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Don't limit yourself during the job search

My Career Fit

05:56 min | 5 d ago

Don't limit yourself during the job search

"Just applying online. Okay my friends I have been in recruiting for over twenty plus years, and if one thing I have said over and over during my career, when asked for job, search advice, it's that you can't simply apply to jobs and expect to get a callback especially right now with over forty million people who are applying to jobs daily. There is a ton of competition in as I mentioned a last week's episode You have to make it super obvious that you are the best fit for the job. If you want that job search to last and last and last and last, then just keep continuing to rely solely on. You know posting in submitting your resume online. If you WANNA move your search head. Start finding and then building a relationship and a network with the people who actually work at the company that you're interested in. So do things like schedule. Informational interviews with would be peers people. You might work with potential co workers approach maybe even an internal recruiter. For the company and just simply ask you questions you know, get on the radar of the very people who might influence you actually getting an interview, so here's your tip by connecting with people on the inside of the companies that which you want to work, you will instantly set yourself apart like there's not many people who do that. Most people just they see a job online. They read the job description. They hit the apply, and then that's it. They just wait for the automated response and maybe get a call back, maybe they. They don't typically people find jobs because of a referral, we're network, not just applying John Online and in this case, the hiring manager or the decision maker interviews people who come recommended or by way of maybe like a personal referral before they even start sorting through the massive pile of resumes that come in through the company job posting in their all nine applicant tracking system. So what you WanNa do is for example. You are an accountant. You're looking for an accounting job. You see a job on say, Ziprecruiter or and indeed. Read the job description looks like a good fit. You hit the apply. Submit your resume. Fill out the information. Of course you're going to immediately get that email back, saying. Hey, we receive your resume. If you don't hear from US Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah. You know the drill. Here's what you WanNa do at that point. You're going to want to go over to link ten and go into the search bar and you're GONNA type in the company name and you're going to go to that business page, and then from there it's going to tell you generally over to the right and a blue link that there are you know one hundred people that work there are three hundred. Hundred people that work there or fifty four hundred people that work there in May. Enlist people that you might already be connected to that happen to work at that company. So you're click on that link and you're gonNA. pull up all the people that work there and you're going to do a deeper dive in the search and screen that search for other accountants that worked there or just use A. Search term like accounting or finance or whatever it is, and then start looking for people who work in that department work in that division within the company, and then start sending you know invites to connect pb. You can even connect with the hiring manager, so you're going to find somebody you're going to want to connect with. Let's say maybe they accept your connection, but that's about all the amount. The you know that's about all that you get from. Reaching out and making the invite what you WanNa do then is go over to the company's web page. Find their contact information. Make a phone call. And then you'll probably get their automated system or receptions. Ask for the person that you've just connected with, and you're going to want to put maybe a twenty four hour to forty eight hour space between the time. You connect unwilling den and the time that you do this, but then you're going to want to ask for that person. Leave a message, just say hey, so and so we connected on link Danjus recently I recently saw job. Ad For an accounting position that was posted I'd love to chat with you further about the opportunity I think there might be a really good fit here, and of course you can do this, too. If you find hiring manager. Of course that would be the best bet is to look for the hiring manager for this position and see if you connect can connect directly to them. You can also look for. They're actually email. You can use a service like hunter dot Io, where you can type in the web address. For a company and it'll give you the potential email addresses that you could use to try and connect with the hiring manager, and actually cinder resume directly to them. The good news is you know they're not going to be a hopefully at this point. They're not going to be like. Hey, go ahead and just apply online. You can say in your intro that you've already applied to the job and you're really interested in with to learn more about the opportunity, so there's a quick. Quick tip on how to apply and then connect with the right people that might be able to help influence you actually getting into an interview with that first round. You know the recruiter,

John Online Accountant Ziprecruiter
Norah ODonnell, anchor of the CBS Evening News

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:26 min | 6 d ago

Norah ODonnell, anchor of the CBS Evening News

"Today O'Donnell joins us on skin from the couch. She is the anchor and managing editor of the CBS Evening News, making her the third woman ever to so anger, a network evening broadcasts before taking the helm of the evening news. She was the CO host of CBS this morning for seven years norad. Thank you for joining us welcome skin from the couch. Thank you for having me, so we're GONNA. Start off with Skim your resume for us. Will I went to Georgetown University I was Law Sophy Major? I was interested in a lot of different things in college so I had internships at always worked and worked at a law firm I. worked at the World Bank, and and then I injured ABC News and I think you know journalism really was what was the right fit for me? Just a deep curiosity about the news, deep curiosity about world events and people have to graduating from college I got a job at National Journal on a publication, a called the hotline, which was the original kind of aggregate her of news before the Huffington. Post and others got into the business of aggregating news. Even like you guys in some way, remember it well, and that also was like a crash course in politics, too, because we would. Sum Up every Senate and House race across the country, all the polling who all the key consultants were, so that really was a great crash course in politics, and then I got hired at NBC and MSNBC when I was twenty five years old to be you know it was one of the youngest correspondents at NBC history, and had a great career at NBC and had three kids, and then we all work on intelligent news underwear like personal services contracts. All of us have anywhere from two to five year contracts. In, so you know in each of those contracts, come up! You have an opportunity to reevaluate your next step and CBS came to me with an incredible offer to be. The chief White House correspondent for Obama's last term, and to be the substitute anchor for face, the nation, and I had always been ambitious about wanting to anchor a Sunday broadcast I love politics, and so to be able to substitute for the legendary Bob Schieffer at thought. This is really an an excellent opportunity, so. and. CBS. News and then Kinda. The rest is history should I keep going? No, that was perfect so something you definitely don't know I. and turned at MVP when I was nineteen in the specials unit, and I was like my first week on the internships. Let's say day two or three in you opt into the office. And you're the first professional famous news anchor I ever seen in person and I literally I stopped breathing I was so excited all I wanted to do is to be a news anchor at the time, and I was so nervous, and when you walked out of the room I asked one of the producers. What is she liked you work with her I will never. Never forget their like she's the best of the best, and I was like what makes her so good. And they said that she always does her homework and I think about that a lot and I'm curious. What is something that you your fans and people like us your big fans? What does the thing that we don't know about you that we can't Google? What I wasn't as good about doing my homework in college. And I did just fine at Georgetown. But I do I think certainly a professional that is dry. Always did know my homework because I do believe that preparation builds confidence and confidence build success, and so for me, you know certainly early on my career as a young correspondent with so many famous people at NBC legendary careers. My confidence wasn't a tie, and so I thought how can I be the smartest person in the room and no more than anybody else and. You know I just really did my homework. I really worked really hard to make sure I knew everything. The thing that people may not know about me. You Know I. Guess would be that I'm from a military family. You know I mean that certainly is my resume, but it's the one thing I mentioned because you know I remember in covering certainly the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after nine eleven, a lot of people would say on television and Mike Barnicle on morning. Joe would say this a lot that Oh, no less than one percent of people have someone in the military who didn't understand these wars, but I grew up in the military. My father was drafted during the Vietnam War. State for thirty years I lived overseas and so I really do have a deep appreciation for those who serve my sister-in-law surgeon in the army and so I do have a really keen sense of the sacrifice that many people go through, and I do in some ways I almost wish that it was mandatory almost like in Israel that we had to sir because. I think you know certainly the discipline that they have is unlike anything I've seen those who sir. Let's actually start with that because I think it's fascinating talking about how you grew up and living overseas. How did this love of news and growing up with that military background kind of come together for you? You know I think one of the. First crystallized for me in some ways when Elena, Nachman Ost, who is still the vice president of talent at NBC? News said to me when I met her. When I was twenty five years old, and she said you know we like hiring correspondents who have from a military background, because they're very flexible and adaptable. They don't complain about being sent to different cities or states or around. Around the world they can talk to anybody because they've sort of been put in that situation where they have to be totally adaptable. Moment's notice

