you may Graham crackers so you gotta hold onto the Graham crackers. Then the next you'll get a banana so you save that and then when you get your peanut butter and Jelly you can make a Graham cracker peanut butter and Banana Sandwich. Jelly Sandwich and those are the best

Graham Sunny San Quentin San Quinn Nigel
From self-isolation to cancelled tours: Artists feeling the impact of COVID-19

Unreserved

4:05 listening | 2 months ago

From self-isolation to cancelled tours: Artists feeling the impact of COVID-19

"Started on March fifth and was supposed to wrap up on April twenty fifth a tour with stops in thirty one cities to promote their latest album warrior down but after only a couple of shows whoops oh climbed back in the van and headed Home Frontman Adam. Sturgeon joins me from self isolation in Sarnia Ontario. Hello Adam I hurry good So tell me where were you when you made the call to head home? We were in New York City. One of the epicenter stop so a little bit of risk taking their I suppose but Things seem to unfold very quickly once we were there. We decided that the best case scenario was to get back over the border Go to our sort of personal isolation stones and and just Take all the necessary precautions and in exactly. Where are you right now? I'm just starting On Lake Huron in a small place called camel lackey. And why are you there? Well Ah bandmate family was in a similar position to ours so we were able to kind of sell play slate together Because I have a toddler at home there was a lot of different concerns between day-care and trust so I'm not able to get home to my family just yet Better safe than sorry. How long are you going to be in self-isolation We'll we'll do this for For the recommended two weeks and must be very difficult for you. It's challenging of course but as long as the the Wifi signal which is just on the purchase is okay. We'll be able to facetime. I feel for my partner at home. Because the we've got a real wild child going crazy playing basketball and pulling things off the wall. I have really great support and I'm really thankful for her right now to now. There's a lot of effort that goes into planning tour rehearsing getting ready booking time off How did you feel when those cancellations started to add up? Well if you can understand it is disappointing. Of course in this was One of our bigger for a One of our larger tours and our first tour the US which we've been working towards for several years and we really waited and took our time trying to make sure that we were GonNa go on the best possible tour that we could All that said there there are much more important things in life such as our health and wellbeing. And we're all really levelheaded about it and we know that I will make all the necessary changes to to to make sure that when we can't get back on the road we'll do so in a good way so You know we're we're pretty okay with things come now. We're talking about the financial impact of cancelled tour dates and unsold merchandise and all of the stuff The two places bands make most of their money. What does this cancelled tour mean for your band financially? Well I think for the for the band were we're in an okay place? No huge losses But of course the implications trickled down. So Uh for you know we feel for the booking agents who maybe you're losing wages No we have to pay off the pay off a record a little bit and so You know the loss fails to do have back on us but What is more challenging for artists in our positions are making Making light of our personal lives so the types of jobs that we have outside of our music careers In in most all of us do have to have dogs inside of Music. Those are where the struggles become palpable. And so the lost wages here are Are Challenging again. We're you know we're dealing.

Adam Sturgeon Lake Huron Sarnia New York City Basketball United States Ontario Partner
March Madness: Marc Ccillon

