Coding

Listen to learn about the latest news, updates and reviews on programming languages, best practices and coding methods aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from The Focus IS the Work

Developer Tea

00:53 sec | Last week

A highlight from The Focus IS the Work

"In your life, specifically, we very often allow focus to be dictated by your feelings. And my goal for this episode is to help you separate feelings and focus or at least give you the motivation to know why you should. Separating feelings and focus. First, you need to decide what you will focus on using all of your decision making tools. Since that second episode of this show, we've talked about decision making in one capacity or another for years. We've talked about many of these different decision making tools. We're not going to rehash all of that in one episode that would be impossible. But decision making happens before.

A highlight from #343: Do Excel things, get notebook Python code with Mito

Talk Python To Me

01:26 min | Last week

A highlight from #343: Do Excel things, get notebook Python code with Mito

"Here's a question. What's the most common way to explore data? Would you say pandas and matplotlib? Maybe you went a little broader and more general and said Jupyter notebooks. How about excel or Google sheets or numbers or some other spreadsheet app? Yeah, my bet is on excel. And while it has many drawbacks, it makes exploring tabular data very accessible to many people, most of whom aren't even developers or data scientists. On this episode, we're talking about a tool called mido. This is an ad in for Jupyter notebooks that injects in excel like interface right into the notebook. You pass it data via a pandas data frame or some other source. And then you can explore it as if you're using excel. The cool thing is, though, just below that in another cell, it's writing the pandas code, you'd need to actually accomplish that outcome in code. I think this will make pandas and python data exploration way more accessible to many more people. If you've been intimidated by pandas or know someone who has, this could be what you're looking for. This is talk python to me, episode 343 recorded November 8th 2021. Welcome to talk python and a weekly podcast on python. This is your host,

Google
A highlight from Dr. Steven Pinker:  Psychologist, psycholinguist and author

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

05:51 min | Last week

A highlight from Dr. Steven Pinker: Psychologist, psycholinguist and author

"Well, isn't that the universe contains some force called progress? That's kind of mystical. In fact, if anything, the universe tries to grind us down, constantly throwing pandemics at us and natural disasters and entropy things wearing down and falling apart and rotting. To the extent that life gets better, it's only because people have applied their ingenuity to try to make it better. We've invented antibiotics and vaccines and intergovernmental organizations. And liberal democracies. Brain children that got fight back against a pitiless cosmos and allow us to increments of well-being. So ultimately, rationality matters for ascertaining the good things in life. Hi, everyone. Welcome to behind the tech. I'm your host, Kevin Scott, chief technology officer for Microsoft. In this podcast, we're going to get behind the tech. We'll talk with some of the people who have made our modern tech world possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did. So join me to maybe learn a little bit about the history of computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into what's happening today. Stick around. Hello and welcome to behind the tech. I'm Christina Warren, senior cloud advocate at Microsoft. And I'm Kevin Scott. Our guest on the show today is Steven pinker. Steven is a cognitive psychologist. He's a psycholinguist and popular science writer. And he's authored 12 books, including his 2018 publication enlightenment now, the case for reason science, humanism and progress. And I'm so sure that you're super, super excited to talk about this Kevin. His 2021 book rationality what it is, why it seems scarce why it matters. So given the world that we're living in today, these are very relevant topics to explore. They are indeed extremely relevant topics. And so I'm super excited to be chatting with Stephen in general. I've been an enormous fan of his work for the longest time. I remember reading his first book, the language instinct when I was in graduate school. I think I've read every book that he's ever written, they've had enormous influences on me because hopefully what we'll see in this conversation is he writes books that explain really complicated things to very wide audiences of people. But also in a way that gives them a toolkit for dealing with thinking about navigating the complicated things themselves. So it isn't just like, hey, let me explain this. You read it done, walk away, like you walk away with tools that you can then use in your daily life. And let me tell you, we all need some tools for helping us deal with the balance between rationality and irrationality right now in 2021. We definitely do. We definitely do. So I'm super excited to get into our conversation with Steven. Our guest today is Stephen pinker, Steven as a psychologist and the Johnstone Professor of psychology at Harvard. His research focuses on visual cognition, psycholinguistics and social relations. He's an elected member of the national Academy of Sciences, a two time Pulitzer Prize, finalist, and a recipient of 9 honorary doctorates. He's a frequent contributor to The New York Times and The Guardian and his author 12 books, including his latest published this September, rationality, what it is, why it seems scarce and why it matters. Welcome to the show, Steven. Thank you. So we always start these conversations by digging a little bit into folks background. And you have such a distinguished career. I'm interested what your childhood was like and when it was that you knew that you were interested in science and a career in science. I grew up in Montreal in I'm a baby boom boomer, born at the peak of the baby boom in 1954. It was part of the Jewish minority within the English minority within the French minority of Canada. So three times the minority I suppose. I was always curious of voracious reader, always interested in science. But I developed it in particular interest in human nature, partly because when the 60s happened. I was too young to be a direct participant in the campus unrest. But it was very much in the air and they were older brothers and sisters who were part of the campus protests. And there are all kinds of ideas in the air. Everything was up for grabs. How should we organize society? Should we be communists? Should we be anarchists should we be Ayn Rand objectivists? And all of these debates kind of hinged on conceptions of human nature. Are people naturally cooperative and will they just share in the best interest of everyone so you don't need money or property and laws? Or are people inherently violent? And so you need a police force within the country and armies protected from outside threats. So human nature has the root of political philosophy was very much in the air. I had my own family. We had conversations around the dinner table. Friends and classmates were constantly in debate and argument. When I got into college, I wanted to study some aspect of human nature.

Kevin Scott Steven Pinker Steven Christina Warren Microsoft Johnstone Professor Of Psychol Kevin Stephen National Academy Of Sciences Pulitzer Prize Harvard The Guardian The New York Times Montreal Canada
A highlight from S18:E4 - How to make sense of the testing landscape (Sergei Egorov)

CodeNewbie

07:10 min | Last week

A highlight from S18:E4 - How to make sense of the testing landscape (Sergei Egorov)

