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Mental Models for Finding Balance

Developer Tea

7:19 listening | 1 d ago

Mental Models for Finding Balance

"What does it mean when we say balance we use this term? When we're talking about our work we use it when we're talking about our political views. We use it when we're talking about how we judge other people. We use the term when we talk about how we should treat other people and we certainly use it when we talk about decision making but what exactly is balanced and who decides win. Something is in a good balance or if it's unbalanced in today's episode we're GonNa talk about two models of thinking that can help us understand some nuances about balance. My Name is Jonathan Cottrell listening to developer tea and my goal on the show is to help. Driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. And here's the reality balance most of the time when we use that word. What we mean is something acceptable. Something that feels peaceful for example when we use it in the frame of work life balance or something that we generally agree is fair. When we're talking about the justice system and defining that balance is a dynamic problem that doesn't have a singular solution for example balancing a workload. What's GONNA look different for different people? Based on their capacity maybe based on what kind of what phase of life therein and so balance has no singular representation. It is like most things relative to your context but there are different ways that we achieve balance. You can edge. I imagine someone balancing on tight rope the idea being that any misstep will throw them out of balance and that once the tight rope walker is out of balance. There is no recovering because they've fallen another mental image. You can bring up. Is that of a scale where you way down. One side and try weigh down the other one in equal proportion many times when we think about balance as it relates to our personal lives. The picture that comes up is more like a calendar. And if you're to scan across that calendar the places where you're spending time if they are heavily weighted in one area. You may feel unbalanced but I wanNA to talk about two models of balance that come from the hard sciences specifically i WanNa talk about thermodynamic balance or inter pellets and chemical balance first. Let's talk about thermodynamic balanced for a minute. Thermodynamic balance is the balance of essentially temperature and temperature is a measure of energy higher amounts of heat means there's more energy and lower amounts of heat means there's less energy and generally speaking when you put something that has high energy near something that has low energy they will interact. They're not going to stay separate from each other but instead it was that kind of system if you were to say create a vacuum in have a one area of the vacuum half of the vacuum high energy and the other half of the vacuum as low energy those two fields of particles whatever they are air or water or whatever will tend to move towards some equilibrium. It's important to note that another law of thermodynamics is that no energy is lost or created in a given system so this is all theoretical if you had something that had let's say one hundred units of energy and something that had fifty units of energy and they were in equal proportion to each other than you would end up with seventy five units of energy on average across that whole field technically the law of thermodynamics. That were referencing. Here is that things will tend to move towards An absolute zero which essentially means that. There's no difference. There's no potential energy in the system available. So why are we talking about this law of thermodynamics him? What does it have to do with your kind of sense of balance as a person or in your work where? There's a lot of ways that we can apply this concept to our lives applying this model of thinking to our lives when you are feeling a sense of tension when you feel what you would label as unbalanced. It's very likely that you have this kind of juxtaposition where you are holding too much energy and we will use that term kind of loosely. Right now where you're doing too much for example and the equilibrium that you need to find is by doing less. This is an oversimplified example because in most systems balance or equilibrium is not found between two competing forces. We don't live in a vacuum where you have only to can fields that are trying to find equilibrium. We live in a much more complex environment with new variables being introduced every day. We'll give you a very simple example of this before I was married before I had children. I had more available energy to put towards working when I say working. I mean learning doing things on the side of the extra energy that I now and putting towards my relationships with my family the seems like an obvious example but what this means is that balance has a different definition for me now balance means something different than it used to and this isn't always purely on an individual level. Sometimes balance is a shared concept in a given culture are giving context we do have some shared limits as humans but we also have shared culture that changes our personal definitions our personal perceptions of what it means to work with balance now most of the time when we talk about balance as it relates to our work. We're talking about. What proportion of our time are we spending on work? And the modifier that we use Let's say as as a Employer is we provide time off. We provide holidays. That's one of the benefits that an employer might provide but sometimes sometimes the amount of time off has nothing to do with the balance at all.

Jonathan Cottrell Developer
Ecosystem Engineering

Front End Happy Hour

6:56 listening | 2 d ago

Ecosystem Engineering

"Gave a little bit of descriptions early in your intros. But I'm really curious. How do you describe? What IS ECOSYSTEM? Engineering NF flakes. So I've my previous role. I was a manager also and interest netflix's have to do a lot of recruiting and I'd have to answer this question a lot. Like what do you do? And what is this an unusually posted by saying you ever go into a store costco someplace and you see the. Tv's for sale and on the box they have netflix on them. Netflix's already pre install on it or if you could buy a Roku already got netflix on their more comcast box you may or may not get it but if it does get loaded somehow. Netflix's getting on all these devices. How does that happen? What happens is there's a team at net flicks that makes the Netflix's player code and we package it up once a year and we call it the de k a software developers kit for the player and we might give it a name but every year we give it out to these partners in these partners are like Samsung L. G. Roku comcast of the world and they have to take it and make it work on their system. And so if you look at all the TV's out there and all the set top boxes you can see that you know they're different chipsets. There's different hardware. They probably have different compilers and compilers settings. They've God's maybe their own libraries that they have to do they have a different os on their TV. Every device out there. Basically a custom made device. And so how do you get those Netflix's player which looks pretty much the same once you start the APP whether it's on a Roku or a Samsung Smart TV or a cable set top box? How is it ended up at experiences? Pretty much universal. I would say in how that happens is there are other teams that work with these partners to make sure that AAA compiles and be that. It's good that doesn't crash We have a suite of tasks and Trevan helps with that that area. The part and my previous manager job was in area too. We don't let net Netflix. Go out or be sold or pre installed on and device unless we know that device is going to have good quality with it. I said it cheers. Cheers cheers cheers and how that happens. Is these partners. Have to run a whole bunch of tests and pass these tests and there's a a Cloud-based tests service that Netflix's made where they can take their device whether they're working in China or whether they're working in Japan or Korea or the US or anywhere in the world they plug it into Internet. They log into this cloud service and they can run tests and we can see these tests if they pass fail and so on so forth and was passed all these tests then it goes out into the field and people can buy them what people have them in their homes or they sign up for cable service and they get this box and they start net flakes. And if it's working great we can see the metrics remotely from here 'cause all these boxes and TV's are sending this logs all the time and if there's a problem we should be able to detect that and try to get it fixed so long story. Short Netflix's works with a whole bunch of other companies to get these apps working and what's out there are jobs not done. We have to make sure that it keeps working. And so that's where he may be a deluded to like. Qe which maybe you could explain. What the Kiwi Patrick. Is that your your teams looking at sure. So Kua we. Quality of experience cheers. Cheers kind of set. You up for that one. They are metrics that deal with how the APP appears to the user. So this would be. Things like is video smooth. Does it look like high. Bit Rate. So it looks like very high quality not just st but also hd for K. buffering a lot. Which hopefully it's not a re buffer is when you're watching in the middle of playback and there's this kind of spinner that appears on the screen where it's trying to load and it's ten percent twenty percent. Seventy five percent. Ninety nine percent starts playing again. It's probably because there's some interference on the network or there's a bug in the buffering on the device we want to keep all that buffering to a minimum so that when you start watching it smooth. There's no interruptions but it's not just limited to that if you have trouble starting the APP or if you're in the middle of the APP crashes or there's like network fluctuations where it goes high quality low quality too much on. These are all things that could be addressed usually on the device side and try to minimize those as much as possible wherever possible. Even things outside of the network that users network or the service provider's network lately. Yeah that's another one. I forgot about that one. The time it takes for you to press the button versus how long it takes to start the actual playback. Hopefully it's around four or five seconds but on some devices we see. It's as long as twenty seconds thirty seconds. That's something that could be fixed on a device. Hopefully I think that's always been something that I've actually been amazed at is just Michael. You paint the picture of the ecosystem of all the different TV devices. But when I think about it too is the Netflix. App is being built for something like a roku stick. It's a lower powered device. And then you have something lake the playstation four or Xbox at you can also play on. It has a lot bigger assessor. I think is really interesting. How you there's large ecosystem of devices that we are supporting and so I can imagine that becomes a lot more challenging in your world to to support all those different variables are those devices and especially when you think that every one of those devices basically a custom made device very few devices. Look or act exactly the same from the code perspective and so it's it's a challenge to make sure that when you start Netflix's whether on a fifteen dollars stick if you bought it on sale the way up to four hundred dollars playstation or even a three thousand dollar four K. SMART TV that the Netflix's experience is pretty universal. On all of them. You still log in the same. You still have your same catalog. He still are able to see and navigate through the you. I pretty much the same. It's pretty familiar despite that range and I think that's pretty

Netflix Samsung Costco Kiwi Patrick Comcast Trevan Michael United States China Korea Japan
Apple, Google release technology for coronavirus-tracking apps

WSJ Tech News Briefing

0:52 listening | 5 d ago

Apple, Google release technology for coronavirus-tracking apps

"Apple and Google have released technology to help governments track the spread of the corona virus through APPs several states and more than twenty two countries. Now have access to the protocols so developers in those places can use them to build their own APPS. Here's how it works when two people get close to each other. Their phones will exchange digital codes through a Bluetooth signal if one of them comes down with cove nineteen. It'll let the other one know that they should get tested. But there are a couple of catches one for the APPs to work. Lots of people have to opt in and to users can choose whether to share their diagnosis with public. Health officials or not officials don't get the information automatically the release comes as researchers in Europe are debating the tradeoffs between centralized public health information and Google and apple technology. Which Emphasizes User Privacy?

