Documentary

Listen to the latest news about groundbreaking documentaries, interviews with renowned directors and learn about the latest releases from audio broadcasts aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Fallout of Texas winter blast

Nightline

06:41 min | 5 d ago

Fallout of Texas winter blast

"Good evening. Thank you for joining us. The governor of sexist apologizing and promising answers after a deadly winter storm the deep freeze. Just the start of an ongoing nightmare for residents now. Struggling with shattered pipes in skyrocketing energy. Bill here's abc's tripled. I can't imagine what it's like for you to see it like this is terrible. I've never thinking house. This brianna bolden tells me she could smell the soap rotting wood from outside the front door of her grandmother's house before walking into this is pictures and the memories. They captured all underwater. And this is actually my big lama right here. This is all and that's the past those wife for half a century. Her grandparents filled this home with children and grandchildren home cooked meals. Tiny reminders of a family growing together is a lot of memories at this house. But now this house like so many in texas has been gutted. Helplessly flooded by first hypes last week's historic winter storm on your couch look. The damage is just a fraction of the devastation. in texas. that killed thirty. Two people will take months or years and billions of dollars to clean up. So how did it go so wrong so quickly. Texas has more than enough generating capacity to handle itself. It was just the state of affairs of that equipment and the state of affairs of the management of that equipment. The causes from texas is the only state in the continental us with an independent grid meaning. It does not connect to any other states power source. When that merciless winter weather hid in one of the warmest regions of the country. People crank up their heaters and the energy demand surged when that system shut down. There was nowhere to turn for power. There is no place for the texas grid to go there. Couple small lines extension cords to the east in the west. But that's not enough really to to pick up. A forty percent drop in texas generation and the result was more than three million texas residents in the dark and cold at one point leading many to take drastic measures for running dangerously low on one. So now what we've been doing. All day is actually coming outside getting snow putting it are pods and heaving on our propane grill. Then hypes began to freeze and burst shutting down water treatment plants across the state inning. Almost fifteen million texans would have to toil their water of four. It was safe to drink daily block water. We don't even have the electric reliability council of texas or bur. Kat had long been warned. Its infrastructure was vulnerable to freezing temperatures the state legislature held hearings on this exact issue in twenty eleven. The last time the state experienced major freeze there were numerous hearings hundreds of pages of recommendations but they were all made voluntarily. Nobody actually change the incentives so that the generators would have a financial reason food to weather. Is this week. Several urquhot born members resigned in the wake of this disaster today in virtual urquhot board of directors meeting. The chairwoman acknowledged the pain and suffering of texans her resignation effective after the meeting ended. All of our hearts go out to all of you with head to go without electricity. Heat water not attending and food during frigid temperatures and continue to face the tragic consequences in some cases. The loss of a loved one state leaders have promised an investigation into urquhot handling of the crisis and members of both parties and the governor of rowing to make sure texans are on the hook for those astronomical electric bills at a time when essential services were needed. The most the system broke. You deserve answers. You will get those answers but people brianna bolden are in need of far more immediate solutions. She's facing mounting hardships. Having recently lost her father and grandfather. It sounds like your grandmother doesn't have home insurance right now. She don't she couldn't afford it anymore. Every generation been through this. Is papa really worked hard for this. I'm sorry statewide. There is so much damage from burst. Pipes plumbers can't keep up see the water. We have another one right here. Everardo omega of a plumbing. In houston says he's crews have been working around the clock just as bad. I mean there's necas mad and they're receiving more calls than they can answer this heartbreaking the tell somebody. uk make we broke down here. Twenty five hours plummer andrew mitchell in his family driving all the way from new jersey with a car full of equipment in arts in short supply here for just going to see what we can do to help out texas residents and also converging in texas to help out the cajun navy civilian volunteers known for using their big trucks. Kamal boats for rescues during major storms like hurricane harvey in twenty seventeen. We talked with a lot of people around here who've been they were impacted by hurricane harvey. I dealing with this. A lot of people think that this is worse than a hurricane's coming in we have more. We know what's going to happen with this disaster. We did not know what was coming. Community was not prepared. No one knew what was coming riley at this is marin mckim. She spent the last decade doing aid work in africa. When disaster struck home she was one of the first on the front lines. The cajun navy has gotten quite good quickly setting up distribution sites like this one but with so many people impacted. What's perhaps most useful is their platform and their connections. Cajun navy crowd sources disasters and cajun navias known so once we find the need we start using the social media platform and we put the word out there and people want to help on this day. They're delivering to katy texas home to just over twenty thousand with some areas still under a boil. Water notice

Texas Brianna Bolden Electric Reliability Council O ABC Hurricane Harvey Cajun Navy Everardo Omega Bill KAT Plummer Andrew Mitchell Legislature Rowing Marin Mckim Houston Kamal New Jersey UK Hurricane
A Ouija board mystery

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:55 min | Last week

A Ouija board mystery

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries. Heiner host kit chrome in my month-long search our investigation into different forms of nation. I touched on the wage board last friday. And almost as a cautionary tale and immediately received some emails. Asking me to back that up. So i put it to my team of urban legend writers to come up with some information. That was something. I can validate with police. A names and numbers and read over this podcast so here. It is in the small seaside town of dungeness bay. The bodies of seventy five year old eric ward and his seventy two year old wife. Mildred were found on the beach without a mark on either body. The clothes were soaked with seawater. The autopsy report indicated. The water was found in their lungs. The bodies were discovered by a jogger who tracks were the only ones found on the beach when the police arrived locals testified that the couple were often seen walking the beach. at twilight. The couple's adult son clayton ward. Came up from california that after three weeks of intense investigation no suspects were revealed and clayton had to get back to his job as a technology specialist for the silicon valley giant apple but his parting comment to the dungeon is bay. Police was that when he returned he'd be able to identify the murder of his parents in eighteen. Ninety one the patent was granted to elijah bond for the we g board but one of the first mentions of the review board used was in asia around eleven hundred. Ad and historical document documents from that era but the design we know today was based on the talking boards of ohio produced by kennard six months after his first visit to dungeness baked clayton more restrictions on the list of clues. He assured police that if followed would lead them to the murderer of his parents. Seven days later after following the various clues. The police brought in steve hawks. The grounds keeper employed by the wards who under intense interrogation confessed to the drowning of the couple. He claimed that eric had kept a large amount of cash in a safe that he planned on taking. He was however unable to explain how he was going to get into the safe. When asked by the police where he got the clues clayton more replied that he belonged to a small group that used the ouija board to solve crimes and that when his father was contacted his father's spirit told him steve had knocked him unconscious and then dragged him into the waves thinking they would be washed out to sea where they would drown but he was unaware that it was low. Tide and they'd be washed up on the beach with the changing tide. He further toll clayton that. If the police went to steve's house they would find the bloody tire iron news to knock him unconscious. Clayton return to california but when police attempted to contact him with further questions about the clues they found his address was nonexistent. Phone number disconnected no record of employment at the apple corporation. Then investigator that was brought in on the case discovered that eric and ward owned a ouija board and from journal they cap learn that they were often the host of the spirit calling itself. Dozo now we g board users will tell you that. Zoe is the demon spirit of the ouija board that sometimes he becomes protective of those that. Hold the open through the board that allows him to enter this world. Where the wards holding the door open for a demon spirit that manifested into the image of a protective son that never existed and when they were murdered by their grounds keeper was a door that allowed so to pass back and forth between this world and is shut. In which world is he

Dungeness Bay Clayton Clayton Ward Elijah Bond Heiner Eric Ward Steve Hawks Mildred Kennard Silicon Valley California Apple Eric Asia Steve Ohio Ward ZOE
What Would Happen If Chabot Dam in the East Bay Hills Broke Open?

Bay Curious

04:37 min | 5 d ago

What Would Happen If Chabot Dam in the East Bay Hills Broke Open?

"What would happen if chicago damn cracked open an empty the lake behind it onto neighborhoods in san leandro and east oakland. It's an alarming thought. We asked cake. Ud's dan bricky. Who's reported on safety issues at california's oroville dam to find the answer. Holly and vickers kings question is a really good one because it reminds us that all dams pose risks of some kind given the nature of the job they perform holding back huge volumes of water they can turn from placid lake into deadly torrent. If unleashed all at once. They deserve very close attention. When that attention lapses catastrophes can do happen in late may eighteen eighty nine flood. Water overflowed badly maintained private dam in western pennsylvania. Triggering its collapse. A wall of water race down the valley below a century later. Historian david mccullough said. The johnstown flood was so vividly alive in the local consciousness. I grew up in western pennsylvania. I'd heard about the johnstown flood my whole life as children. We used to shout run for the hills. The damas busted little knowing what real terror is in those words. The flood wiped entire towns off the map and killed twenty. Two hundred people in california owns its own special chapter in the history of dam disasters with a tragedy that unfolded more than ninety years ago in a remote canyon fifty miles north of downtown los angeles from the day. The saint francis dam opened in one thousand nine hundred twenty six. It leaked the folks in the farm. Towns downstream used to joke. They'd see you later if the damn don't break on march twelfth nine hundred twenty eight. The saint francis damn disintegrated just hours after it was pronounced sound by los angeles water. Chief william mulholland who had designed and built the two year old structure when the massive concrete dam broke apart water raised more than fifty miles to the pacific ocean killing about four hundred fifty people along the way but those events one hundred thirty years ago in johnstown ninety some years ago in los angeles county sound like ancient history much more recently california. Got a lesson in how dangerous and costly failure of even part of a major dam can be failure ambiance spillway structure results in an uncontrolled. Lisa flood waters from link oroville and eating evacuation from the low twenty. Seventeen collapse the spillway at oroville dam in the northern sierra foothills one hundred thirty miles northeast of san francisco touched off a series of events that lead local officials to order one hundred eighty eight thousand people to flee their homes. This is not a drill. Repeat this is not a drill. Spill ways are crucial to preventing overtopping. That's what happens. When a reservoir rises over the top of the dam and simply spills over a spillway is like an emergency valve. Damn managers can open to safely release water from a reservoir bills over the top but back in february twenty seventeen oroville dam spillway began to disintegrate just as a series of winter storms dumped huge amounts of rain across northern california without a fully functioning. Spillway lake oroville rose rapidly water poured over a hillside that was supposed to serve as an emergency spillway. That emergency spillway began to fail to leading to the mass evacuation. In the aftermath investigators found the emergency spillway was ill conceived and the main spillway was badly designed poorly built and inadequately maintained. So how is should bowe damn different from all those bad dams and what does east bay mud have to say about. Chaba cracking open and unleashing catastrophe on the east bay. Simple answer to that question is that the dam would never crack open. That's jimmy yolly east bay mud director of engineering and chief damn safety officer he oversees the district twenty six times including chabad. Damn the reality is that the dams are designed such that. They don't just crack open. You will see signs of a failure if one is to occur and The dan's designs with monitoring equipment to make sure that you can see that happening if it was a east bay mud confidence that a dam built within a quarter mile of a dangerous fault will stand up to violent shaking. Let's take a look at how the dam was first built. Nearly one hundred fifty years ago and how it's been maintained since

