Coding

Listen to learn about the latest news, updates and reviews on programming languages, best practices and coding methods aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from S22:E3 - Demonstrating curiosity kindly with Matt Newkirk (Matt Newkirk)

CodeNewbie

08:07 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from S22:E3 - Demonstrating curiosity kindly with Matt Newkirk (Matt Newkirk)

"Here. Thanks for having me. It's a real pleasure to be here. So Matt, you currently have an incredible role as engineering director at Etsy which sounds very important, very prestigious. But let's take a step back. I'd love to learn about how you got your start encoding. Yeah, my dad was a software engineer growing up we had computers around the house and an apple two C was the first computer that I had in the house and did a lot of very basic games on that and then over time I started to do a lot of writing with word processors and I didn't really understand programming as a job for me, but when I was a teenager, I started to play these online games and I was playing one on AOL and it was great, but it was also expensive. And because I was a teenager with no money, I was not able to keep playing that, but a friend of mine mentioned to me that, hey, there are these things called muds, multi user dungeon. And basically, they're free versions of the game that I've been paying for. And they were made by volunteers, and there's like tons of them, but I started playing this one might, in particular, that was Lord of the Rings based, and it was also created by a few people in college, and over time they found actually a few hundred people that were regularly playing. And in order to scale themselves up, they started letting players volunteer to write for the game and part of that was writing content, part of that was writing code. And so I became one of the coders for that game when I was almost 16. And that world, you started off in the Newbie team and you had this new B project, which was really anything you wanted, but you had to propose it, which was really a couple of page read me text file. All this development happened in this game, which was all on telnet. So I had a telnet client and everything happened in that. And over time, I learned a lot more about software development through this volunteer opportunity, learning about quality control, learning about team management and distributed work. This was back before we had really even VOIP, there wasn't really video chat or anything like that. So most of our chat happened in the game in these channels that were kind of like Discord or slack or bulletin boards or an email. So I was working with people who are all over the world, trying to build mostly our own separate little parts of this world and trying to make it into this coherent game. And I did that for like 15 or 16 years on and off. Before I realized, oh, I can actually make money doing this, and got a job. But I learned a ton about quality through that opportunity and that turned into some contract quality assurance jobs in college, and when I finally tried to start my career at 30, I got my bachelor's degree at 29 in computer science. I was not good at school or at least I hadn't figured out how to have the right coping mechanisms to help me get through it. So when I finally started my career, the job that I could get was as a quality assurance analyst at Electronic Arts for the Sims and I ended up working on a team that was actually a web team within this game company and because I had all this experience in quality assurance and because of the state of the project, I had this extra time and I told them I told the team I can write code if you have any things that I can help with and they took me up on it and I was really lucky and privileged to have a team that gave me the opportunity to do more and they helped me figure out how to do a lot more automated testing, selenium testing all of that and then from there, helped me figure out how to set up AWS instances at a time where that was still feeling pretty new. So that they could automatically test their code every time they pushed a new revision. And then from there, taught me how to build a front end to manage all of that as well. And all of that experience led me to my first paid engineering job and my official title was quality engineer for an education technology company and that job was really interesting. It was still a relatively small company when I joined and I was the only person focused on quality and as a result I was also focused a lot on just how things worked day to day. And so I ended up building a lot of observability tools for the company. I ended up teaching a lot of engineers how to write unit tests, which meant I also had to learn more about how to write unit tests. And build out their entire system at the time, the company, if I remember correctly, it was deploying once a week on a Saturday at midnight and had something like 7 unit tests. And by the time I was running tests against every build and I can't remember the exact code coverage, but it was much, much higher. Especially for a new code. And all of that was really interesting. And it gave me an opportunity to look at kind of the broad side of the code, but I also, because I was the only quality engineer, didn't do a lot of things the way that I would recommend other people to them. I didn't have as much of the team collaborative pair programming code review kind of style in mind. And I didn't really understand how to collaborate with folks as well as I do now, at least, but all of that did teach me a little bit more about how to scale myself and an opportunity came to create a quality assurance team at the company and I was asked if I would like to be a QA manager and have that team and I had no idea what my career growth was going to look like as a quality engineer. And so I said, sure. Let's try it. And it was really hard, and I did a lot of things wrong. But I learned a lot along the way and I got to work with some really great people. I built up a couple of teams and got to see individuals become leaders of those teams and all of that helped me see that where I found the most value wasn't in writing code to solve specific problems, but was helping other people figure out how to solve their problems. So from there, my next job was as an engineering manager at Etsy. And that's where you are today. So I find it interesting that you've been in the tech space for quite some time, but how old were you when you first got your engineering job? I think like 31. 31. Okay, so you've been in the space in the world in the industry for quite some time, but the first engineering job came at 31. Tell me a little bit about this computer science degree that came a little bit later in life. You went to school first, didn't quite work out, decided to go back. And I think this is such an important point because so many people in our community are trying to figure out, do I need a computer science degree? Should I go back to school? Should I just keep kind of going, learning to code on my own journey? So tell me about the decision that led to you going back to school. Yeah, I always felt this desire to be creative, but I didn't really understand how to succeed. And I learned very late in life that I actually have ADHD and looking back, it helps explain why I plug that a high school and why I had such a hard time with so many classes.