Google Apple Europe
3 Ways to Be a Better PR Author

Developer Tea

6:07 listening | 6 d ago

3 Ways to Be a Better PR Author

"Of the most frustrating things you and you can experience as a developer is writing a bunch of code spending a bunch of time working on features and then waiting around for a PR review in today's episode. We're going to talk about ways the you can make your PR's little bit better these pull requests. We talked about Puerto Question the last episode of developer t from the opposite side. How can you be better reviewer? But now we're going to talk about it from this omitting side. My name is Jonathan Controlling. You're listening to developer team. My goal on the show is driven. Villiger's like you find a clarity perspective and purpose in their careers and the first point. I'd like to make about having good. Pr's and hoping that other people will review them which is kind of the goal right the goal of having a good pr. Good poll request. Is that other? People will have all the information that they need to be able to review that Paul request with the least possible friction. Ideally what this means. Is that the review the responses that you receive the comments on your code that change requests that are provided on your code that they're all productive that you're not having to explain yourself multiple times or try to make something that is really confusing in your code or in your PR. Try To distill it down and comments instead what we WANNA see as engineers is Paul request. That are very clear. They're concise they make sense to the problem. There scaled through the problem. There is information and data provided for decisions that were made when it's necessary and it doesn't go overboard on optimization lot of clever code really what we're looking for in a poor request is something that allows me as the reviewer to clearly know what's going on in approve that change and I'm going to give you some specific things to pay attention to in your poll requests. This is a skillset creating pull requests that are narrow and specific enough and clear enough. This is this is a skill set right because this requires that as you are writing your code as you are working on a given feature they. You're considering what does this poll request ultimately look like to the reviewer? You have to put yourself in the reviewers shoes and in fact. That is my first recommendation. If you want to have a good Paul Request Review Your Own Code I review your own code. I what does this mean? Well the evidence of you reviewing your own code might be comments on lines of code and it doesn't even necessarily have to be comments in the code itself you can review your own poll request almost like someone else might review it now and most platforms like get hub. You can't be officially a reviewer. You can't approve your own poll request but you can go through an provide points of clarification input on your your reviewer hat now. This is really important to understand here. His isn't just a formality. When you put on the reviewer hat you're likely to see your code differently then when you were writing it. This is a very functional. Move that you make by reviewing your own code because this changes the perspective or the the seat you're sitting in right you're exchanging one hat for another for the submission had your goal is to hopefully get the code approved so you can get it moved along. You can ship code ultimately provide value to the Business Sarah from reviewing perspective as we mentioned on the last episode the goal is to come to a resolution on the PR. But here's the critical factor when you put on reviewing hat you see your code. Through fresh eyes of specifically criticism. You want to adopt the critical point of view and this operates on two dimensions. The first dimension is if you adopt the critical point of view for your own code. You might catch something before another viewer catches it. This will lower the a number of necessary per poll request and guarantee this. This is true if you start. Implementing this on your teams if you require yourself or require their author to go through and review as if they were a reviewer on their own poll request. You're likely to see many small things very simple errors that otherwise would take cycle and somebody coming in reviewing asking for a change request and then the original You know author of that code having to go back and submit that change and then read requested review. If the author self reviews a lot of those things tend to be caught when they explicitly put on that reviewer hat so there's that one piece of the kind of practical putting on the reviewer had changes your perspective of the second thing that does is it gets you on the same side as the reviewer in some ways pull. Requests can feel adversarial. The person who submitting the code is somewhat of an adversary to the person who's reviewing it and this is not very good necessarily because you both want to have shared common goal. And so if you can get into the critical mindset of your own code. It's possible that you'll be more likely to detach your ego from that code because now the goal is to make it better so that's my first recommendation in today's episode first recommendation for being a better poll requests author.

Paul Developer Villiger Jonathan Controlling Business Sarah
Tips for Pivoting Because of COVID-19

How I Built It

4:56 listening | Last week

Tips for Pivoting Because of COVID-19

"I I want talk about so we'll talk about the things that I'm doing a kind of sprinkled in throughout the episode but a few of my friends six of my friends Were able to record messages and I think that they cover a pretty decent range of Changes that they've made and I want to start with some of the Maybe some of the more obvious or maybe just the things that people probably think to do the things that they think they should do And that's changing their service in some way not completely of course but pivoting to take their service and and help the people who are most affected so I up Is My friend Shannon Schaefer Schaefer Shannon Schaefer. You might remember her from earlier this year and her talking about her processes and how to Not necessarily automate the whole process but put a good process in place to help. Grow Your Business. Well let's hear from Shannon about what she's doing During the pandemic to help pivot her business. Hey Jal so yeah. We had to make some quick changes to our company. We were heavily into both membership sites in also into brochure sites from local businesses than what we found is we were able to take our experience with membership. Sites will commerce that side of the house quickly translated into e commerce sites for restaurants locally here who needed to get their menus online and for some of our other clients who previously weren't selling physical products online. We were able to help them. So while we didn't have a ton of experience in the true ecommerce space We've been using woo. Commerce for memberships and other memberships funding. We just took that experience and very quickly became a ECOMMERCE shop And we are pushing out. Several new will commerce sites here in the next couple of weeks so law. Our core offering is still available We have let our customers know that they need to get their businesses online Specifically in the restaurant space Some of our retail customers who only had a brick and mortar space. So we've kind of partnered with them to help them get their products out there and still be able to do business. The other thing that we've done is help with covert messaging We do email marketing and that was important that we were like. Hey now's not the time to stop so we've actually ramped up the amount of email marketing that we're doing for our clients for source sites are kind of on hold. You know. People don't need. They need something interactive something where they can actually make sales online. So sometimes just stop and think about how your business can evolve so for me. I think that what I've learned in this pandemic quickly is that Sometimes we have something that we do really well that can translate to another line of business and instead of sitting on it We were pushed to to make it happen so Hopefully we will be doing e commerce sites at scale in the near future all right. I WanNa thank Shannon for For calling in a special shout to her because she did basically isn't it? I asked Which was amazing because you never know people are busy and and I wanted to get this out as soon as possible. So thank you Shannon. You can find out more about Shannon and everybody in this episode over at the show notes for this episode at how I built dot it slash one six nine but the important thing to remember about what Shannon said here is that she was doing brochure sites and membership sites and she was able to take and use that experience to help people build ecommerce sites. I know that she works with a lot of local clients and some not so local clients. But she's communicating with her brick and mortar stores. She's helping them get online so that they can continue to do business and Helped with their Kovic nineteen messaging which will hear about from somebody else leader but what I loved about. Her answer was she said now is not the time to stop and think that's so important for us to remember end for us to relate to our clients or customers. This is a time where people are probably worried about money in their thinking that they should pull back and go into complete defense mode But you're you know you're not gonNA score any goals if you're just playing defense so I'm really Miss Sports. So that's what that sports analogy was brought to you by So if you can help your go on the offense and be proactive about their businesses. I think that Shannon offers a great way she took her experience and her teams experience and they were able to use it in a way to help businesses where they need it

Shannon Schaefer Schaefer Shan JAL
The FBI broke Apple’s iPhone encryption, but you shouldn’t panic

Geek News Central

2:12 listening | Last week

The FBI broke Apple’s iPhone encryption, but you shouldn’t panic

"The most recent contention between the FBI. Napa over device encryption has come to an end as agency is unlocked to iphones belonging to the Pensacola shooter with. No thanks to apple going further. Ag William Bars again called for the government to force apple and others to create backdoors and devices the the apple team or apple has replied the terrorist attack on members of the United States armed service at the Naval Air Station. Pensacola Florida was devastating. And hennessy heinous act up responded to the FBI's I request information hours after the attack and continue sport law enforcement during their investigation. We've prayed every piece of racial able to US including I cloud backups. I count information and transactional data for multiple counts. We lent continuous ongoing technical. And investigators support the FBI OPS Jacksonville Pensacola and Jacksonville Pensacola and in New York. Over the month sense on this many thousands of other cases we continue work round the clock but the FBI and other investigators that keep Americans saved and bring criminals to justice as a proud American company. We consider supporting. We consider supporting law enforcement. Port Work Responsibility. The false claim made about a companies are an excuse to weaken encryption and other security measures that protect millions of users and our national security It is because we take responsibility security so serious that we do not believe in the creation of a back door one which will make every device. Romell too bad actors or threaten our national security and the data security of our customers. There's no such thing as a back door. Just for the good guys. And the American people do not have to choose between weakening encryption and effective investigations. Koskinen keep their information secure and one of the ways in which we do so by using strong encryption across our device and servers. We sell the same iphone everywhere. We don't start customers passcodes and we don't have the capability. Unlock passcode protected. Devices and data centers we deploy strong hardware and software security protections keeping afresh safe. And this show. There are no backdoors into our systems. All these practice apply equally to our operation every country in the world.

FBI Pensacola Apple Naval Air Station Napa William Bars Jacksonville United States Florida New York
What is Code, to Our Evolved Mind?

Developer Tea

5:55 listening | Last week

What is Code, to Our Evolved Mind?

"A philosophical discussion can be had about the role of code and our lives. But I I want to set up some backdrop and a little bit of theory for this exploration. Today for the sake of today's thought experiment will accept the idea that humans have evolved over some very long period of time. The length doesn't matter all that much other than to say it's very long to optimize for survival and that the vast majority of that period was spent in a world that looked very different from ours today. This idea that the human brain has evolved for a world that seems to kind of Lurk beneath the surface of our culture and all of our kind of social practices today and that. It's actually suppressed by our civilized instincts and the societal norms. This isn't a novel concept this idea. That Lord Lord of the flies style somewhere lurking underneath all of this. There's more primal instincts but this concept is useful for confronting some hard questions about how our brains perceive that code and that brings me to my next point for the sake of this discussion. We'll talk about two distinct concepts the brain and the mind now. This is absolutely a physical philosophical minefield in I want to be careful here in suggesting a dualist mindset as if those two concepts are truly distinct when I refer to the mind or the brain in this episode you might substitute the concepts of conscious and sub-conscious thought we're essentially talking about the raw processing of information which is what the brain might be doing versus the meaning making of that information. Which is what the intangible mind or consciousness might be doing the thinking about that information that you've processed is that meaning making on the one hand our brain processes information in that sub-conscious realm constantly sometimes without our explicit consent. This is how we can accidentally convert. You know cell phone into a gun or a stick into a snake. This is particularly true for things that we see as threats but on the other hand we dream up our own realities in our mind intentionally. We imagined objects or situations that don't really even exist and sometimes even can't exist our brains in some interesting backward. Fashion are subject to this kind of sensory input as well what we imagine. We process in many ways as if it was real even. If it isn't a short dive into Google can give you some more scientific background on this particularly if you look for the idea that our consciousness itself is a reproduction of the output of that raw processing of data around us. In other words our mind is actually making up what it thinks. Our brain is processing is experiencing so if we are re projecting actual reality and it certainly seems plausible that are imagined realities could be processed as if they were real and this is exactly what research shows. And it's how we can have things like memory substitution. We remember events from our childhood as if they happen us but it turns out they happened to a close family member in. This happens because years we tell that story over and over or that story's told to us over and the actual memory begins warp as we replay that over and over kind of like a VHS tape that's been played too many times instead of getting scratches on the film. You're replacing characters. But I want to get us back on track here out of that philosophical realm about consciousness instead talk about how all of this relates to how we deal with code when we encounter it. Misses OBVIOUSLY PRETTY COMPLEX? So with this complex backdrop. Let's talk about how this ancient brain of ours in our modern context and frankly kind of confused. Mind trying to bridge the GAP BETWEEN THOSE TWO. How we can bring code into the picture? We're going to talk about that. Chance encounter right after we talked about. Today's sponsor winnowed one of the amazing things about developing expertise is that it often starts small. It may even start as something fun. Play as an engineer. You probably know by now that we as a community of people take play very seriously and playing around with some code can lead to some really important outcomes both for the industry and for your own career. And so if you don't have the proper play ground to actually test your ideas out. You can be easily disadvantaged. Now howdy make good playground. You start small but then you make it easy to scale up. And that's exactly what Leonard. Does Leno's plans start at five dollars a month and they scale all the way up to Super Production Services basically think. Gpa You plans for a processing and dedicated CPU plan so that you don't have any steel between you and another one of Leno's customers. All of this is based on this idea that having Reu access to a Lenox server is one of the most powerful tools you can have as developer. But on top of that winnowed is offering incredible hardware and Tools to access the server so things like a Python. Cli Or of course an

