Coding

Listen to learn about the latest news, updates and reviews on programming languages, best practices and coding methods aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Interview With Quincy Larson, Founder Of freeCodeCamp

Developer Tea

04:10 min | 6 d ago

Interview With Quincy Larson, Founder Of freeCodeCamp

"Do you feel like you're not learning enough quickly enough as a software engineer. That is the feeling that i talk about amongst other things with today's guest quincy larsen and if you missed out on the first part of my interview with quincy i suggest you go back and listen to that part first quincy is of course the founder and creator of rico camp Which is something that many of you probably either came to this show as a result of you actually heard about developer because of free co camp or you are going through it right now. Three co dot org in of course free co camp dot org slash donate if you want to support other engineers who are going through the beginning of their career by the way Quincy just to be clear. Did not pay us in any way to plug that Here on the show. Thank you so much to quincy for joining me. Let's get straight into the interview with quincy larsen and that feeling something. I'd love to hear your thoughts on the feeling of inadequacy because you're dealing with a lot of people who are probably invulnerable points in their lives especially people who are changing careers or there at the beginning of their career. They have a lot of uncertainty. And there's a mountain of learning in front of them curious you know. Do you see a lot of people who are in that vulnerable place. In what advice do you have for them when you encounter them while empathy is very important. And it's one of the things that i perceived lack of i was learning to code and keep in mind. I'm you know a middle class white male who has a graduate degree right like. Imagine if you're somebody who's been working as a cashier whose job just evaporated or or a restaurant and you don't have all those benefits of The those layers of privilege right in those layers of just general like oh. Yeah i see how this works. I understand the system so not afraid of it right. I understand how higher education works for example. A lot of people don't have that benefit so for them. It could be even more daunting and one of the things that we do. Is we just try to frame is realistically possible. We start from the premise. Coating is hard in fact when you create a new free co game account I added this blurb at the top when you first get into free co cabinet it basically tells you like this is going to be hard anybody who tells you that learning code is easy is trying to sell you something right. Because it's going to take years and you're going to be daunted in. You're going to be baffled. You're going to have tests telling you failed failed failed you're going to have you know your interpreter telling you air and you need to be able to power through that and the most important thing is to know that everybody goes through this process. A lot of people don't remember it. They don't remember what it was like learning to code because it's so long ago maybe they were one of the lucky people who got a computer when their kid in there. The parents Encourage them to learn programming. Or maybe they just had a natural inclination toward early on if they have years and years of extra experience that accounts i mean that definitely speeds up the rate at which they can learn new things so i would tell people you know. I learned when i was thirty. I didn't have a lot of experience with programming. Was undaunted essentially. And i think that more people if they can remain undaunted and if they can just power through the doubt than they can learn to so the community aspect is really important. Just having a support network in a lot of people can find that on twitter. They can find that through like separatists. They can find that through. Different forums and dischord groups. They can find it on the free cocaine form. There are lots of ways that you can find kind of your tribe and have them have your back in help push you forward and i think that that is absolutely key but but the most important thing again just know. This is hard now that anybody who says program is easy has just forgotten how hard it was when they were first. Starting

Quincy Larsen Quincy Rico Camp Twitter
Cloud Contact Centers and the 'Real World' with Julien Rio From RingCentral

The CX Hustle Podcast

03:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Cloud Contact Centers and the 'Real World' with Julien Rio From RingCentral

"I want to sort of starting to i. Guess your all the mind in terms of ringcentral because ringcentral is obviously in business and provide software for coal centers Tell me a little bit. And this is by no means an ad for ringcentral. Because we don't do that here at six central bet. I am intrigued because there is so much interesting in cloud software at the myron. And that's really the backbone. I guess if you products how are you saying things apply out in the cloud context amok it. I i i love that you say contact center really the word i'm gonna use nuts coal center Simply because i feel like in twenty twenty one of course is still incredibly important. But it's more than that. There's just more than than coal. And i also love the fact that you talk about cloud because i mean this pandemic has made it very clear you need the cloud you need to be able to work remote. You need to be able to manage your contact center your entire. it system. Anyway you need to be able to manage it remotely And what used to be convenience in the past now it's just a necessity So as you mentioned yes ringcentral. We are company that was born in the cloud. So i do believe five hundred person in the power and the necessity of cloud And that's a trend that's just keeps growing yesterday. Yeah absolutely we ringcentral. i mean what. Where do you say because as a call center practitioner. Now it seems to me like every different wake there is. A new cloud context vendor. That just comes out of nowhere. And he's trying to so advertises a very crowded marketplace and a lot of it he's potentially just rebranded coal platform underneath people white labeling it and doing all sorts of we'd multiple stuff for ringcentral. I mean. give me the bit of the story. I guess about how you guys came out. Psa ringcentral is a company that was originally born for the u. market so you would be unified communication as a service right so born in the cloud later late nineteen And it has been for so many years Leader of the metric quadrant of gartner. For this you cast product so when you talk you. Can you talk about a video. Conferencing you talk about a cloud. Pbx meaning the phone system and you talk about t- messaging oldest messaging software that we use internally within the company. That's what it was known for for so many years And a few years ago. Seven eight nine years ago. I don't have the dates in in mind right now with started to contact centers. Well because connect senator is is ios. Aside of communication is great to have internal with you need to have x. no communication as well and so many players you mentioned that his credit market so many players nowadays actually starting to do both internal and external communication so for ringcentral. We started working on this many years ago. All originally in the cloud no on prem. We really believe in the power of cloud from day one and what's interesting about my personal background is actually join four years ago. A company a french company called de mello That created a remarkable Tech for digital contact centers and this company got acquired by ringcentral. And that's how i got into into the bigger. The bigger company that is ringcentral today is through this acquisition of this fantastic technology that he's now one of our major products entering

Psa Ringcentral Gartner De Mello Tech For Digital Contact Cente
Post-Pandemic Life and Work as an Engineer

Developer Tea

04:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Post-Pandemic Life and Work as an Engineer

"We're talking about how we'll get back to normal and what normal might look like when changes we can expect but before we can talk about that. We need to talk about how will know win. Normal is coming. When do we know that were out of the pandemic and this is a much harder question. Because in the beginning of the pandemic we all experience things essentially at the same time there was some time delay between for example high case numbers in new york city in the united states and then eventually That growing the case numbers growing elsewhere. Right this is Just because of the way that the virus transmitted and because of the high population densities and that kind of thing. There's some delay but for the most part the public messaging that we received was in sync. But that's not going to be the case as we come out of the pandemic in fact for some people who have either received the The vaccine or they have already had cova did they are already experiencing. What many of us hope to experience in the future the end of their particular involvement in the pandemic and so this is going to be staggered and it's going to be staggered in a much different way because Vaccines don't grow vira. Lii in other words. We don't have an increasing number of vaccines on the same scale and rate right because the virality model is an exponential model but vaccines are closer to a linear model in terms of how quickly they can be distributed. So we're not going to have Distribution to wide audiences very quickly. instead we're going to have a more linear distribution additionally while everyone could Theoretically catch covid be infected with covid. Not everyone is going to opt to actually take vaccine and not everyone will have the vaccine win. Most of it has been distributed when most of us have been vaccinated. And so for this reason we will still hear about the cases for quite a long time into the future. So when do we declare that the pandemic is over. Mother's a definitive answer to this because remember a pandemic has somewhat of a formal definition or at least a formal declaration. This happened on march eleventh of last year. When the world health organization announced that cove nineteen was indeed a pandemic a global pandemic but declaring the end of a pandemic is not the same as say declaring the end of war. In fact the world health organization will likely eventually declare post pandemic status. We don't say the independent like we say post pandemic. This is all very confusing to our brains or brains wants simplicity. We want to be able to say this thing is but this thing that we're talking about won't be over for a long time. Perhaps ever and the reason for that is because there's a lot of trailing effects even if we have infection numbers that go very low through the floor there's likely to be new versions of the same virus that continue to be spread. It's extremely hard to contain a virus like this that has had spread like this so it is unlikely That any of us will forget that we ever heard of corona virus. It's unlikely that it go into our rear view mirror Without a trace. So if we're looking for a grand finale or a a moment in time that we can celebrate. It's possible that some governmental agencies might know. Hold some kind of press events or something similar to this where we can kind of mark that we kind of have effectively ousted the high transmission numbers right. That's about as much as we can hope for but because of this staggered experience and because for example. Each state is approaching. Vaccinations very differently. Each country is approach is approaching. Vaccinations very differently. We have such an asymmetrical experience

Cova World Health Organization New York City United States
Serverless Properties with Johann Schleier-Smith

Software Engineering Daily

03:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Serverless Properties with Johann Schleier-Smith

"Welcome to the show. Jeff super excited to be here. You've been looking at service computing from the vantage point of berkeley and talked to a number of other people from berkeley about service. Talk to john. Stoica and vikram. She conti from your point of view. Why has berkeley taken an interest. In service computing. Berkeley has a long history of prominent Research in computer science and systems in particular. Lots of really cutting edge work was done here and think the faculty are always looking for that next thing. That's coming down the pipe and can we be on top of an and ideally ahead of that trend and in the context of service computing. This is something that we latched onto people at berkeley. I wasn't actually the first one myself. Yaas okay eric. Jonas published pirate work back in so john's dog. Eric jonas. They published a pirate work back in two thousand sixteen. Two thousand seventeen were were really saying. Wow service allows us this access to supercomputer scale resources for basically anyone. So i think that people kind of latched onto. Hey there's something new. There's something really different that's happening in the cloud and we should really pay attention that we should try to understand what the implications of this new technology are what to service make easier. What does it make more complicated. What are the trade offs in using services from our perspective services computing is really about making life easier for programmers. That's the big change. Now it makes a number of changes so it certainly makes life easier for operators as well in some cases even completely removing the need for certain system administration responsibilities so everything that's complicated about servers and by that we mean things like setting them up making sure that they are patched for security Making sure that when they fail application is responding in the correct way so that continue to deliver service all of these concerns. Go away the handed to the cloud provider. Cloud provider has ways of automating them away. So that for them. It's also much much easier to manage. So they can imagine for many many companies at scale so the program are also has this ability to basically write code and their favorite programming language upload loaded to the cloud and then it just runs not have to worry about it anymore. And that is i. Think in many ways fulfilling kind of this promise of the cloud to give you that effortless access to scale so the downside of that is that you do have to change how you program a little bit so i think that lambda was successful because it allowed you to bring along your existing libraries logic bring along your existing languages so there's a fair degree of continuity on the other hand if you really are going to make programming simpler you're going to be writing simple programs and that means that you're probably going to be rewriting your programs at the same time so you do have to learn to think a little bit