Etsy AOL Matt Electronic Arts Apple Adhd
A highlight from #391: Pyscript powered by MicroPython

Talk Python To Me

01:44 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from #391: Pyscript powered by MicroPython

"No python announcement of 2022 was met with more fanfare than pi script. This project announced that PyCon allows you to write python files and run them in your browser in place of JavaScript, or even with interactions between python and JavaScript. There's just one catch, the runtime download was a 9 megabyte WebAssembly file. That made its use quite limited. On this episode, we dive into some news that might change that calculus. The micro python and pie script folks have been teaming up to get high script running in the browser on micro python. Yes, that's the embedded chip python that you may have heard of. And here's the good news. Micro python's WebAssembly is just 300 K to download and loads it under a hundred milliseconds. Now that could unlock some real possibilities. We have Brett cannon, Nicholas tove, and Fabio plager. On the show to discuss. This is talked python may episode 391 recorded November 21st, 2022. Welcome to talk python, a weekly podcast on python. This is your host, Michael Kennedy, follow me on macedon where I'm at M Kennedy and follow the podcast using at talk python both on Boston dot org. Be careful with impersonating accounts on other instances, there are many. Keep up with the show and listen to over 7 years of past episodes at top python FM. We've started streaming most of our episodes live on YouTube. Subscribe to our YouTube channel over at talk python FM slash YouTube to get notified about upcoming shows and be part

Brett Cannon Nicholas Tove Fabio Plager Michael Kennedy Macedon Boston Youtube
The Creation Story of Bounce With Co-Founder, CEO Cody Candee

Code Story

02:10 min | 1 year ago

The Creation Story of Bounce With Co-Founder, CEO Cody Candee

"Outsourcing network of local businesses all around the world big cities we operate different services inside of these businesses for the main one where the bulk of bounce is all around luggage storage. When you're traveling. Now let's check in check out day. You might have all your things in place to keep them with. Bouncy can open our app or a website and find a place to go and leave your thanks for the day the businesses that we work with make extra revenue off that after traffic and travellers all day of their vacation or business travel or whatever it. Is we see leaving golfer. Events wilson launched another product this year package acceptance rate on top of our existing network. You can send your packages to about slow pitch and help with traveling or if he lives in a city doorman i can't be around. Two receivers earned delivery so yeah sorta long-term and we'll be building bounds to help these small businesses make more money and then on your side we exist to basically keep people from not having to plan their days around there things anymore so luggage storage package. Acceptance tools will add more in the future in two thousand fourteen. I was working in san francisco. Some friends some co workers in the scrap. Some drinks after work. Someone said i'm going to join. But i'm gonna go all the way home. I drop off my bag and being minimalist that i am. You know living by this lawsuit that you're thinks she hold you down. I thought crazy how common it is for people to literally go way out of the way to plan the whole evening around there. Things spend extra money on taxis or the ubers and yeah it's crazy. So how can we solve problem. That night i was far. And i took the back of a menu. And we're just like writing all radios that came to my head including inbound that first day and the big vision is can we build a cloud computing infrastructure for the physical distributed storage everywhere. I mean you go with your thanks to you

Wilson San Francisco
3 Automations Tools You Must Know!