"Thanks so much for being here. I'm so excited to be here, sir. So tell us about how you got started. Where did this journey begin for you? This journey began for me in Siberia in the cold part of Siberia and we aren't very active outside but rather inside and that was the case for me. I was locked inside, you spent a lot of time with your computer and that's how I got into programming. I was just clicking through some random files and visual basic script files in system folder. And apparently I realized that some of them I can change and that's how it all started for me. So you were playing around kind of mess with stuff. What was your reaction to that? Why were you messing around and what did you take from that experience? First of all, to answer your question why? Because I got bored with games. I ran out of games on my CDs and yeah, I didn't know what to do, so I was like, okay, what else can I do? Is this powerful machine in front of me? People talk about computers and computers can solve, you know, like big challenges, big problems in the world, but apparently I had no idea how they work and what they do. So that was my wise is why I started taking these files. Having any clue what they're doing and just something clicked in my head that, hey, when you change them, you modify the behavior and it was my very first interaction with the concept of programming just part you can edit some file. You can add some text, but then it will result in some behavior being changed. So how did that first expiration that curiosity how did that get you to where you are today? I am actually relatively quickly transitioned from trying to understand programming into trying to do some hacking because, you know, movies and of the things and I grew up in 90s, I've been watching some of these hacker movies. So I was like, okay, I want to become the world famous hacker and I started learning how hacking works like how people break into systems and while I wasn't breaking into any systems. Like I didn't want to cause any harm, but I just wanted to understand how it works, how people do that. Ended up being sort of a white hat hacker. A beginner won't be someone who would break into Pentagon or something like that, but, you know, like discovering some JavaScript injections and SQL injections and stuff like that, something that I was enjoying doing and then reporting back, but at some stage I realized that, okay, I need to understand the systems behind what I'm trying to break into so that I can do it better. And it became so exciting. So I was like, okay, I don't care about hacking anymore. I just want to build the systems. I don't want to break them. Interesting. Okay, and how old were you? What age are we talking about here? 13, 14 years old. I'm pretty young. So let's fast forward from that to the first job. How did you get that? Repute was soon after started learning the programming since I was still connected to the gaming industry and still playing some games. I realized that, okay, I can actually, for some of the games I'm playing I could do something and apply my programming skills. And I started writing boats for one of the online games that was very popular in Russia. And eventually one of the online plans, and it's a bit specific to online games, but still, they reach out to me and ask me whether I could create a bot for them that would sell their in game currency to their users. And that was my very first job in IT. I just got paid for creating a bot for game online game and it was fun because I did not expect it to be paid. I was just enjoying what I'm doing. Tell me about your learning process. How did you level up? You started just from kind of poking around and looking around. When it came time to teaching yourself for a formal job for the thing you actually got paid to do, what was your process for learning and leveling up? So when it comes to learning, the biggest principle I'm using is this can not be like that. Sometimes when I struggle something, I always change it and I think, okay, there is no way someone has never solved it already, because that's the reality we are living in. The IT industry is so wide. So mature knows that we have so many solutions to almost every problem we experiencing and what I learned that works the best for me is the first check houses a problem I'm trying to solve was previously approached by someone else already. And most of the times your eyes are fine and answer were someone's result that resulted in nothing but basically can flow the process in shortcut and save some time, not wasting this time yourself, but learning from others experience. But this was really very helpful and many things I'm doing today and many things have been doing in the past, but also what I'm doing today also as part of our company, challenging the status quo is always helpful when it comes to learning. The second part how I earn the knowledge this one is interesting because while I did start by learning books, nowadays, I'm not really reading books because the domain I need to research almost all the times develops much faster than the books get written. You result in reading either some basics that would apply no matter when the book is written like 40 years ago or today, but some modern stuff like, for example, I want to read about, I know, something really fancy and all the stuff in my head. Something about Kubernetes and something music just released. Obviously, I will be struggling finding a book. But reading social networks, especially Twitter is surprisingly a great way to discover the knowledge about things who would think that microblogging platform would help with that. So take us to atomic jar, which is where you are today. You are the cofounder, the CEO. What is atomic jar and how did you get started? So atomic jar is the result of spending 5 years working together by us. I mean, Richard Norris Argentina creator of task containers Kevin with the join us later as maintainer and myself and also our wide community of test containers contributors and users. But we've been working together on this open-source library for 5 years and test containers has become something incredibly popular being used by the biggest companies out there. But we never thought about monetizing it. We never thought about taking a commercial because we had our day jobs. We were paid well and we never had the problem with that, but at some moment we realized that we are enjoying it so much that we would like to turn it into something full time we would like to be spending our time working on this library because that's what gets us excited the most. And how do we never had a chance to work with each other and we were always employed by different companies? Additional motivation for us to start company was to be finally able to work together

Siberia Pentagon Russia Richard Norris Twitter Argentina Kevin United States
A highlight from Dealing with Inevitable But Unpredictable Events

Developer Tea

04:57 min | Last week

A highlight from Dealing with Inevitable But Unpredictable Events

"What would you do? If you knew for a fact, that your code was going to produce a certain number of defects. My name is Jonathan catrell, you're listening to developer team. My goal on this show is to help driven developers like you find clarity, perspective, and purpose in their careers. What would you do if you knew your code was going to have a certain threshold a certain number of defects, and there was nothing you could do to avoid those problems occurring. This is a thought experiment because there is no way for us to know a certain number of bugs are going to show up. There's no way for us to guarantee that that's going to happen. But it is very likely that given enough usage your code will have a bug. We know this kind of intuitively that most of the code that we write ends up having bugs at some point. Whether that's because of a simple mistake that we have made an environmental mistake based on where the code is running, maybe an environmental mistake based on changes around the ecosystem, maybe someone else pushes code to an API that particular system uses a consumes, ultimately, we will have bugs. That appear seemingly from nowhere. So if we take this, this idea that bugs might appear, and we turn it into a fact. Instead of turning it from a possibility that we try to hedge around, we turn it into a fact. What is the best route that we could take? Inspiration for this particular line of thought comes from a talk that I watched on YouTube called a crash course in building reliable software and the pun is definitely intended there, by Ming by. And it was shared by a channel called RT thread. One familiar with the channel either than this particular talk. Then in the talk, Ming discusses the reality that there is far more usage by actual users, than there is coverage in tests. In other words, bugs are much more on the order of a 100,000 times more likely to occur in this particular project scenario that he had set up, than they were to occur in tests there were more likely to occur with actual users. Of course, these numbers are specific and we're not talking about the specific numbers as much as we're talking about this principle, the idea that at some scale, your testing and all of the work that you would do to prevent bugs from actually happening, it becomes difficult to prevent. So what can you do? Abstracting this kind of event they are. A bug is an occurrence that is generally undesirable or was not foreseen for some reason or another. That causes a disruption. And we experience these kinds of events in our regular lives. You may have traffic on your way to drop your kids off at school, or maybe your team member catches a cold the night before a big release. And just like what we talked about with bugs in our software. We know that these things will occur. This is kind of a paradox because we can't say for sure when or what will happen. But if we were to zoom out and look at the occurrence rate, for example, of colds, or of bugs in our software, it's probably relatively reliable. If we were to average it out over time. So from this broad standpoint, these unpredictable individual events become predictable based on some occurrence rate. Now, this doesn't mean that you're going to somehow use the occurrence rate to predict when these bugs are going to happen. That's not the point here. We're not trying to do a prediction exercise. Instead, we're trying to do a preparation exercise. Knowing that bugs will occur. Knowing that teammates will get sick. What can we do? How can we prepare? We're going to take a quick sponsor break, and then we're going to come back and talk about different strategies for

Jonathan Catrell Ming Youtube Colds
A highlight from Episode 140 - Crafting your cocktail mixture to learning

Front End Happy Hour

06:53 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 140 - Crafting your cocktail mixture to learning