Berkeley Jeff Super Stoica Eric Jonas Conti Vikram John Jonas Eric Lambda
Radicle: The Decentralized Platform for Code Collaboration

Epicenter

04:33 min | 2 weeks ago

Radicle: The Decentralized Platform for Code Collaboration

"So united site air like what what is radical. What's division you guys. Have pursuing a radicalization. You kind of code collaboration network on this Designed with certain golden mine It's designed to be through sobering Infrastructure behind the scene It's also designed with security in mind and then finally it brings together a concepts like centralisation value flows. Things things that we see you locked in the in the in the blogs eco-system it brings some of those closer to the gulf collaboration experience. And maybe just to kind of wrapper heads around a little bit like why. Why is it important to have code. Collaboration done in alway decentralized way what's wrong with the existing waste of done we. We see a number of problems with ash centralized our code. Collaboration providers on the biggest problem topic right now in the world is the problem of user perfect censorship unfortunately most of the existing centralized providers basically have to limit usage to certain areas. Like you know. Iran crema like no. There are a number of places in the world so so when we thinking about open shores being through the open you immediately start to realize that they're all of these different arbitrary wolves come into play and that limit basically the openness of the of water infrastructure though so that's the first problem additionally many of these centralized forces have not been designed with security in mind you know we can zoom in on that quite look but the example that was give as a a few months ago. There was Significant hike on twitter. Where some of the most Most high-profile on accounts were compromised. And then i think the your which basically tweeting some kind of bitcoin like send me coincide with link So imagine you know similar attacks on your code. Collaboration infrastructure where someone put index something. You know very significant go based end. You know you as the maintain the tragic. Potentially you wouldn't even be able to notice Simply because a lot of our commissioner have on top i signed for example and then additionally you have like like when we're looking at the centralized forges. There are a number of attacks of being pulled off on the on the source of large fraction. Only on the code side of things associate cure are good collaboration. Distribution of code basis we think that the fundamental problem with centralized infrastructure osso centers one security second and then additionally. You have a number of other problems like than they're looking on. Most of these a lot firms today provide they speak get so they actually operate based on an open protocol but they haven't near the number of things around those the most common being. I'm social collaboration in this. Obviously you know are looked into their own to to their own platforms. These are the three things that we believe are really relevant for for everyone and then additionally you have a number of problems that actually are are specific tuesday decentralized world so at the decentralized world especially last year a lot of we show we show the emergence of dollars right. These are these are groups of people that actually go through the process of coordination. And you know the pain of coordination many times to actually align incentives. And what happens there. Is that actually like when they They all of them. Usually you know have some kind of go. Drip dory like where where the code Most of these things are today on Hub in virtually there. They actually they have to go through the classic abdomen flow of of some of the centralized providers where it doesn't matter if you are. It doesn't matter if you have all of these very sophisticated coordination schemes. You need the one adamant that actually will have overarching powered over over the such of the code base. Or you might like you can have multiple wants but actually many ways this even worse given the and everyone over them now has has a little over. the community. allows there's allows up decentralized organization decentralized obligations to control software trust listening which we thing is a relevant point for

Iran United Twitter
DApp Programming Gateway with Chris Swenor and Jay McCarthy

Software Engineering Daily

07:21 min | 2 weeks ago

DApp Programming Gateway with Chris Swenor and Jay McCarthy

"It's early. Twenty twenty one. What are the applications of blockchain's today. That's actually a great question. And the application of blockchain today if you look at purely the number of users actually using it our currency and d fire really where most of the actual the blocks things are being used. I mean there's a lot of lot of large companies looking at Chain and insurance use. But if you talk about actually real world uses users are actually using it. It's his current scene defy and for building applications in those spaces. What do you need to know. Or what kinds of can you go a little bit deeper. Get a little more fidelity on what those applications look like sure. So when i say defy Let's stanford decentralized finance and the type of applications are out there are lending platforms decentralized exchanges in the ability to exchange one token to another without having to go through a central entity the other tool that are built on top of these platforms to be able to automate the generating yield stable coins. Meaning pegging a a token to the us dollar in a decentralized way things are in defy and let me talk a little bit about what they look like in practice from programmers perspective. So when you build the decentralised application today typically what you'll do is you'll really right like three different programs. You're right a smart contract program. Those are the ones that probably get the most attention. These are written in languages like like for example and they are the. That's the program that actually runs on the blockchain under a virtual machine like the theory in virtual machine theory by the way is the market leader in the space the easy to explain things in terms of how it works and then in addition to that smart contract program. What you'll do is you'll right. Like a middleware layer that actually interacts with the blockchain protocol. Because basically every time you make a new smart contract it's like you're making a new network protocol and you don't want that network protocol to be like directly spoken by. Let's say your front end. User interface sealed typically right a middleware layer that will communicate with your specific new protocol. And then you're right up front and application you know on the web or you know natively or something like that into these three programmes all working together. That's what we call a essentially application and then in terms of like from a progress record of what does program look and feel like instantly what you're doing is you can kind of think of as you're making a single object and you have to think about what is the state space of that object and what transitions do you want to allow that object to go through in changing its state space and basically for every single operation that you want your custom protocol to have. You're going to meticulously right down. Which other states are allowed to be in to make this transition and what modification is going to happen next in the role of the blockchain in this program is to essentially guarantee that everyone across the world agrees on the state changes that this particular object goes through and that's what constitutes the decentralised application part of that application stack is the hardest to build you know. The front end is very straightforward. You know there are a few things that are a little bit strange about it because it's so a synchronous but that's pretty basic for full stack developers similarly the middleware. The main thing. That's complicated with it is. It's really a totally separate program that you have to synchronize with the smart contract program so it's almost like if you imagine kind of the old days of web programming where you know you would change your form labels and you had to make sure the updated the form consumer on the server. It's kind of that sort of thing where you have. These two programs that are evolving in tandem or another way to think about it is that you're writing the rpc andrew writing rpc client at the same time. So that's a little bit complicated end. You know there's some strangeness to the way that you have to interact with these networks but the really the most complicated thing is that smart contract and the main reason it's complicated this because sinking about taking a high-concept program an automatic market maker in turning that into a single object with this bespoke post hall of what you know. What transitions do you want to allow went. How do you verify the state and how do you. How do you check it. That's really complicated in a particular. It's complicated because it's so scary because if you do it wrong then you but what is what is doing it wrong. Mean doing it. Ron means that now. You're decentralized application is going to say yes to some transactions that you meant to say no to meaning that you're going to give away money that you didn't intend to give away or you're gonna say no turns actions that you meant to say yes to which means that you're going to lock away money forever. That known will be able to get access to so both of those kinds of mistakes are really common in the decentralised application world. And they're really the source of these headlines that you read about you know so and so lost twenty million dollars or so in so locked away ten million dollars from their contracts. They come from errors like that. So it's very tense to build these programs in particular all of these programs. Something that's happening in the background that it didn't mention before. Is that when you run a program on a theme you basically pay per cycle. It was a way to think about it. So that when you write a function if this function takes one hundred cycles it's gonna literally cost more to run that than another program that takes you know a hundred in two cycles to run into because that there's a whole lot of stress and emphasise in most decentralize application most smart contract programming languages to give you the programmer detailed intricate control over exactly how the program gets compiled so much. So that in the most popular one of these languages which solidity. It's almost like programming. Gpu in that. There's this very concrete difference between different layers of memory in you have to explicitly move things from one layer to another and you even to the point where. The solidity compiler doesn't really abstract way details like variables from you. It's almost as if you have to know that are exactly sixteen registers and make sure that you don't go beyond using those sixteen registers because then the compiler will fail in its failing from perspective for your benefit because it would cost more if you moved away from using those registers. So you know if you're in the audience interested in blockchain programming in some ways. I'm trying to intimidate you by thinking about all of these weird details but it's not a false intimidation it. These are the kinds of issues that many blockchain programmers think about a lot and a lot of stress put on these issues by the current way. People talk about designing blockchain programs.

Blockchain United States RON GPU
Jonas Downey From Basecamp Discusses How Their Products Reflect Their Opinions

Developer Tea

03:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Jonas Downey From Basecamp Discusses How Their Products Reflect Their Opinions

"People who are listening to this know about about base camp And i'm sure that they have probably seen some of your work. But i love for you. Assume that somebody who's listening to this does has no idea Who who base camp is what they do what you do. Can you kind of give like a two inch. Introduction chirp yeah basecamp is a software product company We've been around. Think about twenty years now and Over the years we've made lots of different products. Our most famous product is the one called base camps are companies named after the product. And it's some generally known as project management tool but that's kind of not a fair description of it. It's really a communications tool for small businesses and teams to get work done and keep in touch with each other. Keep track of everything. Stay on the same page Within that chat chatting twos and things like that So that's base camp and then we recently launched a brand new product called. Hey which is an e mail service. So it competes with things like g mail yahoo you can sign up for a hey dot com email address and it's sort of reinvention of email. We took e mail in basically blew it up and came up with a bunch of new ideas and still all that into this new product. So that's the summary. Yeah bit base. Camp seems to take on all of the projects that when you first start being you know. It's a lot of people listening. Rinaldi become offer engineering. Oh i am going to build a productivity app and kind of this kind of mean culture around the idea that oh yeah of course your first app is going to be to do right right but then basecamp actually takes the next step and like no. We're going to actually build this thing and do the whole you know start. Starting these really really harry difficult problems like email and productivity and project management. All of the things that you know are hard to tackle because there's so first of all so many competitors in space but secondly there's so much Kind of religiosity around how to do these things and I've always seen base campus as someone or someone. There's a big personality. Basecamp has of these heart problems having opinions about them and sometimes having It won't say counter cultural because it's really a buzzy term but having opinions that other people are are quick to criticize So i'm curious if you have that same perception of basecamp in kind of the super culture yeah i think that's right Definitely our products swim in heavily populated spaces. There's lots of competing products and lots of ways to get worked on. There's lots of resent email. Those things aren't novel but what is novel is our approach to how we run our business and how we think of this software and how it fits into people's lives that's that's really the way that basecamp contrast against most of the other companies building tools in in these faces so We are very opinionated about Running a company that's profitable and small and respectful of Our employees time and we build the products that we use to run our company So the products have those same principles and that ethos built into them As just the fundamental of of how we approach work in vacation time we thought a lot about those things over two decades and so when you use any of our products are going to get the kind of distilled version of how we translate those opinions into tools.