Oroville Dam Johnstown Dan Bricky California Saint Francis Dam Placid Lake Chief William Mulholland Pennsylvania San Leandro David Mccullough Vickers Lisa Flood Northern Sierra Foothills Los Angeles Oakland Holly Chicago Oroville Dam Spillway
Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

Museum Archipelago

05:10 min | Last week

Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

"For the past six and a half years more or less weekly museum. People gather on twitter for something called museum our together. These people form a peer to peer community supporting discussion and debate between those who work in enjoy and challenge museums society. That's the beauty of museum. Our is entirely independent. It is not an organization is just about holding a space so other people can talk with each other. This is dr to meena car who co-founded museum our back in october. Twenty fourteen gosper also founded the curatorial research center. Hello my name is to mean a costco. And i am the director and curator of the curatorial research center and that's an organization. I started back in two thousand eighteen very much to support fellow curator's from around the world and also to make progress in modernizing curatorial practice this month gosper officially steps back from her role in museum. Our i wanted this to serve as both exit interview and a chance to highlight other projects that she has founded based on her curatorial. Philosophies museum i started can october two thousand fourteen sophie balancer. Who was the co founder with me got together over twitter. We've never met in real life. Goodness knows whether we ever will. Sophie was based up in the north of england. I'm based in the far west of cornwall. That we both decided we'd give the idea of the discussion based hours that were kind of finding their feet on twitter at that time so we decided to give it a go and it's grown and grown and grown and changed a lot since then of course twitches also changed hugely in terms of who participates. Who feels confident about speaking out. Who likes in the background. There is a lot of polarization on the platform. Now and so we've changed adapted museum iowa to all of those trends that we've seen happen including it's growing politicize ation as well. If i'm being honest i've kind of treated the whole thing. Even six and a half years own as an ongoing experiment in trying to understand how it is people like to communicate with each other and how it is that you can provide some kind of support for this peer to pay contact is what we're really after on museum archipelago. We look at museums as a medium and twitter is also a medium one that has changed since museum. Our started six and a half years ago since then. Twitter has shifted from a simple subscriber model. One we you see all the tweets from the people you follow the order that they tweeted to a system that uses algorithms that optimize for other factors such as engagement with the tweets. This can make a global conversation about museums. Difficult with the change in. How twitter is managed. And how the concept of driving engagement and algorithms are dictating. What we see on our timelines. There has absolutely been an impact on museum our because of that. We've got to work much harder to try and get ideas for topics for example people's ideas out to as broad an interested audience participation group that we can and that has proven very difficult in fact particularly of late because people's timelines also manipulated by twitter's algorithms and because they're so much more noise on twitter than there was so. I'm kind of glad that museum. Our has managed to hold its own. It retains a light structure. It does support those intimate conversations as well as supporting bigger thoughts and opinions and even ones that people disagree about in one space. I've participated in even hosted a few museum hours. And the thing that reminds me of the most is a museum conference or at least the conversations that you might have at museum conference which is yet another medium but interestingly docker says that museum our has never been about recreating that experience. That certainly isn't the kind of experience you usually get unless you Fortunate enough to be able to afford to go to very expensive. Large international museum conferences. For example like the newseum association conference in the uk or any of items conferences but we've never really perceived if museum hours to fill that kind of gap with still kind of exploring what it is that we think we're doing and that's just by way of being very honest about no having an agenda and letting sort of the emergent process of museum our happened

Curatorial Research Center Gosper Twitter Sophie Balancer Meena Costco Sophie Cornwall Archipelago England Iowa Large International Museum Docker Newseum Association UK
Modern Oracle divination with dream interpretation

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Modern Oracle divination with dream interpretation

"Welcome to kits myths and mysteries. I'm your host kit crumb today in my month. Long investigation into different forms of detonation. I've locked up word. Divination is defined as the art or practice that seeks to force your for tell future events or discover hidden knowledge usually by the interpretation of omens unusual insights or intuitive perception with that definition in mind decide to take a look at dream analysis in ancient times people saw dream says vessels of meaning that contain divine messages and had the power to alter history alexander. The great was on the verge of breaking ground for his new city. When a gray haired man appeared to him in a dream the man told him about an island off the coast of egypt when alexandra woke he scrapped the building side and instead found an island on which to construct alexandria today. People still look for meaning in their dreams who are methods of interpreting. Dreams have changed since alexander's day. Our desire to understand them as much the same truth. No one knows why we dream or why we dream what we dream. Dreams are sensory experiences. That happened while you're sleeping. In a dream you see things here sounds and feel physical sensations. You may or may not remember your dreams when you wake up but everybody dreams. Freud pioneered a body of research based on dreams later young expanded the dream theory with his own ideas. Modern co creative dream theories consider how you respond to dream imagery and how you can use that information to guide your waking life now going back a little bit. The ancient sumerians messa taymiyya have left evidence of dream interpretation dating back to at least thirty one hundred bc throughout mesopotamia. History dreams were always held to be extremely important for devastation. And mesopotamia and king paid close attention to them dream analysis also referred to as dream interpretation hinges on the idea that you can attach meaning to your dreams. This process has been used in a wide variety of settings including ancient civilizations a variety of religions including christianity. But keep in mind the dreams you dream pertained to you and your life. Beware of using a standard interpretation for example. If your dream that you can't remember the combination to your school locker. It means that something you are trying to do is being blocked. This interpretation may apply to one person but not to another. Your dreams are yours often. When we visit a fortune teller that lays out the future. We tend to seek a path to the aspect of our future similar to the idea of seeking validation. If you believe that you are slow learner you seek develop that belief or if you wake up in a bad mood and decide is probably going to be a rotten day. Chances are that you will without being conscious of the fact seek out events that make that day pretty bad and validate your early morning declaration. That is going to be a bad day. You know a self fulfilling prophecy now. Returning dream interpretation. Listen and take note then go home or to a neutral place where you're quiet alone and look closely at the result of your dreams as interpreted determine what dreams really do symbolize something going on in your life. Modern

Alexander Messa Taymiyya Alexandra Alexandria Egypt Freud King
Inside Trump’s historic second impeachment

Nightline

05:13 min | Last week

Inside Trump’s historic second impeachment

"Thanks for joining us. They assault on. The capital was a dark day for american democracy now the abc news documentary for who shedding light on the road to insurrection and the second impeachment trial that followed with new insights from prosecutors and trump's inner circle of advisers fifty seven votes for guilty forty-three for not guilty. Donald john trump former president. United states is not guilty as charged. The article is hereby acquitted. The challenge we saw in that senate today was a cowardly group of republicans. Have no power to convict them. Disqualify a former officeholder who is now a private citizen and another sham impeachment down the drain. This was about choosing country over. Donald trump and forty three republican members chose trump a defining moment in american politics. The president of the united states impeached and acquitted for a second time. It's not just donald trump on trial. And it's this entire era of our history. It's a reckoning of. How did we get here. Who have we become. How did this happen the entire saga examined in a new. Abc news documentary for trump the reckoning it all happened here at the heart of our democracy that magnificent capitol building all within about a month. You had insurrection yet. People's storming the capital weeks after that the inauguration and then the impeachment trial is a moment of truth for america. You have the house. Democrats who are the prosecutors led by jamie raskin and his team. Our case is based on cold hard facts. He violated oath of office in the greatest breach of a presidential of in us history. The democrats are trying to make the case that everything that happened on january. Sixth is because of one man and that's donald trump. Let's start with the big lie that the election was stolen. He continued to spread the big lie. Agila way we can lose in. My opinion is massive fraud on january six. We know who lit the fuse. Donald trump told these insurrectionist to come to the capital. We fight we fight like hell and if you don't fight like hell you're not going to have a country anymore. With president trump wanted that day he simply wanted a peaceful and honest airing of the question of whether there were election irregularities in six battleground states. i know that everyone here will soon be marci over to the capitol building to peacefully and patriotically. Make your voices heard at his signal after this. We're going to walk down. And i'll be there with you. He struck a match. We're going to walk down to the capital and he aimed straight at disbelief tape. We saw the house. Managers played this thirteen minute long. Video public has not seen that the senators themselves have not seen. We know those hallways we recognize those corners. It's deeply upsetting. It is anxiety provoking. It is frightening. That awful day could have been so much worse. Multiple members of our government had near run ins with the mob. Senator mitt romney senate majority leader chuck schumer and vice president. Mike pence we saw for the first time. Security footage of mike pence being hustled out of the chamber and his family by thought of vice president. Cheney on nine eleven Being taken to the bunker under the white house to twenty four pm twelve minutes after pence's taken out of the chamber. Donald trump tweets and attack against his own vice president. He tweeted quote. Mike pence didn't have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our country and our constitution he further incites the mob against his own vice president.