"To a brand new episode of the front end, happy hour podcast. I want to stop and thank you all of our listeners for continuing listening to the podcasts. I've noticed we've actually continually been growing so that's awesome and so welcome to all our new listeners. I'm really excited about our topic today because we get so many questions around it. In this episode, we are joined by Lauren to talk with us about education paths for software engineers. There are so many options out there and I feel like continually more options out there. So it's really hard to know what the right path is. So I'm excited for us to maybe provide some insights on that. Lauren, can you give us a brief introduction of who you are what you do and what your favorite happy hour beverages? Sure. My name is Lauren sans ramshaw, and I'm an author and consultant. I just recently finished writing a book on GraphQL called the GraphQL guide with John resig, and in consulting currently I'm working with temporal, which is what I see is the best solution for microservice orchestration. Oh, and cocktail. My go to is margarita. Oh, that's a good choice. Can't really go wrong with the margarita either. I've had good and not real bad. There's always varying degrees, but can't really go wrong. Yeah. Sometimes I feel like they're way too sweet, but usually usually I like them. Fair enough, fair enough. I also like some that are like more spicy and you can get some creative smoky. Yes. All right. Let's also give introduction of today's panelists, Jim, you want to start off? Jim young, engineering manager at Netflix. And I'm Ryan Burgess, I'm a software engineering manager at Netflix. In each episode of the front end happy hour podcast, we like to choose a keyword that if it's mentioned at all in the episode, we will all take a drink. So what did we decide today's keyword is? Books. Books. All right, if we say the word books, which, I mean, around education, I feel like book supply, maybe not so much in our new state of things. But if we say the word books will all take a drink. Let's hop right into the topic. I'm curious to hear there's a lot of options for engineers that to learn. What are some of the typical paths or areas that you all are familiar with for learning software development? Yeah, so we've got college and trade schools and community colleges. We've got boot camps, something traditionally, ways people learn trade apprenticeships like if I want to be a Carpenter and go apprentice Carpenter. And then there's like a company working in the apprenticeship space right now. And then self teaching, which has a lot of different avenues to go in. And of course, books like books can teach you many things. Cheers. One thing I've always been impressed with just where we are today versus when I would have started is the sheer volume of amazing content that is so readily available where it's like how to create a react app. How do learn JavaScript, whatever it is, is you can look that up online, whether it be for a paid tutorial or even just going on YouTube for free, there's some really solid videos out there or blog posts. There's a lot a lot of information. I know when I started, YouTube didn't even exist. So like that, that wasn't a thing. So I think it's really cool that there are these different areas in which we can learn. But I think it is hard, right? I think a lot of people are like, should I go to a boot camp? Should I go down the college degree path? There's all that, I think, it's hard to know. How do you both think about that? What would you choose? Actually, both Lauren and gem, you both have computer science degrees. I do not. So I'm curious, if you were to do it all over again, is that still the right path? Would you think about it differently? Yeah. I'd still do this yesterday. One, it's nice to personally have that accomplishment. It's not an easy degree to get. I would say, no matter where you went to school. I feel equipped to handle problems that I haven't seen before, which is a large part of software engineering. It's not. I think there's different levels of software engineering. There's problems you're going to run across. There are the stack overflow problems, where it's like, I'm into this problem. It's very tactical intangible. I can look this up. This has been solved before. And then you have the tier two problem, which is this is a problem I don't really know how to solve it, but I'm going to lean on my experience and experience with others help solve it. Then there's tier three, which is I've never, I don't even know if the problem is, there's something wrong. But I'm not sure what it is. And I think to me it's yes degree prepares you for but at least the tier two problems, which is the we kind of don't really know what the problem is. It's not as well defined, or I haven't seen it before, but I have that theory behind me. So yeah, I'd say for me personally, I think getting a CS degree was worthwhile. Yeah, I find the choice again, I definitely do college again assuming I had the access like resources time money, ability to get in. And but I'd want to do it again, mostly for social reasons, like social education and enjoyment, more so than learning. I found that I had an intro to programming course that was object oriented, then I had a functional course, but beyond those I had more courses that involve programming, but nothing more teaching programming and certainly not practical things like web development or app development. So from that perspective, I felt like there's much more learning how to do to be ready for a job. And the amount that I learned that was helpful for the professional programming felt relatively little. I think she has a great prepares you to be a more advanced software engineer, but it does not help you become a it doesn't help you first job in probably your second job. It helps you later down the line, but like you really, no matter what you have to work with people, you can learn how to code off a YouTube. You can learn how to code from books and tutorials, but it doesn't teach you how to be like a software engineer, per se. That comes from working with people understanding you're good at this. You're good at this, deleting that. The joke amongst the CS people that I know is the first software engineering course that is a course where it's a group project and you have to output something by the end of the semester. It doesn't teach you how to be a software engineer. It just teaches you how to hate other people. Which is kind of the end result. Some people didn't do any work. Some people did all the work. But that's kind of like how it is in real life. So I like the way you put that CS degree is useful, I think later in your career, but starting off a boot camp is probably more tangible. Honestly, and just getting those first couple jobs. In terms of skills, I definitely agree. In terms of access like much easier to get a job with a CS degree, I think than a boot camp. Yeah, it's interesting. I like the way Lauren put it too. And so clearly I don't have the sies degree. And when I think about there is times where I'm like, should I have gone that route? I went into a more web development the community college wrote. It was a two year program.

Lauren Lauren Sans Ramshaw Ryan Burgess Netflix John Resig Jim Young Youtube Carpenter JIM
A highlight from Think in Composition

Developer Tea

02:26 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Think in Composition

"Our lives and our careers or for dinner? And the truth is, most of the time, we try to make our decisions by optimizing for one thing in a composite whole. Often, this can lead to really poor decisions, especially when that composition is important. For example, imagine you are charged with hiring someone. And as you are developing the interviewing process, you recognize a candidate who has very strong technical skills. In fact, much stronger than any other candidate. And it becomes very easy to become myopic. About this particular candidate to even label them the technical one. And of course, you're not necessarily cognitively choosing to do this. This is an accidental artifact. This is our brain's trying to do us a favor. Even though it's pretty dangerous, trying to give us a simple handle, away of compressing down information. So we can remember and trying to find the principal component of that composition. But the truth is, it is probably universally better when you're trying to hire somebody to create a matrix. Create a matrix of components that make up a good candidate. Now, there might be components that have more weight than others. But even if you didn't have a clear picture of what those weights should be, even if you just started with equal weighting on all of those components, you're going to come out with more likely a better decision. For example, that person who has very good technical skills, perhaps doesn't have very good time management skills were a communication skills. We're going to take a quick sponsor break and then we'll come back and talk a little bit more about how we do this matrix composition, how we can start thinking that way

How to Avoid Sacrificing Quality Work for Speed and Deadlines

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

02:32 min | 2 months ago

How to Avoid Sacrificing Quality Work for Speed and Deadlines

"This week. We're going to talk about whether or not we sacrifice. Quality in the name of speed or deadlines or something to that effect. This was a topic recently in conversations in in thoughts that i've been having if you've been on a team that has a very very tight deadline whether or not you've decided to trade off scope or certain milestones or even potentially changing some of the standards with which you develop software there. There's some things that we can control so while while quality can be subjective. Certainly there are. There are items with which we can agree on. Yeah that's a good question. I mean i think. I think i think that you can i. I think that you can have a team agreed. Standard or especially a majority agreed standard. I think that you can definitely have a team standard. But it's very very very unlikely that it will be your personal standard so with that in and we started talking a little bit behind the scene just to get a feel for what types of things we wanted to discuss include brought up your standards versus their standards versus team standards. Even i i would when i joined a team or when i'm new to a team when the team changes significantly whether that's new team members added or team members leave or for various other reasons. It's worthwhile often. I find to have that kind of team norms discussion. So that you can set the expectation so that you can discuss what what you expect from from each other what you expect from one another the types of things that we determine what quality is in how we define that. Maybe i think those things can certainly be valuable I it's good to have a discussion It depends on how the discussion is held though. Like if you were to stop air if you were to say some time in the in the in the team like oh well. I think that we should all be doing unit tests and the rest team kind of sit there for a second and looks at you and they're like oh okay i mean we can. I guess we can. We can do. We can try unitas than they're probably not going to do. Unit

Unitas
The Creation Story of Bounce With Co-Founder, CEO Cody Candee

Code Story

02:10 min | 2 months ago

The Creation Story of Bounce With Co-Founder, CEO Cody Candee

"Outsourcing network of local businesses all around the world big cities we operate different services inside of these businesses for the main one where the bulk of bounce is all around luggage storage. When you're traveling. Now let's check in check out day. You might have all your things in place to keep them with. Bouncy can open our app or a website and find a place to go and leave your thanks for the day the businesses that we work with make extra revenue off that after traffic and travellers all day of their vacation or business travel or whatever it. Is we see leaving golfer. Events wilson launched another product this year package acceptance rate on top of our existing network. You can send your packages to about slow pitch and help with traveling or if he lives in a city doorman i can't be around. Two receivers earned delivery so yeah sorta long-term and we'll be building bounds to help these small businesses make more money and then on your side we exist to basically keep people from not having to plan their days around there things anymore so luggage storage package. Acceptance tools will add more in the future in two thousand fourteen. I was working in san francisco. Some friends some co workers in the scrap. Some drinks after work. Someone said i'm going to join. But i'm gonna go all the way home. I drop off my bag and being minimalist that i am. You know living by this lawsuit that you're thinks she hold you down. I thought crazy how common it is for people to literally go way out of the way to plan the whole evening around there. Things spend extra money on taxis or the ubers and yeah it's crazy. So how can we solve problem. That night i was far. And i took the back of a menu. And we're just like writing all radios that came to my head including inbound that first day and the big vision is can we build a cloud computing infrastructure for the physical distributed storage everywhere. I mean you go with your thanks to you

Wilson San Francisco
3 Automations Tools You Must Know!