NBC Cbs Evening News CBS Abc News Georgetown University O'donnell Managing Editor Chief White House Corresponden National Journal Bob Schieffer World Bank Google Barack Obama Georgetown MVP Huffington Mike Barnicle
Four tips for navigating a shutdown, turnaround or outage successfully

The Main Column

04:54 min | 6 d ago

Four tips for navigating a shutdown, turnaround or outage successfully

"Project management for Tips for navigating a shutdown turnaround or outage successfully. In the oil and gas sector, managing a shutdown turnaround, or even an outage is an unavoidable requirement. These projects are complex with multiple stakeholders focused on limiting the time. Assets are offline with zero tolerance for safety incidents organization start with the vision to minimize risk ensure operational excellence in ultimately remove uncertainty for maintenance decisions, organizing and executing an efficient cost, effective and safe shutdown. Shutdown and turnaround delivers a significant competitive advantage so getting it right is essential. Avoiding unnecessary downtime is mission critical for owners and operators, the keys to success down to three critical components, people, process and technology crucial steps ensure that a shutdown turnaround or outage event makes a positive rather than a detrimental impact to the bottom line and sets up a facility for repeat success. Planning a successful Sto requires significant time and investment in the planning and scoping stages. This detailed activity is called front end loading. It is vital that the plan and schedule are comprehensive and designed to prevent potential negative consequences adhering to a discipline process is critical to ensure that nothing derails the Te'o kicking off. The project on time is essential, but not easy to achieve as it requires years. Of Advanced, Planning Sto's should be approached with the mantra. Expect the unexpected and plan accordingly, despite how detailed your plan is or discovery, work always occurs. If this work is not accounted for it will impact priorities and the critical path, often resulting in a project, running late and over budget in the oil and gas industry. Any extended downtime can run into millions of dollars with so many external factors implant impacting an sto plant operators must assume that problems will be encountered. Building a contingency into the plan will prevent the STO from being derailed when the inevitable hurdle appears. As part of the planning process time should be allocated for detailed project evaluation, which will help, inform and shape the next cycle if such an evaluation not performed in the same problems may be repeated during the next event. The people factor invest in external expertise. Sto's require large teams, and the makeup of the group is crucial driver of success. Typically, these events are a very specialized activity that happened every five years on average mature organizations, such as Shell and BP have access to teams with a wide array of experience in running these events across their organizations. However, the vast majority of providers lack this knowledge base or personnel power, so adding external expertise is vital an integrated team consisting of highly skilled specialists who helped plan direct and support. The internal team is the right model to adopt when it comes to selecting external. Refiners? Often pick the cheapest option without ensuring that they are bringing in the right set of skills and expertise. Another way they cut costs is to limit the timing of the specialist contractors, keeping them out of the critical planning stage or the project evaluation step were key learnings are determined in the long-term adopting these approaches will drive up costs. External expertise should be approached as a strategic investment rather than an operational overhead. Human Intelligence Bridge. The knowledge gap qualified. Sto leaders are a scarce commodity so structured training should be used to share their knowledge and expertise within the organization throughout the project, due to the length of time between each sto at a refinery, there is risk of investing people that then move onto new projects, taking the knowledge with them, capturing and sharing knowledge throughout the duration of the project is critical. Peer reviews are another way of sharing knowledge and learning from other refineries within the organization. The demographics of teams often add to the knowledge transfer challenge project teams usually consist of a mix of highly skilled workers close to retirement age alongside people that are at the start of their careers. This gap experience is profound inputs further pressure on the need to transfer knowledge. The oil and gas sector is grappling with this generational issue across the globe. All technology is not created equal. Technology is another vital component of successful sto. It plays a critical role when it comes to utilizing the findings and data to replicate the success in future cycles, it is not enough for a company to digitize all its information. The technology deployed must break down data, silos and help facilitate the of knowledge between teams. A technology platform should be selected that his fit pervert purpose and future proved Sto's are complex of that require a mix of scarce skills and a disciplined approach coupled with state of the art software by the tips outlined. Organizations will be on a path to optimizing the cycle.

STO Human Intelligence Bridge Shell BP
Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