Sports Criminals

4:33 listening | 2 months ago

March Madness: Marc Ccillon

"Everyday in March. We're counting down the top thirty one sports scandals of the past thirty one years today we look back at the year thousand and four French rugby star Mark. Cecil was beloved by many but also struggled with alcohol addiction and one August night. He drank too much and the results would be tragic. If you like this episode. Be Sure to come back tomorrow for more shocking sports events from history on our march madness. Special listen free on spotify or wherever you get your podcast August. Two Thousand Four French Rugby Star. Mark Cecil was in semi retirement. After in a lustrous career. He played forty six matches with the French Rugby Team. Making him a local and national hero in one thousand nine hundred ninety six the peak of his fame. He was awarded the French Order of Merit. He played with the France national team until age forty which commentators at the time described as a remarkable achievement but less than a decade later. His legacy sports legend would be shattered blown apart by five gunshots. Welcome to sports criminals. Apar- cast original. This is the fifteenth episode in our March Madness. Special this month. We're counting down the top thirty one sports scandals nineteen ninety. Two Thousand Twenty. I'm Carter Roy and I'm Tim Johnson in today's episode. We're going back to August seventh. Two thousand four and the gruesome murder that landmark Cecil in prison and permanently damaged his reputation. The party in Psalm Savant was quite well attended over. Sixty people were there to celebrate the end of the season. Most of them members of nearby rugby club the host Chris. John was best friends with rugby. Star marks Seo who had turned forty five the previous week mark and his wife Chantal had arrived at the party separately. Neither of them had spoken to each other much over the course of the evening mark hovered by the bar. Most of the night drinking seldomly chantal spent the evening talking with friends. Rumor had it that the married couple had been having problems for quite some time. The partygoers left mark alone for most of the night. His friends knew better than to approach him while he was drinking at around eleven pm. The host's wife by bet braved conversation. She tried to persuade the very drunk sesioana to eat something. The belligerent Jones shouted it bets attempts to sober him up. He struck her giving her a black eye. Sessions stormed out leaving. His shocked hosts and his wife behind a half hour later. When of begins sons sauce? Se On walking back to the villa typing something into his pocket. It was a revolver. Three fifty seven magnum. The teenager didn't have time to warn. The guests. Ascione entered the house and made his way straight for SEAN TALL. As He approached his wife he produced the pistol and fired five shots nearby. Guests tackled SESIOANA and wrestled the gun from his hand. Someone called the police and the chaos mark reportedly said. He wanted to see his wife when he heard what he'd done. He said that's not possible. I love her when he sobered up. The next morning says Yang was devastated to hear what he had done in court. He reportedly said. Why did I shoot? It's a question I shall ask myself all my life. I didn't plan anything. I wish I could understand cecil known as the quiet man of French. Rugby was sentenced to twenty years for murder. He was released seven years later on parole but that wasn't his last brush with the law. In September of two thousand eighteen. He received another twelve months sentence for driving under the influence of alcohol and drunkenly assaulting the owner of a vineyard. He admitted that his problems with alcohol or far from over since his sentence in two thousand eighteen says zone has kept a fairly low profile now. Sixty years old. Perhaps the last fifteen years will be a lesson to the disgraced team. Captain

Mark Cecil Rugby French Rugby Team Chantal Murder Yang BET Spotify Sesioana Ascione France Apar Jones Sean Tall Carter Roy Chris John Tim Johnson
Licorice: A Dark and Salty Stranger

Gastropod

3:29 listening | 2 months ago

Licorice: A Dark and Salty Stranger

"YEP TURNS OUT. There is such a thing as liquorice plant. Somebody just came across it. I've got some liquorice plants. A local person and they they were left from original liquorice gas. Which is what you call a plant. Tina licorice is is called a goth. They had some left probably about eighty plants so so in their back garden they wanting to develop their back garden. Basically we pick them up at the end of the year. Just like the the routes it just looked like dried roots and bought them back and planted them here in. What was really quite close to the car park at that stage then. My brother-in-law managed to dig them up when he was excavating. The COP at somebody went too far. Fortunately the licorice survived no word. On the brother-in-law Heather moved it to a safer location. But the challenges were not over at the mishap. We had which were didn't have a clue about not documented anywhere. We've discovered ourselves. That rabbits love licorice roots so they would come in in the spring and they keep digging up and chewing the bottom of the licorice root. So that's a new one. We do have to electric fence. It keep the rabbits outsmart rabbits. The roots are what we particularly loved to. It usually takes about five years for those licorice roots to grow big enough for a first harvest so after five years heather decided to check it out and see how they're liquorice was doing so we dug a little trench and found a licorice root which is episode exciting. So I've never actually seen a proper licorice roots and we were able to each it initially from the field and it was quite translucent in color at that stage and when we actually eight it was always like a a very clear honey type saps it came out of it and it was super super sweet but really strong off the of more of an aniseed flavour than you would have with licorice also type sweets. Another is sweet. It's a different suites. Like honey sweet. As opposed to sugar sweet. This does not sound at all like the kind of licorice. I'm used to the squeegee. Black stuff you buy a pick a mix but the other thing. That sort of confusing is what is liquorice doing growing in Yorkshire. You Buy Licorice in England. I know that from when I was a kid but growing it there. It grows in hot countries at the present day. We get all licorice from Turkey. Iran Iraq it grows in Mediterranean countries. It grows in Italy India Syria China Southern Europe. Carol Wilson is a food writer. Who's written a lot of books including one called liquorice? A Cookbook and Yorkshire is not a whole country. I went to university there and I swear I didn't take off my jumper fit three years. You can keep your sweater on because we will be heading back to Yorkshire but Carroll says in the wild and hot countries licorice is a shrub that grows like a weed but today when it's cozy base at his Co. face mainly for its roots although all the parts of the plant can actually be eaten. You can eat shoots. You can use the leaves to make a tea but its roots the to the most most important par and those routes have been grown and harvested by humans. Going all the way back to ancient history. The earliest mention of licorice is on an Syrian clay tablet from the seventh century. B. C. E. Licorice is being used for thousands of years advocates. Main use was at the Medicine Carroll says it was thought to strengthen the immune system and it was used as a remedy for coughs and colts. Licorice is also mentioned in the oldest Chinese Book of