No Code No Problem

03:08 min | 3 months ago

3 Automations Tools You Must Know!

"The first toll that i will be covering. Today is happier zappia and makes you happier and is the leading no code automation tool with over thirty eight hundred immigration partners think hub spot milch him google counter and pretty much any toy you can imagine and if they don't have a direct integration you can probably find documentation or youtube video on how to set up the automation you need with a web hook happier is a y combinator backed company led by zayd foster and is probably the best hope to start. If you're looking to get into automation for the first time zap here is the most used toll in no code automation and entire six and seven figure. Businesses have been built using this toll. The only issue with zapper is if you're building a business on top of it. The price can add up extremely fast. I have used an paid for zappia in the past. And i think it is a great tool and how you recommend it to those looking to get started in automation or those that have businesses and are ready to automate those businesses. The second of all that. I'm going to be covering today. Is integra mac. Integra is an incredible automation tool that is affordable and a more visual experience. They were recently acquired for around one hundred million dollars. Integra matters as sleek web-based no code automation tool that pairs with their mobile app for the ultimate automation experience. If you don't like how zappia displays the workflows as you build. I highly recommend trying out. Integra matt i personally use it and pay for it and i think it is fairly easy to use an extremely powerful in regards to what you can do. I think there's i think you can use integral matt. And we'll have more flexibility compared to like zap your but if your needs aren't that complex zap is still a great option. But i personally love. And i pay for integral about their starting plan starts at about nine dollars a month. So it's extremely affordable for makers that are looking to start automating some of their business processes. The third option is air table so as many of you know air table is basically google sheets on steroids and conserve as simple spreadsheet or the back end for a web app. You're building. They have an internal automation tool that connects to popular tools. You use like gmo slack. Google calendar as well as moving data within air table. People run entire businesses just using air table their automation tool. I use it personally for our company placed and they are necessary for our business to function as efficiently as it does. I highly recommend air table and with our business we do events right so logistically speaking that can be a nightmare. But because of air table and air table automations. It makes the process seamless. And yes i highly recommend for sure other notable automation tools include. Ui bakery parabola directional and if this if this then that i know that's another really popular it's not gonna go into too much but they are very very simple way to build basic automations disaster but even a level below

Zappia Zayd Foster Integra Integra Matt Google Youtube Matt
Beyond the Language Wars: R & Python for the Modern Data Scientist

DataFramed

02:17 min | 3 months ago

Beyond the Language Wars: R & Python for the Modern Data Scientist

"Can you describe the set of events that led to our by thon becoming the primary data science today and how this translates into what we call the language war between armed by phone and something that we talked about ready to very beginning of the book is kind of a little bit unusual that we will begin a book on unarmed python by giving this whole history of languages. But i want to that way because i thought that it's important to help you understand the cranks and how we got to where we are and so one of the first questions be blast when they're trying to decide. I learn our show. I learnt python is. What's the difference between aren't python and you'll see a lot of post on stack overflow or different a message. Boards rented where people talk about What are the basic differences between these languages in wash use one versus the other and nobody comes to a clear consensus or a clear. Understanding the differences tried to do in the first chapter is just outline the history of the which is to give an idea about the different ethel's and how things work differently between the two languages so so are was there kind of at the very beginning of scientific computing in academia in the late seventies early eighties in bell. Laboratories was really developed as a programming language for doucet's analysis and within the book i call it a fubu language so who is a street where clothing company from new york. That I used to love when i was a teenager. And is it stands for four as by us. And i like this forest by his attitude is very much a four the community by the community. Kind kind of those in this very much. What are is right is forced decisions by statisticians in. It's just meant to just get statistics that get dot announces his work with down and just just get it done into program language in his own right. But it's first and foremost used for doing that. Analysis and that really shaped all of what kim afterwards in r. and python kind comes from a different direction python originated as a generalist polka me language to make just entry into programming easier with a nice syntax and An easier access to managing all kinds of different tools and system administration and building applications and web development so e cat. It's fingers everywhere. Generalist programming language and then came. That assigns later on so python. Wasn't that a science. I and programming second was kind of the other way

Doucet Academia New York KIM
Use Your Expectations as a Tool

Developer Tea

01:49 min | 3 months ago

Use Your Expectations as a Tool

"Are the source of suffering. This is according to The buddhist tradition. And whether you believe that that's true whether you follow a buddhist practice or not is not really the point instead. It is to look at this idea of expectation to inspect the concept of expectation. And see what we can pull from it as it turns out. I'll modify what. I believe about expectation for this show. That is an expectation is a useful tool that can be abused and it can be kind of a painful painful tool. If it's abused. So what do i mean by tool when we have expectations when we set expectations when we develop some kind of future thinking or or future can have predicting outcome. We can both set what we believe could happen. We can also kind of set an expectation. For what will happen and then we can test it with. This sounds familiar then. Hopefully hopefully this familiar. Actually hopefully you recognize it. As a hypothesis. An expectation in many ways is simply a hypothesis. What do we think will happen.

Q&A: Should I Share MRR With My Employees?

Startups For the Rest of Us

02:06 min | 3 months ago

Q&A: Should I Share MRR With My Employees?

"My co-founder. And i probably be hiring someone in the near future i hire. I was just wondering when you hired in the past. Would you share financial metrics like m. are with employees or. Would you keep that just between you and your co founder is curious to hear what other people do in this situation. It's a good question davis and think the way i would do. It is the way that i did it with drip to be honest if felt weird to me to not share r. m. r. was was our. Kpi right it was the key performance indicator that drove the business and if mara was growing than the business was successful. I'll say. I mean that was the number one. Of course everything flows out of of mr. I wanna be clear. Obviously happy customers happy employees. There's a bunch of stakeholders but just to boil it down to one number to me. It is immoral. Tell so much about your market share about your enterprise value. If you were to sell the company about how much profit you could potentially have all these things so everything flows from our then. It's right like the lower your turn the faster. Mtr is going to grow and without telling let's see my marketers or my customer success people or even my developers where we were it would have felt weird. I think people will likely if they're working for you and they don't know you're probably think it's a lot more than it is and that can sometimes lead issues in terms of why not getting paid more wire. We so stingy with our amazon hosting or why are we paying more for xyz service. Why don't we have better benefits or whatever versus if they start and it's like yeah. We make thirty grand a month and you can do the math here. There's four of us. We're pretty much at break. Even which is in essence. What i would tell every employee i would hire at drip obviously before we were acquired because once we required we were venture backed essence. But i would tell them you know you're going to learn what are monthly recurring revenue is. I'm gonna let you know that we spend all of that every month sometimes more to grow this company so what i was trying to do is level set. You see that number. That's forty grand sixty grand one hundred grand whatever month that is not going into my personal bank account. This business is in essence. A growth business and growth costs money

Mara Davis Amazon
Girls Who Code CEO Tarika Barrett Creating a Path for Equity

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:10 min | 3 months ago

Girls Who Code CEO Tarika Barrett Creating a Path for Equity

"The gender gap in tech starts pretty early. Look at computer. Science students. Roughly four out of five bachelor degrees in that field. Go to men. That's where the nonprofit girls who code aims to get girls interested in the field at a young age as early as third grade since it was founded in twenty twelve. Hundreds of thousands of girls have gone through its clubs and summer immersion programs. Winco vid meant more in person classes. They moved totally online than that actually allowed them to grow. Enrollment went up two hundred percent rica. Barrett took over as ceo of girls who code this year. She said they had to design their new model with the hardest to reach girls in mind. We knew our girls for driving too fast food parking lots to get wifi so we thought about life. We thought about hardware. We thought about living circumstances right often are girls. Couldn't even turn their cameras on because they were sharing a computer with other siblings and we tried to bring best practices in digital learning so shorter days live and asynchronous instruction small group work office hours and project based learning. Because we knew that we'd have to do that for our students and that we were doing the kinds of outreach and really being responsive to the needs of our community how did you design your courses specifically for slow internet connections so we sent out a survey to our participants asking everything. What do you need do need us to send you a computer. Do you have brought them. And even as they answered those questions. And we fill those gaps. We still had things happen in real time. We have teaching assistants. Who are former girls. Who code students. Who went through the summer immersion program there there with the facilitators in this virtual classroom to step in and trouble shoot at any given moment and so that coupled with both synchronous and asynchronous instruction meant that even if a girl got stuck with some tech thing that happened that could always be made up in office hours or there was always someone following up. And saying what do you need. And frankly we have to bring some of that thinking back into the fall even if we're in person because it really made the difference for so many students that we don't want to lose that kind of innovation.