07:46 min | Last week

Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

"I'm not by background attack person I come from a liberal arts background I studied politics in languages at university, and I was fascinated in international affairs I was always interested in history and politics. And that developed into a into a study of international relations, so I I studied. To universities in the UK Newcastle, which is in the north of England, and a Master's degree at Bristol University in the south and it was really. While? I was at Bristol that I developed. An interest in joining the foreign, Service Exams for the for the Foreign Service while I was at university there and I joined the British Foreign Office in in one, thousand, nine, hundred eight, and that took me on a fascinating professional journey, had the opportunity to study Arabic while I was in the Foreign Office and that took me to the Middle East. where I I had a couple of postings. Including some time spent his adviser to UK and US military forces during the war in two thousand and three, and over the course of my my government career over the course of my Foreign Office career I increasingly focused on national security issues. So you know things like counterproliferation, counterterrorism and Cybersecurity, and so that that really took me sort of further towards the the work that I now do but really my my leap into startup space, and and the work that we now do with with cybersecurity companies that was that was triggered towards the end of my government service, I spent a couple of years as an adviser. Downing, street a prime. Minister's Office that was two thousand ten eleven twelve, and around that time there were number of reviews taking place into UK national security, and that flowed some very interesting work around cybersecurity as a as a tier, one, a national security threat, and and you know I I was involved in some of that work. And after leaving, government decided to to make it one of the things that I would focus on. And so, what are you involved with today? What is your day to day like these days? Well since two thousand fifteen with my co-founder grace, cassie, who was another friend of mine from Foreign Service Days A. WE wanted to put in place. A way to support entrepreneurs. In the! Early days of establishing a cybersecurity company we had seen in our time. In government that the this was one of the most important. Challenges and opportunities of of the of the of the decade and we felt that weren't really any. Systems or structures in place to provide the support that was needed. This is fascinating complex area of technology and business, and while there were united some fantastic institutions in the UK there were already a number of significant companies operating this space. We couldn't see the number of innovative new companies emerging that we that we expected to say on the E. found in in somewhat more mature ecosystems like the US, and and to some extent Israel, so we started, Ceylon and Ceylon was A. In early days and experimental accelerator modeled to some extent on programs like Y combinator, but dedicated to Cybersecurity, so we initially Ranna three month program in London, and it's really grown from there and over the last five years we've. We've run ten programs in London and four programs in Singapore and we've had with one hundred companies come through those programs, and so we we spend our. We spend our day odd as in running those programs finding and supporting those entrepreneurs, and then, and then continuing that that support once they leave the program. Can you give us some insights on the state of Cybersecurity and entrepreneurship there in the UK? Yeah well I think it's developed. significantly certainly over the the ten years. That we've been really focusing on this and. Definitely we've seen that. Over the five years we've been running ceylon there really wasn't a a community of of of cybersecurity startups here in the UK back in in the first part of the last decade. We we've helped to capitalize that community here, and there is now a thriving startup ecosystem right across the range of technologies, but definitely in cybersecurity. And I think there are now there are some really quite successful companies that have been set up and developed here over the past five years, and it's now very much part of a a broader technology system here in the UK. And part part of the reason for that is that? The UK has a good reputation in this space, but it's also a a good place to to set up a business if you'll from somewhere else It's been a draw for talent. globally and we certainly saw that in in cybersecurity. We could see the talent. In cybersecurity was was very much distributed around the world. It wasn't just an isolated pockets, and and we found in. Many people wanted to come and. Join our program and get the business started in the UK, and as a result there now you know tens, if not hundreds of of interesting small companies in this field. Is there, even a geographic advantage of of being where you are. I'm thinking you're sort of you. Know equidistant to S- to some of the other important centers of cybersecurity. There's no question. I think you know. Greenwich Meantime has been a competitive advantage for the UK in many different areas of a of business and finance. Over the centuries I think it gives us a genuine advantages being as you say, in time term sort of equidistant between. The economies of the of the of the Americas and those of The Middle East Asia, and that definitely that definitely helps you know having the the economies of Europe on on our doorstep, and you know the last forty years at least strong connections to those economies has been helpful. London has been a melting pot for anybody trying to start a business seek finance and I. Think you know the world the world does come to London or at least it did until we were hit by the pandemic I. Think it will nonetheless emerge from the current crisis is one of the world's great global cities, and and so you know geography masters in Business and certainly been helpful to the development of the cyber ecosystem here.

UK British Foreign Office London Ceylon United States Foreign Service Bristol University Newcastle Greenwich Meantime Counterproliferation Co-Founder England Singapore Middle East Asia Europe Middle East. Israel Americas Grace
Carmen Rita Wong, author, host, and financial expert

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | Last week

Carmen Rita Wong, author, host, and financial expert

"Hey everyone. The show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the skin is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today we are very excited. Carmen reader Wong joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Malakand productions. She's also an author and the former host and Co creator of on the money on CNBC she spent years as a personal finance expert for NBC CBS. And CNN and she's written for publications including Glamour. Latina essence and good housekeeping, and in a very big full circle moment she was also carly's boss. At one point Carmen, we are very excited to talk to you. Welcome your skin from the couch, also good to be with you guys. This is very full circle for me. My very first job right out of college was as a production assistant at CNBC for new show called on the money, and I was there for about two weeks when I think somebody jobs one day, somebody came to me in. They're like you actually your job titles changing. Carmen's personal assistant. Good luck. To check. Back and like go theater sheets, anything for lunch very quickly currently under her wing, and it's amazing that we are still in touch today. I'm so excited to have you here. I'm so excited to be here. Those were the days right. Oh my gosh of you sitting just off the camera when we're on the set. general. I still high. You take all your your hamburger, your water your coffee. I got down hot and it's. Certainly was not divis- at all because it was one of those things where I was working as we'll talk. I'm like jumping ahead like twenty. Our date I mean nonstop seven days a week so carleen literally keeping me alive. We're GONNA get into all of this, but I will say you are one of the hardest working people I have ever known so I. Am very excited to share your story, so we're going to start with the question. We like to ask everybody. Which is Skim your resume? Gone how about this I don't have a resume. Here really I mean not that I don't think I have one. State, but like you've had one at different times you. Working for myself fifteen year whatever many years it was, so I haven't had to pull one together in more than a decade. You become a bio Danielle you did. You did a great introduction in so many things I've been a magazine editor, a TV host and writer and producer and a faculty professor author I'm Working Fifth Book. I'm an investor in women led companies, and I am a board member for some big nonprofits, which I love that work to so all of it. What something that isn't in the bio and we can't Google about you that people should know oh girl. You think I'm GonNa tell you that. Google. Wade Carly anything you know you did not read I think one thing that people like maybe John. Know about us like you're I, mean. Maybe they're hearing now, but you are very funny like you're very good sense of humor, and you're very good under pressure. Thank you yeah I'm freaking rock under pressure, but that doesn't mean I mean. You may not see what's happening inside, but yeah, I'm a goofball can't google at I mean there's some pretty funny pictures of me. Still shots that people take if you google made them. That's the one thing that going forward. It'd be nice to show people more, but as people who do know me like. Carly knows me off camera. Yeah, I'm a goofball. You are all right. We're GONNA get into this. This which if we talk about people's Childhood in? Toss how you grew up, but I think you are very. Guests were like your childhood is really really important to get into and kind of the family dynamic. You grew up with and how that folded over time and you're somebody who learned a lot about your family. As you got older, so I want to let you can share your story. I will just start off by saying you were born in New, York and then West. Those uptown Manhattan. I was I, actually did a story on the moth. Right, which is on the podcast as well a bit about what you alluded to there about finding out only last year that I have no idea who my father is, so that's a whole thing, but I grew up with two fathers. Up with the father named after hoppy Wong, and then I grew up with my stepfather, had a very very strong mother Dominican mother, who emigrated when she was fifteen, and we lived in Uptown Manhattan, and my brother, and my older brother, and I were the walls, but she eventually divorced, and we moved to New Hampshire. And that was a real shock for us a very big culture shock