Yorkshire Carroll Heather Italy India Syria China Southe COP Tina Carol Wilson Iran England Writer
Myrla: The Safe House

Long Distance

1:34 listening | 2 months ago

Myrla: The Safe House

"Can ask you so. Just WanNa be clear so this story that you told you're able to say the real place where you lived in Longo because you know that those people had already left even that woman that you said was pregnant she real real okay and then I checked on her after because I was thinking what she heard or something no they didn't even come close to her so this storyline off ready to cooperate. A little bit was a good opening and later on I was brought to regular debenture to the camp. Yes so we were held in a jail debts within a Philippine constabulary. Come they call come mucky Niagara but the jail is being run by the Philippine National. Police and the jail is intended for common crime. Thor's it's not the political complex Kramer I mean. Usually they keep political detainees together but the facilities are not good point supposedly should also would. Men political detainees but that was the only one he recalled. Pov Oblique order violators. I remember that as a public order by later I could not even get bail doer not given the right to even defend ourselves in court

Philippine Constabulary Philippine National Longo Thor
SXSW Will Go On Despite Coronavirus Concerns

The Frame

7:27 listening | 2 months ago

SXSW Will Go On Despite Coronavirus Concerns

"Welcome to the frame. I'm John Horn every year. A few hundred thousand people gathered in Austin Texas for south by southwest. It's an international festival of music film and Technology but with the threat of the corona virus at hand. Some people are saying that bringing massive crowds into one place could be a very bad idea. Facebook twitter Amazon and a few other tech and media companies. Already have dropped out of the festival which starts on March thirteenth. South by southwest organizers. Say they're nevertheless moving ahead. Dan Sullivan is a writer for Texas monthly and he joins us from Austin Dan. Welcome to the show for having me so before we get into the impact of the corona virus. Let's talk a little bit about just. How big south by South West is in terms of its physical presence in Austin? How much are people's lives affected when the festival comes to town? Well it's huge. It takes over a giant chunk of the city several miles especially the downtown area but also beyond that it does have a huge impact. Let's talk about some health. Concerns from people who live in Austin and online petition calling for a total cancellation of south by southwest. West has more than forty thousand signatures. I've been to south by southwest. It's been a number of years but like any popular gathering. There are a lot of people in a lot of lines it can be getting into a movie can be getting into a club getting into a restaurant. You are very much cheek to jowl with a lot of your fellow festival guests and I guess that's something that a lot of people might be concerned about. It's not just that you're inside venue with a lot of people. But they're massive crowds basically wherever you go on all the streets and a lot of public spaces. Yeah that is a very real part of the concern is that it's just going to put a lot of people in close quarters. The festival did talk today about potentially encouraging people to be further physically apart from each other whether that means capping the capacity at venues or starting a standing in line protocol. I don't know specifically but it's something that seemed to be aware of the head of twitter. Jack Dorsey was scheduled to speak but he's since cancelled. Because of the company's concerns about the corona virus in fact twitter said in a statement that it was cancelling all quote non critical business travel and events unquote. Who else has bowed out so far. We've seen twitter facebook Amazon Amazon Entertainment Amazon studios when out today. Tick Tock went out today. A measurable which usually has a pretty sizeable south by South West presence. Cancel yesterday. There's probably more to. We're talking with Texas monthly writer. Dan Solomon about south by southwest and concerns over the corona virus. I WanNa talk a little bit about the economic impact of south by southwest. Obviously there are a lot of hotels and restaurants that benefit but it seems from your own reporting. There are a lot of smaller businesses. That really rely on south by Southwest Festival didn't happen they'd be in a big amount of trouble. Yeah that's absolutely true. One thing that it's