Donald John Trump America Jamie Raskin Abc News Donald Trump President Trump Senate Mike Pence Marci Senator Mitt Romney Chuck Schumer Cheney Pence White House
"I Am Always Enough Just Being"

Immigrantly

04:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"I Am Always Enough Just Being"

"Today. I am so thrilled to have you all tuned in for our guest. She is so down-to-earth such a busy woman. And if you look at the movement. She's leading i. Frankly don't know how she does it all our conversation. This particular conversation inspired me. And i came away from it. Renewed and challenged do more introspection to look at my mental health. More covered issues. That always been booed in bogus bonnie culture and for me. It wasn't easy to talk about stuff that was considered and still is considered western construct or a privileged that many cannot afford but today's guest and i spoke about it and it was fun. It was beautiful. It was challenging. Yes but i would do it again. If given an opportunity. Sahara goalie is the prince and energy behind brown girl therapy. A mental has platform that is the first and largest of its kind. What started out as fashion project turned into a world where community for first and second generation immigrants who seek to understand a firm that emotional and mental experiences. I did a lot of research. I looked at other platforms and i realized you know there really. Isn't there just. There wasn't anything that existed for children of emigrants when it comes to mental health. And as i reflected on my experiences i realized a lot of by struggles are rooted in this cultural. As in this identity as a child of immigrants. I remember as a kid and even now there are moments of consciousness in experiences that i have literally trouble putting words to are fully comprehending a lot of cultures. Like my own did not promote mental health conversations. Never mind have the lexicon. To even engage nasa hodge colby biz witnessed this unique reality and uses her platform to address these issues. I cannot wait for you all to hear what she has to share. An amazing amazing cheney up onto now and if you want to learn more about brown girls. Ap give her a follow on instagram and they also have a newsletter for which you can sign him. And i've said this before if you have any new ideas story ideas guest ideas diaz even email us. You can reach out to us. This is your platform. And i want to have as many conversations as began with people who stories will resonate with you our listeners. So let's get started. So i am so excited for this episode because i feel like there is so much that i always wanted to talk about and this episode is going to be my answer. Do all that. I want to talk about especially in the context of mental health. But a lot of what we are going to talk about is tied to your story. So i want to start with your ginny thus far. Can you share your story way. did you grow up. where were you born. How did you end up where you are right. Now sure I'm really excited to be here and be having this conversation with you. So i was born in the suburbs outside of richmond virginia The first of my family to be born in the west. I have two older siblings. Who moved to this country with my parents. Right before i was born and i was socialized. Grew up in predominantly non-indian environments. Yes so my parents from job but my mom actually is from japan so while she's full indian full-page rb Grew up in japan. So i have family in japan so i was born outside of richmond. Virginia my parents and my siblings were all born in india but my mom was socialized and grew up in japan. So i spent most of my years growing up Our vacation time between visiting family in india. Which would be. My paternal family and split time going to japan to visit my maternal family. So i feel like. I grew up in a try cultural household because my mom would often make japanese food she would often be watching tv. Dramas and japanese and we have a lot of decorations around the house. That are japanese but my family is sick. They follow the sick religion and my dad is fairly religious and so we grew up speaking jobe. You know going to goodwater on sundays. But i was going to school and had friends. Who were not sick or indian

Hodge Colby Biz Bonnie Sahara Japan Cheney Nasa Diaz Richmond Virginia India Jobe
Modern Oracle divination with Runes

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:37 min | 3 weeks ago

Modern Oracle divination with Runes

"Welcome to kids myths and mystery signer host kid chrome today in my month. Long look different forms of divination. I'm examining the ancient history of rooms simply put room. Stones are an ancient norse methods of division by use of the elder foot hawk alphabet developed in the fourth century. These powerful little nuggets of wisdom were used to predict the future produce signs that brought on protection luck and a lot. More runes are letters of an ancient dramatic alphabet with each conveying a unique symbolic meaning. The word rune means mystery in celtic and germanic languages though sometimes associated with fortune. Telling most rune practitioners. Realistically point out. That runes were not designed to predict the future by assessing ancient wisdom. Rooms were designed to produce a greater awareness of the connection of all things the nature of cause and effect and the interactions between our personal lives. And the rest of the world like any balanced archetype system rooms represent an overview of human psychology the physical world and the universe but how are modern day rooms. Red present day rune casting involves asking a specific question then interpreting the meanings of the symbols inscribed on a set of stones the techniques for selecting rune stones varied. A single stone can be chosen from a bag in an answer to a question or number of stones usually three or nine can be laid out in a variety of pattern similar to tarot spread for interpretation or a handful of stones can be drawn than cast onto a special cloth where unique meanings can be assigned to rooms in the face up or face down positions choosing a method of room. Casting is largely a matter of personal taste. None of these methods. I've mentioned or others omitted. Here should be considered more authentic than the rest says. Sarah's no reliable record precisely how rooms were cast for the nation in ancient times when using rooms listen to your own wisdom and selecting the appropriate technique. Okay here we go. What about runes as a tool for magic in nineteen ninety. Stephen grundy expert on ruins described rune magic as the active principle as opposed to passive interpretations based on runic debonair. Okay still what is room magic. There are ruined. Magic spell lists that consist of four basic and ford vast possible combinations. these combinations require arcane syntax. This image is a user. Made reference sheet for all spell combinations. So you can get a sheet. That tells you how to cast a spell with runes the symbols on rooms like those who've terrible back thousands of years but unlike tarot you can take a single room symbol carved into a candle for extra power in a specific ritual back in nineteen seventy one. I was a guest to the gathering of witches. When i entered the sacred circle. I was pulled aside by which offered to throw rooms onto an animal hide. She called a yoga on my behalf. We'd never met yet. She was able to describe many of my personality traits and after some time she spoke of my future not only was she accurate about my personality. She nailed my future and the data. My father's death did she come to those conclusions. By reading runes truly possessed the ability to see the future. Modern oracle destination with ruins was researched and written by our team. Urban lead jin riders and produced here at night. I will sound studio brought to you in part by the rogue valley metaphysical library and internationally recognized psychic medium. Sharon bauer author of the book. Live internal love immortal. They you can get share. And bauer medium dot com and by kids myths and mysteries dot com. Where you could always get a book on a strange and unexplained for free and just a reminder that you if you have any questions about divination you can drop me an email. I guess that'd be the term you could send me an email at kitt k. Crumb had gmail.com. I'm kit chrome. Thanks for listening.

Stephen Grundy Nuggets Sarah Ford Rogue Valley Metaphysical Libr Sharon Bauer Oracle Crumb
From Australia to Canada, how Indigenous people are coping with isolation one year into the pandemic

Unreserved

05:48 min | 2 d ago

From Australia to Canada, how Indigenous people are coping with isolation one year into the pandemic

"Is unreserved on. Cbc radio one. i'm falen johnson. It has been almost a year since the covid. Nineteen outbreak was declared a pandemic. it's an anniversary. I'm sure many of us are not too happy to celebrate. This year has been a real challenge in the pandemic has fundamentally changed our lives but many folks have found ways to not let isolation get the best of them. I know so many people out there all around the north. Were ready to support you. I think a good storyteller reminds you that all storms pass. We've been here before but we can help to route at resilience and make them more aware of how strong young folks are this week. Unreserved how indigenous people are turning to digital communities storytelling and culture feel connected to squash those isolation blues cleo denny writer richard van camp has essentially been on a one book a year pace for two decades his latest called gathered share some secrets to great storytelling and it includes seven stories. Elders from his community have shared with him. Richard is here with us now to talk about his new book and how storytelling can help fight and banished loneliness especially during this pandemic. he joins me now from edmonton. Welcome back to the show. Richard musi cho- feeling sal. My see my friends thank you. So let's party. yes let's party. So can you tell us about your latest book gather. Oh thank you. Must he chose so. Gather really an exploration of my journey as a storyteller. For those of you. Who don't know my name. Is richard van camp. I m c show denny. I was born and raised in fort. Smith northwest territories treaty. Eight country goes born in nineteen. Seventy one and i was raised in a town. It was. It's the maty capital of the northwest territories if it's paradise schwartzman throws territories officially quadri-lingual so bush cre- dna a french and english spoken at any given time. And when i graduated from high school i ran. I went from hero to zero. Because i had no idea what i wanted to do. No idea at all. I wanted to be a break dancer. I wanted to be a minjah. i was nineteen. I had a mullet. Some pinch hickeys. And i actually had a real existential crisis. I had a midlife crisis at nineteen. Cause i was like what am i gonna do. Who am i supposed to be. And i saw that. They were looking for drivers for the handy bus. They were looking for volunteers. And when i saw that on the green screen in fort smith northwest actors. The bango channel. I realized that that was what i was going to do. I was going to volunteer. I'll start driving the elders around. Because i was a really good canadian. Really good treaty indian. I was a really good person. I was a former. But i was a really poor ki- chou denny. I didn't know anything about our language. I knew a little bit of butter culture through our mother. But you know i was so busy having fun growing up by what i realized when i showed up to begin my apprenticeship as a handy bus driver in fort smith northwest territories to the matriarchs to the lighthouses to the mama. Bear's portsmouth arthritis territories. And i'm talking about irene centers. Dora toronto seraphine evans. Emilia gate tricks. I'm talking about the sweethearts of our community. They could see right away. That i was a really hollow indigenous person culturally and that i was searching and they took me under their wings and it was bingo runs. Hospital runs medical runs. It was trips to cancers in the northern store and trips to the landslide to watch the pelicans return it was through those driving shuttling and careering the royalty of our community wherever they wanted to be that they started sharing their stories with me so gather is really about what i learned. The smartest thing. I ever did belan was i realized a few months into apprenticeship as the handy bus driver. Fort smith risk territories. No one was recording our elders. Nobody because the mistake we make as we think everybody is going to be here forever. And so i remember explicitly having this. Oh my god. If i don't record our elders and get these stories downs. I think we're going to. We're not gonna have this opportunity my message with gatherings. Don't wait to record your heroes. Honor them now. I think that's a great message and it's like it's almost like you went to instead of going to you know you have to your you of a You went to u. of elder for your for your training. Which sounds like you know the those lessons have still have carried you this far so the inspiration for this book is you know it's it's it's sort of obvious You know you mentioned loneliness but can you tell us a bit more about you know what inspired you to write a book about storytelling and its its effectiveness against loneliness. While the university of regina got a hold of me they said how would you like to do something on storytelling. Because they had seen me at my book. Launches and my book launches quickly become good visiting and great gossip sessions. They become about story and they become about community and laughter and spray shin. they said. why don't you write a story about the joy of storytelling. And who's to say no. I'm a huge fan of of the press and everybody their publishing and you know i had tracking heaven the manuscript that i had been collecting with the twenty four hour stories that i've been recording for twenty four years. So they just said just take seven of the greatest stories that you think are going to matter to anybody all walks because these are all indigenous storytellers that. I've been collecting so around.