Founder And Ceo Carmen Google Wade Carly Cnbc Wong CNN Manhattan Malakand Productions NBC Production Assistant York New Hampshire Personal Assistant Danielle CBS Editor John Writer
How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

Learn to Code with Me

05:32 min | Last week

How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

"Went through all this work in effort to become a pharmacist. And then you left pharmacy like you know got a job after you laugh, too. So what led to that like? Regis defined it as fulfilling, or you just were very excited by software, engineering or Yeah! That's a good question. Yeah spent maybe like. Five six years in an industry including education. I think. The more. That's really monroe for me when when I made that program to all the made finding prescription due dates. Preceding that that's program. Bring down the task for like two hours to less than the second. I. I can't tell you how amazing that was. Like it was so painful just looking through every specialty. Bro And finding that but being able to do that in just in just a short program. I thought that this is. This definitely I wanNA. Do in the future. Yeah. That's really cool and. You wrote that I program. What language technology re using some also thinking? Aren't there a lot of? Regulations like in pharmacies like imagine with their computers like things you can and can't do. So Dea it. They have lots of obstruction on the computer, but this was just a local, so I wrote it in Python and there's a local script. It didn't require any. External. dependencies in I didn't look for any other API's so I I just donald a spreadsheet file from our local pharmacy software and plug that into the firm Python program, and the on saw local, and there's nothing to worry about on security side. Gotcha I'm just laughing. Because I'm like imagining like in other jobs or other professions, you could just bring the work home with you, but it's like you can't just bring home like people like I'm sure. It's like sensitive data. Right that you're working with. Other. Same last name address and everything's all there, so you can't really take home, but. You're able to do it at the at the pharmacy while you're working and all that. Yes, keep it to that story, Yeah! Just for context for myself in the listeners. How long ago is this like when you first started coating when you're still working as a pharmacist? How many years ago at this point or pretty recent? Yes Oh. It's Today is the first. One full year that I've been at this company, and then the MRI her I saw been working. suffered the bubble for two years now. Yeah and I think I started just in these in opponent projects. Three years ago. So took me about a year to get. Re Yeah, yeah, exactly like you said about a year when I was working as pharmacists to feel comfortable to looking for a job, and I've been working as a developer for two years gotTa, and then how long were you pharmacist for? Awesome for two years, oaks about the same now right like seeing amount of work experience from pharmacy to announce a software developer torture. Gotcha okay, so we just got your background with the pharmacy in in all of that and your first job. which now you're not there. You're working at a SYNTECH company, right? Cool, so were you planning to work in Fintech? That sort of just come about because I feel like. Some of your experience would be really helpful in like a med tech kind of industry. Yes so that's that's another good question. So the eighty first company went down I. Actually had to go through a job, looking process and actually interested in metallic. How tap that sort of thing because? I thought okay, I do have A. Background there and that interest there, but the thing was when I started the appointees. I met second how companies they required. Either a lot of suffer experience or a lot of research, clinical experience and I had. Neither. So it was difficult to to get into that soul, I started looking into other companies that I thought I had a shot at and this company turned out to be a great fit for me. Go for Culture Wise, and also lies got it. That's interesting about the clinical experience. Research experience at the health. Tech MIDTECH. Quick Sino, could you? Is there a difference between those two things? I love talking about like the different sectors technology. Is There A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MED? Tech in health tech. Some people police Actually I don't think there really is a difference in my point of view. Yeah, I, mean I. Don't know I. I was asking I was like. Okay. Could be medicine, maybe or to the health could be like me. Look physiotherapy or something. Yeah, yeah, that's a good point. Maybe helps more broad. YEA like. Fitness APP or something, or like the thing I always get commercials for Num num the weight loss. You know talking about Donald State. Have as many on I have Hulu, Hulu live TV, and I swear like. Every break! There's a new commercial which is like I guess it's an APP that uses psychology to help you lose weight, but I feel like that's kind of like I guess it was developed by. Doctors by must be yet like health. More. Health Tech

Donald State Hulu Monroe Regis Fintech Software Developer Developer Sino
The role of a leader in removing anxiety.

Hacking Your Leadership

05:01 min | 2 weeks ago

The role of a leader in removing anxiety.

"On Instagram at hacking your leadership and leave us review on itunes. Or for this week's episode I WanNa talk about leadership anxiety. Not, anxiety, from a diagnosis standpoint, rather a philosophical one. Virtually, no one can say they've never felt anxious. Anxiety is simply a realization that a person has free will. Because with free will comes the ability to make decisions that either get us closer to where we WANNA. Go or take us further away from where we WANNA go. We all know someone who seems to self sabotage. These people subconsciously eliminate their options because the very existence of options is too much to handle. If you only have one option, the anxiety of potentially making a wrong decision goes away. I once read that really great parents understand a core paradox of parenting that you are one hundred percent responsible for how your children turn out, and that you accomplish this by teaching them that they are one hundred percent responsible for how they turn out. And I really believe this applies to leadership to great leaders. Hold themselves one hundred percent responsible for the outcomes of their teams, while simultaneously feeling no responsibility for the choices made by their people. And I know what you're thinking. Really a great leader as someone who feels no responsibility for the choices made by their people absolutely, but you can't just take that second part by itself. It goes hand in hand with the first part, which is holding themselves one hundred percent responsible for the outcomes of their team. So think about what this means and why these people really feel any anxiety in their roles as leaders. I what does it mean to micromanage someone and mighty some leaders micromanage? Micromanaging leader is simply someone who tries to control every aspect of the job of someone reporting to them. These leaders incredibly high anxiety, many of them absolutely take one hundred percent responsibility for the outcomes of their teams, which is good, but they also take one hundred percent responsibility for the choices made by their people, and the surest way to reduce the anxiety that comes along with that is to make those decisions for their people, hence the micromanaging. Employees were micromanaged aren't typically happier engaged, but they also don't feel any anxiety over making the wrong decision because they don't really get to make any decision. The actions of their leader freeze them from any anxiety, but they're also deprived from any sort of growth or development. Conversely there are leaders were about as far from micromanaging. It gets they other people to take projects and run with them to feel empowered to feel trusted, and this works really well when things work well when the outcomes are good, but their lack of involvement in the choices made by their people allows them to feel no responsibility for the outcomes of their teams, these are the leaders that allow people to fail and then blame them for the failures. have. You ever seen a team in a corporate environment. Go from superstar status to virtually imploding in a very short period of time. Accolades and opportunities for everyone on the team riding high on fantastic outcomes, and then suddenly complete disengagement and high turnover. Look to the leadership. They undoubtedly allow their people to take the fall for a poor result rather than owning that outcome themselves. So how does the leader do both? How does the leader take one hundred percent responsibility for the outcomes of their team while simultaneously feeling no responsibility for the choices made by their people. It starts an acknowledgement of how people are motivated to make good choices. It isn't done with techniques exercises. It happens when leader show personal risk and vulnerability. The best way to know if you can trust, someone is to trust them, but nothing is as empowering was free to employees than the knowledge that they have the freedom to grow and to fail without significant personal risk to themselves. That you as their leader have decided to take on that responsibility for them, because the anxiety that comes with that responsibility can limit their potential. The feeling that they are responsible for the outcomes of the team is constraining, and it usually leads to a lack of risk-taking, no matter how thoughtful or planned, it might be. But when employees feel the freedom of being able to make their own choices combined with the knowledge that their leader is shouldering the responsibility of the outcome, the vast majority of employees earn it in their actions. They inherently fill the void left by you, taking the responsibility of the outcomes with an enormous sense of responsibility to you, their leader and a desire not to let you down. That's who people are. That's what people do when you're action. Show them their trusted. They earned the trust. You've already given them. Now here's where the anxiety part comes in think about the last time you thought responsible for a business outcome, a number on a scorecard, an important metric for increasing profitability. Think about what he felt like. Feel it for a minute. Now, think of the last time he felt responsible to another person to a relationship the last time he didn't WanNa, let a person down because you valued their opinion of you. How did that feel? Different right. The first one feels out of your hands like you're at the mercy of forces beyond your control, while still responsible for them, the second feels totally within your control, still a deep feeling of responsibility but one that leaves you knowing what you have to do. It might still be hard. You're in control of it. If your leader, people try to stop thinking of yourself as someone whose job it is to own the decisions of your people and instead focus on making sure your people are acutely aware of the freedom. They have to make their own decisions. The real growth that takes place, both in that employees as well as in your relationship with them happens in the moments when they fail, and they see you