Leno REU Google Leonard Super Production Services Engineer Developer
Tips every Flask developer should know

Talk Python To Me

6:50 listening | 2 weeks ago

Tips every Flask developer should know

"We were talking before at you. Were on episode forty eight overlap. Four years ago we talked about building APPs with flask. And then you're on episode. One hundred twenty one where we were talking about micro services and really with a bit of a flask angle there as well so you've been a fan of ask for a long time. Ya I was a user flask. I and rolley told the story in the first episode but quickly I wrote my blog with flask and then not knowing what to blog about decided to blog about flask. At a time where you say that it was an obscure framework. But you know certainly didn't have the following that has now so my articles for someplace where the first that you know outside of the frameworks own documentation and it started growing at the same time I decided to blog about it. Yeah you just catch the wave at just the right time and exactly but at the same time you know you saw the framework like no. I'm not going do it in Django or whatever else I'm GonNa do it in flask right. So there's some you know picking the right idea. Yes and part of my. I'd like to think that this was a little bit of my doing a showed. Y You know. In many cases flask was the better choice by writing tutorials usually my blog and showing actual examples where you can do things that you know usually considered hard and they're not so hard when you look at them through floss yeah to me. Flask. I'll compared to Django. Because that's its biggest alternative right. There's certainly all these other new things. There's so many new web frameworks coming here thoughts and this actually is. Oh yes. There's there's so many new cool little frameworks we got fast. Api HAVE API star. We have scenic it. Just all these. Do not all necessarily leveraging the new a Cinco stuff but a lot of them seem to be like. Hey these other frameworks didn't really solve my problem because they didn't support as thanks so we're going to create something that maybe leverages type pence plus a sink. That's Kinda like flask. We think about some of those like where do you see the action there? The first of all I'm very excited that the model for all these frameworks is flask. Right they all yes. The kind of like flask as you said. Yeah that is what was really surprising to me. So if you compare flask against Django organs pyramid or against the other frameworks and you look at their popularity like I think flask is. We're talking neck and neck but I think actually if you look at the newer projects that haven't been around for Awhile Flask is pretty clearly Jingo in terms of popularity honest Django. People are still working on. Do you work on Django or flask. It's a lot of times I think it means I work on Jingle opt. It's been around awhile not that there's anything wrong with Django but just in terms of that growth but then if you look at flask as the the idea of it that all these other frameworks seem to think that this flask style. Yes Slight adaptations what they want. Right big reason for that. I think it's the we are moving a lot of the The logic the business logic in applications to the client site right with all these new javascript based for the browser What's left to do in the server is really the database storage related actions and maybe authentication chillier anticipation. That's it so if you look at the framework like Django you can do that really well but it has a lot more components that you really have no use for and at least new frameworks model after it sort of give you just the API portion of your service side of your project right. It's gotTa just enough server side. Es Right now. I will say that it has a little less and then you can pick you know the right extensions to to make it exactly what you want. Yeah right add on yeah. That's a good point. I'm still a fan of having a decent amount done on the server side. I I don't know I just I like the instant Idaho. It drives me crazy to see these pages sort of build up as I interact with them. You know you'll see like you're logged out no way half a second later. I'm logged like that kind of stuff. Yes I'm not a huge fan you. You'll find the right mix between server and client. I think people are too quick to go to bill. Everything a single page reactive. You agree angular. You know those types and they don't think about doing it a right balance sometimes. You don't expect everything to be done in a single page. It feels weird. The whole H. is changing but it's sweet on react for example which slow and weird it messes with the buck button in the browser at prefer to basically use the single. H. Up only when you see clear benefit you really need like an interactive thing. I'm a little dashboard. I'm exploring or something like g mail or something. It's perfect right but it's just see the one hammer. You hit everything within the web. My blog the blog that I wrote six years ago. When I started with flasks it's still a traditional application several centric and just find it acid javascript sprinkle catering there to make a little bit. Nicer. But it's mostly several side and I think for a blog that works really well. Yeah I agree. So you're talking about the front end. Frameworks like I agree. Like don't overuse them whatnot but sometimes they make a lot of sense. What ones do you like right now? My preference this is going to hinder rate generate a little bit of a disappointment in your audience. I think is Vanilla javascript. That is the framework or the no framework that fits my brain the best so I can do whatever we want in Vanilla javascript. If you years ago I will say J. Query as you. You don't really need that. The J. Query was a layer. That will make older browsers sort of uniform and as the pros the buzzer predate. Inform each other. So that's my favorite out of. The real frameworks. React is the one that I've used the most but only four simple apps what I've seen. Is that all these dependencies that are generated between all the older parts of the page. It's very easy to get them. Pretty out of control as the project grows right. At least I personally find having handled like for example when Writing Vanilla javascript. Having handle of what part of the page is related to what other part makes it for a much faster and dynamic

Rolley Vanilla Idaho
Complex flavors: Coding Comments

Front End Happy Hour

4:55 listening | 2 weeks ago

Complex flavors: Coding Comments

"Gets out of date code comments. Are We picking fights? I would argue that code. Comments get out of date because you're not maintaining them like you're supposed to because they're in your code if code comments exist in your code. It's your job to either maintain them or delete them. I update Michael Comments. But I never touched anybody else's yeah why not. I don't know I just. I usually just skim right past them. I don't actually knowledge their existence. Even despite that's like leaving the sign up. That's like attached. I've had enough experience where it's just not actually been remotely close to the code. I'm reading but that's that is vicious circle updated or delete them I would. I would prefer that someone delete a comment if it's not relevant anymore than leave it around. Yeah I I one hundred percent agree. I think comments are amazing. And you should be commenting and you should be editing others if you've made a change and acknowledging those changes in with a comment but also have one thing to say about comments as well as much as they can be helpful review over comment meaning is like you right like a paragraph for some. Change People Argon ignore that. Maybe that's Ryan some of your symptoms. There are two words like you've read. It's like it's bloated. And you're like this is too much. Yeah they're useless right like slash slash return number something. That doesn't make like that. I can figure out. Yeah I mean I actually have a talk on this exact thing Because there are bad comments. I think that we get we kinda get on one side of the other of like a coke co comments or good or bad but there's they're bad comments they're good comments and we don't talk through the nuances there. Yeah if it's repeating what's there then? That's annoying because you're reading twice like that's so unhelpful. But sometimes co- come. It's can be really useful for explaining the why because code can always explain what but not a why Jess I didn't want to jump on this yet but since riots get go ahead and start start trouble a few minutes into the podcast yes. One hundred percent agree with Sarah comments explained. Why and code explains the how the best way I think about the the best design system especially when we're talking about complex systems cheers is is your question. Ryan when you're when you first company and we've all started at a company at some point and you're like I'm smart and then you get dropped into a code base like I have no idea what's going on. What's the ideal system that you WANNA be dropped into just like Sarah saying you want something with a good read me? 'cause that means people care about other people on the on the code You want something with a lot of comments. Because people's coach sows differ wildly especially Java scrip-. The wild wild west of programming. The way I write let's say an asynchronous function probably looks completely different from the way stacy writes it and they're all valid but you want comments explaining like kind of why you're doing it this way and that really helps on a new person and then finally of course what you want is a bunch of tests so that when you finally get ramped up and you make that change you. WanNa be certain that you didn't break anything and that is an ideal system so that you can just drop in and get get going and you have full confidence in your changes and you understand. Exactly what's happening? Yeah I just chopped. Kobe's had none of those things no unit test. No comments very scary to change. I The pick two main you get one to two of the three. You can get really good tests good comments. Don't ever get all three of these. I have never seen a code base. That has all three so stacy. How do you approach that well? I was lucky enough to still know who wrote the code. Originally and that person was still at the company so I reached out and I said here's the thing that I wanted to do. And then we pair programmed on it a little bit so that was nice. But that's if that person's not there anymore and you don't have a way to get a hold of them. I mean that then you're in a different predicament. Near just sort of have to make the change and try and test it manually as best as you know how but still it's. It's not it's not good place to be that reaching out among like inside of a company is so funny like I definitely showed up just like a big company when you have to like go. Find THEIR OFFICE OR ROW OF DESKS. Or whatever and you sit next to them you like so. I have something to talk about. And it's called line ten thousand seventy to explain yourself. They're like

Michael Comments Ryan Sarah Stacy Kobe
Alex DeBrie - DynamoDB for Relational Database Diehards