kind of hard to break apart is south by southwest rise with the rise of Austin Austin city of that is rapidly growing population and that growth has coincided with the rise of south by southwest. And so you've seen a lot of people and a lot of businesses that factor south by South West heavily into their business models. So you've got caterers. Who opened up operations because they knew that every march they could pay a third of their monthly bills. Off of one week I talked to all sorts of people who have jobs that you wouldn't think of as a south by southwest thing carpenters and pedicab drivers and people who rent Porta potties. And all of those people really do count on South by southwest as a huge part of their annual income. I think it's also important to note that south by southwest can be an important launching point for musical acts and for movies right now. I think there's about one hundred world premiere films including new movies from Judd Appetito. There's a documentary. About the Beastie Boys New King Arthur movie with Patel. I'm wondering in terms of its impact in the conversation about art and artists. How important would you say south by southwest has become? It's huge. I mean especially. The film festival has been growing every year and people like John. Appetite Tau like if he can't premier his movie at South by southwest any other film festival in the world would be happy to have him but there are a lot of people who get a benefit from small filmmakers independent filmmakers short filmmakers who get a benefit from premiering their phone at the same festival judd appetite out of festival with the prestige of south by southwest. And that would be. It'd be really difficult for people who are counting on that premiere to make connections to launch their careers to lose it as far as musicians. Go The festival itself doesn't pay very well but there are all of these events. Historically that happened around the festival often paid for by companies like Amazon and facebook and twitter. Who Get pretty good paychecks? And you'll see bands who wrote their entire tours around going south by South West so they can play. Fourteen shows in Austin that week including official showcase and without that economy happening it really does have a huge disruptive effect on a lot of Art Creativity. That's at the core of the festival the organizers of MIB TV which was set for later this month in France just cancelled that annual television convention. I'm wondering if you have any idea of what the organizers of south by southwest are trying to wrestle with now what is the balance they're trying to strike? I mean. I think that they do have a real concern. Certainly the city of Austin has a real concern if it makes more sense to have everything under the control of south by southwest which can at least institute hand washing protocols and recommended safe distances and have some authority over the people who who come to town for the festival versus just having sort of a chaos festival because all of those bands who booked their tors to Austin. Most of them are hand to Mouth. Starts Musicians. Who CAN'T AFFORD TO CANCEL? Literally they already took time off of work. They're going to be coming anyway. You know people who aren't traveling on badges people who are just coming to south by South West to have a good time a lot of them are still gonna come so I think that a big part of the concern right now is. Is it more useful for south by South West to continue to have control over what happens in Austin or is it more useful to just say everybody stay home? This isn't a safe place to be. And I think that they're legitimately struggling with that. And I'm sure there are also struggling with some very real financial considerations it will be hard to me bound from cancelling something that they've worked on all year. I think that there's a real resistance to that. Just because this is all they do south by southwest project of another organization. They put on this festival for ten days in March and having to cancel it just days before it's supposed to begin. It's supposed to start a week from Friday. I think that's something that they're just resistant to do. Because they've been working on it for a year then Solomon is a writer for Texas monthly. He joined us from Austin Dan. Thanks so much for coming on the

South West Austin Texas Texas Monthly Twitter Austin Dan Amazon Writer Austin Austin Southwest Facebook John Horn Dan Solomon Jack Dorsey West Dan Sullivan Solomon Porta Potties Judd Appetito France
The 1992 Little League World Series Scandal