Rinaldi Yahoo Harry
Work and Life as a Post-Pandemic Engineer: Is The Office Still The Default?

Developer Tea

05:21 min | 3 weeks ago

Work and Life as a Post-Pandemic Engineer: Is The Office Still The Default?

"This though is applicable to software engineers and interestingly has been applicable for many people for many software engineers for a long time. This idea that our physical workspace. Our physical location for work is not necessarily concrete. We don't have for example if you were to work at a restaurant. We don't have a grill that we need to go and cook at. We don't have a cash register to stand at. Our work is mostly what happens in our minds. What happens on our very portable devices. So what exactly does it mean for us to be at work physically speaking. What does it mean. Well one of our work is also about human interaction in fact arguably the vast majority of the value of our work if not all of the value is determined by how other humans will interact with them and so there is some layer of locality to our work and there always has been to some degree. Our work needs to be consumed by other people and we very likely are going to be interacting with other people to collaborate on our work. So it's not that crazy. That luke has mattered and probably will continue to matter. Even post cove it. But here's what is likely to change made in my opinion. Here's what's likely to change before covid and really especially in the early two thousands. Before a remote work became a popular option. We had the default of working in an office. When you go to work working in an office where you go. And there is some precedent for this right we. We know that our home is a sacred space That we've evolved to some degree to make our home a private space. And so why would we allow our trade and are home to become mixed. There is some again psychology backing up this idea and bolstering at that. We should have some separation of these concepts at the same time. There's also a lot of evidence to show that are working hours and are working. Environments are into thematical to The productivity especially of the kinds of problems that software engineers are solving. And so wasn't that long ago when remote work became an important option for a lot of companies. There's a lot of benefits to remote work simple examples. Some obvious examples are you can choose from talent pool around the world and you can hire people sometimes for less Less money less of a salary because they're living conditions there They're you know working wage. The amount of money they need in order to live going to lower their living costs are lower and so there's some obvious financial benefits. There's some obvious kind of sourcing benefits to going remote but there's also some softer benefits like the fact that people tend to be happier when they're working in remote capacity. So what does this mean. And what is the future looking like. Most of the companies in tak large companies and small companies like before the pandemic. The default default was still working in the office. It was odd company that had full distribution. It was the strange company that had even fifty percent of their workers being remote most companies Especially large companies. If they have remote workers enough of them will be in the same location that they'll start a satellite office as idea is the host small office and then you have a headquarters office. There's a lot of different forms of remote work but cova changed remote work for virtually all companies. It changed it. Because for many companies that held out in the idea. That officers were necessary for productivity. Cova challenged that assumption. We suddenly had a forcing function and that forcing function was in order to survive. You must be productive and remote the same time. So what does this mean. It means that all of the people working inside of these companies has now had a chance to trial run. Remote now. this wouldn't be a huge deal if it was only one or two companies even if those one or two companies were very large but the fact that this is virtually universal experience that everybody went remote for a while that the all had a chance to work from home they all had a chance to see what those differences would be like for them. This changes the landscape of opinion. It changes from default being in the office to now. A very large number of people are asking the question. Is the office still the default

Luke Cova
Lego Problems - Modes of Operation on Component-Driven Problems

Developer Tea

04:10 min | 1 d ago

Lego Problems - Modes of Operation on Component-Driven Problems

"In today's episode. We're gonna talk about the theory of problem solving couldn't do it using legos. My name is jonathan trailer listening to developer t. My goal on this show is still june developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers and i'm excited to talk about problem. Solving we have problems facing us every single day. Sometimes there's problems about what to do with our time Sometimes the problem is as simple as what we're going to have for dinner. Usually those problems have some consequence and sometimes they have major consequences. Some things are common with our problem solving processes in in today's episode. I wanna talk about different types of strategy or the kind of abstract the idea of problem solving if you are the manager of this problem when abstract the different ways that you can interact with the problem and we're going to talk about it using legos. Let's imagine that you have a table on. This table is a set of legos. See if i don't know some set number of legacies and you're given some kind of goal to accomplish with those legos extensively. The goal would be to have the legos in particular shape. But it could be that you need to have them reach any particular height. No specific shape is necessary. This is very much like the problems that we face in our day to day lives in the sense that we typically have a variety of factors which turns out to be our lego blocks. Those factors might be people they may be actual facts or resources some kind of component that we can take into consideration sometimes. Those components are much smaller than we expect him to to be like for example a component might be something that you said to someone a long time ago that has affected them until today other times. Those components could be very large very important like for example resources. Money these are things that are can be treated in a very similar way to legos because they are components of our problem right than for the sake of this argument going to treat them as such and so when you have a problem that has a bunch of different components. There are only a certain number of ways that you can interact with that problem. There's only a certain number of ways that you can work with these legs and we're gonna talk about all of them on today's show and we're also going to can explain some examples of these kinds. The first kind that we're going to talk about is probably the kind that comes to mind when you think of legos. But interestingly rarely comes to mind when you think of actual problems that you have and that is the transformative approach transform. If we're not talking about reforming your legos. Melting them down in creating something new. We're talking about moving them to different places right. Moving the legos. In such a way that They are in a different shape than they were before. This is how you would expect to play with legos. This is how you would expect to build. a you. Know a given shape with legos. That have already taken a different form right but we really think about their problems. This way we really think about our problems as a reorganization problem. Then we're not talking about reorganising people talking about reorganising resources or for example on your team you could imagine that you have three people on your team. You're a manager

Jonathan
S15:E4 - What is Node.js and when might you use it (Danielle Adams)

CodeNewbie

03:41 min | 1 d ago

S15:E4 - What is Node.js and when might you use it (Danielle Adams)

"Thank you for having me. Tell us about your journey. Where did you get started. Yeah sure so. I have a little bit of a unique journey. I tell myself to do front end development. When i was in middle school back or gio cities actually learned a lot about html and how to like style a website and a little bit about java script. J. query back then. I don't know if that reveals my age. A little bit of web development took a couple of cs classes in college but then eventually went into advertising. I did that for a couple of years and nine. I did a code book. And then i started working as a developer at a startup in kind of took off from there started doing job script and now it's pretty much my whole job interesting. You start off doing some front end. Actually mafia says staff and you kind of ended up doing some some notes stuff now. Where did the transition come from so my last job. I did both running back. End up really what project i wanted to work on but i did do a lot of work in ember and so i've really got to understand how fronted frameworks were. There was another team at the company they were using react and so it really gave me an opportunity to understand and actually watched the evolution of front end development and then when i got to roku joined the team and got to work on developer experience there and then there was an opening for node language owner hiroko and i said hey can i. I guess it was more of an audition for this role and it worked out. Nice nice so it's interesting that you were exposed to coding. You did some coding in middle school. But then you didn't graduate with a cs degree when you actually went to school. He graduated with an advertising degree. Why was that. Why not go to see us. Yeah that's a really good question. I think i just didn't understand that. Computer science did not mean. I had to be a scientist i in anything to do with in my classes. I remember being in the labs in you know. It was in like the engineering building and there was just a lot of. I don't know at the time. I guess it was like a little bit daunting to pursue a career in science and at that time also i didn't know little bit about front end development and how like websites worked this whole idea of like companies coming out with these big internet. Campaigns was very exciting from an advertising perspective. And so. That was what i wanted to do. Yeah what got you from advertising back into code. How's that transition for you. Yeah i i got out. And i was doing a little bit of coding and then i kind of hinted into doing more digital marketing. I was doing some seo stuff and at the time like facebook. Ads were super new and so just helping. Companies are very technical. So the roles that i was taking i was finding ways to kind of put myself in these positions. Were i was able to help out with people who are a little bit more old school in their advertising knowledge in ways and just show them be like. This is what you should do like. Here's the do now. look at. How many people this reaches look how many clicks we got in so really trying to push the whole media advertising. seo to the companies that. I was working at in. Show them that this is. the future of advertising. Wasn't quite the creative direction that i wanted. Which is why. I kinda got back into coating i think sometime. It's now it's an eight years which is insane but my dad sent me this new york times article about this coding school that doesn't exist anymore but called death boot camp in the firs- yeah exactly and he