Full Stack Radio

5:50 listening | 2 weeks ago

Alex DeBrie - DynamoDB for Relational Database Diehards

"I guess maybe the best place to start would be. How do you describe what Dynamo DB even as if someone was just GonNa ask you like? What is this thing for? What do you use it for? Yep share so it's a no sequel database like you were saying and and that's not super descriptive because it basically just says what it isn't right. It's not a relational database. That a sequel. But you saw a lot of these sort of no sequel databases popping up in the last ten or fifteen years and one common thing about all these relational databases is They were they were built for larger scale you know as as he's sort of. Internet enabled platforms are happening where you have thousands or millions of of users around the world Like the single instance relational database just wasn't keeping up As well so polices started building these no sequel databases and I think one thing in common with most of these. No single databases is that they they charge your data across multiple instances so rather than having like this one monolithic database. You know you're you're my sequel instance. Your postcards instance. You'll have you know maybe five different shards of Mongo DB or with something like Dynamo DB there starting that behind the scenes sort of transparently to you Across a lot of large variety of machines The big thing that you need to do there with a no sequel database. Then is that data's going to be sharded and you need to make sure you sort of design your data correctly so that you're only hitting one Charlotte and doing efficient query rather than queering across like four or five different shards and having network calls. So that's that's a super high level but Yeah okay that makes sense so the the my sort of exposure to Dynamo. Db guests has been almost like guys have rightous alternative in a lot of situations. So I see a lot of times. People use read us for like a cash just like a key value store and I see people using Dynamo. Db FOR THAT A lot. If you're hosting your stuff on Amazon because a lot of the tools designed to work with us in that way can also interact with Dynamo. Db In that way But it sounds like a lot of people are also using Dynamo. Db is like their primary data store as Australia. Replacement for a relational database. Is that true in your experience. Yeah absolutely I think you know. A lot of people think it's only used for key value store like type Type Actions Media Session store and you can use it for that. But you can. Use It for highly relational models. You can handle one to many relationships. Many Dominion relationship all that in Dynamo. Db I show how to do that. And and there's a bunch of people doing that at a pretty large scale If if you're talking about like Amazon. Aws any of the Amazon retail. Any of the AWS stuff they. If it's a tier one service at one of those places which means if it's down it's losing money they're required to use. Dynamo. Db and they have relational models there. They have shopping carts with items in them and they belong to customers or or they'd aws stuff. That's all relational as well. So you can definitely handle these. These complex relational models not just a key value stores. Yeah cool that's really interesting so I think it'd be cool. It'd be sort of get into I. Guess like just understanding some of the core concepts and stuff around this technology. What some of the terminology is how some of it may be maps. Back to the relational database world for people who come from that. Same background as me. I'm familiar with the old tables and columns and rows model. You know what I mean. So what are some of like? What are the sort of terms and concepts that you have to understand but Dynamo DB to even get started with in the first place? How do you build like the right mental model for what it's doing? Yep sure so I'd say the four or five basic terms you want to start with and I'll just compare them to to relational houses. Well first of all. There's the notion of table which is going to be similar to a table in a relational database With some differences that get into on such as holds all your all your data in it and then each record in a table is called an item sets a row in a relational database or a document in Dynamo DB but just like a collection of data each when you create your table. What you're GonNa do is declare a primary key for your table and each item that you put into that table must have that primary key and it needs to be uniquely identified by that primary key so so there is that like is that is that auto generated by the database for you like it would be like sequel or you always have to provide it from the client yet. You need to provide it by the client. And it's usually going to be something meaningful as well. Like win a relational database. You know you might just have an auto incremental primary key like you're saying but this is GonNa be actually something meaningful life maybe username or In order ID or or something like that but you can actually use to identify that particular item because that primary keys actually gonNA drive your access patterns as well. You're going to be queering directly on that primary key. Okay interesting so I think. Like in the relational database world the advice that. I've often heard it's been like the opposite right like don't use your email column as your primary key in your users table because it's it's going to be inefficient or whatever in different ways compared to just using an auto implementing. Id but in in this case if as long as there's some existing unique identifier for the record the best practice leverage that don't add like some additional unique identifier. Yep generally and sometimes you might want to use something like a you. Id or or similar like if something like an order. Id you know you don't really have Anything meaningful about the order. You can generate a unique unique. Id and use that. But then you'll probably also refer to that that d like in your url path or whatever to help find that they'll be accessible to the client. If you needed to go do that look up. You know if someone goes to slash orders slash whatever that idea is then. Then you're back in knows. Hey this is order yet. I need to go fetch from the back end.

Dynamo Amazon Australia AWS Charlotte
Apple to hold annual developers event online from June 22

News, Traffic and Weather

0:26 listening | 2 weeks ago

Apple to hold annual developers event online from June 22

"Apple announcing its upcoming worldwide developers conference will be exclusively held online like many events apple has had to shift as a result of covert nineteen and the company says its annual worldwide developers conference will be a virtual experience this year the conference beginning June twenty second will be held through its apple developers at the conference gives app and software developers a look at where the company's mobile and computer platforms are

Apple
There Is No, "Way We've Always Done It"

Developer Tea

3:37 listening | 3 weeks ago

There Is No, "Way We've Always Done It"

"And you probably take something for granted. In fact we all take things for granted and most of the time we do this unintentionally. We're not trying to ignore the systems that are around us. We're not trying to discredit the idea of questioning those. Those systems the average engineer in today's marketplace. They've heard this over and over question your assumptions and it's conventional wisdom now rather than unusual wisdom to stop and think about first principles but in today's episode. I want to give you a specific call to action or or Hook if you WANNA call it that a reminder you can use in your day to day work and it's specifically around identifying places where you're still making assumptions. These are the invisible assumptions. These are the majority of the assumptions that we make not the ones that we explicitly say that. We're assuming something. Most of our assumptions are reflected instead in our behaviors rather than our words. And if we do that. New Conventional wisdom the newly found But now conventional wisdom that we hear all the time of questioning everything and Reasoning from first principles. Then we know that this starts with asking the question. Why why are we doing something this particular way? Or why are we using the tool or why are we even solving this problem? To begin with these are the kinds of questions that you might ask to uncover your assumptions. But here's the critical thing when we answer these questions when we answer the why questions very often. We assume that we're uncovering the raw truth. But are answers. Tend to have assumptions in them as well. I WanNa talk about a specific category of assumptions. When we ask the question why this is really zooming in here. I'm going to talk about a specific category of some of assumption. That is typically used as our answer as to why we're doing something. We're going to do that right after we talk about. Today's sponsor head spin head spin for mobile unifies into an automated testing full stack performance monitoring end user experience analytics for any application. Whether it's native or on the web running on any device in any network anywhere in the world if you are running your test suites only on your continuous integration. Or if you are limiting your test suites to you know. Only unit tests or only limited integration tests. If you aren't doing true into in automated testing in a real environments that means environments that your users are actually using than you are very likely to miss out on a whole load of bugs. But here's what's almost equally important to users. Bugs are often indistinguishable from usability concerns. It doesn't really matter to your user if you have something wrong in the code or if your query is just taking too long to run so don't get caught in the trap of thinking that just running through your test suite is

Engineer
The Role of Custom Fonts

Under the Radar

6:44 listening | 3 weeks ago

The Role of Custom Fonts

"Today. I wanted to talk about fonts. It's something that I've been spending a lot of time thinking about recently with watched Smith and it's a topic that I think is just interesting that I think a font is in many ways the the strongest sort of side of design that a lot of developers like like Mark Roe. And I deal with where. I'm not an artist by sort of at all like I'm just sort of like drawing pretty pictures or making things pretty I can lay out a Ui and the appropriate spacing and alignment and those kinds of things but the thing in my apps that are is usually the most like visually interesting is probably going to be the typography that I'd choose and use inside of it and honestly for most of our APPS I feel like eighty or ninety percent of the. Ui is text. And so if that's the case like the thing that the the the fonts and the type choices that you make for that is hugely impactful on the user's experience in these sort of the overall design and aesthetic and if the personality of your application By by those choices you make are are so big and I feel like there's so many different approaches that you can take with font. We're like out of the box. You can just use the basic system font and there's a lot of reasons and benefits of going down that road and you get all kinds of serve the accessibility and dynamic text. And there's lots of things in heavy work than apple has been doing In that range to make like San Francisco. They're based system font like really good in so many circumstances But if you go down that road than like it was like he had all these benefits but you also lose a lot of things in terms of personality and differentiation and Making your your APP and your sort of your at the appearance. Feel unique and different and special and so. I think it's just an interesting thing to talk about. You know because I kind of went back and forth so many times on what funds to us In Washington at the end I served settled on the phone call decimal which is by Jonathan Hoffler. And it's this sort of very watch inspired fond that's very It's supposed to vote and be kind of derived from the kind of fonts that you would see on a traditional mechanical watch and there's actually just as a side note. There's a really looking for something to watch the netflix documentary. Abstract has a whole episode about the sort of design of this fund. Which I just thought was really interesting if you're kind of New especially if you're new defense is really good discussion in expects punish a lot of the terms. You'll hear when people are talking about fons the simple things of like seraphin center but even things like leading incurring and our sesame athletic let earning dissenters centers like all the terms that you would see like the these things that you you you you I font and you can ask for all kinds of information about itself like some really good inspects nations. So I'm going to that in the show it's but anyway that's the point that I chose. I really like it. I think it works really well super well in the watch and I think because works while in the watch. That's kind of their personality that I wanted to bring over onto the phone But that's kind of the direction I went and I like it but also had had some feedback that people don't like it and they wish that it was. I just use the system font and like gets complicated like I don't really know how to feel about that. Yeah it's fonts are tricky because when you when you use a custom font for an absent tire you I You know basically when you replace the system font with your custom fund. It is a personality that you're adding the system font basically has no personality. Ideally at least you know. Sometimes there's a couple of in history there have been a couple of like you know. Slight personalities imparted here. And they're like I think the regional Macintosh Chicago Font had had a certain personality That that we have more personality than system funds tend to have But for the most part like system funds tend to be as kind of neutral and universal and therefore by definition bland as possible because they are used everywhere. You know that people should never get sick of them. They shouldn't really ever notice the personality of the system. Font it should just kind of be like just a a nice like basic default that everything can use and that nobody will ever have thought about and so the system will never impart personality into your APP. Custom Fonts simply by by not using the System Font. Even if you pick another fairly bland one you are making a personality choice with your APP for sure and so some people are GonNa love that and some people are going to hate that and then beyond that if you pick a a font that has a strong personality where like you wouldn't necessarily use this for any type of document or any type of tax rain tight like something. That has a point of view. A personality. Like your watchmen. Fonterra's that's going to be even more polarizing and it's even harder to be even more careful with like how and when you use something like that in-app because people the Ui of an APP to behave in standard ways and to look standard ways and if you don't match the standard you have to have really good reason not to and it can backfire for some people. And that's why like you don't usually see a lot of APPs using their own funds if they do use their own funds they don't always use them well and as a developer. You have to really be careful like it is a great way to add personality but you might not always want personality in certain context and you have to make sure you're adding the right personality for the APP. So for instance like whenever. I go to my dentist that they had like these computer screens at run. Their dental management system. Whatever it is. They're they're always in kind of in the side of my field of US. I can see them. What's on the screen and you know some horrible windows APP. That's clearly like custom made for the industry and there are certain dialogues that use Comic Sans and I just don't I never feel good seeing Comic Sans on the system that is responsible for my dental health. Would you want? There's no there's nothing comedic about the situation right exactly and and like you know. There are ways that you can mismatch a font to the application and so you have to be careful when you're if you're going to choose this route to have a custom font and and I think there's there's a good argument to be had not to have custom fonts these days and I'll get to that in a little bit but if you're gonna go down the route of having a custom font you have to really make sure that you're choosing one or the personality is appropriate for the context in which the APP is running like what. What kind of APP is what kind of people use it? What kind of mood or situation they might be in when they are using it

Macintosh Chicago Font Developer Mark Roe Netflix Smith Seraphin Center Fonterra San Francisco United States Apple Jonathan Hoffler Washington
MongoDB with Emily Giurleo