Richard Van Camp Falen Johnson Cleo Denny Richard Musi Cho Quadri Fort Smith Chou Denny CBC Dora Toronto Seraphine Evans Schwartzman Denny Edmonton Belan Richard Fort Smith Bush Arthritis Cancers
From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

Unreserved

06:41 min | Last week

From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

"And my mom is from sweet grass and my sister and my family. We lived in a couple of places where in the capelle valley. Of course lebron and then we moved to saskatoon and saskatoon was where i spent my boyhood until i was plucked plucked from the prairies at the age of ten years old to attend canada's national ballet school in toronto and my family and i we moved from treaty six territory to To dish with one spoon territory. So i could pursue dance as as a career potential career and so i wanna talk about your dancing a bit but first i want to know what was it. Like growing up on the prairies. What do you remember What do you remember about growing up on the prairies. So many beautiful things. Obviously that's home. That's that's that's my home. That's where i know about my family. My a my early years. I remember the sunlight of remember the sky. I remember my cousins and all my relatives. And i remember playing just riding my bike with my banana seat all over town. They need to make banana seats again. They're very comfortable. they do they do in los angeles. There's a whole like bike culture. We're fleeing be tricked out bike's banana seats. So you're known primarily as an actor now but as you mentioned you know you got into the entertainment industry in a different way. You started as a dancer as a ballet dancer. So how does a kid growing up in saskatoon and up in the ballet well by accident entirely by axes we were living in saskatoon and my mom was a teacher at the school for the deaf. A very famous School for deaf children in saskatoon and my sister. And i were doing you know little kid things. I was playing hockey of course and my sister was taking dance lessons so mumbai. I we used to week for my sister in the car and i was you know five six years old so i was like a super board super easily so it was like she died. She'd done and i would go up and check on her. I remember the classes at the university of scotch one and it was kind of like this wile experiences little kid i walk in. I'd look for her and then she be dancing with these little girls. In one day. I decided to really kinda pay attention to what they were doing. And i and then. I blurted got ceesay. Teacher overheard me. She said well. Do you think it's easy. Why don't you come on back next week. So i said A will and i told my mom all week. I'm going to dance next week. And she of course you know. I apparently said lots of crazy things as as a boy but as the days got closer. She was like okay he. He's repeating it. He's he's he's he's insistent about this. Why do you think you're going to death sex because the teacher invited me so with my mom and my mom used me. I'm so so sorry. Michael thinks that you've invited him. Smith usually oh yeah yeah yeah come on in. And that's how. It started precocious boy pushing his way into a dance class that he hadn't signed up for. And what do you remember about those those first days of dance class those first classes that you're taking remember taking to it right away. No i don't remember anything weirdly weirdly. I remember the hallway outside the dance studio. I remember there was lots of kids there. And i was i would i was there and just a lot of activity and was nervous about everything and they're all these girls like. I was the only boy i think. That's probably what kept me in. I was like the center of attention from all these little girls. Because i was like an oddity right. There was a boy in our dance class. But i didn't care. I guess i enjoyed it enough to keep coming back. And so then you end up at the national ballet at a young age. What was the training there. Well it was hard i remember. It was really hard. We trained Six days a week. I went from a recreational dancer to a professional training program so there was quite a learning curve and i remember just sweating a little sweaty kid. Dancing my butt off. And that's what we did you know like we were. We were hard workers and they pushed us so the transition was tough because they expected a lot from us. And it's like it's like showing up at the olympic training know. Oh oh okay we we start with one hundred situps. All right well okay. I mean we didn't do. We did sit ups but not it was tough to negotiate but then that became my new normal so any other job of had ever since even though they might have been difficult or hard just was never as hard as the training. Did at that school. So in a way i earned my stripes at a very young age very young. Yeah and were there any other indigenous dancers in the program when you were there Not immediately not that. I was aware of. I'm certainly became aware of a to indigenous was a little bit older and one was a bit younger than me. A remember lisa. She was i think she was initially bikeway. I remember santee. Smith uncle hoi. Those were my indigenous Sisters in the trenches with me. When did you have any favorite roles that you performed while you were there taking. I'm taking your really far back here. The way back time machine. I remember doing cracker. I really enjoyed that. That was fun as a kid. And then later i remember dancing when it was advanced student. I remember dancing with the company in sort of like a core roles like sort of group roles earn member. That was exciting for me. 'cause you know obviously been working my way towards joining their ranks and then finally always asked to participate in a few shows here in there so that was exciting. Hi i'm michelle. Shepherd host of uncover sherman any from cbc podcasts in nineteen. Ninety nine fifteen year old charming and undeveloped disappeared on her way to a job that police believed in exist. Four months later her remains were found in a wooded ravine. I revisit the case that a stayed with me for over twenty years. Ever since i i covered it as a crime reporter for the toronto star. You can find uncovered cher meany on abc. Listen or

Saskatoon Capelle Valley School For Deaf Children University Of Scotch National Ballet School Lebron Toronto Mumbai Canada Los Angeles Hockey Smith Michael Olympic Santee HOI Lisa Sherman CBC Shepherd
The Case for Sweatpants

The Experiment

03:00 min | Last week

The Case for Sweatpants

"Looking for a job dressed or do tastefully. Not expensive. you know. Clothing is actually the first visual impression. Other people have it some. Say it's a key to how do we appear to others to communicate only looked. there are good investment. I anton good nice to meet you not to be a complete creep right now and we've never actually met in person because of the pandemic but i question for you is what are you wearing. I am wearing sort of a shapeless dress. Slash top emmanuel is a staff writer at the atlantic. She tries to explain who we are. As americans through material things like beauty products kitchen appliances and the clothes we wear or don't wear like there's no way to say this without some. Are you wearing pants. I am not not wearing pants and lately. She's been spending a lot of time thinking about pants or not pants per se but what pants have to say about us. I think that fashion is a social language. When i was in high school in two thousand three it was the first time that i had had a super steady paycheck. What i wanted to do was buy a coach bag. I wanted to be the type of person who carried cam bag. The costs a couple of hundred dollars. That just seemed like the most sophisticated adult thing that i could do based on my conception of what sophisticated adults did in suburban atlanta so funny. The coach bag was so the thing in suburban miami florida as well it was like the pinnacle. Yeah at some point. It was sort of like i have psychoanalyze myself. I understand that my desire for these things. It was definitely like a striving impulse kind of thing you know. Even if you haven't spent a lot of time thinking about stuff like this close speak. They can at least try to tell people things like. I'm rich or i met a funeral. We've set up almost like these laws in american life about who gets to wear white at certain events or what it means to wear pink but in this time when many of us are barely seeing each other a man has been thinking about how the rules change which brings us back to pants. I think the The clothing item of the pandemic sweatpants again with sweat pence comfortable. You know the message sending out to the world with these sweatpants. You telling the

Emmanuel Atlantic Atlanta Miami Florida
Nicco Montano - UFC Champion

John Bartolo Show

03:34 min | 4 hrs ago

Nicco Montano - UFC Champion

"The list. Sponsors want a few of them now. Gallo technologies for the walls behind us rhino metals for the tables blackwater ammunition appreciate blackwater right on optics volkov firearms and pulsar thermals and infrared technology of come down in price. Go checkout pulsar. Love their stuff. Appreciate those guys appreciate all the sponsors. Don't forget galco get a special guest. Today i'm really excited to hear her story. She was the introductory. You have see. Women's flyweight champion jerry. Remember that i got that right. We got now. How do you say nico montenero montana. Montagna see i tried to get it right tanya and want you to say it before i was trying to get it exactly right and you are a representative of the tribe. Yeah navajo nation dinette. Drive isn't that crazy crazy to me. How does that work. Can i become like an honorary member. I mean i suppose anybody could as long as they're good embassador right. No i mean you could sit back and moved the mike if you want by the way if you want to get more comfortable but so intrigued by this. So so you're this is like this. You're involved this. Yeah yeah how does that work I suppose growing up there and being dinette in the first place helps a lot. Yeah when i when. I won the belts I honestly didn't know that was. There's this many people pulling for me. I granted i know how tight a native like a tribe is a community tribe. Yeah yeah so. When i came home with about The next day. After i had fought roxie there. Is this huge parade setup. I wasn't ready. I was still beat up and people were grabbing at me. And i was like what is happening. I'm just coming home to look at you guy arizona. That's crazy in there. Like first nation peoples who traveled down from canada to to be at the parade and i was just i was just blown away completely surprised now. How how does that work when you become a part of in called an organization or nation like that and they take you in and they make you you know not just a part of a family but a part of the tribe and part of all things you know and they start involving you do they do they look at you for all of a sudden you like making decisions or you. They're looking at you for advice and like how to do things right. yeah There's so we're our own entity technically sovereign though. It's still not quite clear that we still have to. We still have to work under federal guidance But we have our own president. We ever own vice president and we have different chapters throughout the novel reservation. And my mom's the vice president of the chapter and the gut. You guys were from where my grandparents own a trading post so they're still like Government system that ties everyone together. You could be like manny pacquiao. You could be like the queen of like the navajo. Nah i'm serious. It's a thing it's like a big deal.

Gallo Technologies Nico Montenero Montagna Tanya Jerry Montana Roxie Arizona Canada Manny Pacquiao
Episode 189: Damnatio Memoriae (Thats Latin for Cancel Culture)

The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

02:38 min | 11 hrs ago

Episode 189: Damnatio Memoriae (Thats Latin for Cancel Culture)

"Hey guys it's mike rowe. And this is the way. I heard it episode number one eighty nine. And it's called damn now xio memorial or damn not yo memorial or possibly damn nasio marie or maybe memorial. There is some ambiguity as to the proper pronunciation of this phrase. Call it what you will. It means the condemnation of memory and it seemed like an apt title for this episode. Since we'll be talking about one of the very few statues in this country not currently in danger of being toppled by an angry mob. This whole cancel culture thing. That's been dominating. The headlines led a lot of people to conclude that it's relatively new phenomenon. But fact is it's been going on for centuries it was the romans who originally called it. Damn nacho memorial day and they used it to great effect over the years removing statues of former heroes and political leaders who fell out of favour scratching out the faces of people and famous paintings and doing all sorts of things that we're currently doing today. And what i happen to believe is a misguided attempt to change the present by racing parts of the past That's why i wrote the story you're about to hear. It's the true story of a genuine hero who braved on the battlefield earned him a monument. Unlike any other then briefly discuss the strange circumstances that led to the commission of my own unlikely likeness in bronze some years ago back when i was impersonating a host on tv. Show here in. San francisco called magazine. Then i sit down with chuck the producer of this podcast who now lives in constant. Fear that i'm going to say something that gets cancelled to discuss the insanity unfolding here in san francisco where the geniuses on the local school board have voted to change the names of no less than forty four public schools. I referred to names like george. Washington abraham lincoln. Thomas jefferson theodore roosevelt. And a few dozen other notables whose monikers are now mud dam nasha memorial indeed. It's mostly thoughtful rumination on a mostly insane trend sweeping our nation and it all starts right now and buy right now. I mean right. After i reflect ever so briefly on the many benefits posting job for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash row. Let's start with the fact that it actually works for out of five people who use a

Nasio Marie Mike Rowe Thomas Jefferson Theodore Roos Nasha Memorial Chuck San Francisco Abraham Lincoln George Washington
How To Survive a Doomsday Cult