Sports Criminals

4:59 listening | 3 months ago

The 1992 Little League World Series Scandal

"Event the International Youth Sports while it might Okun Image of fun and innocence throughout its seventy three year history. The tournament has been plagued by scandal and on the afternoon of August. Twenty Ninth Nineteen Ninety. Two as spectators watched the Filipino team celebrating on the field after clobbering their American opponents. They couldn't shake the uneasy feeling that something about the situation didn't feel quite right. Welcome to sports criminals. Apar- cast original. This is the third episode in our March Madness. Special this month. We're counting down the top thirty one sports scandals from nineteen ninety. Two Thousand Twenty. I'm Carter Roy and I'm Tim Johnson in today's episode. We're going back to nineteen ninety two and the Little League World Series Scandal. Zamboanga city located on a small remote island in the Philippines is most famous for its canned sardine industry but in nineteen ninety two. It was the city's Little League Baseball team that caught the world's attention the team from Zamboanga breezed through the World Series Tournament. Demolishing everyone in its path until trouncing a squad from Long Beach California in the championship. Game fifteen to four from a gold medal in boxing thirty years before the boys victory represented the most significant athletic achievement. In the country's history they returned to the Philippines as heroes where President Fidel Ramos through them. A parade in the capital city and awarded them over forty dollars in scholarship money. Nearly everyone in the country celebrated the team's victory everyone except journalist Al Mendoza as a journalist. Mendoza's job was to tell the truth. Which wasn't always easy in a country like the Philippines twenty years before dictator Ferdinand Marcos had banned anything beyond state-sanctioned news and only recently after a regime change had independent news outlets resumed operation. Just a day. After the team's Victory Parade Mendoza published a column in the daily Enquirer with the heading mothers. How old are your children? He not only cast doubt on the ages of the players from Zamboanga City. But whether they were actually from the small town as they claimed to qualify for the Little League world series players must be between ten and twelve years old and the player must live within the geographic boundary of the town or city that his or her team represents for example. Boy From Austin Texas. Can't play on team from Dallas. Ten to twelve is also a tricky age because of the disparity and boys sizes and appearance at that age some of almost reach their adult height will others are still under five feet tall to Mendoza and many others the Filipino players looked too and too poised for boys that age after he published his column. The American League president fact sheet of questions to his counterpart in the Philippines to confirm the players were the correct age and if they were all from Zamboanga City in his response the Filipino. Little League president declared that all the players were of legal age but admitted that several from outside Zamboanga city had been added to the roster because the original players weren't able allowed to travel to the United States. He explained that Zamboanga City is a very rural area and that many of the boys were needed to work on their parents farms. Others had been too afraid to fly. He also maintained that if the substitution hadn't been made the original team from Zamboanga City would have beaten the Americans by twice as much but days later Mendoza and his colleagues revealed that excluding the eight players added to the roster from other cities the six players actually from Zamboanga city. Were all over. Asia anywhere from thirteen to fifteen years old and had assumed the identities of younger boys in town that the team had replaced their original manager with coach from Manila. A coach who couldn't even speak or understand the dialect used in Zamboanga City. Furthermore the parents of the overage athletes had also assumed false identities in an effort to maintain the ruse. Maybe the Little League Baseball could overlook the replacement of a few kids who were too scared to fly but when it came to systematic fraud perpetrated by multiple generations. They had no choice but to strip the Filipino team of its title and awarded to the boys from

Zamboanga City Parade Mendoza Philippines Nineteen Ninety Little League President Fidel Ramos International Youth Sports Gold Medal American League Long Beach California Apar Asia Ferdinand Marcos Texas Manila President Trump Dallas Fraud Carter Roy
The State of New York vs. Harvey Weinstein