Ruby on Rails Podcast

3:55 listening | 3 weeks ago

MongoDB with Emily Giurleo

"Emily. What is your specific experience with Ruby on rails so I've used ruby on rails at a few jobs I had an internship while I was in college where I did a bit of rails. I don't think I really understood what was going on So I'm not sure how much that counts But then when I started working at Code Academy I was primarily doing back in development and primarily using rails or sort of rails adjacent services And so when I had the opportunity to go work at Mongo. Db On the ruby driver and rails. Odiham object document member It was kind of it was very. Meta because those are the tools I was using at Code Academy to implement the platform for our learners and so I thought it would be a great kind of Change an abstraction level to work on the tools that I had been using as a developer. I love seeing that pattern in your career. That basically you use these tools you love them and you look for ways getting more. It's it's such a neat way that you've gone about your career. Yeah and it's really fun to get Tickets from users now who are using the ruby driver or Mongoloid and to know exactly where they're coming from because I I was the developer using these tools encountering these problems and having to figure out how to fix them. So it's a it's a really nice way to cement everything that I learned. I could catch me so I'm personally really interested in what it's like working at Mongo. Db What does a typical day in the life? Rio sure so I think the first thing you have to understand is what I work on and those are the drivers now. A driver is a library that allows you to connect your project to the Mongo. Db Database and my team implements those libraries in many different languages. So I personally work on the ruby and rails Drivers but my teammates work on swift rust. See et Cetera So my day to day is primarily coating working on the driver. But it's also really cool job because I have the chance to interact with people from the community by checking stack overflow answering questions or getting user submitted tickets and then seeing if they've found a bug or if they just need some help figuring out how to use a certain feature and so. It's a really awesome combination of coding and community Community Development. That I think really suits me is all of your work and public facing yes. All the drivers are completely open-source. That's amazing I mean that's a dream job for a lot of people to be able to work in open source full-time so how closely do you watch the Ruby and the rails repositories in order to see? What changes are making? So you know what kind of changes you have to anticipate doing whenever they released new versions very very closely and since I started up Mongo DB about eight months ago I haven't really had much of a chance to experience this. So that's something I'm actually really excited for But one example is as they're rolling out. Ruby version three. They've changed some of the tax around Keyword arguments for example. And because we test the driver on a whole range of Ruby versions. We immediately catch that that stuff because it breaks things in the driver or in the libraries that we use and so we really have to be up to date on the latest changes in Ruby and even in rails because we want to update the object document member to reflect the most recent patterns from the frameworks. That are developers are using.

Developer Code Academy Community Community Developmen Emily. RIO
Ronald Gijsel On WooCommerce Plugins By YITH

How I Built It

3:30 listening | Last month

Ronald Gijsel On WooCommerce Plugins By YITH

"You're based in the UK You ran a small agency. Also Google partner and so yes focuses on Commerce extensions right so they are The number one independent will commerce extension very much so yesterday Let me go back a little bit to the history of how it started to so none. The popularity of history was the CEO. He would for an IT company In two thousand eight. He came up with the idea to use some of the the trends in web development that were being seen in the US in UK with a little bit further ahead and Brian blocks about loss of blocks at technical a furring dedicated plan he executed in soon after that he released his first themes which were designed by a by his wife. Who's a amazing a U. X. Designer The teams went down really. Well were being sold on theme forest and in years literally sold millions of them along time. The number one theme salary with those themes. And you probably remember that they they. They came loaded with lots of plug. Ins and functionality. If you have a Nolan months solution that was spreading to go yet if you have a restaurant he or his restaurant. Beloved him loaded but over time. These functionalities separated from the theme. So these plug INS I will bolster agents search Filter they became styling products. Stay on so. That's why the joining of Luke must plug INS started full. Forgive the stands for your inspiration teams But it's a lot less team themes on a lot more plug ins we have over one hundred now Catholic wow mosts Uses make of the club membership. So you have still the old plug-ins On six thirty websites but the the the direct line in all of this is it's all about creating this customer journey from start to finish so plug. Ins includes The being displaying products. In a nice way on your website to different checkout methods payment methods also lot of admit tools a pdf in frustration as adults and everything in between those Yeah absolutely And so you mentioned the customer journey again so I love to you Get into this. I am an online educator and I always talk about the learner's journey one year putting together a course you WanNa make sure that they have a problem. You're solving it. Through whatever actions they need to take solve and that they have a very clear path it sounds like the customers journey Is a little a little bit similar to that but maybe we can talk about what exactly you mean by that. I I think customer journey you can have different views on that and I think a developer looks at it in a very different way to a a US designer to a web designer on taking more of the the the stand as a data analyst and look at key points

United States UK CEO Google Partner Web Designer Luke U. Brian Developer Analyst
Showing off our personal bars - Personal projects

Front End Happy Hour

9:21 listening | Last month

Showing off our personal bars - Personal projects

"Welcome to episode one hundred and one of the front unhappy our podcast. It's actually been along milestone tat. Hit episode one hundred. Do you think we will maybe hit the milestone of two hundred at point only if the government bails us out jemmy needs some of that sweet sweet cash out small business bailout money. Yeah but definitely. It's kind of exciting to be released though episode. One hundred ten for this episode. We all focus a lot of our time on engineering work for large companies. But we've always you know there's always been side projects or things that we've worked on throughout our careers and so we thought it'd be in this episode to be really cool to share some details about some of our side projects that we've done in the past before we get started. Let's go around and give introductions of today's panelists Augusta's you want to start off. Sure maims Augusta's software engineer at twitch. Jim Young Senior software engineer at net flicks. And I am Ryan Burgess. I'm a software engineering manager at net flicks. So only the three of us today. So we'll be fine art in each episode the Front End Happier podcast. We love to choose a keyword that if it's mentioned all in the podcast we will all take a drink. What did we decide? Today's keyword is personal personal. Awesome all right so if we say the word personal which I'm sure we will. We will all take a drink to start off. I'm really interested and curious to hear each of your side projects that you've done in the past. I'm sure there's been a few and I'd love to hear some of the things that you've done and I can say. This topic came up with from our previous episode. We did a twitch livestream one of our listeners asked. Hey y'all talk about corporate programming all the time because the corporations do you ever do personal side projects anymore. And here's like jeers took a topic Let's see done a few in the past or if done many in the past obviously Yeah One Shoghi engineer who is pretty senior and like who's never done a side project like it just doesn't happen like I think to get where you are up to some sort of work on the side. It's just the nature of being is offering engineer. I feel like that's how I learned like that's really how I truly learned. It was constantly China. Solve some sort of a problem that I was really excited to do and build and and I felt like I learned a lot by doing that. You can read and learn but I feel like actually applying it. is where I excelled to learn. Really quickly yeah. I agree I find that when you work in just for your job. You're so focused on the problem and just maybe shipping. Like how do you ship it out to users? But the nicely. Cy Projects is he can really focus more on the learning aspect of. Oh this is what I ideally want to build and even if it's even if it doesn't solve anything it's like exciting. Maybe you might choose a random new technology like oh I WANNA learn view this time where something. It's just really nice. You've a lot more freedom and also you can cut corners it. Does you're like whatever it's my project. I'm going to do what I want. Great Test if you want. Combine your coat if you want. You should always comment your code. I've heard him say that. I do MICO because looking at my repo from years ago and my projects. I'm glad my code because I have no idea what I was doing at the time and the comments. I'm like okay. I can make a quick change here if I need to because I commented my code so I'm guilty. I gotTA say on my side projects. I HAVE NOT APPLIED. The Best Practices sometimes and it has that commenting is seriously. It is bit me in the ass a few times. 'cause YOU'RE RIGHT MIGHT. WanNa make a change to something and you're like I'll just quickly go do that. But when you haven't made those comments it becomes really difficult then. It becomes a bigger tour to try and make that change. So I'm with you gem. I should take that advice more often. I'll say this that it's controversial for those listening in the car. At home I would comment my code before I wrote tests. If you're asking me like which one is more valuable for personal projects commenting code like I? Almost I almost never test for my personal projects like I. I don't care I know it's bad practice Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah but that there's stakes so unless is doing something for money but that point it'd be more of a side hustle. Not a personal project cheers cheers. It's funny I feel like a lot of people are really obsessed with test driven development or really. Let's run the tests upfront first. And then you have one hundred percent code coverage or all these things but especially for side projects you know. Just just build what you want to build the damping get me started on the like one hundred percent TESCO. Yeah it's like I don't believe that I mean I don't think you can do it no I don't. I don't think the schools Aaron I don't think there's one hundred percent test coverage like if that's the case then you never have bugs and if that's the case I don't know there's no there's no case for us. No bugs like it doesn't happen before begins. I like the projects we've been working on. I'll say like a failure that I see and I think what discourages a lot of new people is feel like. Oh I wanNA build something. I want to build a quick game website on my own. You ask vice on twitter people like well what you need is react starter kit. You need that you need every was bad. You need Apache. You like your own server. You need like a million things to get started. I'm like no start with an html page at a script tag and like see where you go if you need that sort of thing cool but if you look at most of the work that I've done in the past arise I projects thereby minimum minimum. Like maybe node almost never framework it just like hassle. And if I'm doing that I'm not learning anything it's different if you're trying to react or view or angular something like that but I really think side projects for exploration just like free form like art as you can make it and if you get too hung up on like the precision tests in like the right framework and all these things then you're kind of doing yourself a disservice using the frameworks grader. Using node or some other language that you're like I'm just kinda curious about learning or this will do the job really well absolutely but I used that people get hung up too much on getting all the things like I gotTa make sure web pack is configured of gotTa make sure that all these different tasks are happening. Do your point. I'm like maybe just writing some vanilla javascript in a script tag might actually do. Do just what you need for that project. I think another one that I always hear too is especially when people are trying to learn something. It's like well what can I create? That's already been created. I'm always like go create another facebook. I honestly you'll learn lots like if that's something that you want to do is create another social network or game or something like that. That's a great way to learn as recreating something From scratch yeah plus one thousand two that I felt like I had that kind of same mentality. Where as they own. This sounds like a good idea. That's already done like I guess the world doesn't need it and it's like don't don't think of everything you want to build as something that needs to solve a problem that everyone has barely. I mean those are good problems to solve. I guess just do it. Even for learning for your own sake is like a really beneficial side project. I was like doing projects or something that will make my life better in like or easier like some when I think of building like tool or command line tools script plug in library. Something that I'm creating like. Hey this help me. And just the smallest slightest way to be more productive or just shave off some time. Whatever it is if I throw it up on get hub in like one or two people find it useful. Great if not who cares. It made my life easier. And that's all that matters and and it was cool to create like that's kind of the way I look at it yet. I want to hear the past projects that you've all worked on. I think I know of two that worked on but it's embarrassing as not that big but I I guess I'm proud of the proud of proud of them enough. I would pin them on my of with zero stars or but So one project I worked on was it's called co Co Nami. Commando it's on MPM and literally all it is is. There's this thing called the code and I forgot what game did it. But there's a lot of games they have this secret code. This contrast I'll cut. Yeah so yeah. So there's this codes like up up down down left right left right B. A or something and I saw a lot of game stewart. I thought it'd be cool if it'd be like there's just this cool mpm package they could just install onto your website and then you could just have this very convenient handler that said when this chain of commands was was done then it would just do something as I just published it Npr One day so so the added. It's awesome yeah I love it. Yeah the this was like when I was like super new to MPM in general is like Oh wow. There's a whole package manager and so I just thought it'd be cool thing to do

Augusta Software Engineer Engineer Cy Projects Ryan Burgess Jim Young Engineering Manager Co Co Nami Twitter China Facebook Tesco Aaron
Understanding Customer Success in Saas: Javier Cortavitarte, Customer Adoption Manager at Broadcom Inc.