Barrett Rica
How to Monetise Airtable Securely

No Code No Problem

01:02 min | 3 months ago

How to Monetise Airtable Securely

"Pay table is a great product and they allow you to launch air table databases as digital products and monetize them quickly. So basically what they allow you to do is you can take any base. You have in place it behind a paywall whether that be for a one time or a monthly fee and monetize it. If you're looking to start launching digital products which. I highly recommend i were actually using pay table at our team is at sabertooth and we're launching one this week and we're using pay table to secure and monetize base. They have a free plan. And if you're looking for more of their features they do have a starter plan which is only twelve bucks a month which is extremely affordable. Especially whenever you're trying to launch products and see if they get any traction twelve bucks a month is nothing for that so you can find them at pay table dot. Io and start building digital products using the basis that you use for reference every day.

Making Automated Machine Learning More Accessible With EvalML

The Python Podcast.__init__

02:11 min | 3 months ago

Making Automated Machine Learning More Accessible With EvalML

"Can you start out. A bit by describing. What the project is in some of the story behind how it got started and what the reason was for creating in the first place. I can talk a little about that. So valla mel as you mentioned is automated machine learning library and so maybe to talk a little bit about what that means. We can talk about the workflow for machine. Learning usually as i think traditionally with machine learning refers to like being the select data and then models and then the model parameters and that's quite difficult to do by hand. I think usually it requires a lot brute force or specific knowledge whether about data science or also just the field and what i think my manager likes to refer to. It's trial by grad student. Basically just a lot of like root for trial and error until auto l. Annabella mel and sue simplified that process so the user instead only have select the data that they care about that describes system of interest and then auto is supposed to help you select both the type of model and also the parameters for your model and a little bit about like how that came to be so i can speak personally at least like i came from a background where i had used machine learning in some of my courses but i wasn't very familiar with it and in the courses where a used machine learning. It was exactly what. I described where i had to use specific models that maybe my for blessings had talked about are. We went over loss. I didn't really understand how to tune the models or exactly how to like get better performance except try different parameters so there was a lot of frustration on my part where i was just trying a lot of different things and like seeing the scores. Go up and down and not really like understanding how to approach it well and spending a lotta time on so. I think because we saw a lot of frustrations out there not just in modeling in data signs process in general about knowledge is created through that process.

Valla Mel Annabella Mel SUE
How to Find a Mentor and Be a Successful Manager

CodeNewbie

01:44 min | 3 months ago

How to Find a Mentor and Be a Successful Manager

"So tell us about how you got interested in code when i was in about grade. Three very slow which is about eight years old. I'll primary school got a set of computers and straighter the lab though at about four to six computers in the that was Squad got and they asked parents of the school if they were interested in enrolling children for often compete lessons and for some reason which i don't know my parents decided to enroll me fafsa mischievous at home and i started attending those computer classes and we didn't do anything complicated. Did like i remember. One particular program was like typing to program. We yet to that. Try type in like a sentence in the faucets diamond. You'd have the record and everything. But as a result of being exposed to competing debt early on as the school got more computers than computing became more combine. it goes across. Zimbabwe studied my primary school in high school and I was always good at it. And data than most other students within exposed later on in my high school korea i started doing actual computer science coating. I think what it's supposed to. Coding stuttered incomplete assigns. End as it was odd. I gained because i've been supposed to computing machines odia. I was good at the computer. Science side of it that really got some good interest in it And that. Lynn obviously took me to studying at university and everything but the roots reading comeback to that small computer lab which not everyone dope which you need to go through to that and my parents decided it would be useful for me to studying computer. That early on

Zimbabwe Korea Lynn
The Creation Story of Webapp.io With Founder Colin Chartier

Code Story

01:55 min | 3 months ago

The Creation Story of Webapp.io With Founder Colin Chartier

"Colin chartier started making video games. When he was young he used to play warcraft. Three which had a powerful map editor for users he recalls that one game map was called goblet exploration where you were stuck in the middle nowhere and you had to make civilization. He found that this was really good for learning how to make things that people want it. He lives in toronto and is a twenty minute bike ride from the waterfront many days. He will head down to the beach and work from there. New enjoys getting outdoors. When he doesn't have to call schedule that day in his prior startup. he found that he and his team were very sensitive to breaking changes as it was critical to deliver information in a timely manner. So much so that customers would turn. If anything broken the critical chain he created something to fill this gap prior venture which he was offering up to friends and colleagues via open source. This is the creation story of layer. Ci now called web dot. Io layer ci helps software developers review. The work proposed by other suffer developers. Think about you know. You're you're making a sites that sells pizza people so you have your website. You have a couple of software developers. They're making changes to the website. And you want to that. If one developer proposes a change the other developer. Make sure that the change has broken anything so a developer if they make a code change might make that the by pizza doesn't work anymore which would be a really big problem for your business. So essentially gives developers in the environment. The has everything set up with this new change and then the developer can actually like try the product so they can try buying a pizza like customer would and then make sure that everything has worked crespi

Colin Chartier Toronto
Equity for Developers With Aaron Kahn

Ruby on Rails Podcast

02:15 min | 3 months ago

Equity for Developers With Aaron Kahn

"You can imagine from my desk you know. Talking to engineers receive offers equity is typically offered. And there's so many questions they've received over the fifteen years running mirror cell. Really excited to meet you here. Aaron and kinda hopefully enlighten our listeners. A little bit with some of your knowledge. This is great. Likewise i think equity is the best kept secret that everybody knows about an attack and so i think chatting some light on the details is going to be really exciting terrific. All right we're gonna kick it off with the easy one for you would love to get your outlook on the economy. And how things are shaping up. So i actually feel pretty optimistic about it. Twenty twenty was a little bit harry. We had what two of the worst trading days since the great depression in three of the best and you bring are having this conversation a couple of weeks ago and it's just so crazy that all of that volatility resulted in a pretty extraordinary year. I think the economy has figured out how to operate in a covert worlds and i attribute that almost exclusively to the fact that we're globalized and the fact that technology has been the life support for our global economy. So i feel good about it. There's a lot to be worried about. There's lots of uneasy about. But generally i feel optimistic. Excellence yeah as do. I in a lot of folks i talk to. I would be curious how you feel that. The current labor shortages are affecting the economy. So that such an interesting question. And you know. It's i feel like it's a very specific. One labor shortages in dining and tourism are having a much different impact than labor shortages in attacker medicine. For example i feel like technology and medicine are in a position. To almost avert the labor shortages there are levers in place to get around the shortages and increase the capacity of the existing workforce whereas you know in tourism and restaurants for example. You can only carry so many trays their help. So many people to their rooms. That's really scary. So i'm curious to see what's going to come up that. And how in america specifically the stimulus checks are going to continue and ed needle really impact. The desire for people's get back into the workforce is obviously it's a risk versus reward dynamic where the workplace and the pay stands right now for a lot of people that's just not worth it

Aaron Harry Depression Ed Needle America
The Creation Story of Indico With Co-Founder Slater Victoroff

Code Story

01:35 min | 4 months ago

The Creation Story of Indico With Co-Founder Slater Victoroff

"This is the creation story of indigo indigo. The ten thousand foot level is an intelligent process automation company. What that means for us is that we're taking some of the most complex and l. right the kind of stuff that you hear coming out of opening in google you know not only do we have into co alums. The nation's sort of advisors and liberate with them but our goal really rather than intermittently kind of moving forward. The architectural state of the art is really this idea of how we take that technology and make accessible specifically to nontechnical use. In-intelligence prasada automation. Do that primarily in the document domain. If you will from an email perspective the thing that's cool about documents is that they are image data combined with text data So you know we. We do imaging text use cases as well but but documents primarily. we're very classic dorm room startup. I would love to tell you that you know i was some some you know. Brilliant engineer undergrad. And i planted plotted out. This ten year plan of iv going to become a thing. But it really wasn't that honestly me and my co founders and that's rat for madison and diana. We just fell into it accidentally. Frankly we fell in love with the technology and then we became entranced with this idea. Of how do we actually make. Success did now realize the path that was going to lead us all the time. But very happy that it's ended up this way.