Interview With William Hill

Revision Path

05:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With William Hill

"All right, so tell us who you are, and what you? So, my name is William Hill some people may know me as MJ mostly for people who've known me like for a long time. But most senior software engineer currently at new relic now before we get more into what you do, and your background and everything. This is a question that I've been asking. You know guests I guess for the past few months now for the show, but like we're recording this now in the middle of a global health pandemic. So how are you holding up with all? All this going on I'm doing about as well as to be expected. It hit at a really I mean it's never an opportune time for global pandemic right, but it had a pretty it offered to tie for me because I already accepted the job in new relic, so was like basically transitioning between two jobs, and I had planned to have six weeks off. You know starting at new relic, so I was GONNA. Have all these plans I was going to travel? I had like two conferences. I was GONNA speak. It already had tickets a couple of NBA Games. I was GONNA like go through all this stuff. And you know obviously none of that happened so but just kind of sitting back relaxing. You know since I was fun employees for several weeks at the beginning of the pandemic, so it just kind of caused me to slow down for a little bit and. Capone from video gaming. What is it like kind of being unemployed because I know that like folks are in various states of working or not working unfortunately. During this time, but what's it like in that transition stage with all this is happening right now. It was a little nerve wracking on going into it, because like I said at already accepted the job before the pandemic really started to the curve released to ramp up. So like I said I had all these plans with my employment that I was looking forward to doing it was going to be because it's so rare as an adult to of get time off. Tear voluntarily getting time off knowing that. Hey, I already got something else lined up, so let me take some time off. Just kind of breast recharged and have some fun. So going into it. It was like Oh. This is going to be great, but then it quickly turned into like a nerve wracking experience, because I'll say I'm leaving a very very stable job and you know, keep an eye on the news keeping an eye on the at blind and stuff like that where I'm seeing all these technically also just layoffs in general crap. They you know I'm going to a new job. I don't WanNa. Be like you know the last hired and first fire so. I kept having conversations with my. Who's going to be my new manager and I was like Yo. Like is our house. You're looking. Because I've lived this other job which was pretty stable. I was already set up. You know to work from home with them, but I didn't want to take that leap in these strange times, and then get the accidentally in. There'd be left without a job. Yeah, I mean that's a hundred percent fair. A very fair invalid feeling I mean granted with the way that they've just sort of check out with the pandemic you have industries like the service industry you know restaurants bars, but also hotels and things of that nature like in the hospitality industry that are suffering from this, but tech is also having big cuts. Was Reading the other day about Uber lift having pretty big cuts. I know Airbnb just laid off like a large, I think most of their design team like It's affecting a lot of industries in different ways, and so that's a a really kinda valid point. Did they SORTA? Reassure you that like you were fine like we hire you. You're good. Don't worry about it. They! Did they kind of you? Know says they are already a public company. They kind of share with me. Manager kind of share with me. The financials the with me that he could. And even just the nature of their business motto. Me To believe I would be okay. Yeah, because their whole thing is application performance monitoring, so you kind of think of a large large ECOMMERCE, large streaming site, or something like that they will use new relic service to monitor the health of their application, the health of their servers. You know high performance is and stuff, so everyone being stuck inside that leads the people you know doing virtually everything online now whether it's streaming whether it's shopping or whatever. Their business model actually Kinda Linda itself to more people being online and dealing with larger amounts of web traffic. Once I kind of thought about it from that perspective. I'll say. This actually if I was going to go to a company, that's probably the business model of company. I will want to go to during these times where there's GonNa. Be a heavily increased traffic on the web yeah. Also I mean it's good on them for being open and transparent with you about financials. A lot of companies do not do that. At all, so that's good that they are being upfront about that with you. Yeah, because I was nervous, man like I can imagine that's that's a scary feeling. Yeah, because I had everything pretty stable in my at my previous job. You know I was leading a team there. Yeah, you know that will head a government job yeah man. Like. I was I was I stayed if ever wanted to. Retirement about. But yeah. I was like I wanted I was looking forward to making the leap and I'd already kind of accepted a job before everything happened, but man. The world changed in a blink. Yeah.