Latinos Who Tech

2:13 listening | Last month

Understanding Customer Success in Saas: Javier Cortavitarte, Customer Adoption Manager at Broadcom Inc.

"Nowadays. What happened Basically I am now. Doing what is called a customer adoption management or Customer Success Management Basically that's what my role is nowadays. Which is a big change from what I did when I moved into the valley. So so when you say. Customer success What does that look like? I mean because of the way I look at Liza in the Tech Space. I see that great. We Build APPS WE BUILT OUR. Were we sell it and thank you for your money? And that's it. You mean that we have to keep working with the customer. Yes definitely okay. Whether then look then. What does a happy customer look like? How do you know that your customers happy and I guess those are two different questions but I just be customer? Success thing is very well. There's in most business. Transactions or or relationships The usually three faces two phases basically There's a pre sales portion and then there's the transaction basically and then the the pulse ration- then nowadays most businesses. Very full is on making sure that their customers are engaged in are actually Really focused on prairie feedback onto whether experiences. So what happens after someone has bought out or product from another company? And those you know those people the customer say they want to know how to best use it. I mean one thing. Is You come in our stop retailing in year or account manager and show you what their product can do? one is

Customer Success Management Liza Account Manager
Upstream w/ Dan Heath

Developer Tea

4:21 listening | Last month

Upstream w/ Dan Heath

"In the book you get into these details a little bit more mechanically Specifically talking about you know uniting people and What are the changes? Actually that you need make to assist them. How do you determine some of those things Finding Leverage One thing I'd like to talk about specifically is how do you know when this is succeeding in the point of no when we're talking about the The children that are that are drowning. It might make sense that if you had a rate of children drowning when every five minutes in that drops to one every twenty four hours then that might make a good measurement but it's not always that easy right. No it's not and I think the reality is. We live in a world where in the fictitious parable world. I mean my guess is that enormous corporate America. What people would be a measured on is? Is the speed of Rescue You know it and in fact. There's there's an example in the book. I think illustrates this. Well it's about expedia the online travel site and back in two thousand twelve. This guy named Ryan O'Neal is studying some data about the call center at Expedia. So if you book a flight or hotel or something in something goes wrong with your reservation you call one eight hundred number. What he found made his jaw drop. He found that for every hundred customers. Who booked a transaction? Fifty eight of them ended up calling the call center for help. Which which would pretty much seem to nullify the whole point of having an online self service travel site and so he starts digging into figure out why are so many people calling us in the number one reason people are calling. I mean to the tune of twenty million calls in two thousand twelve was to get a copy of their itinerary was twenty million calls. Can I get a copy of my tannery? And so he and his boss. Just they're like this is madness. We've got to do something about this. And they make the case to the CEO to create a special team to work on this and they do and The technical solutions as you might expect are pretty simple. They changed the way they send. It's not like they forgot to send the itineraries. They were always sending them. It's just they would end up in spam or customers would delete them thinking they were ads or the sort of thing so the change their strategy and emailing they added a self service tools on the VR and online and so forth and they basically took twenty million calls and whittled them down to zero so from from a technical perspective. This is a trivial problem. But I think what's interesting about? This story is is why this problem got to this level like you would think that there would be an alarm bell. That would go off somewhere. Once you reached like your your three million call for hi Tenora like people would start to take this seriously but but the deal is that expedia like like virtually every other company has to organize itself or chooses to organize itself in in silos. And so you got a marketing team whose job it is to to attract customers to expedia versus. Kayak or someone else. And then you've got a product team whose job it is to make the site so smooth and intuitive that the customers are funneled toward a transaction. Then then you've got the tech team that makes the plumbing run and keeps up time high. And you've got the call center that's trying to minimize you. Know the the response. Time to fueled a customer issue and to keep them happy via net promoter score or something like that and from a silo perspective like all of those goals make sense but but the problem is when you ask a very basic question. Like whose job is it to keep customers from needing to call us. The answer was nobody. Yeah Yeah and it was even worse than that like none of those silos even stood to benefit if the number of calls went down and so. That's something I think that that's really interesting. About upstream problems is that it's often very easy to find owners for downstream problems like your house catches on fire. It's the fire departments problem at that point. Like It may not be an easy problem. But it's an easy problem to define an owner for verses if you flip things around and you say whose job is to keep customers from calling or whose job is to keep your house from catching on fire will. That's a very different

Expedia Ryan O'neal America CEO
Haseeb Qureshi on the Unbelievable Story of the $25 Million Lendf.me Hack

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

8:12 listening | Last month

Haseeb Qureshi on the Unbelievable Story of the $25 Million Lendf.me Hack

"So last weekend. A defy protocol was hacked De Force. Which is a Chinese defy protocol backs by Multi Coin Capital last twenty four point nine million dollars via its lending platform. Lend me and let's not talk about the significance of that name. What happens with the D. Force attack? So it's kind of a complicated story and there's a little bit of a back story understand what exactly happened so it was a busy weekend and defy the the story centers around this particular asset called I. Nbc which was the cause of this hack and actually another hack. That happened twenty four hours before this hack so Let me let me. Just do a little to setup so I am. Bcc is this is just token that's basically a BTC peg minted by this company. I am talking. Which is a Chinese Theory Mall? It's like the biggest theorem on the world and I can see is not an ear. See Twenty it's an ear. See Seven seven seven. Two seven is a new token standard. That's kind of an augmentation of your see. Twenty there's sort of fancier see twenty with a bunch of other bells and whistles and it turns out those bells and whistles that they added to this token standard makes it behave somewhat differently than the RC. Twenty and it's a little bit complicated. What exactly those augmentation are but long story short. What it lets you do is if the contract that integrates Twenty doesn't know that it's integrating with seven seven seven you can potentially do re entrance the attack. We interesting attack for those remembers the same attack that attacked the Dow The original massive attack that resulted in the three and four so twenty four hours before this Linda thing happened I am. Btc which isn't seven seven. Seven was drained In the swap liquidity pool for Ambi Devers. So basically somebody was able to take a little bit of his NBC and steal all the money in the unit swap pool. That was that was a balanced between east and ears An IBM PC. So now this was not UNICEF's fault because you just want anybody to create a pool so he was like well you know this is kind of is really unfortunate but You know the people who created this pool should have known that it was well known in advance at seven seven seven. Have this problem so twenty. Four hours later So you know this is really bad. Everybody's talking this weekend. Twenty four hours later it turns out that some attacker out there was scouring of defy looking for places where similar type of attacks might have been possible in terms out the biggest liquidity pool anywhere for NBC was in Linda. So what is lend lend? F is a Chinese defy compound clone. That was built by these two guys. In China Mendel Yang is a Chinese defined buster and Shoeshine. Who's the founder of Spur Pool? Which is one of the largest theory mining pools so there too you can think of them as like defy celebrities in China. So this was a very hot project is widely renowned in China as being like the wheel. Breakout defy project Because China doesn't really have any big defy contenders was cut their their Export to the defy ecosystem. And if you if you remember back a few months ago they were actually brought to some controversy because they copy compound V ones code And they were aggressively listing assets into their collateral pool addy's mutations as their business model it's a lot of people in the West. Were kind of pissed off at them as being a derivative project content V. One so they they also an older version of compound rights compound upgraded to combine the two since then And compound has this very careful listening process where they list only one time. They do a risk review. They do all the stuff and Linda was a lot more aggressive in all of the assets that the added and one of the assets they added was this. Did you see and the reality is that people knew about this. We entrance the attack since at least June last year. Actually I think opens Zeppelin security research firm actually published an open source version of this exploit. That could actually worked against SLOP. This is back in June last year. So people you talked to anybody security. They know that this is a problem. So what happened was on April. Eighteenth us what was attacked twenty four hours later almost the dot it attacker started draining the lendup contract okay. You can think about this. As though basically the attacker is fooling this compound like protocol into thinking that they have more and more collateral than they really have and so if they're putting a little bit of collateral they can sort of double or triple eight quadruplet and they keep doing that over and over again taking bigger and bigger loans until eventually they take out a loan the size of off the money in the pool and By the end of about four hours of repeatedly iterating on draining money out of the pool the entire pool of Linda was empty and the attacker made off with twenty five million. Yeah so for people who are not with that attack. I'll just describe it briefly and also I just wanted to say the swap hack From the day before was a loss of three hundred thousand dollars but essentially the way this reinsuring reinsurance seat attack works is that it's like if you were to go to a bank teller and say. I want to withdraw one hundred dollars and your account has one hundred and five dollars within it. Then they'll give you your hundred dollars and then normally they would give it to you and then update your balanced five dollars but in this case with this contract does is. It's able to interrupt the teller at that point and requests the one hundred dollars again and because the balance in your account hasn't been updated five dollars. The bank teller thinks that you still have one hundred dollars like enables you to take out one hundred dollars again in. That's essentially how the these funds were siphoned from the Dow and from Linda me and you know these other and UNICEF Bob It's just like a small amount every time but it just keeps going in the smart contracts like matic and it works very quickly so one thing that I wanted to ask you about also was if the reinsurance vulnerability was known about with your c seven seven's from a year back then. Why haven't all the different smart contracts that might be vulnerable upgraded like an also weirdly? Why would it take somebody so long to even exploited if it was known for all this time? It's that's a great question It's it's sort of you know. People have this kind of efficient market hypothesis. Thing in defy that like well everybody in the world can see all these contracts and all the information is out there therefore the moment. That's something vulnerable is on May net. It should get hacked. And of course we see that. That's not true right. It takes some time for somebody to kind of put all the pieces together so a year ago it was known and security experts everywhere note. Seven has this issue. But you know it's like okay. Maybe the nine months or ten months later. Nbc's in Europe seven seven seven and they list on their own unions while pool. It's not that big yet and not many people in the West know what. Nbc is right And so it sort of takes some time for these things to get remembered an integrated in the right way that people realize like. Oh yeah there. There was at attack from a year ago. The real question in my head was it took twenty four hours after the use while pack for Linda for somebody to put the pieces together. Like oh I can do this to lend up as well And Try to imagine you know. There are a bunch of people probably looking. For what else can I do? What sort of a copycat attack that I can. Do you remember the Bee ex HAC? We saw a copycat attack like just a day later doing the same fundamental kind of thing with fresh loans against the asks. The same thing we saw today but it took a whole day for that attack number two to happen and I have to imagine. Somebody was like practicing. They were playing around with it. They were making sure the attack wasn't exactly the same. There are some different details. In how exactly that you contracts are set up but the overall problem was the same that the contract did not the contract allowed itself to get interrupted mid execution with another contract call. And that's the fundamental issue of re entrance fee that you have to avoid to fix this