J. Query Hiroko Roku Facebook New York Times
Episode 123 - Documentation - the bartenders' almanac

Front End Happy Hour

06:15 min | 2 d ago

Episode 123 - Documentation - the bartenders' almanac

"So we thought why not do. An episode on documentation in this episode share our opinions and thoughts all around documentation. Let's give introduction of today's panelists. Mars you wanna start it off sure. Hi i'm marga leeann. I am a senior software engineer in the bay area and all thoughts are my l. I'm stacy london and senior. Front an engineer at trello and all my thoughts are marzieh's. Hi my name's augusta soon. I'm a software engineer at twitter. I am shirley. And i'm an independent creature of data visualizations and. I'm ryan burgess. I'm a software engineering manager at net flicks and all thoughts are documents in each episode of the front. End happier podcasts. We like to choose a keyword that if it's at all in the episode we will all take a drink. And what did we decide. Today's keyword is read me. Read me need me. So say the word. read me which. I'm assuming move well when we talk a little bit about documentation we will all take a drink all right. Let's hop it. I feel like we got a star. What does documentation mean to all of you. How would you describe it. What are your thoughts on it. Oh gosh that's so broad. I like don't even know where to begin. Because you can document or just generally like if you generalize it like right down things for a variety of different types of work in different ways but the way i like to think about it is usually like documentation is sort of saving myself from my future self or my future self from my current self and also like. I can't remember where i read this. But it's like the ultimate way to scale yourself and your work because if you write things down once it conserve many people at the same time a lot of people. But you're only one of you and you can't be asked the same questions from all those people all simultaneously so it's sort of interesting way to write down what's currently going on in the current state of affairs and it's a good resource for other people and i think it saves time for you and for others down the road very broad. But that's how great you did a great job. Yeah that's that's a pretty good way of describing it. And i love the you got into like sharing the ideas and not having to explain things over again especially in us all being in the pandemic but the more being remote and not always working in the same time zones and just everything is. There's a lot more flexibility in the sense that you can share those ideas. Broadly and you don't necessarily have to have a meaning for it. I think it also gives people reading your documentation not only a resource but they can be more independent in the way that they work. Because it's sort of like a self serve model that they can grab the resources they need when they need them which is pretty. I think pretty useful and like really empowering for a lot of people. I wanted to add onto that that as a team of one. I'm working on mostly like one off. Projects the way the interface the most with documentation is with like libraries. And i feel like documentation for me doc. First of all documentation and second of all the community around the library is like what makes her break the library from me and whether i'll ever use it because like great documentation is so good and then and then i've also come across documentation. That's like literally just repeats the functioning and i'm like i don't know how to use this library or the code example. Just be like very abstracted and it's like food equals bar times food and like you're like this i can't head around or i think even worse is when it just socially unlike an open source project in did hub. It defaulted to the plane. Read me where it is just the title and that's it you're like cheers to read me. Cheers cheers so funny. We talk about those useless functions and makes me think of. There's this winter that javascript has where you can make it lint and look ask for you to put the comment of what the function is and what the parameter type expects. I remember one time. I was working in some. Oh thank goodness they have this linter. I'll know exactly what parameters are getting past and the person just put at parameter is object. What is the object like this is like typescript and stuff i was like would object. Jason object anything could be. Maybe they're saying. I guess this maybe you can just take any brings up an interesting. About how like code can be self documenting think is objects might be a little vague but it also goes to how you name your variables to stacy's point to like don't name a variable foo or bar like what is that variable do but if it's like is honor is offer is enable like that's one way of making your code self documenting as well. There's i mean there's different ways you can document stuff and naming. Your variables correctly is one way to do that. Merged such a good job of defining mutation. There's probably not much to add. I plus one to the documentation for your future self especially like if you stick around at a place long enough you will write code that you forget that how it works and why and why we slater for me. Yes i was going to sound like i mean. I hope that you're staying longer than two weeks. I forgot what i did. A couple of weeks ago interrupted so yes. It's nice to like for your for your future self to like. There's there's there might be a lot of wise that art just reading the code. You wouldn't know like oh. There's some sort of shortcut happening here. But why like if you have some documentation or on that just like helps save much time not only

Marga Leeann Stacy London Marzieh Ryan Burgess Shirley Bay Area Twitter Stacy Jason Slater
Quincy Larson, Founder of freeCodeCamp - Part Two

Developer Tea

05:50 min | 6 d ago

Quincy Larson, Founder of freeCodeCamp - Part Two

"Do you feel like you're not learning enough quickly enough as a software engineer. That is the feeling that i talk about amongst other things with today's guest quincy larsen and if you missed out on the first part of my interview with quincy i suggest you go back and listen to that part first quincy is of course the founder and creator of rico camp Which is something that many of you probably either came to this show as a result of you actually heard about developer because of free co camp or you are going through it right now. Three co dot org in of course free co camp dot org slash donate if you want to support other engineers who are going through the beginning of their career by the way Quincy just to be clear. Did not pay us in any way to plug that Here on the show. Thank you so much to quincy for joining me. Let's get straight into the interview with quincy larsen and that feeling something. I'd love to hear your thoughts on the feeling of inadequacy because you're dealing with a lot of people who are probably invulnerable points in their lives especially people who are changing careers or there at the beginning of their career. They have a lot of uncertainty. And there's a mountain of learning in front of them curious you know. Do you see a lot of people who are in that vulnerable place. In what advice do you have for them when you encounter them while empathy is very important. And it's one of the things that i perceived lack of i was learning to code and keep in mind. I'm you know a middle class white male who has a graduate degree right like. Imagine if you're somebody who's been working as a cashier whose job just evaporated or or a restaurant and you don't have all those benefits of The those layers of privilege right in those layers of just general like oh. Yeah i see how this works. I understand the system so not afraid of it right. I understand how higher education works for example. A lot of people don't have that benefit so for them. It could be even more daunting and one of the things that we do. Is we just try to frame is realistically possible. We start from the premise. Coating is hard in fact when you create a new free co game account I added this blurb at the top when you first get into free co cabinet it basically tells you like this is going to be hard anybody who tells you that learning code is easy is trying to sell you something right. Because it's going to take years and you're going to be daunted in. You're going to be baffled. You're going to have tests telling you failed failed failed you're going to have you know your interpreter telling you air and you need to be able to power through that and the most important thing is to know that everybody goes through this process. A lot of people don't remember it. They don't remember what it was like learning to code because it's so long ago maybe they were one of the lucky people who got a computer when their kid in there. The parents Encourage them to learn programming. Or maybe they just had a natural inclination toward early on if they have years and years of extra experience that accounts i mean that definitely speeds up the rate at which they can learn new things so i would tell people you know. I learned when i was thirty. I didn't have a lot of experience with programming. Was undaunted essentially. And i think that more people if they can remain undaunted and if they can just power through the doubt than they can learn to so the community aspect is really important. Just having a support network in a lot of people can find that on twitter. They can find that through like separatists. They can find that through. Different forums and dischord groups. They can find it on the free cocaine form. There are lots of ways that you can find kind of your tribe and have them have your back in help push you forward and i think that that is absolutely key but but the most important thing again just know. This is hard now that anybody who says program is easy has just forgotten how hard it was when they were first. Starting i agree with this and i. I think there are different kinds of hard right. And i think this is. This is where people go wrong The perception that i've heard from a lot of people who are not co you know a totally outside of this industry and they kind of people who who view coders as You know super smart geeks right this. That's the perception outside of this industry or As many industries the perception that they have when they start getting interested in maybe figuring out. Oh maybe i could do this. The misperception that i see very commonly as oh this is. This takes a lot of specific knowledge. That i don't have to even get started. There's there's a basis of this really specific knowledge or there's some base you know and and much higher than average. I q required to be able to do this thing to be able to learn to code. Oh i have to. Have you know very deep mathematical. I gotten asked very specific questions. Like do you need a lot of trigonometry to be able to code and on you know in my head i'm thinking i don't remember the last time i use trigonometry and my job Directly at least in a maybe. There's some some point at which i did use it but it was. Certainly you know nothing. Deep in my trick. You know the class that i took about. Trigonometry wasn't the thing that made me you know capable of becoming a developer. So i think there's these two kinds of hard right. The

Quincy Larsen Quincy Rico Camp Twitter
Jacob Collier & Ben Bloomberg: Grammy award-winning duo

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

03:10 min | 6 d ago

Jacob Collier & Ben Bloomberg: Grammy award-winning duo

"Honestly i think mostra is is a myth. I don't think it exists. I think the new ideas are ever finished or new. Everything's just re combined. And i love that because it that we get to be assists rather than inventors you know we can paint with what we know and so i guess my hope is musician is being to to learn as much as i possibly can. Hi everyone welcome to behind the tech. I'm your host. Kevin scott chief technology officer for microsoft in this podcast. We're going to get behind the tack. We'll talk with some of the people who made our modern world possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did. So join me to maybe learn a little bit about the history of computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into. What's happening today. Stick around hello and welcome to behind the tech. I'm christina warren. Senior advocate at microsoft. And on kevin's god on today's show. We have two very special guests been bloomberg and grammy award winning musician. Jacob collier and for those of you who tune into the show. He got about tech. And you're thinking okay. So what does it grammy award. Winning musician has to do with tech. Well kind of everything. Jacob collier is a musical artists that is fully embraced tech as an integral part of the music that he creates and he partnered with. Mit's been bloomberg and the two of them have collaborated to bring their genius into the creation of song video and kevin. I know that you've been so excited for this interview for quite some time. Yeah i've been unbelievably excited. We've been trying to get ben and jacob on the podcast for a while now and you know have to say. I am an enormous fan of the work that these to do. I think both of them are outrageously talented. It's it's probably the first podcast that we're recording where my children are legitimately going to be interested in You know in in in listening to a because everybody in the house has been bopping around all summer long listening to all i need. So i'm i'm just super excited to chat with these guys about their approach to creativity in like how they have very cleverly merge Art technology into a set of creative endeavors. That really have i think pushed the boundaries of how it is we think about music and live performance. Absolutely absolutely end. I think actually you know this might be the sort of thing with the conversation. Might be so great that this might even be some that we do in two parts right. Yeah for sure so Like we will split this conversation. With jacob ben into into two parts Just so we don't have to cut short any of the conversation absolutely well. Let's chat with jacob ben and this is the first part of that conversation took a

Jacob Collier Christina Warren Grammy Award Kevin Scott Microsoft Kevin MIT Bloomberg Jacob BEN Jacob Ben
Quincy Larson, Founder of freeCodeCamp - Part One

Developer Tea

03:02 min | Last week

Quincy Larson, Founder of freeCodeCamp - Part One

"Thank you so much for listening to develop your team. My name is jonathan cottrell. We're gonna get straight into the interview with quincy. Larson quincy welcome to develop. Hey thank you. Jonathan for having me. I'm excited to have you For a handful of reasons one is because we've been trying to do this for a long time A second reasons because you're going to be this episode as very likely going to be a very common answer to an extremely common question of. Where do i start Or do you recommend anything. This is what. I'm going to recommend for people who are at the very beginning of this journey of becoming a software engineer whether they're doing that to to as a hobby They're interested in actually going down this as a career path. This is ryan to them. Most likely stu this episode. So thank you for giving me that. that perfect answer to that very common question absolutely so i'd love for you to take a moment and just kind of explain you know your your thirty second elevator. Pitch for anybody. Who's listening to this for the first time. Those people that i'm sending here Speaking from the future. I suppose but if you can answer the question what exactly is free cochem just the elevator. Pitch version is perfect. Yeah we're a global community of people who are learning to code together And we have the free co camp itself is a five. Oh one c. Three donor supported nonprofit public charity And we have a whole lot of learning resources. We have a curriculum. you can work through. We have a a publication release of tutorials on very specific programming related questions. We have a form where you can get help if you're stuck or if you just want feedback on a project and we have a youtube channel that also has lots of full length courses as agree pitch most people when i ask them to give their elevator. Pitch will talk for quite a while about what they do and It seems that you have given this bitch a handful of times. I imagined yes. Those are the four pillars of our community. And i think about them every day. When i'm in the shower like how we can further simplify and refine and yeah because things have to be simple people are busy. People are in a hurry. Ya that's true it's You know one of the genesis kind of seed ideas for the show was. Hey and what people don't wanna spend a lot of time Listening to me pontificate they want short. And to the point episodes. And if they wanna skip them they can And and i think that that is you know. It's i've gotten some criticism on this idea which is That sometimes people do want a little bit longer of a Experience right they wanna talk.