How To! With Charles Duhigg

08:07 min | 13 hrs ago

How To Survive a Doomsday Cult

"By new customer survey twenty nineteen potential savings will vary discounts vary not available in all states and situations. I'm not a professional designer but a lot of people these days. I do some design. I design my own newsletter. And i'm constantly having headaches with imagery like how to size the images i make for social media and for the newsletter itself. Neither are exactly the kind of us that can appro can help. Designers canvas pro is the easy to use design platform. That has everything you need to design like it comes with time saving tools that simplify and speed up the creative process. A great feature of canvas pro is that you only need to design image once and then you can have it automatically for whatever platform you wanna share design like a pro with canvas pro right now you can get a free forty five day extended trial when you use promo code. Just go to canvas dot me slash how to to get your free. Forty five day extended trial. That's c. a. n. v. a. dot m. e. slash how to canvas dot me slash how to hello slate podcast listeners. Help us make a better slate. By answering our survey it only takes a few minutes and you can find it at slate dot com slash survey. We're back with michael our listeners. Who grew up in cope. Michael wishes he could talk to his parents in a way that would help the family process what happened and move forward. I remember asking my father once. I said so. I'll discuss up to you of the us. There's one two three four of them who live on the street and i asked him. I said hey. Like how much of their problems do you think are caused by the fact that they were raised in a cult and he didn't have a good answer. It's almost like he didn't think it was a problem And i've found one of my sisters ones in l. a. and just utter mass. And you know the problem. Is that all she talks about is the coal and if they don't view it as a mistake now would it be more hurtful to you to leave the question unanswered or are you concerned. That's how they would react in. That would be even more difficult to deal with our beyond being hurt now. It's not really question a hurt. It's more it's more about hearing something said from someone who you care about. it's not about being sorrier. i just want them to admit they were wrong to raise twelve. Children around an apocalyptic cult full of pedophiles. That was wrong while michael was sharing his story with us. Rebecca stott was listening patiently. She's a writer in the uk and author of in the days of rain. A memoir about her own family's experience in a cult called the exclusive brethren michael. I just found that very moving because it's so similar and the way you describe your childhood the way you describe your confusion the way you describe the difficulty of speaking. I mean when. When i wrote my book i was in my early fifties and it felt like all of my life had been preparation for trying to write it. Write my father story. As well as my own and i found the book came to completion and was about to be published. I developed laryngitis and lost my voice for a whole month. No so whenever. I have an interview like this. I can feel the frog in my throat. it's fake there's something still censoring me. And that's in my own head. I'm still really surprised by the visceral nature of some of this stuff of owning my own reluctance to spill the beans. My mother's phrase to spill the beans is to portray the cult even if we left it. You know i'm. I'm so happy you said that because i'm shaking right now. You know that body that reaction. Yeah it's touching to hear that from someone else. yeah rebecca. Could you tell us a bit more about the exclusive brethren and what. It was like growing up so really a lot. Similarities am with michael's cult. We also were a torch that the rapture was coming and that if we went on the right side of the line we would be left behind to face the tribulations and the tribulations are. I mean we read the book of revelations again and again and again and again meetings were an hour. Long women weren't allowed to speak. The men had absolute authority in their homes in their communities. So you lived in constant threat of being excommunicated. They called it withdrawn from but it was basically. If you were withdrawn from you throw now you would never see your children again. So people stabbed everything was banned. No radio no television no holidays. No pets no risk watchers so we had no radios but my father liked to listen to the cricket scores in the back of the car so every now and again we see him taking radio out of the wheel section of underneath the car listening to the cricket scores. And i remember thinking. Am i supposed to denounce my father. But then in one thousand nine hundred seventy two leader of the exclusive brethren was caught having an affair with a married woman in the cult. He tried to pass it office. The will of god but the scandal drove rebecca's family and many others to leave. Rebecca was just eight years old. She later described that transition to the outside world as like being lost in town where all the signs had been changed into a language. I didn't know so. I'm fifty six now and i have nightmares still. I still sleep pork. Sometimes i still have high levels of anxiety. But i would also say. I've learned to live for them now. I've learned to god. This is gonna very twee in a bit pollyannaish. But i've learned to use it in my writing in terms of my imaginative world. I think as a small child. I spent a lot of time playing these strange. We didn't have books so all of my games were from the bible. And i suppose what i'm trying to say is that i have come to appreciate the ways. In which that strange childhood painful there was fearful though it was actually produced some quite rich things to too. And i a unique person because of it. I have such a strong impulse to run hundred percent. Yeah i'm always looking at like apartments and other cities and like imagining myself going to it's that we were always on the move to it. Within a year we move like six times and to this day. That's a that's a. It's a sensation that i kind of enjoy like the feeling of being on the go but like i know it's rooted in that so it's a bit dangerous and you have to. I mean for me. I try to catch myself. You know what. I'm sitting late at night like you looking at other houses in other test thinking what. What is that coming yes. I'm looking for the place that safe and you know even this house. When i bought this house in norwich where i live now one of the things i did and i found myself doing it late at night when i realized what i was doing. I loved loud. I was checking for flood warnings. I suddenly realized this like you've always bought houses on tops hills because you're afraid of water level rise and that's because you were raised to think that the tribulations will bring mass flooding and

Michael Rebecca Stott Rebecca Cricket Confusion UK United States Norwich
Part One: How The U.S.A. Murdered Panama

Behind the Bastards

08:09 min | 13 hrs ago

Part One: How The U.S.A. Murdered Panama

"Corporations direct access to our brains our point we no longer just consumers. At what point do we become their product. Listen to tomorrow's monsters on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Were warring my. I'm i'm robert evans hosted by into bastards. Podcast that's the worst people in all of history and consequently combat an awful lot of war crimes which is what we're going to be talking about today more or less with our special guests the air horns the air horns nine eight or nine airports chelsea. Are you doing today. I do in a day. It's all right little little cold and snowy out here in new york now. Got the Cut the lovely Brooklyn weather. But i i have at least a at least. They have a power in some kind of functioning functioning emergency services and and water and basic essentially. All those light yankee thing yeah this carpetbagger luxuries that we don't have down in texas. All we need is to freeze to death. Yeah and if we don't freeze to death to be built tens of thousands of dollars for several days of natural gas because that's how freedom looks. I'm in texas by the way Chelsea what do you know. What are you know about panama What i know about panama panama thinking about i usually think of teddy roosevelt and steam shovels. So your party. My animal yeah. That's that's that's what i usually think of I don't know much about the actual. I don't know much about it beyond like imperialism colonialism capitalism national strategy and engineering that is a lot of the history of panama. And that's we're going be talking about today today Are bastard is the united states of america. A little time for your mida heard of. I don't know In specifically we are talking about the relationship between the united states of america in panama. Which is one of the most abusive relationships in the entire history of geopolitics. It's really outstanding. Hey that's a nice. It's got there. Be a shame if america were to happen to it. North america So this this was all inspired when a friend advised me to take a look at a documentary called the panama deception which was made in like nineteen ninety four and is quite good and so i decided to start looking a little deeper into the history of panama. I found a book length. Study on the history of us panamanian relations and about two articles and my god it is. It is chelsea. It is as fucked up as i dunno sophie. What's something fucked up I'm like a bed lashed to the ceiling. I mean that makes sense. I was gonna say when people put their beds in their closets and then like then they can't get into a get stock and then you just it's just like you have no bed or caused. Yeah it's as fucked up as a bed closet chelsea why i usually. I usually think of somebody who like Uses the toilet and then doesn't slash comeback three or four days later Yeah you could say choked on coffee you could. You could say that. The history of us panamanian relations would be embodied as like if panama is like a small apartment in the us is a guest at a party in that apartment. The us has just like continuously leaving upper deckers for the last hundred and fifty years or so just just just shit in the water tank. That's that's america as regards panama. It also drinking all of their beer. It's good stuff just really good stuff So panama's one of those countries. You can look on a map and immediately know is just kind of completely fucked in a historic sense right. It's a beautiful place but in terms of geopolitics it's just doomed because of where it is in the world. It's sorta like how you can look at ukraine with its fertile soil in this position like right between the middle east eastern europe and western europe and be like boy. I bet those people got their shit fucked up constantly because other folks needed wheat panama's in the same kind of position their northern neighbor is costa rica and their southern neighbor is columbia. The nation is the bridge between central and south. America and more to the point is the narrowest landmass in central america. So if you wanted to say dig. A big trench through a country to let people travel from the atlantic ocean to the pacific ocean without sailing around an entire extra continent. It's basically the best place to do. It and people realized that pretty much as soon as they found panama in the seventeen hundreds and eighteen hundreds travelers. Who wanted to go from new york. To san francisco would generally go by way of panama. So if you were trying to get to like doing the new york to san francisco route traveling through the middle of the united states. Just you you would. You would probably die horribly right. We all played oregon trail or some version of that. So your best bet was to sail down to panama from new york. Then spend like three days going across panama. On the back of a borough and then ceo from panama's pacific coast up to san francisco. That was how you did like with from east coast to west coast back in the day And i think if things were still that way brentwood probably be cheaper in los angeles. So you've got this. You've got this perfectly situated country and from kind of the beginning of the united states being a thing american or us leaders are looking down there and being like boy. I bet we can fuck and cut. Cut a hole in the middle of that country and that would really make it. Easier for us to colonize north america So like most of latin america panama was owned by spain. For centuries and spain used its resources to buy gold for the various kings and spices to make better pie in eighteen twenty one panama freed itself from. Its now ailing colonial master. There was a strong independence movement and the isthmus but they were overruled by the folks who wanted to join the grand columbia federation so he had panama like columbia. A whole bunch of central and south america separates from spain in eighteen. Twenty one and a bunch of guys in panama are like. Hey you know it'd be rad. If we were our own country but more of them are like you know it would probably be a better idea if we were part of columbia. 'cause we're tiny in colombia's real big and they're probably just gonna take us over if we're if we're not if we don't get on board the columbia train. It's the story as old as time now. Panama subsequently tried to free itself from columbia and eighteen. Th they they they of different independence attempts in the eighteen thirties up to eighteen forty but it never quite worked out and the region's separatist tendencies were boosted by the fact that they were very isolated. There were no roads connecting them to columbia. There were a couple of cities and towns in. Panama was not heavily populated and they didn't really trade with colombia. They mainly traded with the caribbean and Other parts of like south america rather than their countrymen in bogota from the beginning of panama american saw the misses something to exploit in eighteen forty six. The usa signed the bid lack treaty with colombia. And this basically in the treaty the us promised to protect colombia's control over panama. In exchange for access to any future canal that might be dug through the country. So we were like. Hey hey columbia. You know you guys are new country. You don't have much of a military yet. This place places realized invaluable will will take. We'll protect it for you. We're a big country. We've got a whole lot of developed. We got ships and everything you do. You just chill out. Let us protect panama. And if someone happens to build a canal there we get free access to it. You know surely a deal without any sort of alterior motives to it. That will never be abused by the united states. Right wasn't the united states at the time still considered by the rest of world to be a young upstart with. Oh yeah Like in comparison compares to the european powers of the time like well. Yeah france in france and spain for the usa in this period is younger than nancy. Pelosi