No Code No Problem

03:08 min | 1 year ago

3 Automations Tools You Must Know!

"The first toll that i will be covering. Today is happier zappia and makes you happier and is the leading no code automation tool with over thirty eight hundred immigration partners think hub spot milch him google counter and pretty much any toy you can imagine and if they don't have a direct integration you can probably find documentation or youtube video on how to set up the automation you need with a web hook happier is a y combinator backed company led by zayd foster and is probably the best hope to start. If you're looking to get into automation for the first time zap here is the most used toll in no code automation and entire six and seven figure. Businesses have been built using this toll. The only issue with zapper is if you're building a business on top of it. The price can add up extremely fast. I have used an paid for zappia in the past. And i think it is a great tool and how you recommend it to those looking to get started in automation or those that have businesses and are ready to automate those businesses. The second of all that. I'm going to be covering today. Is integra mac. Integra is an incredible automation tool that is affordable and a more visual experience. They were recently acquired for around one hundred million dollars. Integra matters as sleek web-based no code automation tool that pairs with their mobile app for the ultimate automation experience. If you don't like how zappia displays the workflows as you build. I highly recommend trying out. Integra matt i personally use it and pay for it and i think it is fairly easy to use an extremely powerful in regards to what you can do. I think there's i think you can use integral matt. And we'll have more flexibility compared to like zap your but if your needs aren't that complex zap is still a great option. But i personally love. And i pay for integral about their starting plan starts at about nine dollars a month. So it's extremely affordable for makers that are looking to start automating some of their business processes. The third option is air table so as many of you know air table is basically google sheets on steroids and conserve as simple spreadsheet or the back end for a web app. You're building. They have an internal automation tool that connects to popular tools. You use like gmo slack. Google calendar as well as moving data within air table. People run entire businesses just using air table their automation tool. I use it personally for our company placed and they are necessary for our business to function as efficiently as it does. I highly recommend air table and with our business we do events right so logistically speaking that can be a nightmare. But because of air table and air table automations. It makes the process seamless. And yes i highly recommend for sure other notable automation tools include. Ui bakery parabola directional and if this if this then that i know that's another really popular it's not gonna go into too much but they are very very simple way to build basic automations disaster but even a level below

Zappia Zayd Foster Integra Integra Matt Google Youtube Matt
Beyond the Language Wars: R & Python for the Modern Data Scientist

DataFramed

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Beyond the Language Wars: R & Python for the Modern Data Scientist

"Can you describe the set of events that led to our by thon becoming the primary data science today and how this translates into what we call the language war between armed by phone and something that we talked about ready to very beginning of the book is kind of a little bit unusual that we will begin a book on unarmed python by giving this whole history of languages. But i want to that way because i thought that it's important to help you understand the cranks and how we got to where we are and so one of the first questions be blast when they're trying to decide. I learn our show. I learnt python is. What's the difference between aren't python and you'll see a lot of post on stack overflow or different a message. Boards rented where people talk about What are the basic differences between these languages in wash use one versus the other and nobody comes to a clear consensus or a clear. Understanding the differences tried to do in the first chapter is just outline the history of the which is to give an idea about the different ethel's and how things work differently between the two languages so so are was there kind of at the very beginning of scientific computing in academia in the late seventies early eighties in bell. Laboratories was really developed as a programming language for doucet's analysis and within the book i call it a fubu language so who is a street where clothing company from new york. That I used to love when i was a teenager. And is it stands for four as by us. And i like this forest by his attitude is very much a four the community by the community. Kind kind of those in this very much. What are is right is forced decisions by statisticians in. It's just meant to just get statistics that get dot announces his work with down and just just get it done into program language in his own right. But it's first and foremost used for doing that. Analysis and that really shaped all of what kim afterwards in r. and python kind comes from a different direction python originated as a generalist polka me language to make just entry into programming easier with a nice syntax and An easier access to managing all kinds of different tools and system administration and building applications and web development so e cat. It's fingers everywhere. Generalist programming language and then came. That assigns later on so python. Wasn't that a science. I and programming second was kind of the other way

Doucet Academia New York KIM
Use Your Expectations as a Tool

Developer Tea

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Use Your Expectations as a Tool

"Are the source of suffering. This is according to The buddhist tradition. And whether you believe that that's true whether you follow a buddhist practice or not is not really the point instead. It is to look at this idea of expectation to inspect the concept of expectation. And see what we can pull from it as it turns out. I'll modify what. I believe about expectation for this show. That is an expectation is a useful tool that can be abused and it can be kind of a painful painful tool. If it's abused. So what do i mean by tool when we have expectations when we set expectations when we develop some kind of future thinking or or future can have predicting outcome. We can both set what we believe could happen. We can also kind of set an expectation. For what will happen and then we can test it with. This sounds familiar then. Hopefully hopefully this familiar. Actually hopefully you recognize it. As a hypothesis. An expectation in many ways is simply a hypothesis. What do we think will happen.

Q&A: Should I Share MRR With My Employees?

Startups For the Rest of Us

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Q&A: Should I Share MRR With My Employees?