Jonathan Cottrell Larson Quincy Quincy Jonathan Ryan Youtube
#304 asyncio all the things with Omnilib

Talk Python To Me

05:23 min | Last week

#304 asyncio all the things with Omnilib

"The show on twitter via at doc by von. This episode is brought to you by la- node and talk python training. Please check out the offers during their segments. It really helps support the show john. Welcome to talk by to me is going to be here yeah. It's great to have you here as well. It can really fun to talk to you about acing stuff. I think we both share a lot of admiration and love for a cio. Owing all the things. I definitely do. It's one of those cases where the things that enables is so different and you have to think about everything so differently when you're using a cinco that it's it's a nice challenge but also has you know potentially really high payoff. It's done well. It has huge payoff. And i think that it's been a little bit of a mixed bag in terms of the reception that people have had. I know there have been a couple of folks who've written articles like well. I tried it. Wasn't that great. But there's also. I've had examples where i'm doing something like web scraping or actually got a message from somebody who listened. Maybe they were listening to python bites my other podcast but anyway. I got a message from a listener. After we cover some cool a sink things and web scraping they had to download a bunch of stuff. And i could take a day literally takes all day or something. It was really crazy and then they said well. Now i'm using acing. And now i computer runs out of memory and crashes. It's getting it so fast like there's a large difference right there. There's certainly a category of things where it's amazing the case we've seen most useful for is definitely doing those sorts of like concurrent web requests internally. It's also extraordinarily useful in monitoring situations where it's like you want to be able to talk to a whole bunch of servers as fast as possible and maybe the amount of stuff that comes back from it is not as important as being able to. Just talk to them repeatedly. Yeah but you're you're right. There's definitely a lot of cases where people are not necessarily using it correctly or they're hoping to add a little bit of a sink into an existing thing and that doesn't always work as well as just building something that's a sink from the start and there's more frameworks these days that are welcoming of a think from the start. I guess you'd say we're gonna talk. Yeah we're talking about that but before we get too far down the main topic. Let's just start with a little bit of background. You get into programming and python. Sure so my first interaction with computer was when i was you know maybe like five or six years old. My parents had a ti ninety nine for a which was like the knockoff. Commodore attached to the television. And i think back to that. And how could you have like legible. Text on these crtv. it was. It was pretty bad. it's bad right. it's like my biggest memory of it is really just every time we would try to play a game and the cartridge or taper. Whatever wouldn't work correctly. It would just dump you at a basic prompt where it's just expecting you to start typing programming in and like nobody in my family had a manual or knew anything about programming at the time there was like i think maybe we figured out that you could like print something to the screen but nothing beyond that right and it wasn't until we ended up getting a dos computer. You know a few years later that really started to actually do some quote unquote real programming. Where we were writing like batch scripts to do menus or like you know deciding what program to run or things like auto execs on a floppy disk in order to boot into a game. I was just thinking of all the auto execs bad stuff that we had to do like. Oh you wanna play dum. But you've got you don't have enough high memory when you've got to rearrange where the drivers what a weird way to just to play games. I've got to rework where my driver's make sure you don't load your mouse driver when you're putting into this one game that doesn't need the mouse because otherwise you run out of memory. Yeah it was kinda crazy and my biggest memory of programming. There was there was q. Basic on it and it came with us guerrilla where you just like throw bananas at another guerrilla from like some sort of city skyline. They got a king kong. Knockoff donkey kong knockoff. Type thing yeah exactly. And i would struggle to figure out how that was actually doing anything. And he's like. I'd try to poke at it and figure it out. I went didn't really do that much. But it was actually my first opportunity for quote unquote open source projects. Because there's a video game that. I really really liked called nascar racing and one of the things that i learned you. His burgeoning part of the internet for me at least was people would host to these mods for the game on like geo cities or whatever and so these these are change like the models for the cars or the wheels or add tracks or textures. Or whatever and i actually wrote a batch script that would let you like at the time that you wanted to play the game. Pick which of the ones you had enabled because you couldn't have them all enabled so right is basically just a batch script that would go and like copy a bunch of files around from one place to another and then when you're done with the menus or whatever then it would launch the game and i remember posting that on geo cities and you know having the silly little like javascript counter or whatever. It was take up to like a couple of hundred page views of people downloading just the script to switch mods in and out as the first real taste of open source programming or open source projects that i had that actually led into the way that i really learned programming. Which was i wanted to have my own website. That was more dynamic than what gio cities had and so i ended up. Basically picking up pearl and eventually php to write your web pages that i hosted

LA Twitter John Nascar
S15:E3 - How to build an app from idea to maintenance (Kyle Lee)

CodeNewbie

05:23 min | Last week

S15:E3 - How to build an app from idea to maintenance (Kyle Lee)

"Being here. Thanks for having me on civil really excited to talk to you today about app development but first. Let's get into your coating background. How did all star for you. It started about six years ago in twenty four team and i kinda started off by dabbling in web development. I was jumping around from job to job will second job of doping around and my primary job was working at a restaurant and i want it to get out of the restaurant because i really didn't like it there so i started looking into web development and i learned html css and then when it got to java script. I couldn't figure out what the keyword this meant. And i it was and and i couldn't understand it so i just completely dropped it so then i started looking into mobile development. Ios specifically since. I was fan boy and this was right before swift was released. The swift programming language cells to learn objective c and didn't realize that you have to know a framework and language together in order to build apps all struggling with that but then swift came out and i kind of started learning that. But i was kind of doing it just on the side not taking it too seriously and then about a year and a half later in twenty fifteen. I started taking it a little bit more seriously. Learn how to create an app. And i put about their. And that's what kicked off my journey into islas development. And how did you like development. Now that you're into as it better than what you were doing before. Well i don't want get anybody angry. But i enjoy personally enjoy. Ios development much more than web development swift is still my favorite language to work in a wooded self teaching. Look like let's dig into that a little bit more. What resources did you use. How did you schedule your time. How long did it take myself. Teaching was mostly of what i could find online so like blog articles and youtube videos which there were far fewer youtube videos back then and online courses so i would take maybe like the cheap online courses that you could find for ten to anywhere from ten to twenty dollars. Didn't have a whole lot of money. And i would Take some of those. And then any online resources that i could find for free so is like learning on a budget because i didn't have a whole lot of money to spend. I can go to a boot camp. And i wasn't gonna continue down the school route and my schedule was kinda like i would work mostly during the day even though depending on like when you're talking about i had two jobs and i would usually work during the day and then usually during the late nights i would stay up late and i would code and learn you know in the evenings when my now wife was asleep. So that's kind of how i went about it. Yeah while good for you. I know finding those pockets of time to study. When you're taking care of family going to your your regular job is really tough. Took it for you. Yeah i was lucky enough to work at a restaurant where there were slow days so i would actually take my laptop into work. You know it'd be learned. How during the slow hours. So what did you find to be most useful and least useful when it came to teaching yourself at a code. This is what i really like. Understood my learning techniques. Which is the fact that i am a auditory learner so i did much better when i was able to watch a video and and hear somebody talking about it as opposed to like just reading a blog article. So that's why. I tended to focus on picking up courses the online courses that i could get access to and youtube videos that i could find and those wounds were the ones that helped me out the most as opposed to article where i have poor reading comprehension and just couldn't really consume the information that it was trying to you know convey so you mentioned that you know you love swift and you'll have mobile development. What was it about mobile development that clicked with you in a way that java script development did not well i think it was mostly the fact that i had already been in the mindset that i didn't think the websites were that cool. You know showing somebody a website on a computer. I just didn't think it was like anything to interesting because websites had been around for awhile and you know i had technically started coating if you wanna call it coating before this like with the mice space days modifying my my profile but i wasn't really impressed with web development and the fact that you could like code something and put it on a phone in show that like. Just pull out your phone. Show that to somebody. I thought that was much more interesting. And i liked to have like my work. Move around with me. And i could actually build a tool. That would be right there in my pocket. So let's dig into getting that first job a little bit more washer process into getting that first job. What are your thoughts on. Just job hunt processes in general. Yeah so around. December of two thousand fifteen that. I was able to put out to release simple apps in to the app store for iowa. The i was like a note taking app in the the second was just a large text app. You just be able to type something show large texts and i knew the having apps

Youtube App Store Iowa
Post-Pandemic Work and Life as an Engineer - Skills for a Different Future