New Relic Software Engineer NBA William Hill Airbnb Wanna Capone
Colin Mulholland

Hacking Your Leadership

01:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Colin Mulholland

"On this episode I WanNa Recognize Colin Mulholland. Collins. Title is the Enterprise Change. Management Global Practice leader of change healthcare. Colin has some great posts. On his Lincoln page, it has been a guest on a few podcasts sharing his views on Change Management Co, creating shared vision, aligning goals and embedding continuous feedback. I appreciate counts thoughts on how to have a systemic approach to creating efficiencies while including the voice of the employees and customers I also appreciate his definition of a system as the shared behaviors, beliefs and sumptious of a team, and that anyone on the team is in the system. In recent posts Colin shared and I quote when we show up with a willingness to listen openness to learn encouraged to co create together. We are better when we attempt to coerce or change others we are doomed to lose trust, and our best will not be accomplished. Grateful to learn from a comprehensive approach by Michelle, Kim to navigate during traumatic times key takeaway know that your team will remember your compassion, but they will also remember your silence. So. I highly recommend checking collins content in as usual is the links to is linked in profile in the episode notes Great Job Colin and thanks for helping others to Hashtag be a better leader.

Colin Mulholland Change Management Co Collins Global Practice Michelle Lincoln KIM
Elevate Others

Hacking Your Leadership

04:05 min | Last month

Elevate Others

"My name is Mary or race, and you're listening to the hacking. Your leadership podcast guests series by Bam The most impactful leader or mentor, my life has been Akbar Sheikh and the reason he has been the most impactful because when I started my entrepreneurial journey, he taught me that make more give more giving back to the world. What's most important so when he does succeed? And we're talking success financially. He takes a portion of that a percentage of everything he earns, and he gives back to the world whether it's giving eyesight to children or building wells in Africa in villages. Were these children have to walk miles order to drink fresh water? To me, that was the most impactful because it switched how I saw elevating others the movement on creating so it's getting everything that I'm doing I make sure I'm giving back and I'm giving back to the world. The first mistake I made as a leader. And it was the first of many was that. I used politics as a leader rather than being a true leader, so I saw myself as a manager I did not see myself as a leader. I think a true leader. Help. People grow rather than telling them what to do. So at a very early age, became a leader at twenty six years old, running into international trading desk and I did it I. The biggest mistake was that I did not put the power in the people who were working on my team. Rather I was using politics to use them against one another to see who could excel further and faster and bring more revenue into the table once. I realized that mistake. That's when I realized what a truly did was. The difference between a good leader and a great leader I. Think a good leader, a mediocre leader because good is mediocre A good leader is more of a manager. A manager is someone who tells people what to do. A leader is someone who is GONNA stand in front of everybody and take them on the journey and elevate them and put them on that path to success. Whatever success means to them that leaders be in the front of the pack. They are not going to be in the back telling. Telling people what to do, they are going to show their show. By example sharing the stories sharing the fail failures, a great leader should never be afraid to talk about their failures or the failures of the team as a whole, they should come together and look at it as a learning experience, and a truly understands that the people that are on their team. They are going to make mistakes. They are going to have failures, but a true leader. GonNa turn that into a learning experience and help them grow. How do I measure success? There are two types first off. If we look at it in in the business world or in the entrepreneurial world, it's people take ownership when people take ownership of their wins and take ownership of their failures and correct that to me that is that is everything that's where success truly lies. When people take responsibility for everything they're doing whether it's for an organization for themselves or for team. Now we can also look at it. I'm a father. I have three beautiful daughters. How do I measure their success? I measure their success by. Are they doing the things are truly passionate about. Are they acting in a way where they're spreading love to the world, and they're taking care of other people. They're being compassionate. They're practicing empathy if they're doing those things and they're and they're truly living their life with passion purpose. Then, I know I've done something right, and they are doing something right because they are no longer going to exist. They are truly going to live and live a fulfilled life.

Akbar Sheikh Africa
How an English Professor Became a Front-End Web Developer with Bekah Hawrot Weigel

Learn to Code with Me

04:21 min | Last month

How an English Professor Became a Front-End Web Developer with Bekah Hawrot Weigel

"Mentioned this. But what were you doing before? I think he did say this quickly. But what was your career before for this? I was an adjunct instructor for ten years. Okay, right so at a university so works Johnny from classroom. Okay, so I'm assuming you never went back to that since you start coding. I did so. I also remind drama. Even when I was in the hospital I was still teaching I was teaching online, and then I think I did another semester after and then one of the interesting things is united been doing it so long that I almost forgot what it felt like to really love what you're doing. Because I think at some point, the joy in teaching went away. It was really kind of clouded by school politics. Politics in in things like that, and when I started learning to code, and I'm learning this new skill. I really love this like I. Want to get up everyday and do it, and at that point I think that right about the time I entered flat iron school and I knew this is going to be more than just a hobby for me. This is GonNa be a new chapter in my life, and that's when I stopped teaching. So maybe jumping around here, but I'm just very curious. What was it like when you were learning? Initially end even when you're going through flat iron school because you have four children and I assume they're all pretty young. Right like you had just be given. Birth started learning to code and then went to a coding bootcamp. It was challenging so at the time I had a one year old, a three year old, a six year old, and an eight year old, and we had transitioned them from home schooling into going to school, so two of them were in school, and then the two youngest ones were at home with me, and it was I mean the the whole scenario is challenging because I'm redefining my life I had never imagined that this would be a part of my story. Story so you know people ask you that question what your life can look like in five years and like I never would have dreamt that. This is what my life would have looked like five years ago, not only were they redefining what my career was, but I was redefining who I was as a person coming out of trauma, and so I really had to find for me I find scheduled very comforting and sorry. His working hard to find blocks of time. Time and so eventually that turned into was I was waking up at four thirty in the morning and coating a couple of hours before getting the kids to school now when I started it wasn't that four thirty up because I had a baby that was still waking up at night, and so it was maybe six o'clock in the morning until six thirty I do a little bit, and then at nap time I would do a little bit, and then like after. After four PM I started to go brain dead I can't think straight, and so it's hard for me to go then, but if I if I had to. There were some late nights that are just muscled through it in order to get done what I needed to get done at every possible. Actually it's not unlike now through the pandemic West kids at home, I trying to find all of those bits of time to do the thing that I really enjoyed doing. Yeah Wow, what a story! And when you were chatting I, was just thinking about. There's a lot of folks have had on the show or speaker. People I've spoken to over email. Who are learning to code? Maybe they're few months few years. Whatever and they'll do similar world. They'll wake up really early before anyone else's away, if they have family and they'll. Learn to code for a few hours and then get on with their day and then got you spoken to people. It's kind of the opposite. They wait till everyone goes to bed. They stay up really late and then that's when they do stuff. When like sort of like the houses? Quiet can actually focus for you know a prolonged period of time. Okay, so you start learning with free co camouflaged iron I assumed that was their remote program because they have the remote learning right right? It was part time self paced, or it was not part time it was self paced. Full Stack? Okay in about. How long were you going through that? It's hooked me eleven months and I think I was pretty proud of the pace that I, said I really had to challenge myself with you know working with the kids, and in having a couple of part time jobs and making it through that so for me, it was. Eleven months I went through a lot of recovery over those eleven