"My co-founder. And i probably be hiring someone in the near future i hire. I was just wondering when you hired in the past. Would you share financial metrics like m. are with employees or. Would you keep that just between you and your co founder is curious to hear what other people do in this situation. It's a good question davis and think the way i would do. It is the way that i did it with drip to be honest if felt weird to me to not share r. m. r. was was our. Kpi right it was the key performance indicator that drove the business and if mara was growing than the business was successful. I'll say. I mean that was the number one. Of course everything flows out of of mr. I wanna be clear. Obviously happy customers happy employees. There's a bunch of stakeholders but just to boil it down to one number to me. It is immoral. Tell so much about your market share about your enterprise value. If you were to sell the company about how much profit you could potentially have all these things so everything flows from our then. It's right like the lower your turn the faster. Mtr is going to grow and without telling let's see my marketers or my customer success people or even my developers where we were it would have felt weird. I think people will likely if they're working for you and they don't know you're probably think it's a lot more than it is and that can sometimes lead issues in terms of why not getting paid more wire. We so stingy with our amazon hosting or why are we paying more for xyz service. Why don't we have better benefits or whatever versus if they start and it's like yeah. We make thirty grand a month and you can do the math here. There's four of us. We're pretty much at break. Even which is in essence. What i would tell every employee i would hire at drip obviously before we were acquired because once we required we were venture backed essence. But i would tell them you know you're going to learn what are monthly recurring revenue is. I'm gonna let you know that we spend all of that every month sometimes more to grow this company so what i was trying to do is level set. You see that number. That's forty grand sixty grand one hundred grand whatever month that is not going into my personal bank account. This business is in essence. A growth business and growth costs money

Mara Davis Amazon
Girls Who Code CEO Tarika Barrett Creating a Path for Equity

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Girls Who Code CEO Tarika Barrett Creating a Path for Equity

"The gender gap in tech starts pretty early. Look at computer. Science students. Roughly four out of five bachelor degrees in that field. Go to men. That's where the nonprofit girls who code aims to get girls interested in the field at a young age as early as third grade since it was founded in twenty twelve. Hundreds of thousands of girls have gone through its clubs and summer immersion programs. Winco vid meant more in person classes. They moved totally online than that actually allowed them to grow. Enrollment went up two hundred percent rica. Barrett took over as ceo of girls who code this year. She said they had to design their new model with the hardest to reach girls in mind. We knew our girls for driving too fast food parking lots to get wifi so we thought about life. We thought about hardware. We thought about living circumstances right often are girls. Couldn't even turn their cameras on because they were sharing a computer with other siblings and we tried to bring best practices in digital learning so shorter days live and asynchronous instruction small group work office hours and project based learning. Because we knew that we'd have to do that for our students and that we were doing the kinds of outreach and really being responsive to the needs of our community how did you design your courses specifically for slow internet connections so we sent out a survey to our participants asking everything. What do you need do need us to send you a computer. Do you have brought them. And even as they answered those questions. And we fill those gaps. We still had things happen in real time. We have teaching assistants. Who are former girls. Who code students. Who went through the summer immersion program there there with the facilitators in this virtual classroom to step in and trouble shoot at any given moment and so that coupled with both synchronous and asynchronous instruction meant that even if a girl got stuck with some tech thing that happened that could always be made up in office hours or there was always someone following up. And saying what do you need. And frankly we have to bring some of that thinking back into the fall even if we're in person because it really made the difference for so many students that we don't want to lose that kind of innovation.

Barrett Rica
How to Monetise Airtable Securely

No Code No Problem

01:02 min | 1 year ago

How to Monetise Airtable Securely

"Pay table is a great product and they allow you to launch air table databases as digital products and monetize them quickly. So basically what they allow you to do is you can take any base. You have in place it behind a paywall whether that be for a one time or a monthly fee and monetize it. If you're looking to start launching digital products which. I highly recommend i were actually using pay table at our team is at sabertooth and we're launching one this week and we're using pay table to secure and monetize base. They have a free plan. And if you're looking for more of their features they do have a starter plan which is only twelve bucks a month which is extremely affordable. Especially whenever you're trying to launch products and see if they get any traction twelve bucks a month is nothing for that so you can find them at pay table dot. Io and start building digital products using the basis that you use for reference every day.