Developer Tea

05:31 min | Last week

Post-Pandemic Work and Life as an Engineer - Skills for a Different Future

"How can i prepare for a post pandemic world. You may asked this question. You may not have asked this question. Many of us probably are just hoping that it happens as soon as possible because the pandemic for most people has created some kind of at least uncomfortable scenarios. And for some it's dire many people listening to this. Podcast probably have been affected financially. Many have probably statistically quite a few of you have had the virus your health has been impacted your perception of your friends and your family has likely been impacted in some way. Almost certainly your workplace has been impacted. Maybe your livelihood personally has been impacted your employment situation and it makes sense that we would just want this to end but perhaps we need to stop for a moment. Stop waiting for the end in instead. Prepare prepare ourselves for what comes next. So we're gonna talk about some of the things you might want to do as a software engineer to prepare for the changes that may be coming. My name is jonathan cottrell. You're listening to develop t and my goal on. This show is helped. Driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers as we said on the last episode in this series this post pandemic work in life as an engineer. The pandemic didn't change a lot about what we do. You know of course what we mean here is that it didn't change the direction of where we were headed as a society as a culture One wide even most of the things that have changed actually just accelerated not necessarily different and so the move to for example. The most obvious change that has been accelerated is the adoption of distributed workforce's. This means that remote work will be more normalized. Certainly virtual interaction will be more normalized as a Kind of a first class citizen of doing business both within a company and Between two companies. That might be working together. This wasn't a new concept for the majority of companies. Remote working has been an option on the table for quite some time and has probably been gaining traction in those companies for quite some time but because we mentioned on that last episode of the forcing function that covid provided that said we must find a way to work from home. We must find a way to work in a distributed manner. This forcing function has Both convey increased our ability our skill to be able to adopt these these new practices but perhaps more importantly it has had an effect on the cultural perception of remote work previously. Remote work Being distributed with seen as a weakness or seen as a second rate way of doing work now it is kind of the norm at least it has been during the pandemic and as we also mentioned on the last episode. the pandemic won't have a concrete in date is not a very clear point where everyone will expect things to go back to normal. So it's very likely that this will continue on into the future. This and many other trends that we were already kind of watching occur before the pandemic hit have only been accelerated. So how do we prepare for the future. Well we can kind of imagine doing what we did before in a way in terms of preparing for the future. And i'm going to give you some practical advice and things for you to work on as a software engineer in this kind of phase of our culture the first one and perhaps the most important one is your ability to communicate with other people. They are not in the room with this covers. A large section of what. I want to talk about today. And it's very simple reason. Our ability to communicate with other people is for most people the bottleneck in their careers. Our ability to communicate with other people is not only a bottleneck. But it's also the launching point for anything meaningful for any meaningful transition in your career. It's going to start with

Jonathan Cottrell
Episode 538 | When to Sunset a Product, Enterprise Security Assessments, Lifetime Deals, and More Listener Questions

Startups For the Rest of Us

04:50 min | 13 hrs ago

Episode 538 | When to Sunset a Product, Enterprise Security Assessments, Lifetime Deals, and More Listener Questions

"Let's dive into listener questions with inartful set interval set. Welcome back on the show sir. Thanks for having me absolutely. You may be hitting that steve martin on saturday night live mark where you perhaps are the most frequent guest. I don't know. I think i've been like three maybe four. Maybe it's more than that. I don't remember. I think it is. Yeah because you were on least one of the startup. The news round tables and then qna and we talked about company types. Remember then we did one on the pc type thing. I think there's a lot so good to have you back but for folks who are less familiar with what you've been up to. I mean you're experiencing you have a phd in computer science. And but i won't hold that against you and you actually taught cornell for a couple of years you were in white at a start up your in y combinator in the two thousand nine class. You have a lot of experience with enterprise sales with cold outreach. Called the outbound. Email live experience in emanate specifically the sell side of sas. You founded a company called discretion capital. That is basically the kind of the go to that. I refer people to if they're if they're like. Hey i renaissance app doing seven figures or eight figures and i've been approached by private equity or by strategic to you know and they made me an offer and it's like okay so there are people who do this for a living and you know you are one of those people with a lot of expertise senate and so obviously you know. There's other folks working in there. Because you and i are focused and working hard on tiny seed and we just closed fun to him blows. Let's call it. come on. Give me some more time to fill this sucker. I keep saying closed what i mean. Is i close so doing well with that. And then obviously batch three applications. You're in and we're working through those so why we don't have enough going on. I figured pull your mike answer. Some listener questions today are is so with that. Let's dive into our first question. It's voicemail from phil at its circle. Time dotcom fell from its circle. Time dotcom. we provide a online classes for kids across the united states of america and canada. We matched them with high quality teachers. That will help them socialize and continue their education when we launched the company earlier this summer we started with a preschool targeted audience. With bringing the circle time experience online meeting up to ten other kids of their. You know similar age three six six. Then we started. New course called kinder- prep which has is targeted towards four. To six year olds who are entering kindergarten. Kinda struggling in maybe their distance. Learning this is blown up well beyond ever hoped for which is awesome Now you know run track for four hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year in new run rate in only about four months of our history however now our new service offering is dwarfing original in revenue. And i'm kinda curious like when would you consider possibly studying sunsetting or winding down something you know. Even though it's only making like eight thousand dollars a month revenue that's about a third of what the other product makes and the new one is growing leaps and bounds. Anyways just want to pick your brain and sweet. You thank you. Thanks for that question phil and just so you know. Fill centers voice mail in about a month ago. And we're able to get it get to it already because voicemails always go to the top of the stack so if you're gonna questions two questions at starter for the rest of us dot com. You wanted answered quickly at least with a month or so. That's quickly and sent sent voice voicemails. Some of the other written questions we're answering here are like october of last year. Sorry it's been been a little bit of a backup but fill a little more context in writing and he basically broke it down like we had this offering. It grew to eight or nine k. A month and then we added a second offering and that far outpaced it. And it's three times the revenue so three plus one it's like seventy percent of the revenue is the new course. He said the you're the original service is only doing eight or nine ks a lot more complex. It has three membership plans versus the new direction with a single plan. And so his question in the end he says i guess. My question is what factors. Would you look at when trying to determine win or if it is a good time to sunset a product or service. I'm in between a rock and a hard place with this issue. And i'd love to hear your advice so many thoughts. What what do you think sir mean. I'm a great believer in focused through degree. So it's like it sort of depends on how much you know. How much time is being taken up in efforts being taken by the original product but from what we're hearing it's link. This is something that three times as large and much shorter time. Like anything that detracts from that growth.

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Bridging The Gap Between Machine Learning And Operations At Iguazio

Data Engineering Podcast

01:22 min | 20 hrs ago

Bridging The Gap Between Machine Learning And Operations At Iguazio

"Companies by logs in others a lot of data analytics and engineering. Which is a good segue to this podcast. And do you remember how you first got involved in the area of data science and analytics heading alday data center activities open source. Projects do lyrics working with databases. We helped build things. Like oracle exiting essay behind and other social men marxist driven infrastructure of blair and right knowledge part of in via my role was essentially to help optimize the performance of each one of those databases. The storage. there's it's a certain point was said. maybe we can do it better and we. We formed the company. We brought some key architects from companies idea and you see and others and essentially are asia was to build something area. The multi model database says she something that performs really but also do an olympic sensor of historical laid on sunday on that and they can't believe gatien for that is assigned him people in need to do bring on one hand but then infrared saying on the other end in one of the biggest challenges data scientists around data. We'll probably get to talk about it. Can you give a bit more about what it is. The built at aguado and some of the story behind how it got started and

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How to Hire a VA That Actually Helps You with Matthew Yahes

How I Built It

06:58 min | 1 d ago

How to Hire a VA That Actually Helps You with Matthew Yahes

"The podcast that asks. How did you build that. My guest today is matthew years. We're gonna be talking about hiring v. as which i didn't intend to rhyme. But it did there you go And our sponsors for this episode text expand or restrict content pro and mine size. You'll be hearing about those fantastic companies later in the episode for now i do want to bring on matthew as he's the ceo of extend your team matthew. How are you today. great how you doing. I'm doing very well. Thank you thanks for coming on the show. I appreciate you taking the time. And i'm really excited because at the time that you were a men did To come on the show. I had just hired a virtual assistant So some background is during the pandemic My wife is a nurse so she was not at home. I am self-employed and my kids. Were not going to school while my one kid. At the time. I two kids now are not going to daycare or school or anything like that. And so on the days she works. I don't work. Which means i work about half of the time i normally do and i wanted to keep my business going because i like being self employed so i decided to hire a few people including a va and It sounds like you're the perfect person to talk to you about doing stuff like this so before we get into the kind of what to look for when hiring do should you. Va why don't you tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do. Sure he's not as i'm a at this point. A serial entrepreneur didn't start out that way typical middle class upbringing This is my third business i learned about. Va's through owning ecommerce portfolio. And i started their entrant. Otherwise start hiring overseas specifically in the philippines culminating with hiring someone to run the entire business. Doing four thousand orders a month. Millions of dollars hear someone in philippians. Run into our business. And what yeah. I was a little different than what everyone had ever done that. I know and so and it works. I mean says she's the djelic is phenomenal and through that the pandemic wish i talked and we decided in actually is because our gorgeous businesses in weddings. So you can imagine how much smaller that god very very quickly. It's right right. Yeah and so what happened was they said okay. That's great we save the business. That will be great another day but for now what do we do. so why. don't we find the best possible people with the highest quality people in the philippines. Connect them with. Us complex people just like her and through that we started extend. Your team started in may. Is we just hit. A fifty people at the end of the year and with a goal of going to the hundred fifty by the end of two thousand twenty. One are our sweet spot. Is we just find high quality. Better people to make a difference in your business today. They're not not typical. Va from the philippines. That are more entry level but these are professionals that have fifteen twenty ten twenty years experience and are successful Know joe there if you are i the philippines. That's we target to make a difference in entrepreneurs and business owners as this. Yeah that's that's really great and again this is something that really resonates with me. I actually have a virtual assistant from the philippines and She's been really good. But this was my first Endeavor hiring virtual assistant right. I'm pretty bad at delegating. Because i think If i want to do something. I gotta do it myself. Except for the case with my audio editor joel. You're great and and if you other people right like i a video editor now and and a transcriber but as far as like the research tasks and the kind of things i was doing that i realized i don't need to do i thought would be good for that and so My process for that was kind of Find a website. I used of online jobs that ph absolutely everyone starts including by. That's where we started hiring way back. Whe- gotcha yeah and so like. It was a little bit overwhelming right. Because like i like found people. I that i thought was good but i don't i didn't know and then i posted a job and got literally thousands of applications and so with that in mind if we're talking. Let's first talk to the person who's hiring their first. Va right What kind of research should they do. What kind of what should they look for. How do they know what to delegate. What what are the basics. Sure let's let's buy forget that into two things right. What should you do and then how do you figure out what the delegates to different things right. So i is. Divide your day of your week into two buckets. it's real. It's actually very simple. It's not that complicated. Strategic non-strategic rides strategic tactical essentially and strategic is anything that requires joe's experience his knowledge his expertise or made joe money right. That is strategic what you have to be doing. Because i can't do what you do. Even if i came into where you. I could operate august right. You need to get on your great interviewer interview the guests that makes you money. So great everything. That's not that everything that's tactical on strategic. That gets outsourced right through that. Then when you do is you could call that a task on it. So people call that keep it simple. Just right on a piece of paper two buckets from that develop a real job description in number one thing that people make mistakes. It's a number mistake. People make is that they do not treat virtual assistant hire like a regular higher. It without fail cause you to fail if you do it on the fly like oh i just want someone to do everything right. There's no person on. This planet is gonna step into a job with with no set of expectations and be able to meet expectations right if their vacations than how you meet them. How do you know what success looks like so that the things that people should do from there right so let's assume you're doing on your own. There are places you can go such as jobs to act to go. Put it out there right and from that you have to start filtering and just be prepared so when you do on your own. So what are the reason. You go free agency recedo if you're an experienced person right and you've hired a lot of as you may be able to do it yourself but i have a lot of experience. People were clients because they don't want to deal with it know but if you're not experienced at your first time hungering. Va be prepared for