Court Junkie

6:37 listening | 3 months ago

The State of New York vs. Harvey Weinstein

"During this trial. You are going to learn. The defendant was as savvy New York City businessman. He was a famous and powerful Hollywood producer. Who lived a lavish lifestyle? The evidence will also show that this man was a sexual Predator and rapist. These are the words of Manhattan Assistant District Attorney. Meghan has in her opening statements on January. Twenty second two thousand twenty. She continued on quote different women different places decades apart same crime at the end of this trial. The evidence will be clear that this man it was not just a titan in Hollywood but also a rapist. He stalked women when they didn't comply he used power to ensure silence. You will learn during the course of this trial. These women internalized trauma some even for decades. They will each describe fear. Shame and humiliation following violent encounters each of them struggled but managed to put on a brave face for the world. Each feelings small and insignificant. They were no match for this powerbroker in Hollywood at the same time he was seen for the cameras on red carpets and rubbing elbows with politicians. These women will have their voices heard. They come from different walks in life and only one is still an actress but what they have in common is strength and courage. These sexual assaults are not what you think about when you think of rape not back alley unsuspecting person not date rape scenario here. The rapist was at the pinnacle of the precision that the victim strive to Be Power. Imbalance was professional and physical women. Take the stand keep in mind to the defendant was in the world of these women and the realities of how victims behave. Listen to these women with an open. Mind really listen when you hear anyone in this courtroom talk about consent and what? The defendant thought. Remember the trick. Anyone who consents to being with another person does not have to be. I tricked ultimately. This trial is about the defendants desire to conquest his complete lack of empathy. That he must be held accountable. Attorney Damon shrillness delivered opening statements on behalf of the defense. Good Morning. This is Harvey Weinstein. Right here he's the person that prosecutor Megan has asked called a predator. Trickster rapist this stops now in this courtroom. Would we have just heard was a narrative to explain things that are inexplicable? The evidence about these women is not true. Everything that has just told you is not evidence. She wasn't there. She's relying on what the women told her happened. You will judge what is fact and fiction. The only test that matters for credibility you sit in Judgment Harvey Weinstein says. I didn't do it and I'm going to let twelve people decide. Your job is extremely important. Individuals raised their hands and said I can't be fair. God bless them you all said I can be fair. I can listen to the evidence in drought the noise in this case. Whatever I heard or read about doesn't matter. The only thing is what happens here. The judge told you the importance of that. If you are not the noise you are going to know that. What has told you doesn't hold water because it's not true. We have been waiting patiently to tell the story. It hasn't been easy for Harvey Weinstein to listen to that. If you listen to the state there are themes that are common. The women were weak. Couldn't stand up for themselves. Were lured in by Harvey Weinstein tricked. That's a mirage. And don't take my word for it. The twenty twenty version of Harvey Weinstein Kinda feds. But this happened in two thousand and six in two thousand thirteen. He was a successful producer. The truth that doesn't change when an article comes out in two thousand seventeen. He made all these movies at the Oscars. I'm going to ask you to think about if it's possible that any of these individuals were attracted to him. Evidence will show that he wasn't this master manipulator the seats openings. Were a preview of a movie. You aren't going to see is going to be emotional and it's GonNa be tough to see but be patient. This state knows their story is problematic. You're going to hear about communications. The accusers had with whom they're calling a predator. We are going to show you the truth. We ARE NOT VICTIM. Shaming victim is a conclusion after a trial. These complaining witnesses Harvey Weinstein has a right to say not so fast. No one has questioned anybody yet. Some of these people have gone out and done interviews. No one has asked them questions. We will do it respectfully and ethically as jurors you're going to be shown to realities here. What the witnesses say. They're going to be asked to go back in time and hear what happened at that time. Were you will see is shocking. Based on the opening statement you just heard from the State Weinstein was not a Predator to these women quite the contrary the state knows they have a problem. And it's all the evidence they have to create something you are going to see after. Weinstein allegedly sexually assaulted one of the women. She wanted him to meet her mother that she gave him her new number after she lost her phone and that she asked if he will be around for her birthday at some point. You're going to say oh my God Harvey Weinstein is innocent. Then I'm sure you've heard Harvey Weinstein's name before local national and international media have reported on allegations against him for years now but in this episode. I'm going to take you inside. The courtroom were cameras are not allowed. And thanks to the hard work of reporters and producers bring you the firsthand account of the testimony against one of the biggest media executives and a driving force behind the metoo movement. Then decide for yourself is Harvey Weinstein. A master manipulator and abusive rapist. Who treated women is complete disposables as the state alleges or is he simply a sex addict to engaged in consensual encounters with numerous women as his defense insists

Harvey Weinstein Hollywood Producer Manhattan Assistant District A New York City Meghan Rape Attorney Prosecutor Damon Shrillness Megan