Panama USA Robert Evans Columbia New York Texas Teddy Roosevelt San Francisco Brooklyn Spain Sophie Apple North America Grand Columbia Federation Colombia Western Europe Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean Ukraine Costa Rica
Episode 337: Henry Cavendish (Entry 197.JB2825)

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

06:45 min | 14 hrs ago

Episode 337: Henry Cavendish (Entry 197.JB2825)

"A remember growing up thinking that was kind of a personality type. Yeah and as a kid. I think you're very aware of sinus. Because unless you're like the one percentile most outgoing kid you're pure shy in some ways right. You're shy of new people. Your side adults. Were you shy. I feel like i was shy of grownups. I remember hiding behind some curtains in our living room. One time my parents had friends over. And i did not want to be on display as far as my family's story agra goes. I was not shy at all. My mom said that. When i was a an infant or toddler age child i would try to meet the eyes of every person in the grocery store and if one of them would meet my eyes i would bat my eyelashes and try to get them to come over and a young bill. Clinton tickle me under the chance to albertsons to all. The moms always loved grownups. I think if if there's any place. I was shy. It was with other kids in the sense of like a group of kids playing over there. I have no idea how to approach them how to behave. Yeah i feel like when we talk about the tr- just the foundational traumas of childhood. We always focus too much on the family like it really is just the terror of what some other kid on the playground might do. Yeah he might. Just what if you just said something mean earn. Knock you over for no reason to. That's more dangerous than almost for most of us than anything. That could happen at home. So i think a lot of people. That's the those are the foundational child experience. I didn't relate to other little boys. I would go try and talk to them and i don't know if you remember all the way back to where your son was a little boy. Little boys don't wanna talk. They want to do something truck noises. They wanna hit you. Knock you down so i would go try and talk to them and i was never successful until i figured out that the girls were my friends. Yeah it's a lot that's a lot easier. Its own kind of terror to that continues to govern my life. I just feel like shyness. Now i think of it as a symptom. It could be any number of things like my daughter has. She was always a super outgoing kid. That would just march up to any little any little kid on the playground and they'd be best friends in five minutes and then she'd cry on the car on the way home because she'd never see them again but she kind of has a real anxiety about dealing with adults to the point like she doesn't want to order restaurants. She's like you order for me. I don't want to have to choose. And i don't want to talk to the server you know. He's pretty good with us. Oh yeah like you know with. She's if anything. She's overconfident with people she knows. Yeah but there's that or there's just kind of an introver- introvert kind of personality. We you and i both have this degree where we can work a room. But that's not how we recharge. Yeah that's right. Well i feel like these days or at least in the last ten years. Shyness has become almost a political designation. Right there are people who are adults and identify as as super shy and that dictates how they live their lives who their friends okay with the extroverts have rammed the culture for so long. I think it's okay to have them be the ones for a change in that everybody online just jumping to be the first run to announce you know what i'm actually wait for it. An introvert a. Who would have guessed that you didn't see that county extroverts so there's the end and there's just varying places on severe. Maybe what our parents would have thought of as severe shyness. We now would diagnosis different locations on a spectrum of of of autism similar behaviors where there's actually something neurologically different about the way the person handles sociality and social cues right. I mean it's there is such a thing as a librarian. Someone has to sit in a quiet room. Far i've said this before. But when i worked in tech i was surrounded by people who had chosen a job where they would never have to see anyone. Yeah least of all a user of the thing they're working on you know what's interesting. Is that some of the most introverted people. I know who formerly worked in offices before the pandemic in conversation with them. I've always kind of open with boy. You must love the pandemic because you don't have to deal with people anymore and i've heard multiple very shy. Introverted people say actually. I had plenty of solitude before because i made sure of it. My work life was the only place i interacted with people. And i miss it right there. Ideal was not zero interaction. They had cleverly managed the kind of interaction they wanted. Yeah and then and now the virus that little bit of like standing next to the microwave in the employee break room. It was enough to interacting with colleagues. Because i've been very lucky to have the pandemic privilege of just to live with some people. I like right and that kind of blunts it because they were most of the people i would see on a normal day you know. Can you imagine. And i'm sure this is true for millions of people. They don't like their home right. They have a bad dad or a bad room. Mater very like alcoholic mother whatever or brick wall instead of view. You know they look forward to just you know decompressing for a few hours in a a bar a club or a restaurant or a bookstore. Right they have a cot in a in a in a single room occupancy hotel and this has been a night that's the place they retreat to for the least amount of time possible and then this yeah. I do feel lucky about about that. Do you know people who are maybe performative. Or bordering on exhibitionist in some professional field. That are kind of painfully shy in person. Oh a lot yeah. That's not uncommon. Not at all in the early day in the you know back when rock and roll was a very different thing you know. Rock musicians and sex workers had a lot of overlap. Socially and i knew a lot of women in their twenties that were making a living performative lee. As as you know dancers or or other kind of burlesque performers and a lot of them were not especially social but had figured out a way to Behind glass or on a stage you know be i mean the the most social

Albertsons Clinton Autism
Full Episode: Monday, March 1, 2021

Nightline

04:13 min | 14 hrs ago

Full Episode: Monday, March 1, 2021

"Thanks for joining us tonight. A look at generational wealth stolen from black families and how one community of entrepreneurs is fighting to close the racial wealth gap just as cova threatened to erode it even further. Here's my nightline co anchor byron pitts with the latest in our turning point series teal. Right here at the foot of this road. You saw his body lying in the ditch with this is kenneth. Have your child ever forget such a thing. Not bad for seventy eight year old josephine bowling her childhood her life shaped by her father's murder more than seventy years ago. A murder that today stands as a metaphor for dreams to her. The unhealed wounds of racism etched in stone in raised whites jealous over the business accessible negro. I believe to be the natures of ammo bowling too successful to be a negro. He had to farm. He was important about forty people. He started a milk route where he transported from other blacks to the dairies in montgomery and then when he went to the church. Is my mom care. Trunk of food and people balk plates from us. Oh and ice cream. Sounds like in many ways. Your debt was the jeff bezos. The amazon of his time yes so he was killed because he was out of his place and deemed by to go. Hi how dare he. Your danny elmer bowling was thirty. Nine shot seven times by at least two white men lynch long historic route eighty near montgomery in loudoun county alabama or wrote made famous by martin luther king junior and thousands who march from selma to montgomery and what impact that your father staff have on your family. We lost everything but it was something that we had to live with adjust within and gone l. more was one of untold numbers of successful business owners throughout the country. Who found the weight of thrive in the early. Nineteen hundreds at the time of my father's steph yet. Forty thousand dollars in the bank in montgomery is estimated. It would be worth what now that hundred thousand dollars. The family stories would of generational wealth not just lost but stolen truth repeated across the country a true with severe consequences today. A typical white family has nearly eight times. The wealth of their black counterparts josephine says after a father's murder white debt collectors fraudulently claimed they were owed and took everything plunging her family into poverty. The older brothers quit school and got jobs. My mother got a job working on a dry cleaners. She put me through college. Working in lingerie fokin church. Say your mama made away at of knowing. That's what they were saying. Yes only what men was arrested for moors murderer and the charges were later dropped by a grand jury but you thinking hard difficult was not accused of a crime had not committed a crime yet. Meredith being successful leaving seven children life loss never forgot well never reclaim when you cut down to the bottom with nothing to build on. And that's basically where black people are. You have nothing to build on for those who who in this moment. My ass is elmer. Bowling's daughter asking for a handout. Absolutely not my father did not and all will add. You got fired just now think that would be the last thing. My father believed in work.

Byron Pitts Josephine Bowling Montgomery Bowling Cova Jeff Bezos Kenneth Loudoun County Selma Martin Luther King Fokin Church Alabama Josephine Meredith
Bernie Madoff | Collapse | 3

American Scandal

02:06 min | 14 hrs ago

Bernie Madoff | Collapse | 3

"Two thousand eight a small peninsula and the south of france today. The mediterranean sea is a bright bright blue off in the distance waves crash against the rocky shore. It's a picturesque setting and one of bernie madoff favorite places in the world. That's why he's here now. Lying in the sun made off sinks lower into his wicker chair and smiles as he traces the curves of a cloud for made off. This trip couldn't have come soon enough. He desperately needed to get away from new york and the nightmare. He's been living through. All across the country homeowners are defaulting on their mortgages. That's causing stocks to tumble. The global economy has entered something like a death spiral with people calling it. The great recession claps has been especially disastrous for bernie madoff because his clients keep demanding to pull their money out of the stock market. There's a problem that money isn't actually invested in stocks instead. Made off has been using his client's money to pay his other clients. He's merely shifting money around from one account to the other to make it look like his clients or profiting from actual stock. That's the heart of his ponzi scheme but with the economic collapse. It's getting harder and harder to keep the scheme going. He's running out of money. Which is why made off his here today. In his home on the french riviera. He's with his wife and friends and he's hoping to clear his head and to figure out how to get himself out of this mess out on. The porch made off leans forward and grabs a bottle of champagne from the bucket of ice young corks the bottle and fills three glasses. All right everyone got us a crew. So let's drink up and enjoy ourselves. Made off hands out. The glasses and his friend raises his in a toast. Cheers everyone to a year. That can't get any worse. Amen to that. But you know we're here in the most beautiful place in the world so how about this today. Let's talk about something else. Anything else other than stocks and money. Something else ernie. What else is there. Besides stocks and money.

Bernie Madoff Rocky Shore Mediterranean Sea South Of France New York Ernie
180: What if your plane was hijacked?

This is Actually Happening

00:57 sec | 16 hrs ago

180: What if your plane was hijacked?