Philippines Matthew VA Philippians JOE Joe Money Joel United States
419: This Weeks Gasp

Accidental Tech Podcast

07:51 min | 5 d ago

419: This Weeks Gasp

"I have an update about our our household alexa situation for everyone. Just for the two of us are we. We're live okay. It's for every device that response to that trigger where i decided to finally not say like everybody live and started with that. Because it's like the first thing i do when like so after we record the show. First thing i'd do it. Usually i upload the bootleg while we are still talking off the air we're doing scheduling discussions. Whatever like 'cause. I wanna get the biggest as possible for the for the members so normally i will upload the bootleg in the browser with the drag and drop thing while we're still talking and i think it's the right file because you know like i have a system that has made the right file every time but because i haven't actually listened to it yet i wanna make sure like before i go to bed that night because we recorded night. Usually i go to bed right afterwards. Basically i mean casey sleepy shirt and anyway normally. I have to my final task for the night after. I close up the studio during the lights off. My tonight is to empty the dog before bed. And so i bring him outside and while i'm doing that i opened up. My overcast my phone. And i look for the bootleg. That was released ten minutes. Really whatever it was. And i hit play and just make sure that it's the right episode but because all of the begin with high running rely it's hard for me to really know whether it's the right one or not until at least a few seconds then so i was trying to save myself a few seconds of uncertainty and time later tonight By beginning this one with something else. I say well you know it's funny. You say that. Because i don't know if the two of you have noticed and i promised myself i wouldn't call attention to it but here we are I've been trying for the last several weeks to have some sort of like. I don't wanna say icebreaker because it has all the terrible connotations of awkward corporate gatherings but like some sort of fun question sorta kinda in the spirit of snell talk at the beginning of upgrade but but just some sort of fun question that i come up with that i can ask the two of you each week. That's kind of off the wall and totally random and the first couple of weeks. I've decided i had to decided to try this. I was able to sneak it in right up front and was great and the last two weeks. I've been dedicated to doing it at some point. But i've been doing it. Semi randomly in the in like the middle of the pre show or like as the transition from pre show to follow up. And i've been trying so hard not call attention to it so it would be more natural and take you guys off guard but now you have ruined yet another one of my attempts and i think my last time in your defense last time was my fault because i made a clubhouse joke and then everything went off the rails but but you've ruined yet another attempt of mine because i do have a question for you all To to have some sort of ice breaker in the beginning and it seems like this is a futile attempt to add a new feature to the show. Both are over thinking this. Marco overthinking change. I would naturally say you're over thinking like both the thing that you're doing. Casey don't need to plan to do it. Just we just to go with the flow. Just i don't know why it's eight years in. It's all of a sudden you're trying to do this thing just cisco it'll be fine so here actually since you've asked now we're really going off in the weeds. I i worry a lot. That worries may be too strong. A word. I think a lot in somewhat worried that one day. We're gonna wake up and we're going to realize that we haven't really changed with the times and we're gonna talk about that a little bit. Don't just hear me out for before you jump. I haven't used for you. We already aren't changing with the times and it's fine and that's fair that's fair. That's fair. But i think that there are some things that we can do while not destroying the spirit of the show in ascii. Atp is an excellent example of that which we totally didn't steal from upgrade not one the new feature of the show that we added five and a half years ago still. I think that there are things that i just don't wanna look around in five or ten years god willing and be like wow. We really haven't done anything different in a long long time. And i don't think we're really guilty of that yet. you know. I think a membership almost a year ago now I think that was a great development. And i really pleased with how that's going in and actually i was thinking earlier today. It's been a while since we've thanked everyone like properly and thank you. Everyone who makes everyone really really means a lot to all three of us. I think membership is a is a nice change like that. But i don't wanna be in a situation where all of a sudden i realized the world has moved on and us three old old dudes are sitting here just talking to each other. Which for the record. I would still be doing even if no one listening. But you know if there's something that we can be doing differently or some little spice that we can add to the show from time to time. I want to do that. And i'm scared that that i'm gonna get complacent and i'll just be myself now that i'm gonna get complacent and just be like. Oh i'm sure everything's great. And and then we become evermore irrelevant with each passing day which probably happening anyway. But getting a head start in your mid life crisis or something. He says If you're wondering if we're falling behind the time. It's just watched to see on all of the mac websites. Whatever topic we've been talking about for the past month suddenly appear and you'll know that we are not behind the times we are as always slightly had. There's some that. And i hope that remains true. I mean i think a lot about you know making sure our show is is good. I care a lot about that. And as you as. I know you both do. And i think the key to a lot of the stuff is like to to know who you are and to know who your audience lash customers are and to to do like you know what keeps you comfortably making something. That's good for for you and for them without trying to be something. You're not also like this something like you look around the tech business. You got places like twitter that is venus for not knowing who they are always trying to be somebody else to to varying degrees of failure. They never succeed. They just like fail in different ways. Like twitter's always trying to be mostly facebook and other things mixed in house. Oh god i don't even know what that is. I'm so glad the instagram stories. Instagram tiktok. i think isn't it. I don't even know or is it. Twitter tiktok instagram. I don't know anyway so if you try to be something you're not then that doesn't usually work and everyone can tell doesn't go well But i think if you if your customers have a certain thing they want and you can keep it giving it to them in like a good high quality way. that doesn't feel stale. it just feels consistent. There's nothing wrong with that as long as it's still good like when things start feeling stales when it's getting like super repetitive. And they kind of like of running out of things to talk about. And you know you're kind of just like fishing for topics every week like that happens to podcast after a while especially those that are not particularly news based but that hasn't happened to us because we are so news based and i i think we also have a healthy amount of diversion every episode. That gives people interested. And so maybe maybe too. Much diversion possibly. Yeah and we've actually had you know ebbs and flows of the amount of diversion that we allow into the show versus some kind of topic or structure. The amount of follow up we allow in the amount of questions like that fluctuates over time. But i think as long as we keep putting out a show that our listeners like that we don't really have to necessarily care about what everyone else is doing as long as what we are doing is working for our customers which so far it seems to be and and there's lots i mean i think the tech business is so big.

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359: Sales for Software Developers with Evie Zawada

Ruby on Rails Podcast

05:21 min | 6 d ago

359: Sales for Software Developers with Evie Zawada

"To be here. This is my first podcast. So hi everybody and thanks brett for this amazing opportunity. Absolutely well evy. You have had some very exciting news happening your life. So congratulations on being a new. Mom how are you. You know what i'm doing very well. This has been a crazy and amazing experience And it took me a while to Chris and i did get to this point but were excited. We made this decision. And it's it's just been awesome. He's wonderful. What is the one thing that has surprised you about being a mom. Oh yeah i you know what surprised me was how my instincts actually kicked in because brit. You know me but your listeners stone. I really had no experience with children. I've never change a diaper. And before i had no clue what i was doing. And you really will be amazed how your instincts just kick in you know what to do. You're happy to do it. It's a joyful process. And i think that's what surprised me the most That chris and i just were able to really understand his needs and do what we needed to do to make him happy. That's wonderful well. That actually leads me right into your sales origin story. You're one of the few people that i know who not only enjoy sales but excels at it. So how did you originally get into sales. Well i actually have a bachelor of fine arts in acting From west virginia university. And so you know. I think a lot of sales can be acting so i guess i'm doing what i went to school for bud right out of school I worked at a Sketch comedy theater in columbus and part of my responsibilities. They are not only doing sketch comedy. And singing with the band there They found out pretty quickly that i had a knack for calling past customers and up selling them on additional tickets so they placed me in their sales department and i'm using air quotes here And i was able to really excel that to the point where they actually moved me into corporate sales where i would sell larger corporate events for companies that wanted to do team builders and at book the comedy club for their team. So that's actually where a started into sales. I moved down to florida to work at disney. I'm doing entertainment. And i just you know i was having a hard time making ends meet and i decided i wanted to go into something different. So that's when. I actually found at verizon wireless was how a hiring in sales so i went to this interview funny enough. The the person that was interviewing with was from columbus. Ohio had seen me in a few shows there. Recognize me from it. Couldn't believe it. I felt like it was fate and hired me and is my first official sales jobs. Just a sales representative. At kiosk for verizon wireless and that's how it all got started. Wow that is a great story. I love how disney got tied into it but sand tastic. It sounds like you have a knack for being in the right place when you're needed so i love how that all happened. Yeah it was kind of crazy. I can't believe that guy actually knew me. And like you said right place right time and i felt like it was just kind of fade getting me and to a career that i absolutely love. Sulfur for someone who's listening might be entirely new to sales. What is your first piece of advice. Yeah i would say my my first piece of advice would be when you get start that new sales job. You're in your first company. Take moment look around you. Identify who the top performers are who you have can have a really good relationship with and find yourself a mentor. This is something that i have done in every position and company that i've been in it's so important for those people that are really performing and also have the ability to teach and you've identified that you can learn so much i've had many mentors Across my career that fulfil a certain. Need that i have for instance at my last job when i was doing industrial automation My mentor there. Was daryl pining. And he taught me a lot about sales strategy because i was selling very quick At at verizon wireless consumer fast pace sales where you're selling something over the phone within a few minutes and then moving to strategic sales where you can have a twelve to eighteen months sales cycle and you're building a strategy for your accounts and he has taught me everything i know about that and that has helped me so much to further my career and get into more advanced and extensive sales process Currently now my current job. Travis deschamps is my mentor. And i'm trying to move into a director level position and so the analytics behind business and budget. That's something that. I'm weak with right now. I'm strong with sales. But we with that. And travis as over the last year and a half really strengthened. My skills in that department helps me take an analog analytical.