Linda NBC China West Bob It I. Nbc Spur Pool Unicef BTC Multi Coin Capital Ambi Devers Founder Mendel Yang Europe
Tom Preston-Werner: Building Full-Stack JS Apps with Redwood.js

Full Stack Radio

5:58 listening | Last month

Tom Preston-Werner: Building Full-Stack JS Apps with Redwood.js

"Jaaz is indeed an attempt to build a full stack framework for Java script and to really deploy it in a service way. So that's one of the primary tenants that we have is build it end to end with Javascript and deployed to server list environment. To give you the advantages of the scale that that can bring as well as the global distribution that that can bring so one thing that we say about redwood is that its edges ready and by that we mean all of the different parts of redwood should be able to operate on the edge once technology plays out a little bit more. This is not entirely true today. But really we're building redwood today with an eye to the future so redwood is not yet fully realized but the idea is that if we start today with the idea that some of these technologies will exist in the way that we want them to in say a year. Then we'll be there when the technology is ready instead of technology existing first and then coming in and saying Oh let's take advantage of this and then it takes another year or more to built for it. It's like the way that game. Programmers build their games for the hardware that will exist. Yeah when they release. We're doing the same thing but with web technologies supplying some bets that Some of the tooling that you kind of need to kind of make this thing work the way you you believe has. The potential to work are going to exist You know in the near Ish Future. Yeah absolutely and so I. I can dive into those just real quick to go over them. So as hard as the edge readiness goes so the whole point redwood really is to take advantage of GM stack architecture. And so you start with the client which ends up being a react based javascript client that can be delivered statically so before we even like go even further there. I think it'd be interesting to kind of touch on some of these kind of different layers of the stack because he get through and figure out what the opinions are I think even before he talking about the react client. I'm I think a lot of people have sort of a different definition of Jim Stack or different picture in their head of what it means so when you say stack like how do you define that. And what is what is it. And what is it not in your mind? Yeah so I use the term jam stack. Maybe a little bit more loosely than most people today. But it's a bit on purpose. Purposefully trying to push the boundaries of what would be considered gem stack while still being true to the definition so jam stack javascript. Api's markup that's can cover a lot of territory but it really comes with the deployment strategy as well so a big part of the jam stack is the idea that you can push your code to a git repository and that will trigger deploy. And you're basically done and so that's part of Redwood that same idea the same way that you would build a traditionally considered jam stack application today where it's content faced and maybe you're you have a built step and then you push that aesthetic content to a cdn and with Netla fi and others you can have functions. That'll be spun. Up for you redwood operates in exactly that that space and so by Jim Stack. I mean you have Java script that is your primary it flips a little bit. Maybe the J. M. in in aesthetic content based site you're probably going to have mostly static markup and then you're gonNA sprinkle in Java script to interact with Third Party. Api is or maybe an API that you've written yourself in the redwood version of Jam Stack. Which is really the same tall just jam. Stack. You might have more or less of each one of those components so in Redwood you have more javascript so your your front ends up being all react. So it's page APP and you're mark probably ends up being minimal. Though the idea is that you can do pre rendering and have pages. So let's say you're marketing pages or other content pages that are that are suitable for pre rendering that you have a bill phase to do that and then you can push those out like you would in a more traditional jam stack APP Today and the. Api is baked in as part of this stack in that. You're you're going to write your API it would be. It would be a reason that you would choose to use. Redwood is the full integration throughout the stack to use the all of the fancy stuff really nicely integrated really great developer experience that we're producing four the back end as well and this is. This is another difference from a more of a content related. Jim Koch So in my mind what I'm hearing is it sounds like it's like a Jam Saqi framework designed for People Building Bespoke web applications where they need to write a lot of their own custom backend code and they need a place to do that. That hopefully has some opinions and conventions that let's do it in a more productive way maybe like we typically been used to something like rails. Yeah exactly so. We see it as a rails replacement. Yeah Very Cool. Anything you would normally do with rails. We hope that you'll be able to do with redwood the that's the competitor. Is that really the full end to end? Full stack tightly. Integrated includes everything testing like all like the whole database access. Like the whole thing end to end is just use. This stuff used these sorts of technologies together. We've integrated them beautifully. We've created a deployment paradigm that scales very easily and requires almost no intervention and is Java scripts and

Redwood Jim Stack Jaaz Jim Koch GM Third Party People Building Developer
Hilary Stohs-Kraus's journey with Ruby on Rails

Ruby on Rails Podcast

3:42 listening | Last month

Hilary Stohs-Kraus's journey with Ruby on Rails

"I am curious. What is your specific experience with remainder else? So that was the When I was looking at boot camp you know there's so many there's so many different kinds and they all cost different amounts in some are fronton and design somewhere front and back end and really having very hodgepodge tech experience. I didn't know what I wanted and so I I kind of stopped to try to think about it from different instead of like what language WANNA learn. I tried to think like well. What kind of job do I want to have at the end? And I knew I wanted to work with startups. I wanted to work at a small company. I didn't want to work for a bank or an insurance company or anything like that and so then I kind of did some some research on what what are the languages that are used at startups. And then how can I learn that language and I saw a lot of good things about ruby on rails I liked that it was written to or is created. You notice sound kind of English. E again being someone with a writing background that was appealing and And I just really liked what I saw about the community itself so there happened to be a boot camp that taught reveals full stack. That actually one of my really good friends from college was a teacher us and it was in Nebraska. You know kind of like well. I don't really want to go back to Nebraska. I've kind of done that been there done that. I'm sort of looking for something different. He's like Hillary. I think you should just apply go through the interview process. I think I think you'll find. It's a really good fit and I remember in my interview. This is for Omaha Code School which doesn't exist anymore. But I remember my interview the the other instructor Who's Indian American and my friend is Went to high school and They you know he talks about like entry points to marginalize communities and things like that and I was just like this. This is perfect. This is exactly what I want like. This sounds like a really really good fit and I loved my experience. It was a really great program So scan my entry intriguing rails it was. It was deliberate to the extended. It could be given how ignorant I was of most of the tech industry. But I'm really really grateful that that's what I chose because the community has your spend phenomenal and I think especially for for second career folks. Newcomers it's just so welcoming and there's so many resources and everyone seems really willing to help you level up instead of trying to be competitive forcing you to prove yourself. And that's so refreshing so great and it sounds like you and I probably learned to code around the same time for me. Rail three was just starting to turn into rails for and so I was like right on the cusp aware. As I learned code we were learning how to upgrade to rails four and it was very exciting for the community at the time I just remembered the energy around rails for and it was. I felt like I really picked the framework that I was excited. About yeah exactly. We have a a WHO came on board in the fall has been phenomenal. And she studied economics. I think quantitative economics in school and then likewise decided to switch and into doing more tech and she came to ruby through a I think it's called Ruby me. It's the it's where they period with a mentor. New Work on on open source re-budget together remotely and she just loved the experience and and I think that's just a prime example and she's been huge asset to the company is really eager to learn has agree attitude and I think you know it's true that you like attracts like right if you put out really good energy and you're welcoming and you and you build these programs for folks to get into Ruby on rails you're gonNA attract really great people who will then you know further that ecosystem and build upon it and make it even better totally agreed.

Nebraska Omaha Code School Hillary WHO Instructor
Mark Hutter and Rails

Ruby on Rails Podcast

3:20 listening | Last month

Mark Hutter and Rails

"What is your specific experience with rails? How did you get started in it? Are you currently working with it today? I am working with the today. I started in twenty fourteen. And it's pretty much been the only language framework. I've used since then I started you know out of the consulting world I moved more into product companies and I started working at smaller companies. I liked the I like and liked the small company VIBE. Where you you get to touch a lot of things and they were using ruby on rails got hired actually as a Java developer but they had some side rails products and I was working on those things and It really opened my eyes. Just enlighten me to a lot of things. I had this really great co worker. Who was you know your true? Rubia like your tried and true. We all know this person and they loved teaching in explaining and pairing and so I just sit him every day and he would teach me all the things and the rails wants it strips down if anybody's ever had to do Java Development and like you know do a spring configuration of dependency injection in that. Xml file you understand the benefits of like stripping all that away and getting this convention over configuration approach. Because you're able it makes it makes the simple things. Just go away and so you can focus on the harder things and making them simple. Simple more simple problems. So can you tell us about landing including its origin story and technical sack as an apartment owner at honestly? Sounds like a service. I really want to use? Yeah Yeah me too I. I love working for companies that I also want to buy from Really helps motivate you towards the product but we landing started about a year ago Our founders saw some some rough patches in the process of finding equality apartment getting through all the paperwork and getting moved in and moving all your stuff all just seemed taxing so he was trying to devise a solution that would get away from all that so landing offers a membership base leasing model on these network of beautifully furnished apartments across the United States. And they're all like fully equipped linens towels kitchenware Internet. You name it all. The stuff already comes with the unit and we automate away all of the nasty paperwork you kind of fill out. Fill out a one time form upfront with us. The leasing is one hundred percent online. He get freedom to move anywhere within the network available apartments. So we're really trying to change the way people think about apartment living in leasing where you can kinda get this freedom. Get this flexibility and move between cities and states with your suitcase and just be droppin ready. I think that's so awesome. So what does the current and technical stack life? You know. It's a saying it's like you know. Choose choose boring tech quote Unquote Right Boring code quote unquote. So we're a a ruby on rails monolithic application post graph database There's some re there to react. Apps that are talking to the rails. Ap Is there. Are there some view? Some react on the front end but it's mostly traditional rail rails parcells So it's kind of right up the gut.