Google Diana Madison
How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

CodeNewbie

02:21 min | 4 months ago

How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

"Thanks for being here. Thank you so much so carry. You are a career transition or who was pursuing dancing. Tell us how you got into development. Yes so i had done ballet my entire life. When i was three and i kind of started taking it more seriously. When i was in high school. I started going to summer intensive by different ballet companies and those are kind of just like summer camps for kids during ballet and the summer before my senior year of high school i went to the joffrey ballet summer intensive in new york city and they offered to let me do a so actually ended up moving there my senior year of high school finishing high school online. And doing that and when it was coming time for me to think about college. That's kind of what i was like. Kay do wanna keep pursuing ballet. Do i to do something different. So i'm moving back home to nashville. And i studied public relations and after graduating i got a job in the music industry. Doing pr in. I done that for a few years as getting really burnt out. I was really stressful. A time anxiety was at a high. And i was like i need to figure something out so i actually stumbled upon code academy and started teaching myself to code and enrolled in a boot camp. And i've been in tech ever since. Wow that's exciting. So you went from ballet. Pr music to to coding. That's really add clyde a transition. Yeah so when you first started. Coding what did that look like. What were you doing. I went to the iron yard. Which was the boot camp. It was twelve weeks long. And i was studying front end engineering so it was a lot of it. We're learning h. Two miles css melodramas script and then my cohort studied view in number as our frameworks so it was a lot of in the morning class. Time learning about new topics and then in the afternoon applying those and working on various projects. And what was that boot camp experience like tons of people who are maybe considering it thinking about it. What was your experience like there. I mean it's like a fire hose of information conflict. You i feel like once. I kind of got the grasp of wine concept. We were like. Here's a new one. Gotta learn this and i mean it was twelve weeks long. It's hard to learn anything twelve weeks but it kind of preps you for the basics of what you need to know and then obviously most people coming into software engineering or currently in it know that we're always constantly learning so kind of just prompts you to how to teach

Joffrey Ballet KAY New York City Nashville Clyde
How to Improve Site Speed With Andy Schaff

How I Built It

02:12 min | 4 months ago

How to Improve Site Speed With Andy Schaff

"Andy how are you today. I'm doing well. Thank you for having me my pleasure. Thanks for coming on the show. And i'll just say right off the bat that i'm really digging. This is not a video podcast so for the listeners and he has a very Looks like a very complete record collection behind him So maybe we'll talk about that in build something more we'll see. We'll see where the conversation takes us. But before we get into any of that really Andy why don't you tell us a little bit about who you are. Which do particularly what does development architect mean. Yeah so it's It's a contributor path with portent. That i've been on for a long time. Now i've been working with porn since two thousand and four and and i didn't start off being an expert with site speed or really being an expert at all Over you know over the years of doing lots and lots of client sites and and you know failing in some aspects and learning and improving in the technology's changing i've i've you know worked up the expertise to get to where i'm at now And what that means. I'm more back end focused. But i implement everything that happens on the front end. So you know the term full stack. Developer gets thrown out a lot. these days. how many true full stack developers are actually are I would consider myself a little bit more of a full stack implementation engineer. Like i i don't you don't want me doing your css. Because i'm not trained in it right. But i understand how it works. I can set up the preprocessing workflows and things bat nature. But my expertise is more on i create environments that that make site super fast Working with the various caching technologies and configuring. The web servers like engine nexen apache to make those sites run very quickly or at least give the really good server response time which is a backbone of of a lot of fate speed

Andy
Interview With Developer, Jason Rohrer

CodeNewbie

02:18 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Developer, Jason Rohrer

"So i wanna get into prodi december. What is it and why did you created so project. December is a system that allows Human being to have a back and forth conversation with an artificial personality like dialogue through text is you can type questions to artificial personality for example and the Artificial personality will answer back and you can have a back and forth. That goes on from there. And it's based on these underlying text engines that came into the world within the past year and a half or so basically text completion engines right so the these engines allow you to provide a prompt to the system. For example you might give the first few lines of banana cream pie recipe for example and then the artificial intelligence will continue generating tax to complete whatever you have started right so complete the rest of the recipe for example. You start giving it the first few lines of a poem. It'll right the rest of the poem. If you give it fi first few lyrics of a rap song rap lyrics for you if you give it the first few sentences from a paragraph or monopoly will continue writing the rest of the novel for you so this is pretty fascinating technology because it can write text very convincingly but then the question is what do you use it for. A lot of people are like well. Use it to write my blog from me or i'll use it to tweet from here. Use it to write magazine articles or books or something like that but it turns out that kind of a firehose hose of language in a way right once the starts going and starts generating text based on what you said. It just keeps going off in its own direction and it kind of goes off into bizarre directions. Very so project december tries to leverage this text completion service to enable a dialogue back and forth between a human user. And that kind of keeps they i on track more and keeps it from kind of going off into these strange directions. Like for example. If you ask it to generate a banana cream pie recipe might start generating. Something seems very sensible says. Step one get three eggs and two cups of sugar and so much lower and so on and three sticks of butter but then by the end of the recipe it's talking about you know grinding a mouse and putting it in the recipe or something right but in a dialogue the human being intervening every couple of sentences right and so that back and forth kind of keeps the ai on track and keeps it going into a flow of a conversation that can become very convincing for the human user

Prodi
Intel Group VP Brian McCarson on the Future of IoT

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:48 min | 4 months ago

Intel Group VP Brian McCarson on the Future of IoT

"Well brian i as i mentioned just a moment ago you are among the most experienced people around when it comes to the internet of things and i wonder if you could just maybe a little bit of the groundwork as somebody who's seen its evolution even driven aspects of its evolution. Where are we in in the kind of The process of iot from your perspective. Yeah so this. Iot journey began across a number of industries before even the term iot was invented but it was really isolated only to the most wealthy interprises in the world so for example automotive assembly and semiconductor manufacturing at we're trying to make at robots smarter use additional automation at driven a lot by quality issues and the ultra high precision. That's needed for those industries. And they could afford it. Given the the the relatively a high premiums they can offer for those products and what we've entered into now is this era of affordability. The key technological ingredients that are needed to make the internet of things of reality have become so inexpensive that at basic units of computer becoming one of the most inexpensive assets in in the entire market right now and so the cost of bandwidth the cost of compute the cost of storage and the the technological innovations that are overlaid on top of that now through the open source developer communities in all the innovation. That's happening there is making this internet of things. Promise a reality in every industry

Brian
Unqork's Head of Platform Strategy, Ken Gavranovic, on What Drew Him to Unqork