How to Find a Mentor and Be a Successful Manager

CodeNewbie

01:44 min | 1 year ago

How to Find a Mentor and Be a Successful Manager

"So tell us about how you got interested in code when i was in about grade. Three very slow which is about eight years old. I'll primary school got a set of computers and straighter the lab though at about four to six computers in the that was Squad got and they asked parents of the school if they were interested in enrolling children for often compete lessons and for some reason which i don't know my parents decided to enroll me fafsa mischievous at home and i started attending those computer classes and we didn't do anything complicated. Did like i remember. One particular program was like typing to program. We yet to that. Try type in like a sentence in the faucets diamond. You'd have the record and everything. But as a result of being exposed to competing debt early on as the school got more computers than computing became more combine. it goes across. Zimbabwe studied my primary school in high school and I was always good at it. And data than most other students within exposed later on in my high school korea i started doing actual computer science coating. I think what it's supposed to. Coding stuttered incomplete assigns. End as it was odd. I gained because i've been supposed to computing machines odia. I was good at the computer. Science side of it that really got some good interest in it And that. Lynn obviously took me to studying at university and everything but the roots reading comeback to that small computer lab which not everyone dope which you need to go through to that and my parents decided it would be useful for me to studying computer. That early on

Zimbabwe Korea Lynn
The Creation Story of Webapp.io With Founder Colin Chartier

Code Story

01:55 min | 1 year ago

The Creation Story of Webapp.io With Founder Colin Chartier

"Colin chartier started making video games. When he was young he used to play warcraft. Three which had a powerful map editor for users he recalls that one game map was called goblet exploration where you were stuck in the middle nowhere and you had to make civilization. He found that this was really good for learning how to make things that people want it. He lives in toronto and is a twenty minute bike ride from the waterfront many days. He will head down to the beach and work from there. New enjoys getting outdoors. When he doesn't have to call schedule that day in his prior startup. he found that he and his team were very sensitive to breaking changes as it was critical to deliver information in a timely manner. So much so that customers would turn. If anything broken the critical chain he created something to fill this gap prior venture which he was offering up to friends and colleagues via open source. This is the creation story of layer. Ci now called web dot. Io layer ci helps software developers review. The work proposed by other suffer developers. Think about you know. You're you're making a sites that sells pizza people so you have your website. You have a couple of software developers. They're making changes to the website. And you want to that. If one developer proposes a change the other developer. Make sure that the change has broken anything so a developer if they make a code change might make that the by pizza doesn't work anymore which would be a really big problem for your business. So essentially gives developers in the environment. The has everything set up with this new change and then the developer can actually like try the product so they can try buying a pizza like customer would and then make sure that everything has worked crespi

Colin Chartier Toronto
Equity for Developers With Aaron Kahn

Ruby on Rails Podcast

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Equity for Developers With Aaron Kahn

"You can imagine from my desk you know. Talking to engineers receive offers equity is typically offered. And there's so many questions they've received over the fifteen years running mirror cell. Really excited to meet you here. Aaron and kinda hopefully enlighten our listeners. A little bit with some of your knowledge. This is great. Likewise i think equity is the best kept secret that everybody knows about an attack and so i think chatting some light on the details is going to be really exciting terrific. All right we're gonna kick it off with the easy one for you would love to get your outlook on the economy. And how things are shaping up. So i actually feel pretty optimistic about it. Twenty twenty was a little bit harry. We had what two of the worst trading days since the great depression in three of the best and you bring are having this conversation a couple of weeks ago and it's just so crazy that all of that volatility resulted in a pretty extraordinary year. I think the economy has figured out how to operate in a covert worlds and i attribute that almost exclusively to the fact that we're globalized and the fact that technology has been the life support for our global economy. So i feel good about it. There's a lot to be worried about. There's lots of uneasy about. But generally i feel optimistic. Excellence yeah as do. I in a lot of folks i talk to. I would be curious how you feel that. The current labor shortages are affecting the economy. So that such an interesting question. And you know. It's i feel like it's a very specific. One labor shortages in dining and tourism are having a much different impact than labor shortages in attacker medicine. For example i feel like technology and medicine are in a position. To almost avert the labor shortages there are levers in place to get around the shortages and increase the capacity of the existing workforce whereas you know in tourism and restaurants for example. You can only carry so many trays their help. So many people to their rooms. That's really scary. So i'm curious to see what's going to come up that. And how in america specifically the stimulus checks are going to continue and ed needle really impact. The desire for people's get back into the workforce is obviously it's a risk versus reward dynamic where the workplace and the pay stands right now for a lot of people that's just not worth it

Aaron Harry Depression Ed Needle America
The Creation Story of Indico With Co-Founder Slater Victoroff

Code Story

01:35 min | 1 year ago

The Creation Story of Indico With Co-Founder Slater Victoroff

"This is the creation story of indigo indigo. The ten thousand foot level is an intelligent process automation company. What that means for us is that we're taking some of the most complex and l. right the kind of stuff that you hear coming out of opening in google you know not only do we have into co alums. The nation's sort of advisors and liberate with them but our goal really rather than intermittently kind of moving forward. The architectural state of the art is really this idea of how we take that technology and make accessible specifically to nontechnical use. In-intelligence prasada automation. Do that primarily in the document domain. If you will from an email perspective the thing that's cool about documents is that they are image data combined with text data So you know we. We do imaging text use cases as well but but documents primarily. we're very classic dorm room startup. I would love to tell you that you know i was some some you know. Brilliant engineer undergrad. And i planted plotted out. This ten year plan of iv going to become a thing. But it really wasn't that honestly me and my co founders and that's rat for madison and diana. We just fell into it accidentally. Frankly we fell in love with the technology and then we became entranced with this idea. Of how do we actually make. Success did now realize the path that was going to lead us all the time. But very happy that it's ended up this way.