Instructor Johnny
Starting to Write with Louise Tondeur

The Rookie Writer Show

05:27 min | Last month

Starting to Write with Louise Tondeur

"Hello Welcome to season two episode twenty, two of the rookie writer show I'm Robin. Cable and I will be your host today you can find me on twitter at Lacan twos and on Instagram as Robin Canadial I wanNA dedicate today's review to all the new writers out there who are listening Kudos to you. Forgetting started a lot of the time. PODCASTS or videos that discuss writing are talking about submissions, queries, getting an agent or polishing the manuscript. You've been working on for the past few months or longer. So, today's review is going to go over the basics. I'm going to tell you about starting to write a free class offered by Louise Thanh Dur Unu- to me for beginner writers. Her focus is to get a new riders started with the basics, though there are a few helpful reminders and tidbits in there for season writers or writers who have gone astray who are in need of regaining some focus and getting back to their craft. The entire course is only an hour long, and it is broken up into eight sections Louise does a great job giving detailed synopsis at the Individ- Section as well as instructions, if needed for the activities, she suggests. She is extremely engaging and likeable, and if I were a new writer, she would be an excellent first teacher. Louise has. Two novels has been teaching for twenty five years. She offers six classes on Unani two of which are free of charge. She also has published a book on Time Management, a short story, collection and several writing guides. If you enroll in starting to write, you will be eligible to receive two of Louise's e-book writing guides free of charge. This class is a total win for new writers. She has a variety of resource pages to pull up and a variety of exercises to get. You started as well. I'd also like to admit something. One of my favorite parts of this class was just enjoying Louise's beautiful accent and some of the British. British lingo that I. Don't get to hear every day. It made it even more enjoyable not to mention her generous gift of two free e books is great. I look through my copies and feel like they have a lot of good information. I do have three tips and a hack. That will be sharing today. The first tip is to start where you are. Don't wait until you feel like it. Everyone has moments. Moments when they say I'll do such and such when this happens or when that happens or when my desk area looks like a writer's desk, or when everything is just so louise encourages you to start now. Don't wait for the perfect conditions because they never happen also right down why you want to start writing and be really specific if you have written in the past, but haven't in a while be kind to. To Yourself, also you can still start again. You can carry your notebook with you and build time into your day to right when you have free moments. Perhaps you get some writing in while you're on a bus or a train. Maybe you can take a few minutes to jot down. Some of the word sketches Louise Talks about in her class. While you're sitting at your favorite cafe, the second tip is turning up. As. The most important piece of writing advice she can give is to turn up. Show up and start writing. Establish a habit that works for you with a time you can identify some people enjoy being part of the five am writing club. That's not me yet, person. Some people prefer to work at night. When everyone else is asleep, whatever works for you, put it in your calendar. And as Lewis says, turn up, the third tip is to collect writing prompts as you're starting out a great way to get story ideas is to collect those problems. You can even make a scrapbook of it helps you collect images postcards things you might usually throw away like bus tickets or advertisements gather objects from nature anything that you can think of. Of that's GONNA. Kick off your writing. You can also get books of writing prompts or find websites online. One of the free e books from Louise has prompt ideas in it as well once you have some prompts, sit down with one of them and a lot yourself an amount of time to work on some of the exercises she shares. Then you can try another the next time with prompts. The possibilities for creating stories are endless. Today's hack is something called. Habits stacking. Each of us has something that we do every day. Perhaps a multitude of things may be in the morning or even throughout the whole day you enjoy a hot beverage. This is where you can stack a habit that you want to start onto an existing habit for instance. Put a notebook beside your tea kettle, or maybe your coffee pot, and as your drink is brewing, you can write while you're waiting. Perhaps you have to use the laundromat when it's time to do your laundry. Put your notebook in your basket and use that time to your advantage. Make you writing a habit by stacking it on top of your current habits whether they are daily or weekly. Find whatever works for you.

Louise Writer Louise Talks Louise Thanh Dur Unu Time Management Robin Canadial Individ- Section Lewis
Making the Pivot from Pastor to Web Designer with Chris Misterek

Learn to Code with Me

04:16 min | Last month

Making the Pivot from Pastor to Web Designer with Chris Misterek

"Manage your time better, but I want to kind of switch gears a tiny bit and talk about your decision to go from doing web design, part time, or on the side to doing it fulltime, because I've. I'm trying to think in my head, but I don't think I've ever met. Anyone interviewed anyone who was working in like a faith related. There's probably a like industry term for that like a faith based profession, or whatever who went from that into tech I. actually do know someone who did the reverse who was intact and then went back to school for Ministerial Studies but I haven't heard someone quite like you, so i WanNa. Know like how you made that decision in what went into that? Yeah, for sure you know it wasn't easy because I had been at my job at the church for thirteen years when I decided like okay I. Think I think this might be the direction that I'm moving in show it was it was a multi tiered decision and I think anybody who goes through a career change, no matter where they're coming from or going to their show, many things that you have to consider and part of it was I was working fulltime for the church. And then you know still another twenty hours on top of my my work for the church show. For the Church was at least fifty hours a week, and so I was point seventy to eighty hours a week depending on the activity that we were doing, and so part of it was like okay like this is, this is to be too much in. So I need to figure out a way to. Scale back a little bit and have some more free time for myself and you know. It wasn't that? It was taking time away from my family. It was more that it was taking more time away from me. Being able to sleep because my girls would go to sleep my family, we've got to sleep. I'd say up until two or three in the morning. Just trying to get things done, so you know there was that aspect of things at NFL goes back to having the time to do things like I think. You can only run the at your pace for so long before you go. Okay, something needs to change or. On a short train to burn out, so so there was that. And I don't sound too overly spiritual or anything, but my my understanding of who got is and how he operates within the world is that he's not confined to a church, and so my thought was I'm not. I'm not necessarily leaving the ministry, but just that ministry is going to be. Looking a little bit differently for me, and how to huge heart and passion to see how God could use me in the tech space in the tech world, and and so it's it's been pretty awesome to connect with people who are of of this infant, but even people who have heard my story and have been encouraged and know that you know God is still using that despite the fact that it's not overtly from. From a church or or from Christian organization, so it's it's been pretty fun, and and it's still like a year and a half inch, so I'm still like figuring it out. You know because I have thought patterns in like beliefs and stuff. That I've been building up for thirteen years, and so the transition. It's not like I'd turn to switch on in my whole thought process in mindset change you know like is a. A gradual process and I think that's true for anybody who's WHO's trying to make a transition even if you haven't been in a job for a short as long a period of time as I was, you know like I've had to be patient with myself. I've had to have people speak into. Have some people to bounce ideas off of like I know you and I have bounced ideas off of one another as like. Like what is this look like for you? And how do you experience this? And but at the end of the day like I love the idea that you can have like a big impact. No matter what space you work in the impact that you have on the world is not dictated by the job that you do, but it's by how you do that job and how you look at it approaches and so. If I were saying Oh. This isn't as significant of a job as my last one. Then I think I'd miss out on a lot of opportunities that I've had just because you know that's such a bad way to look at.