Code Story

02:45 min | 4 months ago

Unqork's Head of Platform Strategy, Ken Gavranovic, on What Drew Him to Unqork

"This is creation story at uncork uncork as a product is is the concept of enterprise software development often times different. Enterprises are building very similar software. In the second you write code. You've got maintenance and so the idea for encore was what if we can build the kind of enterprise grade building blocks so that you can build a repeatable no maintenance no dat solution and so that's kind of the fundamental course you can go in a what's the business problem trying to solve in. I'm gonna drag drop enterprise create solutions and build it and it's been amazing uncork stun prior to my arrival. You think about know in the in the middle of cove it you know. Working with new york city to deliver millions of meals to ta- customers or you think about bentley working with state so that they can innovate and deliver that relief to people. That really need it so kind of you know doing just doing good in the world and at the same time helping some of the largest enterprises around the globe build applications faster and more customer centric whether it be goldman black rock marsh. Liberty principal tremendous tremendous progress. So what i would say is to me. Uncork allows businesses to focus on their key differentiator and built quickly built enterprise applications that meet their customers needs so I've been involved in a lot of transformational things cryer jenny joining uncork iran product and engineering company called new relic which basically made sure that the internet works. Right has high quality solutions and i heard about unimportant. Where three things that really got me excited about it. You know as one. I'm a big believer. That culture matters and purposeful culture. And so i think leaders you know gary and team had really been purposeful in the culture that they were trying to do secondly something that would change the world because uncork is not only changing the way enterprises build develop maintained enterprise software but it's also making development more accessible right so not if you have the developer mindset. You could do it. And then third just a huge opportunity where i felt that the only question was who's going to drive this fundamental change in the way enterprises again maintain a build and develop software. So that's what brought me to uncork in. It's it's an exciting right. Have been here almost nine months. Now

Cryer Jenny Bentley New York City Goldman Iran Gary
Why You Have to Be Able to Embrace Automation

7 Layers

01:40 min | 4 months ago

Why You Have to Be Able to Embrace Automation

"So what is your background in automation. What makes you knowledge on this subject. I've been working in automation my entire career. We first started a twenty years ago working with very rough tools working with pearl bash scripts essentially making it up as you went along. It's been really amazed. I've just been amazed. Watch the industry. The tools the mindset of the entire industry start to understand that automations crucial karen of business by automation. And it's been it's been joy on see the impact that people finally get it. yeah I've definitely also seen through my research I definitely haven't been here for the whole time. Automation has been worked on but That automation is only become more critical to businesses with it infrastructures which is most businesses at this point. What are some of those use cases for network automation that you've seen develop over your career. Oh let's start out. When i first started out we will work with So prevalent i Big environmental work was at the university of florida and we had a lot of interesting esoteric system set. Sto silicon mainframes mini computers as400's alpha chips from from deck. And one of the first things started working on is. How do we connect these things together. How do we move them over from ten days. T networks to switch networks. How do we then start. Managing these things at scale because it was increasingly the growth and complexity but swiss on upper glide path

University Of Florida
Interview With Joel Beasley From Modern CTO

Developer Tea

01:44 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Joel Beasley From Modern CTO

"So i met this gentleman named at pnd bruin. Who owns seven cto's and he said you know do like executive peer groups for technology leaders. Vp's engineer cto's there on me. More like premium side or people are paying twenty thousand dollars a year and it's facilitated by a professional facilitator. You have to pay all that. So it's definitely good value. But he wanted to create something for the mid level of the market. Like you know people that are you know. They're they want to become a manager for the first time or they wanna move from manager to director in that was at a price point that was like much cheaper than that like super affordable even if they wanted to pay for it for themselves so i said okay because i have the audience and you have the knowledge of how to run these communities and the staff and the support so we created elevate one fifty dot com and the idea was elevate. Bring people up to the next level and then one fifty was like one of dunbar's numbers of community size. So we cap the community at one hundred and fifty people and so we have a hundred people now and We've grown over the past eight months and every week we have speakers and then the it's like a ten minute topic of conversation and then you go into a small group of like three to four people in that. That speaker has set you up with something. It's not like a generic cycling of speakers that are doing sales pitches like they have to adhere to our format. And so what it does is it gets you in these communities having these small discussions and building relationships. And that's been like unbelievable. So now i've now i've got this community where i can go and then every every week or every other week i'm getting introduced three or four new peers and were having legitimate conversations.

Dunbar
Beware When Scanning QR Codes

Talking Tech

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Beware When Scanning QR Codes

"The show to learn about special financing for talking tech listeners listeners. It's brent molina here. Welcome back to talking tech co host. Mike snyder is off today as you may have noticed over the past year plus. Qr codes have taken off short for quick response code. Qr codes feature a matrix. Barcode user skin scan to pull up information such as restaurant menus by simply using your camera. You've probably seen them on flyers and signs at different places or you've seen him online they're basically a square and it looks like a bar code and you use your camera diskette it. It's super easy supercomputing. There is one big problem though scammers. Love him too which is why they're using. Qr codes to trick consumers. Detroit free press columnist susan. Tom poor writes about this protect. Usa today dot com. These qr scams can come in various forms for example one victim of the scam told the better business bureau that they had received a fraudulent letter about consolidating their student loans. It included a qr code that appeared to link to the official student aid dot gov website. The qr code also came in this letter which again looked very official and look legitimate. And that's how the scam works experts. Describe these in a similar way too phishing scams you get the qr code. Then you're sent to a link where you're asked to plug in more information. And then that's how the scammers get what they need and these can come from anywhere. It's not just something you might get. A text message might be an email. You might even see him out in public on flyers when you're out and about so what do you do to avoid a scam like this. Well a susan rights. Yes several tips for one. Don't open links from people you don't know that's number one and that's for anything any email. Whatever if you see link from someone you're not familiar with don't open it. The other thing to do is verify the source if you recognize who it is whether it's a government agency or a company. Take some time to confirm it on their website. Just to be safe

Brent Molina Mike Snyder Tom Poor Flyers Susan Usa Today Detroit
Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

Software People Stories

01:54 min | 4 months ago

Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

"One. Kushner was ability leader anga product year in caterpillar inc. You would hear this very stock in talk later and the passion he phone. I'm lita remove and woods park thinking and you embedded software and really moved him. Athletics medals the woods thinking realistically and thinking from a customer's angle and he also her is ashen words not just romar respected. Although from using his as as dolan onset listen all high blend welcomed the software people stories. Thank you so much for doing this. But when the high that's being pretty good fashion of the deal and Thanks for having me in decision. I want you to introduce yourself for our listeners. I know you along absolutely absolutely so i Actually lead the one of the divisions of character. India have been working company for quite a long time before that. I started my company called meaning now for five years and then i moved out love. What for lost twenty or so. So i be working in Cat and i've been non genetic leader and caterpillar of going engineering Either ship for right from a what be infused with playing that software. Studies rely staggered. Mike idiot us a software engineer. A little beat. Her family moved into engineering product. Looking plus no need pretty large.

Caterpillar Inc. Woods Park Romar Kushner Lita Athletics Dolan India Mike Idiot
The Creation Story of THRV With Founder & CEO Jay Haynes

Code Story

02:30 min | 4 months ago

The Creation Story of THRV With Founder & CEO Jay Haynes

"Jj haines has always been interested in tech just like his dad in nineteen seventy nine. His dad bought and brought home an apple two plus though he was using it for his business to do spreadsheets. Jay began writing code so he could play video games for free riding his games and basic. It's worth noting that this was back when you had to pay a quarter to play video game. His dad was a navy pilot and hobbyists sailplane flyer which j. flu as well even to thirty thousand feet in the air as he says he got grounded as soon as he got married and had four kids early in his career. J. got into finance and quickly became familiar with using debt to get equity returns however he was always interested in the core innovation of why customers buy new products and why they switch throughout his career his time at microsoft schooling start obliged etc. He found out that no one really had the secret sauce innovation. He started evaluating new ways to do it and came across the jobs to be done theory which became the foundation to what he's built. Today this is the creation story of thrive at thrive we build enterprise product management software for product teams are software is built from the ground up around methodology known as jobs to be done and jobs we don in its very simplest form. Is the idea that your customers are actually not buying your products. What they're doing is hiring it to get a job done. If you're on a product team and you want to create a product strategy and a product roadmap that is going to be successful. meaning it's going to generate more customers and it's gonna get customers to switch from your competitors to your product to build that kind of product strategy you should think about your markets in terms of the job. Then you're costumer is hiring your product to do rather than just your product in your features. We mentioned music before. Because i view on eight tracks cassettes cds. What's interesting about that. Market is a great example. Job done so the job. There is to create a mood with music. That's what we're doing whether you're using a record seedier streaming service or string quartet you're trying to create a mood with music and that job is the same. It's never gonna change. So the power of the method behind our software is it gives teams stable target to aim at and try and