Google Diana Madison
How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

CodeNewbie

02:21 min | 1 year ago

How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

"Thanks for being here. Thank you so much so carry. You are a career transition or who was pursuing dancing. Tell us how you got into development. Yes so i had done ballet my entire life. When i was three and i kind of started taking it more seriously. When i was in high school. I started going to summer intensive by different ballet companies and those are kind of just like summer camps for kids during ballet and the summer before my senior year of high school i went to the joffrey ballet summer intensive in new york city and they offered to let me do a so actually ended up moving there my senior year of high school finishing high school online. And doing that and when it was coming time for me to think about college. That's kind of what i was like. Kay do wanna keep pursuing ballet. Do i to do something different. So i'm moving back home to nashville. And i studied public relations and after graduating i got a job in the music industry. Doing pr in. I done that for a few years as getting really burnt out. I was really stressful. A time anxiety was at a high. And i was like i need to figure something out so i actually stumbled upon code academy and started teaching myself to code and enrolled in a boot camp. And i've been in tech ever since. Wow that's exciting. So you went from ballet. Pr music to to coding. That's really add clyde a transition. Yeah so when you first started. Coding what did that look like. What were you doing. I went to the iron yard. Which was the boot camp. It was twelve weeks long. And i was studying front end engineering so it was a lot of it. We're learning h. Two miles css melodramas script and then my cohort studied view in number as our frameworks so it was a lot of in the morning class. Time learning about new topics and then in the afternoon applying those and working on various projects. And what was that boot camp experience like tons of people who are maybe considering it thinking about it. What was your experience like there. I mean it's like a fire hose of information conflict. You i feel like once. I kind of got the grasp of wine concept. We were like. Here's a new one. Gotta learn this and i mean it was twelve weeks long. It's hard to learn anything twelve weeks but it kind of preps you for the basics of what you need to know and then obviously most people coming into software engineering or currently in it know that we're always constantly learning so kind of just prompts you to how to teach

Joffrey Ballet KAY New York City Nashville Clyde
How to Improve Site Speed With Andy Schaff

How I Built It

02:12 min | 1 year ago

How to Improve Site Speed With Andy Schaff

"Andy how are you today. I'm doing well. Thank you for having me my pleasure. Thanks for coming on the show. And i'll just say right off the bat that i'm really digging. This is not a video podcast so for the listeners and he has a very Looks like a very complete record collection behind him So maybe we'll talk about that in build something more we'll see. We'll see where the conversation takes us. But before we get into any of that really Andy why don't you tell us a little bit about who you are. Which do particularly what does development architect mean. Yeah so it's It's a contributor path with portent. That i've been on for a long time. Now i've been working with porn since two thousand and four and and i didn't start off being an expert with site speed or really being an expert at all Over you know over the years of doing lots and lots of client sites and and you know failing in some aspects and learning and improving in the technology's changing i've i've you know worked up the expertise to get to where i'm at now And what that means. I'm more back end focused. But i implement everything that happens on the front end. So you know the term full stack. Developer gets thrown out a lot. these days. how many true full stack developers are actually are I would consider myself a little bit more of a full stack implementation engineer. Like i i don't you don't want me doing your css. Because i'm not trained in it right. But i understand how it works. I can set up the preprocessing workflows and things bat nature. But my expertise is more on i create environments that that make site super fast Working with the various caching technologies and configuring. The web servers like engine nexen apache to make those sites run very quickly or at least give the really good server response time which is a backbone of of a lot of fate speed