Sketch Comedy Theater Verizon Wireless Columbus Brett West Virginia University Disney BUD Chris Florida Ohio Daryl Travis Deschamps Verizon Travis
Episode 537 | On Launching, Funding, and Growth with Serial SaaS Founder Rand Fishkin

Startups For the Rest of Us

03:50 min | Last week

Episode 537 | On Launching, Funding, and Growth with Serial SaaS Founder Rand Fishkin

"I think that it had the potential to bring bring a a new new audience audience but but my my experience experience has has been been so so lost lost and and founder founder for for reference reference ping ping random random house big publisher one of the one of the big four. Now after they merged they tend to want bestsellers. It's not unlike a venture capital model. Where either you're a really big success or you're not that big a deal to them and lost and founder. I think they hoped that and ended up not being that it did not end up being like a new york times bestseller all that kind of stuff. It's had slow steady sales. I think it sold around. Maybe twenty five thirty thousand copies which is decent for a business book but not runaway success. And i don't think that it's had a huge impact on my profile if someone said like hey i really want to raise my profile and my credibility and get invited to more conferences or whatever the metric for someone is. Would you recommend a process like what you did with austin powder. I think my answer would probably be no that instead you could. You could do that. More effectively through online channels today than through books having books are sort of a prestige and if you have a best seller potentially you know very big audience builders but that's difficult to do with non single subject book so lost and founder is kind of a. Here's a journey with a bunch of lessons warts and all look at. What what it's like building a venture backed startup especially the ones that aren't unicorns. And i think that's been helpful to a ton of people and i've gotten a lot of kind messages from folks but there were almost all people. I already had some connection to fascinating. I like the fact that you pointed out. It's this perhaps a single subject thing. That's impacting it. I also think you're you're far along in your career and sense of notoriety having the following i mean obviously it's always possibly get bigger but it's not like you're an unknown that then sold twenty thousand copies that's something 'cause i've written a couple books now and my first one i self published and it sold probably half of what lost and founder has somewhere like. Let's say twelve thousand and thirteen thousand copies but it was in two thousand nine. And it's when i had i don't even know i was on twitter yet or i had one hundred twitter followers you know and i didn't have speaking invitations and really i wasn't a name in the seen yet. That book did break me in. But i think a big part of that is because it was so focused. It's really focused on going from zero to a five or ten thousand dollars a month software product. Yeah and i think that there are numerous reasons to get a book published. One of the best reasons i think is a desire to have people get a full reckoning and understanding of a deep complex topic and even if you only sell a thousand or five thousand copies if they're to the right people on that subject you can really make a big difference in those people's lives in their understanding of the topic and in subject matter area especially in each one so i don't want to discourage people from writing books i think there's still a great medium but i will say i am not. I never enjoyed the single subject. Business books the ones that you could basically could read the summary of the book and then read the whole book and go okay. I got more of the same concept. But i guess you know. There's these four keys to being a good manager that this person thinks there are and and we went really in depth on them. But honestly i could do with the summary article that makes sense. And that's that's even a little different than what my book is. My book is kind of a step process of idea validation and all that so it is an. I know what you're talking about. You're talking about like this start with why or though all the businessmen books right the ones that you see on the shelves behind all the people on right.

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Self Service Open Source Data Integration With AirByte

Data Engineering Podcast

01:56 min | Last week

Self Service Open Source Data Integration With AirByte

"So michelle. Can you start introducing yourself. So i'm michelle have been walking into data industries in studying my carrier in two thousand set on studied monarch financial data and dozen need event. I moved into the us and actually started in. This company called live which is today at a public company and of adele was running all the integration team which like people and basically bahrain all the data exchanges from live and to libraries so at the king hundreds of terabytes of data that was developed on databases aca when of my Conveniences i started walkie engine. How about you full sada. I wasn't to be two cs into depth tools that the latest before air bites was self engineering management platforms. That sit on top of all the desktops. So we had to build or those pipelines six seven before we can ring any venue and it was a mess. So that's when i get into data and michelle was known each other for seven years and we want to work together so when my foot stat of these one didn't and well to i. Once were exited at that point we decided to do something about it and so that brings us to the project that you're working on now which is air by some wondering if you could give a bit of background about what it is. You're building there and some of the story behind in how it got started so one thing that we've discovered about yards on johnny is less expensive. That building integration is hub building like technically is it but the complexity comes from like the maintenance of and it's a problem that is taking a lot of people stein in every company that

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How to be an Effective Podcast Guest with Kristin Molenaar

How I Built It

07:00 min | Last week

How to be an Effective Podcast Guest with Kristin Molenaar

"Hey everybody welcome to episode two hundred seven of how i build it. The podcast that asks. How did you build that today. my guest is I i'm so terrible. Because i just asked you how to pronounce your last name. Kristen mo- molenaar molin. Excellent excellent I'm excited to be talking to kristen. Molinaro she is the founder of yes boss. And we're going to be talking about why being a podcast guest is ineffective for many entrepreneurs but before we get into that. I want to tell you that today's episode is brought to you by three fantastic sponsors mind size restrict content pro anteks extender. You'll be hearing about those fine folks later in the episode right now. Let's bring on our gas. Kristen how are you. hey i'm doing. Well how are you. I'm doing fantastically. I said i'm really excited to talk about this. Because i do feel like for a long time. I didn't take advantage of the fact well enough that i was going on other people's podcasts and trying to build my audience things like that. I know that a lot of my guests. This is a platform for them. Basically what we're trading here is. You are giving me some of your time. So i can create good content and i m putting you in front of my audience and so i want you to you know. Have people get in touch with you and stuff like that so Hopefully this will be a good reference for future guests on this podcast and others but before we get into that I just said before we get into it like three times. I want you to tell people who you are and what you do. So i run. A company called. Yes boss and we do. We're a podcast booking agency essentially so we help mostly service based entrepreneurs so online service providers. We help them get booked on podcast so they can generate more leads just an hour week so myzone geniuses talking. I like to talk for living. And we help other clients who like to do that. Exact same thing. That's fantastic and i've got to say you you do a good job. I get lots of guest pitches of each day and i have a pretty strong litmus test for if i'm going to respond or not or if i'm going to accept the guest or not and you pass not once but twice or thrice. I think at this point so used to our service. Aw thank you yeah that absolutely because you know you get the pitches and it's like high name. I'm person and then like five paragraphs by why they're so great. And i'm just like i don't want you to just like i want to bring value to my listeners. So i i don't remember exactly what you said in your email but i read it and i was like. I think this will be insanely valuable for both me and my listeners. So well i'm excited. There's definitely a formula. There's definitely a lot of testing. We've done those pitches. So i am so glad to hear your thoughts on it. Then he absolutely. I mean and thank you for For taking the time. I feel like you've listened to the show and you knew exactly what i want to talk about. So you don't have to say whether you have or not but it was felt that way. At least so you are a podcast booking agency. There is definitely a lot of value in that. So maybe before we get into the the main thing that we're talking about why. Why should more entrepreneurs go on podcasts. I would say that. It's like the simplest sales funnel i've ever built in my whole entire life. I i feel like as entrepreneurs you especially if you're an entrepreneur that has ever been on facebook. You're going to be hit with a lot of messages about how to do all the things right. And i think what took me a while to really learn because when i first started in this entrepreneurial journey i was like floundering for fourteen months and then i found a rhythm that really worked and what i really found is it all boils down to having a sales funnel that hits a few like check marks so at the top of that sales funnel is you know. How are you getting visible. You know how are you attracting those people. However you then nurturing those people selling those people in retaining those people let's like you know just as basic sales funnel strategy and there's all these ways to do that right you know there's like ads there's social media platforms. There's always like top level things to get new audience attraction. Then there's all these ways to nurture your clients you know email lists or people that are on your social media. How are you retaining those existing. People selling bright. So there's all these different ways to do this. What i have found though is It was honestly. I i stumbled upon this honestly When i started doing podcasts. Guesting myself what i realized is i was getting in front of new people and attracting new people and forming relationships with a new person so specifically the podcast host And what happened. Afterwards was people were coming to me to ask about my services and they had already been presold because the nature of a podcast episode is that you are building not not like trust. Dr really rapidly. You are attracting your the nurturing by really sharing all of your genius on that episode like you already said at the beginning of this episode like you bring on guests and you want to highlight all the ways that they know how to do what they do. So you're providing a platform for me to talk to you about how smart i am. I mean if you wanna put it that way and by the end of the episode you know how to work with me you know who in your network to tell to work with me and then as a ripple effect so i see this as a secondary thing as the secondary thing your audience and the people that are listening to the podcast. Also know that so. I've just been like kind of blown away. At how effective in fund. it's been. Yeah that's incredible. I love a lot of what you said there. I mean if longtime listen to the show will no. I've said no like trust a million times on this podcast right because it's it's so important. It's why i teach people how to start their own podcasts. To grow their business. Because it's an easy way for not an easy way but it's a fast way to convince people that you are likeable untrustworthy. And people invite me into their headphones every every week and It so they feel like they know me and and it's a strong bond. And so when i have a guest on the show. I'm saying i trust this person enough to give them the platform of listeners. I have teach me something. I learned something from every single one of my guests. So i love what you said there about how this is. The simplest sales fell ill. You've ever built

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