United States AP Developer
No Code Quarantine

No Code No Problem

2:51 listening | Last month

No Code Quarantine

"Recently had cancel events in New York and it's looking like our event in San Francisco that we were supposed to have is not going to happen now so I wanted to bring you guys a very similar event to the no code summit and what was supposed to be no code Kelly. So I'm bringing you know code quarantine and it is a digital event taking place online and I'm really excited about it. It's going to be a two day. Virtual event taking place on Friday April Twenty fourth and Saturday April Twenty fifth on the twenty fourth. It'll probably be about two hours one and a half hours two hours and then The second event is going to be. I mean as long as you want to stay on really but I'll get more into depth on what those days hold so I will have the link to sign up for free and the description and it's my last pin tweet on twitter and we have two companies confirmed right now for the first day which is Friday and they are builder and Huddle both of which I met the Guy. I met both of those guys in person at our no could summit so I'm really excited for them to come on and talk about what they're building and how it's going to improve the no code space and then I also have two more spots left and discussing the opportunity with a few companies so make sure to sign up and attend the event. If you're just coming to listen and if you are a company and you're looking to participate and sponsor shoot me a DM or email me at no code no problem at GMO DOT com so for what the day's GonNa hold really. Friday is going to be each company which is a maximum of four. They'll have each one twenty minutes to demo their product. Lie for you to show you some things that you can build and then a five minute Q. And a. After so that's going to consist and that is kind of how we did the no code summit as well and but one thing that I really loved about the could summit and that people will love going to events for is the networking right. Like what isn't event without the networking part so on Saturday. In mid day we're going to have a networking event where you'll be able to hop from table to table and introduce yourself and meet other people virtually just like you would at a real life except it'll be you know video video call and you'll have like hover long to discuss what you're building or what the other person's building and you know I really. I'm trying to foster like the sense of community and foster the relationships that you can build in person but do so virtually and that's the tough part but we're gonNA give this a shot no code quarantine so make sure to sign up attend both parts of the event and I really look forward to seeing you guys and meeting you guys. I'll be there both both times so I look forward to talking to you guys. On the twenty four th and then meeting you guys and personal the twenty

Twitter San Francisco Kelly New York
The Developer Origins Story of Adrianna Chang

Ruby on Rails Podcast

5:51 listening | Last month

The Developer Origins Story of Adrianna Chang

"I got into programming pretty late actually computer. Science and computers in general weren't really on my radar growing up. But I did have this love for math and for English. I really liked to write an express myself that way so a little bit later on into high school my parents who are actually both in the tech industry encouraged me to give computer class. A try and I was actually pretty reluctant. I didn't think it sounded very fun. I was picturing a bunch of kids typing ones and Zeros into computers and so yeah I was a bit hesitant But they promise that if I hated it I could drop it and take a different class so I decided to give it a try And to be quite honest I really didn't like it. In the beginning I was the only girl in the class and it seems like I was the only one who had never written code before so I felt pretty out of place But I really liked the teacher He taught me a couple of glasses. And he encouraged me to just stick with it a bit And what really changed things for me. Was this program called Tech Nation. It's this global twelve week program that encourages girls to solve local problems in their community using technology and entrepreneurship so they were bringing it to Ottawa. For the first time they ratio to all the schools in the district Where I was going to school and they said you know if you have a group of girls who might be interested in forming a team and taking part in this like tell them to consider signing up so I ended up taking part in it with some other girls in my grade It was a really exceptional experience for me. It was the first time I got to see female developers You know talking about things. They were excited about it and talking about work that just made them really happy and the problems they were solvent that they were really excited to solve So that was what really changed things for me. It's what made me consider computer. Sciences occur thing Suddenly it wasn't you know coating wasn't about writing little programs to solve math problems. It was this tool that I could use to solve actual problems around we in impacts people around me so I decided to pursue computer science after high school I am urgently from Ottawa here in Canada and I was applying to a bunch of different Canadian universities One of those universities. Carlton which is In Ottawa and it was actually at the time that Carlton was working together with shop vie to develop a work integrated learning program so it was going to involve essentially four years of computer science at Carleton combined with hands on experience as a developer intern at shop. So I had applied to Carlson. Cs program already and they reached out to me and asked if I was interested in applying for this work agreed with learning program. It hadn't even Really been approved by the board yet. It was still kind of being pulled together but shop if I had actually been a sponsor of tech nation and so I was already familiar with them Was Pretty excited about getting to work there? So no hesitation in applying and Yeah I ended up getting selected to take part and the very first cohort of this program which has since been branded dub degree And that's how I ended up at shop it's been a pretty whirlwind experienced since and actually finishing my degree and my time in the program this April and it'll be joining them fulltime in the summer. That is such an incredible story. It's so inspiring and it just seems like you've had a lot of opportunities that have come up that you've taken advantage of and you should be so proud of that. I am curious. So what was the day like for you? Would you be taking university classes during the day at night and then working at Chapel Fai like? How did you balance everything? Yes so the program Basically consists of twenty hours Carleton Thoughts time dedicated to mostly being in like lectures or being into Tourelles And then it's twenty hours a week of work On a team so the way the program is set up. Now there's about eight months to a year of Training and course content So students in the program will essentially be at shop by just learning about kind of the way shop by operates. And what What a developer dies day today? And what kind of workflow looks like And then after that period they get put on a team And at that point they're balancing teamwork and schoolwork So yeah that's that's the way the program operates. It's pretty fun to be. Yeah getting to learn in the classroom but also getting to work on actual problems at a company like shop fi so great so I'm going to take a gas that your first experience with Ruby on rails was when you got to shop with I if so what did you think the first time you saw it. Yes you guessed correctly so yeah I had no experience in rails prior to joining shop five I didn't even really know what rails was but I knew that Shop if I was kind of known for being involved with rails and for being a company that had adopted Rael since its inception almost and nowadays SCHOPF is pretty well known for having this huge rails code base that has managed to scale over the last decade or

Ottawa Tech Nation Developer Carlson Carlton Carleton Rael Canada Intern
Tim Neutkens - Continuing to Innovate with Next.js 9.3

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Tim Neutkens - Continuing to Innovate with Next.js 9.3

"The reason I wanted to have you on. The show is next chess. Nine point three came out recently which Just looking at the version number sounds like it might just be a small incremental change but in practice actually introduces some really kind of paradigm changing features. But the way people use next at least in the way that I understand it so Maybe I think the best place to start would be talking a little bit about the major sort of new editions that came in In nine point three and what they do and then we can just Kinda have some discussions around that. Because there's a lot of questions that I have about that stuff So how do you explain to people? What kind of the major Improvements are in next nine point. Three right so Basically this whole shift started with the release of next nine Ravi released basically Like Firdaus who don't know it next is a framework for react That makes it really easy. To build a web applications Psychos from websites so et CETERA. But from the very first release like the main thing that we focused on was making it really easy to use react but also to use server side rendering unabomb trend ring like every request comes in a a new render the react APP happened server. Sides said that allows you to like optimize for a search engine optimization To like got a foster pain to vie basically like sending the full html on the amount but Starting from next nine we Bisley started focusing on also providing you dislike not rendering only but rendering a dull time so static generation basically Like the first feature that we released to the chief dot is that patients that didn't have blocking data requirements. That you've got initial props. At the time Route to be exported statically medically at built time. The reason for that is if you didn't have a blocking data requirements. The facials already studied goes rerun ring the same thing every time on demand That would obviously like sources Be Slower Etcetera So basically that wasn't optimization so he called it the automatic static optimization And that means that if you don't have block and data requirements it's that yes. So maybe they like to get into that a little bit so people are clear on it at least the way I understand. It is like prior to that feature Basically you are paying like a penalty on any really simple pages Because everything was trying to be rendered the same way so everything was sort of working with this like lowest common denominator. Assuming like Oh we're going to need to be able to make. Api calls to fill in holes on the page before we render it and stuff like that so when we want to render are static marketing page or something. Now that has to go through. This node process on demand. That's going to boot up. React and figure out what the final rendering should be sending back so that where whereas reality. That wasn't necessary because it's never changes between deploys. So why not figure out how to just like cash that on a cdn basically somewhere and have that page delivered instantly? Essentially the people not what you can do as of next nine basically automatically it just detects whether or not you even need kind of run time server side code or not. Yes so basically the Like the example if you took a create very simple yet component that is like your page with like just exporting. Hello will like. Hey Sean will. That's it right Then that would have been rendered on the month for every request that comes in which makes like little sentence of course because It can be Expert Bill Time Using the same rendering as usual just generating steady. Html that can be served from like either a CD or from your Like edge network or something like that And that was like the first like initial step and in Next ONE TREE. Bisley like took that a step further by allowing you to do blocking data requirements so when I say booking day requirements I mean like fetching some posts from like your cms or fetching data from your database or something like that the lobbying you to make those static also so to do that. We introduced get stomach. Drops and get service at props ambitiously. The the way that works is it. Generates it statically adult Means Static Bill type and then get service site. Prompts means you've got the only manned when a request comes in it's rendered so that's mostly what we did before basically But we still like. We went a bit fitter and we made some adjustments in how semantics works says not exactly like get initial props which we had before a main difference is that for example. I should to do like actually call note. Functions like s or like extra set shows or something like that or even direct database We see people experimenting with that. Right now. Like doing a database query inside of gut service props inside of trump's Which is pretty cool. 'cause actually allows you to like get rid of overhead from fetching. Api calls for example like focusing on crops. I basically the way that it wreck says once you export function from page it will generate that page as steady interesting adult time and then If you have dynamic pot segments like Pages block slug for example right like dynamic date. I basically You can actually return. You can export another function that is called pods that Elisha to basically give back the pods left to be rendered adult time and yeah. That's the way directs like in a nutshell But there's a bunch of other optimizations that we did around. That's cool so I think maybe a good place to start would be kind of digging into some of these in. I can ask some questions about them. If that's cool and make sure that Everyone understands exactly kind of a cool benefits that you get from some of the stuff. So the way I understand it gets get static. Props anyways is trying to solve this problem that existed prior to next nine point three not really a problem per se but trying to help optimize for this situation where so next nine introduces disability for things to be automatic automatically statically generated if they don't have any data requirements so like a marketing page. No data requirements can be statically generated. When you try to deploy up thrown on the cdn somewhere goes works instantly but then like sometimes you have these like inbetween pages. I guess that or not like an internal application page to have real time data that needs to be we kind of refashioned every time you refresh the page or whatever but they do have things that change every sort of like Deploy it's possibly so like a good example of what people do a lot of the times with like headless. Cms's now and they want to build like a static output where all the articles are pre generated. But they're still coming from an API or a database at the end of the day it prior to next nine point three. You had to just use the get initial props to get that and that would be calculated every single time but get static. Props is giving you the opportunity to say. Well if you do have data requirements will let you get them once at Bildt's time but then from that point forward we're going to serve as a static pre generated page until you sort of intentionally want to refashion rebuild because like you know that the underlying. Data's changed show really. I guess it's optimizing for for for dynamic data that just changes very infrequently I

CMS Ravi Bildt Elisha Sides Sean Donald Trump