Andy
Interview With Developer, Jason Rohrer

CodeNewbie

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Developer, Jason Rohrer

"So i wanna get into prodi december. What is it and why did you created so project. December is a system that allows Human being to have a back and forth conversation with an artificial personality like dialogue through text is you can type questions to artificial personality for example and the Artificial personality will answer back and you can have a back and forth. That goes on from there. And it's based on these underlying text engines that came into the world within the past year and a half or so basically text completion engines right so the these engines allow you to provide a prompt to the system. For example you might give the first few lines of banana cream pie recipe for example and then the artificial intelligence will continue generating tax to complete whatever you have started right so complete the rest of the recipe for example. You start giving it the first few lines of a poem. It'll right the rest of the poem. If you give it fi first few lyrics of a rap song rap lyrics for you if you give it the first few sentences from a paragraph or monopoly will continue writing the rest of the novel for you so this is pretty fascinating technology because it can write text very convincingly but then the question is what do you use it for. A lot of people are like well. Use it to write my blog from me or i'll use it to tweet from here. Use it to write magazine articles or books or something like that but it turns out that kind of a firehose hose of language in a way right once the starts going and starts generating text based on what you said. It just keeps going off in its own direction and it kind of goes off into bizarre directions. Very so project december tries to leverage this text completion service to enable a dialogue back and forth between a human user. And that kind of keeps they i on track more and keeps it from kind of going off into these strange directions. Like for example. If you ask it to generate a banana cream pie recipe might start generating. Something seems very sensible says. Step one get three eggs and two cups of sugar and so much lower and so on and three sticks of butter but then by the end of the recipe it's talking about you know grinding a mouse and putting it in the recipe or something right but in a dialogue the human being intervening every couple of sentences right and so that back and forth kind of keeps the ai on track and keeps it going into a flow of a conversation that can become very convincing for the human user

Prodi
Unqork's Head of Platform Strategy, Ken Gavranovic, on What Drew Him to Unqork

Code Story

02:45 min | 1 year ago

Unqork's Head of Platform Strategy, Ken Gavranovic, on What Drew Him to Unqork

"This is creation story at uncork uncork as a product is is the concept of enterprise software development often times different. Enterprises are building very similar software. In the second you write code. You've got maintenance and so the idea for encore was what if we can build the kind of enterprise grade building blocks so that you can build a repeatable no maintenance no dat solution and so that's kind of the fundamental course you can go in a what's the business problem trying to solve in. I'm gonna drag drop enterprise create solutions and build it and it's been amazing uncork stun prior to my arrival. You think about know in the in the middle of cove it you know. Working with new york city to deliver millions of meals to ta- customers or you think about bentley working with state so that they can innovate and deliver that relief to people. That really need it so kind of you know doing just doing good in the world and at the same time helping some of the largest enterprises around the globe build applications faster and more customer centric whether it be goldman black rock marsh. Liberty principal tremendous tremendous progress. So what i would say is to me. Uncork allows businesses to focus on their key differentiator and built quickly built enterprise applications that meet their customers needs so I've been involved in a lot of transformational things cryer jenny joining uncork iran product and engineering company called new relic which basically made sure that the internet works. Right has high quality solutions and i heard about unimportant. Where three things that really got me excited about it. You know as one. I'm a big believer. That culture matters and purposeful culture. And so i think leaders you know gary and team had really been purposeful in the culture that they were trying to do secondly something that would change the world because uncork is not only changing the way enterprises build develop maintained enterprise software but it's also making development more accessible right so not if you have the developer mindset. You could do it. And then third just a huge opportunity where i felt that the only question was who's going to drive this fundamental change in the way enterprises again maintain a build and develop software. So that's what brought me to uncork in. It's it's an exciting right. Have been here almost nine months. Now

Cryer Jenny Bentley New York City Goldman Iran Gary
Interview With Joel Beasley From Modern CTO

Developer Tea

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Joel Beasley From Modern CTO

"So i met this gentleman named at pnd bruin. Who owns seven cto's and he said you know do like executive peer groups for technology leaders. Vp's engineer cto's there on me. More like premium side or people are paying twenty thousand dollars a year and it's facilitated by a professional facilitator. You have to pay all that. So it's definitely good value. But he wanted to create something for the mid level of the market. Like you know people that are you know. They're they want to become a manager for the first time or they wanna move from manager to director in that was at a price point that was like much cheaper than that like super affordable even if they wanted to pay for it for themselves so i said okay because i have the audience and you have the knowledge of how to run these communities and the staff and the support so we created elevate one fifty dot com and the idea was elevate. Bring people up to the next level and then one fifty was like one of dunbar's numbers of community size. So we cap the community at one hundred and fifty people and so we have a hundred people now and We've grown over the past eight months and every week we have speakers and then the it's like a ten minute topic of conversation and then you go into a small group of like three to four people in that. That speaker has set you up with something. It's not like a generic cycling of speakers that are doing sales pitches like they have to adhere to our format. And so what it does is it gets you in these communities having these small discussions and building relationships. And that's been like unbelievable. So now i've now i've got this community where i can go and then every every week or every other week i'm getting introduced three or four new peers and were having legitimate conversations.