Jj Haines JAY FLU Navy Apple Microsoft
Delivering Deep Learning Powered Speech Recognition as a Service

The Python Podcast.__init__

01:56 min | 4 months ago

Delivering Deep Learning Powered Speech Recognition as a Service

"So dylan can start introducing yourself. My name is dylan. I am the founder of ai. And what we're working on is making a really easy to use a pi for automatic speech recognition. That developers are using to do a wide variety of things from transcribing. Podcast like this to zoom meetings. Phone calls we started our company a few years ago. Now back in twenty seventeen and have been chugging away ever since do you remember how you i got introduced the python. Yeah yes oh. I actually was econ major in college and i'd always been interested in. Computers is the kinda word started. I played on video games. This kid i played a lot of like counter strike and ruin scape in like world of warcraft as a kid and my brother and i would build computers because he was also really computers. And at one point. I believe i was like hosting counterstrike servers and selling them on irc really a schedule. But that's that's got into like computers programming. Because i remember i built a website for the counterstrike servers that i was selling just in like html. That i kind of put that on the shelf and thought that i wanted to go into finance in college so i majored in econ and then my senior year of college. I started a company with a guy went to college with and throughout that process ended up learning how to code and the language that i started with was python so attended some python meet ups washington. Dc made a few friends. That i'm still friends with now in python community. And i think one of the first books i read was two scoops of django which i me into it. So that's where it all started.

Dylan AI Washington
Co-Founder Marko Anastasov on the Creation of Semaphore

Code Story

02:24 min | 4 months ago

Co-Founder Marko Anastasov on the Creation of Semaphore

"Marco and staff has been working with computers for a longtime. He grew up in former yugoslavia in the nineties. When there was civil war hyperinflation in the economy was taken back twenty years. His father was electronics guy. There was always a computer around the house. He found himself fascinated with information. And the things. You could conjure up on the magic screens. And he found that computers were place. You could build things that were not influenced by the outside world as a kid. He played sports mainly volleyball. He's taken many lessons from his time playing volleyball. Where a group of people have shared sense of purpose driving towards a goal while building applications under the guise of his web development agency rendered text. He and his fellow builders saw a need to have a way of automating the processes of building testing and integrating and doing so fast. This is the creation story of semaphore. Semaphore is cloud based product for college. You companies our customers are software development teams and semaphore helps them. Automates the process of testing and deploying code. That's kind of a big deal these days because you know software is built collaboratively. The problem that people need saul is how. How do you build software together. You know multiple people adding new codes implications. How do we make sure that it's everything's actually working right. So that's why in modern software development. You know there is an emerging practice of automating various phases of testing and delivering basically applications to end users and customers. So we help them do that. Productively because our product is thing here of that whole aspect of building software for them. Prior to creating similar we were small web development consultancy company was called rendered text. It's still call that but semaphore is what more more now in the world in our practice of basically building applications for clients typically like small start ups we basically saw needs to have how way of automating these processes of testing and integrating software together

Volleyball Yugoslavia Marco Saul
The Birth of RavenDB With Oren Eini

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

02:12 min | 4 months ago

The Birth of RavenDB With Oren Eini

"Hello and welcome to six figure. Developer podcast gaspar. We talk about noon. Exciting technologies professional development clean code career advancement and more. I'm john calloway. I'm clayton hunt. And i'm john ash with us. Today is foreign. Any orrin is the founder of hibernating rhinos which develops raven db a new sequel open source and acid a document database. Welcome orrin so Before we sort of jumped into the meat of you know. What raven devious. Would you give our listeners. Maybe a little introduction to yourself Perhaps tell them how you got started in the industry. False computer poke up. The lighting was instruction fully orangeville. Still to to move left and right does logo in the eighty s Maybe any nineties I remember that the head to convince my mother to by dc supreme expensive visual studio four book so could learn how to do interesting things with computer. I always knew that. I wanted to work with computers and full while i thought that would be in house. Will technician ablation side. And somehow i go into pretty software and then more and more software. Most of that was crop. Some of that was like supreme crop. I remember at a ninety eight or nine thousand nine. I wrote a folk software in a speech is because it which means that was writing in a adventurous. I was like teen in several sites javascript into ninety s and sometimes i was like the mvp scrape on the civil side and people decline site with a class. I was but remember what these false of any single file and didn't know about databases anytime but they needed to stole do a full messages.

Orrin John Calloway Clayton Hunt John Ash Hibernating Rhinos Gaspar Orangeville
Elements of Revenue Marketing Success With Mark Emond

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Elements of Revenue Marketing Success With Mark Emond

"Argument here with demand spring. Delighted to be with you today. I am going to give you a year. And i want you to think about for a moment. I'm gonna give you a few moments. I will pause. And i want you to think about what that moment means to you. The year is nineteen ninety-six. All right have you connected that to what that means to you for. Some of you may be. That was the year that you were born for others. maybe you weren't even born than maybe. Your parents got married in that year. Or maybe you got married that year. Maybe you graduated from college that year for me. Nineteen ninety-six was the year. That i started my be marketing career. I had graduated from university a couple of years previous to that. I had backpack through europe with my girlfriend at the time. Now my wife sue. And we had a great time traipsing through europe eating baguettes and gouda cheese and crepes and i had gotten back and decided now is the time to start my career and i thought i was going to change the world as abebe marketer while little did i know that in nineteen ninety six my job is a bead marketer was essentially to keep the food warm and the beer cold now. I'm being a little facetious. But just a little as it turns out see back in nineteen ninety-six. The internet had just been commercialized. The year previous to that google was just a tiny company back then. There was no amazon. There was no net flicks. Microsoft was rolling the world with microsoft office and windows ninety five and marketers jobs back then were really Subservient to sales Bb sales definitely ruled the ruled the go to market roost in organizations and our job was to really support a bb sales There was no digital marketing ad. There was no content. Marketing mar tech was not a thing. Social media was not a thing back then so that was. That was my job. That was my life back then. It was really supporting

Europe Microsoft Amazon Google Mar Tech
Little Automation Tools in Python

Talk Python To Me

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Little Automation Tools in Python

"Rusty kim jae rivers. Welcome all of you to talk by tony. Thanks great to be here. Thanks thanks. Thanks a beer. It's really excellent to have you here to share this topic. A lot of times have people on the show like. Oh here's how we built instagram. Are we using this cool library to scale like the largest django deployment. Or here's how i built flask in our evolving it and something like that and data science and that's great but i think so many people out there listening like well. I'm not building those kinds of apps. I'm building something entirely different. I don't spend a little things. And i think actually that's where a lot of the magic is for everyone out there listening. You know we all have these things that are in our day to day and it's just like you know that is i. I'm not looking forward to that. But so many times a couple hours python or other codeine a little automation and then that becomes automatic and life is just you know it's so rewarding to do those little things. I am excited to share the ones. That i did. They're incredibly simple but there they just make me smile so much as i do them so really looking forward to doing that but before we get into the apps in the details. Let's maybe go around the youtube stream picture here and let you all quickly introduce yourself. Three of the four of you been on the show before bag. Just you know a quick instruction rusty okay. I gave my long introduction last time. Saw say that. I'm a reformed teacher. I've two years ago. I or maybe three years ago. I started coding. And then i had an opportunity to kind of become the data manager at my school district. So i'm trying to build a pathways between all the various services that we use and Keeping data clean. Because it's not like you had to leave the education space or the public school space. Just sorta transitioned into this world where you can take what you really into help. Everyone whether it was a great move for me. I was actually trying to learn how to teach coding to the kids. And that i really enjoyed it so so it was more than just the same time. Big data hit so it was

Rusty Kim Jae Rivers Tony Youtube