"In ethiopia. They came over to the united states. In december of nineteen mediate. And i did not find out until about college that my parents actually escaped ethiopia due to a political regime. That was just terrorizing people who didn't agree with what the government was saying. There was actually a really large migration ethiopians to the united states during that time because there was just so many people affected by it and my father was one of those people one time they had seen him with a person. They suspected to be against the state at church and arrested. My father and my mom did not know where he was for days so that was his last straw and you decided that it was time to leave and they would come to washington. Dc in december of nineteen eighty eight. To never come back to the obey. At least twenty years

Ethiopia United States Washington
Anne Lamott: Loved and Chosen

Everything Happens with Kate Bowler

07:43 min | 19 hrs ago

Anne Lamott: Loved and Chosen

"But that's not the way this works. When i was thirty five i was diagnosed with stage four cancer. And here's the fun thing about that. The world loves you better when you are shiny when you are cheerful when you still believe that your best life now is right around the corner. I've written multiple books on the history of the idea that you can always fix your life. So i'm going to be the one to say it. There are some things we can change and some things we can't and it's okay that life isn't always getting better. We can have beauty and meaning community and love and we will need each other. If we're going to tell the truth. Life is a chronic condition. And there's no cure for being human. We are not disillusioned anymore our little darlings our pet theories but what we deserve and how this might go are gone. They've been swept away not by a breeze but by gale force winds. And yeah all right here we are. I know this sounds very sanctimonious but a long time ago. Someone told me that. I would need something very strong to stand on to live here like this. Virtues said my friend. Reverend doctor warned. Smith and i believed him not only because he was wearing a clerical collar but because he always like he had been built by them virtues like love he was very good at being loving. Never nearly sarcastic as i am and hope he seemed to know that hope was something that i had pretty sure that i've gotten confused with optimism when i look around at people can know how to stand there. Built by something other than a ghazi photo filter an assign in a living room that reads live laugh love. I realized that. I'm searching for people who embody good strong virtues. Virtues are not just concepts. they're ideas that must be practiced. It's not love if you're not loving. You're not faithful if you don't step out to the unknown it's awful because it must be done tried. We can't just imagine it into being when people and communities can bring them to life put skin and bones on concepts and ideals it is wonderful to behold it allows us to dream. What would it be like if this worked. Can this help me live. Can this take me a little further to the place. I wanna go. The person i want to become today is one of my favorite writers who wrestles with the embodiment of our deepest hopes to be transformed. She is a dream boat to read. So i will spare no time and saying i am elated to be talking to amber lot and lamont is a writer and speaker. Who doesn't sugar coat. A single terrible thing. Her beautiful books like traveling mercies plan b bird by bird which should be required reading for any writer and her latest dusk night. Don are filled with honesty disappointment and hope her essays about alcoholism motherhood and jesus will leave you in a fit of tears or laughter or both at the same time and remind you that sarcasm is also a spiritual gift and thank you so much for being with me. I thought my life was complete before this but apparently it's happening right now. Thank you data. Love you slow so glad to be with you. And i loved your book. You and you concept. I think i think it might be fun where we could just start with reality because every other premise seems absurd as we speak. We are living through a version of the apocalypse. And your book begins there. You brook no nonsense about the subject in case anyone feels confused about this. What are the things we genuinely have to fear. Well steph yeah. I don't really care that much about my own desk. Because as a believer. I sort of think of it as a really dramatic change of address but fear is the deaths of the people. I love most seniors. Three people that I can't imagine living without and but my best friend son. Just i use twenty three and a little bit matic on. I'm not quite speaking to god about this yet. But the grace that. That house was filled with immigration. His passing was so incredible and yet she lost her son. You know our child and so she's been sober songs. I have thirty four years and she said to her sponsor i'm just terrified in the end. The sponsor were you afraid to. I'm afraid i can't do this and this must be doing. It wont really helped me that up to that last brass and until the next day when the davis death we bathe them together in now she was doing you know. Kovin has been so heartbreaking. Not because what the impact on me. And i will too are no sixty seven next month and so i got my shot and get another shot next week but in the world where people in the rest of the world of people thinks through who are all ready living through grinding poverty and and the anjana side you know and then on top of it this disease it's terrifying and yet without sugar coating anything the response has broken my heart open in the good way it carly simon said there's more room in a broken heart and watch people take care of the wieger as right now and enter take care of the the party's stricken all over america is medicine. It's a ruby said that through love. All pain will turn to medicine. It doesn't say pain or some of the paintings his all pain from watching that around me. in in tears. I'm sure cheers too. Yeah there's an awe seeing like all the ragged edges and then seeing everybody drop close to it with love. It does absolute. We stagger me. Every time i'm near to it. And i'm always shaking people down for money for another because for some weird reason. I'm good at in people i've never met will send me like sounds dollars. I mean it's real one hundred dollars with a lot. I think you feel it. The pupil i've never met with jimmy. A sows rollers. And that's what love looks like. Sometimes tough on a lot older than you are but when i was coming up in the fifty s then early sixties. People talk about sacrifice because he is come to the war. My parents generation had my mother's from liverpool. So she'd been there. My father was in the navy and and they knew from sacrifice. Ask that's right or my parents esiason. I wasn't allowed to think about god. Or jesus is sacrificial love but my

Lamont Cancer Kovin Smith DON Wieger Carly Simon Davis Ruby America Jimmy Liverpool Esiason Navy
Reisa Sperling  Making Alzheimers a Memory

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

04:24 min | 20 hrs ago

Reisa Sperling Making Alzheimers a Memory

"I'm alan alda. And this is clear and vivid conversations about connecting and communicating. One of the problems is that we only recognize alzheimer's disease often when it's already a pretty advanced stage. And so if you add to that the people of mild cognitive impairment and then add the people whom i study. We call preclinical alzheimer's disease before they have clear symptoms. You're probably talking. Fifteen million people in the united states alone who are at some stage But i do have high hopes that if we could start treating much earlier that we could bring that symptomatic number much lower and of course. That's the stage that so devastating to people in their families. That's not the recent sperling. She's leading to major. Clinical trials aimed at the prevention of alzheimer's disease. Her earlier research on how memories are formed in our brains is what led me to visit her lab in boston several years ago. We were filming an episode of scientific. American frontiers called. Don't forget this is so great to be talking with you today and to see you again. After all these years you remember the last time we met. I was just coming out of an mri machine and you told me. I had a plump pippa campus. I know and in fact people have been giving me a hard time ever since that about whether their hypocr campuses as plump as alan alda's So i absolutely remember. I still have your picture from that up in my office so those sadly i don't get to go to my office much these days right now. People at dinner parties all the time about five and and since we had that very interesting afternoon together. I think it since then that you've been concentrating on alzheimer's isn't it. Yes i you know. I was already interested in alzheimer's back. Then but i was really Approaching it from studying normal memory or aging memory and comparing that to alzheimer's and one of the things that's really changed Is i really wanted to make a dent in trying to slow down alzheimer's before it starts so really Tried to take what we've learned from our imaging work and the memory test work and apply it in actual clinical trials so. I've really been focused in prevention trials and using all these methods to say. Can we stop the symptoms before they start. Wouldn't that be wonderful. The scale of the problem. It just seems to get worse and worse. What's the percentage of people now experiencing alzheimer's so it's estimated. It's about one in nine people over the age of sixty five and that's really at the stage of dementia so in the united states. That's about close six million people now But i think one of the promises that we only recognize alzheimer's disease often when it's already at a pretty advanced stage and so if you add to that the people of mild cognitive impairment and then add the people whom is study. We call preclinical alzheimer's disease before they have clear symptoms. You're probably talking. Fifteen million people in the united states alone who are at some stage but i do have high hopes that if we start treating much earlier that we could bring that symptomatic number much lower and of course. That's the stage that so devastating to people on their families that would certainly be ideal because as advances in medicine keep us alive longer. More and more verse will develop this disease. The rate is now phenomenal ended so we were in the middle of one pandemic and this is in a way a secondary epidemic that we don't we don't regard as such absolutely in fact you know. I have thought a lot about this over the past year because it seemed at times like you know.

Alzheimer's Disease Alan Alda Pippa Campus United States Boston Dementia
If Government Did Its Job We Might Not Need GoFundMe

Sway

00:58 sec | 1 d ago

If Government Did Its Job We Might Not Need GoFundMe

"If you read my reporting or have been listening to sway for a while. You already know that. I'm all about holding tech companies to account facebook twitter. Google these are the new gatekeepers publishers and curator's of our lives and they have serious responsibilities to uphold. But there's another platform with life altering consequences for its users but doesn't usually get bundled in with those tech giant's go fund me. It's crowd funding site. Where steve bannon can raise money right alongside your local little league team and if you look closely at what go fund me is being used for today especially during the pandemic. It's really become more like a safety. Net filling the gaps. Were government has failed. And i know it's not what the platform was intended for but this new and crucial role for go fund. Me only adds my sense that is worth examining just like all those other companies so here with me. Answer questions about how they make decisions. On controversial campaigns like bannon's content moderation

Steve Bannon Twitter Facebook Google Bannon
NotPetya, Part 1

Malicious Life

03:35 min | 1 d ago

NotPetya, Part 1

"We read the declaration of independence and on martin. Luther king's day each of us spends the whole day reflecting on dr king and the injustices against african americans in this country. Both past and present. You all do that right right. Unlike in america ukrainians used their national holiday as a mere excuse to take a relaxing vacation the day before constitution day in two thousand seventeen only. The yanko was heading to a country house where he'd spend the long weekend with his family. There've yanko is founder of information systems security partners Security lab which in some ways has become the go to for ukrainian targets of russian. Abd's ukraine is targeted a lot by russia so the folks at isp are probably more deserving of vacations than most of the rest of us but only was mistaken in thinking he would be able to enjoy our relaxing holiday weekend during his drive north to the countryside that morning of the twenty seven his phone began to light up. He had to pull off the highway. Then as the gravity of the situation became clear. He ducked into a roadside restaurant to get on his computer by the afternoon. Oleg was calling every executive at every company he knew telling them to unplug all their computer systems immediately. Shut everything down. Whatever the cost. Usually this isn't an easy pitch to make most executives shutter the idea of shutting down their whole business for any amount of time could any cyber incident really outweigh the cost of a few days or even a few hours of last profit but what was unique about this cyber incident and what might have made all his job easier is that it didn't take any cyber expertise to understand that something bad was happening. Unlike data leak or an account compromise the effects where abundantly clear to the naked eye from sandra a book written by technology journalist. Andy grinberg quote when the yanko emerged from the restaurant in the early evening. He stopped to refuel his car and found that the guest patients credit card payment system had been taking out to with no cash and his pockets. He i'd his gas gauge wondering. If he had enough fuel to reach his village across the country ukrainians were asking themselves similar questions whether they had enough money for groceries and gas to last for the blitz whether they will receive their paychecks and pensions and whether their prescriptions would be filled and quote computer systems around. The country were utterly disabled from

Yanko Luther King Ukraine ABD Martin Oleg Andy Grinberg America Sandra
How To Fix It: Crime