Dunbar
Beware When Scanning QR Codes

Talking Tech

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Beware When Scanning QR Codes

"The show to learn about special financing for talking tech listeners listeners. It's brent molina here. Welcome back to talking tech co host. Mike snyder is off today as you may have noticed over the past year plus. Qr codes have taken off short for quick response code. Qr codes feature a matrix. Barcode user skin scan to pull up information such as restaurant menus by simply using your camera. You've probably seen them on flyers and signs at different places or you've seen him online they're basically a square and it looks like a bar code and you use your camera diskette it. It's super easy supercomputing. There is one big problem though scammers. Love him too which is why they're using. Qr codes to trick consumers. Detroit free press columnist susan. Tom poor writes about this protect. Usa today dot com. These qr scams can come in various forms for example one victim of the scam told the better business bureau that they had received a fraudulent letter about consolidating their student loans. It included a qr code that appeared to link to the official student aid dot gov website. The qr code also came in this letter which again looked very official and look legitimate. And that's how the scam works experts. Describe these in a similar way too phishing scams you get the qr code. Then you're sent to a link where you're asked to plug in more information. And then that's how the scammers get what they need and these can come from anywhere. It's not just something you might get. A text message might be an email. You might even see him out in public on flyers when you're out and about so what do you do to avoid a scam like this. Well a susan rights. Yes several tips for one. Don't open links from people you don't know that's number one and that's for anything any email. Whatever if you see link from someone you're not familiar with don't open it. The other thing to do is verify the source if you recognize who it is whether it's a government agency or a company. Take some time to confirm it on their website. Just to be safe

Brent Molina Mike Snyder Tom Poor Flyers Susan Usa Today Detroit
Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

Software People Stories

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

"One. Kushner was ability leader anga product year in caterpillar inc. You would hear this very stock in talk later and the passion he phone. I'm lita remove and woods park thinking and you embedded software and really moved him. Athletics medals the woods thinking realistically and thinking from a customer's angle and he also her is ashen words not just romar respected. Although from using his as as dolan onset listen all high blend welcomed the software people stories. Thank you so much for doing this. But when the high that's being pretty good fashion of the deal and Thanks for having me in decision. I want you to introduce yourself for our listeners. I know you along absolutely absolutely so i Actually lead the one of the divisions of character. India have been working company for quite a long time before that. I started my company called meaning now for five years and then i moved out love. What for lost twenty or so. So i be working in Cat and i've been non genetic leader and caterpillar of going engineering Either ship for right from a what be infused with playing that software. Studies rely staggered. Mike idiot us a software engineer. A little beat. Her family moved into engineering product. Looking plus no need pretty large.

Caterpillar Inc. Woods Park Romar Kushner Lita Athletics Dolan India Mike Idiot
The Creation Story of THRV With Founder & CEO Jay Haynes

Code Story

02:30 min | 1 year ago

The Creation Story of THRV With Founder & CEO Jay Haynes

"Jj haines has always been interested in tech just like his dad in nineteen seventy nine. His dad bought and brought home an apple two plus though he was using it for his business to do spreadsheets. Jay began writing code so he could play video games for free riding his games and basic. It's worth noting that this was back when you had to pay a quarter to play video game. His dad was a navy pilot and hobbyists sailplane flyer which j. flu as well even to thirty thousand feet in the air as he says he got grounded as soon as he got married and had four kids early in his career. J. got into finance and quickly became familiar with using debt to get equity returns however he was always interested in the core innovation of why customers buy new products and why they switch throughout his career his time at microsoft schooling start obliged etc. He found out that no one really had the secret sauce innovation. He started evaluating new ways to do it and came across the jobs to be done theory which became the foundation to what he's built. Today this is the creation story of thrive at thrive we build enterprise product management software for product teams are software is built from the ground up around methodology known as jobs to be done and jobs we don in its very simplest form. Is the idea that your customers are actually not buying your products. What they're doing is hiring it to get a job done. If you're on a product team and you want to create a product strategy and a product roadmap that is going to be successful. meaning it's going to generate more customers and it's gonna get customers to switch from your competitors to your product to build that kind of product strategy you should think about your markets in terms of the job. Then you're costumer is hiring your product to do rather than just your product in your features. We mentioned music before. Because i view on eight tracks cassettes cds. What's interesting about that. Market is a great example. Job done so the job. There is to create a mood with music. That's what we're doing whether you're using a record seedier streaming service or string quartet you're trying to create a mood with music and that job is the same. It's never gonna change. So the power of the method behind our software is it gives teams stable target to aim at and try and

Jj Haines JAY FLU Navy Apple Microsoft