Don't Shoot The Messenger

07:40 min | 2 d ago

How To Fix It: Crime

"Picture into perspective in two thousand twelve toll. Now which is what nine years the murder rate increase by thirty seven cents so quite substantially year on year and any other car category. That's increased that much by forty percents is armed robberies aggravated which that is robberies where to with david changes weapons threaten or use a weapon to steal from that. Obviously there needs to be killed raped six so we have been getting increasingly since two thousand twelve to the extent that they are now forty three thousand on the tax statistics for two thousand nine hundred twenty twenty. That's with forty three thousand more on your ovaries across the country than was the case in two thousand and twelve so costa hanging trendy bowl armed attacks heavy damage and the numbers of reuters. We're looking at a five hundred. Four murders taking place in so we certainly notch hitting in the right direction so the country is becoming less safe which we know is likely linked to a whole bunch of other factors like increasing unemployment. Just so we can keep in mind what we're aiming for. I asked gareth to remind us what society's looked like which have very low levels of violent crime decide is available. Violent crime society tend to be very stable have been stable for a long time with the population has been exposed to violence for example in haven't been possibility walls or any kind of internal strife for a long time that tend to have strong social networks strong cultural norms that resist violence way of dealing with problems. They tend to his co. Punishment at high levels tend to be very focused have strong social networks and support systems good education systems and about necessary wealthy countries. Rich country sullivan. Middle income oprah bit but those kinds of factors that tend to be associated with lower levels of violence. Here's one of the things that makes. Crime seem such an intractable issue. We can all think of examples of places that used to be safe crime-free peaceful which have now become crime infested hell holes be they in south africa or internationally. It's much more difficult to think of the converse places that used to be overrun by crime. And now i just as delightful and peaceful as can be because we assume that would require a whole constellation of factors improved economic opportunities. Better policing may be better drug policies. A whole bunch of stuff but actually there's a really good example of a whole very big country which experienced a kind of precipitous drop in crime in the last decades of the twentieth century. That country is the little known united states of america. My name is bernard. E harcourt. And i am a professor of law. Political science but not hartford is one of the most distinguished legal scholars in the world. He heads up two units at columbia university in new york. And he's also a total manche. I say that because we put in through technological hell recording this episode and he remained very nice throughout anyway. Not makes the point that america's big cities in particular were pretty dodgy places to be for much of the second half of the twentieth century. United states had experienced vastly increasing rates of crime from the end of the nineteen sixties up until nineteen ninety one basically and so there had been a spike in violent and property offenses during the nineteen seventies and during the nineteen eighties. There have been three spikes that corresponded really with three different drugs waves. The last of which at the turn of the nineteen ninety s was crack cocaine and because of the shifts in the drug markets and the fact that crack cocaine was with a new drug that was being distributed by new organizations. There was a lot of violence associated with the drug trade at the time and then something changed from around thousand nine hundred ninety one onwards. There's this massive decline in crime across the united states. We're talking sixty percent decrease in robberies and murder in cities like new york and los angeles. I mean those figures to make south african weep new york. Authorities are very quick to take credit based on the policing theory generally known as the broken windows approach which will discuss in a second. But actually bernard says. That just doesn't really make sense. The same thing was happening in the city of los angeles with a police force. That was completely dysfunctional. So there there was no broken windows policing going on. In fact the lapd was completely dysfunctional. Because it just had the rodney king incident and it was going through a period basically about to get federal oversight because of the planting of weapons and drugs on people that was happening in the nineteen nineties so a dysfunctional police department. And if you looked at the rates in los angeles actually robberies declined smidgen more than in new york over the period and what you saw cross the entire united states was a remarkable wonderful drop in crime which frankly no one really has been able to explain in this country. Let me just repeat that. In case he's owned out for a second. The usa experienced this incredible drop of crime across the country in the ninety s seeing reductions of sixty percent and more in robberies and murders and nobody is quite sure why not says they've been all kinds of wild theories aimed at explaining the lowering of the american crime rate. The economist steven levitt for instance. Who you might know from freakonomics has together with his colleagues. Come up with a model. That suggests that the legalization of abortion in america in one thousand nine hundred ninety two may have contributed to the drop in crime. Other economists think that's crazy but if we actually entertain that for a second. We know that in south africa despite abortion being legal only a fraction of the abortion services that government should be offering up and running so if the freakonomics dude is right making access to abortion in south africa. Easier and safer could put a big dent in the crime rate. But the one thing bernard says cannot possibly explain why the drop in american crime is policing and that's because both the quality and methods used by american police in different cities was wildly varying so in new york city that trump has popularly been attributed to the theory known as broken windows policing. The idea of the birth and windows was first introduced an article in one thousand nine hundred eighty two and what it proposed effectively. Was that mina forms of public disorder. If left unchecked lead to more serious forms of crime so neighborhood wet graffiti appears designated where broken windows happen and aric nord consume. Expect to see more hardcore misdemeanors taking place and the flip side of this. Which is the policing theory. Is that if you crack down on the broken windows these minor infractions. You can preempt the rest of the crime the pr campaign around this theory. Which

America Bernard New York Gareth South Africa Los Angeles Reuters Costa Oprah Sullivan Columbia University David Hartford Rodney King Steven Levitt Donald Trump New York City
635: Chip in My Brain

This American Life

07:56 min | 2 d ago

635: Chip in My Brain

"Wbz chicago this. American life amara glass with the rise of cunanan and other various conspiracy theories and fake news out there. Lots of people around the country have had to figure out what to do when a loved one starts believing starts being consumed by something that is not true at all the easy choice. Of course do nothing. It's really hard to change anybody's mind about anything especially somebody whose beliefs are not grounded in reality but some people choose to intervene like in our story. Today i put on the air before the pandemic before. The current news cycle the parents in the story. They thought they were close to their son. Who's doing really well in school thinks fine anyway. It's our show today. A story we caught chip in my brain. David kessler tells what happened which begins with basketball. It would probably be wrong to say that. Could he try big loved basketball at the beginning. It would definitely be wrong to say he was good at it. He wasn't at all. He was good at world of warcraft. Though the video game. I sometimes i still almost cry like thinking about the first time i walked in. The storm wind the capital human city and the music changes. And you see these like beautiful huge castle and you're walking in and it's like is just really it's amazing could. He says he wasn't exactly avoiding physical activity. The game was super fun. He and his friends would all log on going adventures together. Someone who used to play a lot of video games felt like bad etiquette not ask who is online character was could he told me and knowing him. A little bit now seems entirely appropriate. He was a paladin which a holy knight who can fight but also he's nice no cast healing spells when his co. adventures get hurt could eventually build them up to level sixty ties. You can go. I was just really proud of having six eight light forge gear which was nothing but just to say that sports were not cody's top priority in gym class. When they'd have to run laps he'd always be at the back basketball somehow. He kind of liked his dad played when he was growing up so early. On in third grade cody found himself on this local youth league team. I was not very athletic at all. I remember being at basketball games from my friend. Daniel and we'd be talking about war. The warcraft like game was going on on the bench. Okay well from mom's perspective. I thought he was adorable. That's mom drew. try big. And here's dead jimmy tribe who wasn't real aggressive. He's in the middle of the court watching everybody run back and forth if he got the ball he wanted. He's just give it to him. He would he would just so sweetly handed off to another player. I didn't really have a problem with that. To be honest at that age he was little. I thought this is my dear sweet boy. He'll get it he'll get it eventually but it bothered him. You know after a while that the boys were making fun of him. Drew describes herself as a kind of helicopter. Mom which seems right while i was there. Talking to cody. She kept mumias. Are you guys hungry. Happened smoothie i'm going to get one drew says the whole family is kind of kooky whenever someone was leaving they'd be sure to say i love you to the other person and i don't mean leaving the house just like leaving the room cody's dad jimmy. Says he had a hard time getting his father to say i love you. So this is their fix. The tribes live in texas on the outskirts of austin. Jimmy wasn't early tech entrepreneur. He founded a company that made the computers that ran. Atm machines so they had a nice house on a big piece of land. There were cows around but no neighbors. You could walk to which jimmy told me. He regretted as it happened. There was no basketball court out behind the house so they decided to get cody some lessons like instead of a piano teacher. Something get him a basketball teacher. His dad found someone through the local youth league. A guy named aj could. He's in third grade at the time. So so i remember the first meeting. He came in the front door and he was very friendly. You know what. I remember feeling at the time tall. Six foot six. I think probably asked him. Oh my god can you dunk. And he's like. Oh yeah i can. He said they used to calm. Springs was his nickname because he dunked a lot so that first day. Aj walks in. They all hang out by the front door. Cody is shy. But ag gets right down on his level the two of them go out to the basketball court talking the whole way when they get their code can't really even do a layup and ages like okay. We can fix this. Let's do some basics. He teaches coding. This drill rear stand just to the side of the basket trying to bank it in off this magic spot. Then you get the rebound go to the other side and do it again back and forth back and forth and he would put his hand through the hoop and act like a little monster dragon or something like squiggle his fingers around like you know. Feed the monster feed the monster. So i thought that was pretty fun. Aj works with cody two days a week then three days a week sometimes other kids come over so they can all together and it's great mom would bring out snacks for everyone or if other kids weren't around mom or dad would get drafted. We would stand there and pretend to be a player on the team so that they could you know or he told us like try to move into them or try to steal the ball or you know so. We can kind of be silly doing that too right. Yeah it was really fun but not on the hot days sage. I don't wanna do this too. Hot word spreads around town about this great basketball trainer. Other parents hiram. Aj and cody. They have something kind of special. Just click may have this way of being around each other. That seems sweet. Energy was working with cody. Would trash talk on the cord. Which i always thought of is involving a lot of swearing but edgy. Talk really hilarious kind of trash talking just messing with someone asking weird random questions in the middle of the game pay. Would you have for breakfast. Like he would act like my mom sometimes like he would talk to my mom's voice and be like okay. Cody make the shot. You know time to make your go. You know like you just get in there and try hard you know and that would obviously crack me up and it would be hard to focus. Could he played constantly. The family went on a trip. He would deflate a basketball stick it in the suitcase then reinstated after they arrived. When you're a kid you want that to be something that your special or even just a little good because as a kid you start off being terrible everything that is like the definition of being so when you meet someone who helps you get good at something. It can feel amazing. Could you remember this one afternoon. Maybe fourth grade on court out back where it all just felt perfect. We were just doing jump shots. And i was like making like all of them like never done like making all of them and one of my brother's friends had come to hang out with my brother and he was up at the top kind of watching us and i noticed that and i was like to me like he was older and cool and like i was making them and he could see i was making And i just like this pride just like it's something i loved the shooting and i was doing good at it and i just remember feeling like i was like yeah floating on air. It was really nice. Aj was there. Yeah he was coaching me here. I'm giving you the passes the next year. Could he got the mvp award for the school team in some ways. Aj was like a big kid himself. Drew says he often seemed more comfortable with kids than adults and as he gets older j. Really start to become friends after games. Could he would always call. Aj to tell them how it went. Which kind of drove my parents nuts. Actually because they wanted to talk to me after the game in the car. And i would be talking. Aj on the phone. The hallway home shows like how close are you. are you know. Aj would sometimes pick cody up from middle school. Could he started to listen to the music. James young mc buster moves a favorite. When cody went clothes

Cody Basketball WBZ Amara Glass Cunanan Jimmy Tribe David Kessler Drew Jimmy AJ Chicago Daniel Austin AG Texas