Wanna NFL
The most important job you'll ever have as a leader.

Hacking Your Leadership

03:24 min | Last month

The most important job you'll ever have as a leader.

"For this talent Tuesday episode I WanNa, talk about the most important role. You'll ever have as a leader. This last week is one. We'll all remember for the rest of our lives. I saw tweet yesterday. That was an attempt at humor it read. Can we go back to the tiger? Kings slash stimulus check part of quarantine. Because now it's just getting dark. And I suddenly felt like the last two months of being hunkered down in my house, dealing with the pandemic was somehow ancient history. Many people just feeling comfortable inserting themselves back into the lives they left behind and twenty twenty. Let us know that it more in store for us. Back in December you know way back six months ago when the entire planet was different, the rent and I discussed the five most viewed leadership videos on Youtube. We got a lot of great feedback from that series. In the events of the last week of reminded me of something incredibly profound something. I'm processing with different eyes than the ones I initially used to make that episode. The second episode of that series was about the interview of Oprah Winfrey by the Stanford Graduate School of business. I re watched that video today, and then I re listened to the episode from December ninth, and the parts for me back then is still the part that stands out today, possibly even more so. The interviewer reads oprah quote from a previous interview. She did and asked her about it. The quotas I've talked to nearly thirty thousand people on my show, and they all have one thing in common. They all wanted validation. I would tell you that every single person. You'll ever meet shares that common desire. This is still one of the most true statements I've ever read I believe it's an inherent part of the human condition, and I believe long-term lack of it leads to a mint psychological trauma. And if you think I'm being dramatic, look at the hundreds of thousands of people who just had the final straw placed on their proverbial camel's back. If, you look at the cultural rise of social media, beginning around two thousand five with a tipping point of my space, going all the way today, the popularity of Tiktok Instagram, you'll see the same thing, no matter when you look billions of people who want desperately to have their voices heard to make some kind of mark on humanity. To feel validated. When it comes to the psychological and emotional needs, if human beings validation is really close to the top. So, what is validation? I'm sure you will kind of know what it is meaning. You describe how it feels, or what actions are required to get it, but at its core to validate something means to prove that it's based on truth or fact, so developed a person means to provide credible assurance of their identity and their feelings. And I WANNA be clear. This is not the same thing as empathy showing empathy alone. Only tell someone you can relate to how they're feeling, but it doesn't necessarily validate those feelings objectively true. The first after this process validation is to amplify another person's voice so that others might hear it, too. And, if you're a good leader, I promise this something. You already do all the time. Think about the last time you were giving Kudos from your boss on an assignment on performance and your response was something like Hey. I really appreciate that, but it didn't do much. Jerry was the one who closed that huge sale. Melissa made sure everyone on the team was trained in the new process and Lindsey Project managed the whole thing she been asking for more responsibility. I thought she was ready. Clearly, she didn't disappoint. If, you've had an interaction similar to this. You're already acutely aware of the importance of elevating others of redirecting the spotlight from yourself. This process is the process of allegation. They did the work, but you gave it credibility. and Mrs why this is the most important royal ever have as a leader because people aren't capable of valid themselves. Might have large if you go where they think they can, but it's superficial, and it's fleeting because we're social creatures, so it's not until others come along and support that a person is capable of feeling truly valid.

Melissa Oprah Winfrey Twenty Twenty Stanford Graduate School Of Bu MRS Tiktok Instagram Jerry Lindsey Project
Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

The $100 MBA Show

06:10 min | Last month

Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

"I could begin today's episode by naming all the famous entrepreneurs. We all know that don't have a college degree. Whether. It's Mark Zuckerberg or Walt Disney or Michael. Dell or Steve Jobs or Steve Wozniak or Bill Gates or Ray KROC or I can keep going right. But. That doesn't prove that have a college. Degree is a waste of money, or the conjugate doesn't help you become an entrepreneur. I let's recognize the fact that everybody on that list I just named and more ones I didn't list are exceptional entrepreneurs, exceptional people whether they're very bright and talented, whether they have a lot of tenacity like Ray Kroc, or just are willing to work harder than everybody else I'm not interested in edge, cases or extraordinary people that are extraordinarily things. I am interested in addressing this question with the fact that what about everybody else everybody who may not be a genius or The special gifts of some of the people we've talked about. Can they make it as an entrepreneur without a college degree? Well, let's talk about what caused. Agree gives you so that we can boil it down to. Do you need those things to be successful there more college degree? We'll give you an education. They will teach you somethings who go to class and you'll learn now whether that. is of date or not is a different matter, but you will learn. You will gain those skills number two. It's going to put you in an environment where you're going to meet. Other people go to college whether it's online or offline, you are going to be networking with other people other likeminded people other people. WanNa be successful just like you, and often you know in the same field whether it's computer, science, or business, or whatever it is so one you're gonNA give formation number two. You're going to get exposed to people, and you'll be able to build a network and the third thing that call will give you is a piece of paper. They'll give you a certificate. They'll give you a diploma. Something that tells other people employers particularly that hate. This person knows stuff or knows this area of expertise whatever your degrees in, so it's almost like a permission, slip or sort of like a coupon like hey, this paper proves of this person. Know something in this area with a stern on a different matter, but that's how society views a degree, so those are the three things college will give you now. Can you achieve these three things outside of college with Al GonNa College Information Skills. Skills Yup, you can learn the outside college whether that is indifferent programs online learning courses online books, universities will have a monopoly on the information, right? You can get this information elsewhere network while there's a little bit different because you know you're not in a space like an actual campus, but hey, you still can go to conferences. You still can meet people online. You could be a a person that really values relationships in kind of. Of Fall some advice. We talked about in this in this podcast. How To make sure you build your network constantly? So this is doable. Assad College, and the third thing is the piece of paper now a totally different think society has agreed that this piece of paper will allow you to get you know opportunities whether it's jobs or an interview or whatever it is. This is the difference the piece of paper. So do you need a? A piece of paper. That's the question here, so college is beneficial. If you do need a piece of paper that permission slip, but if you plan to be an entrepreneur, if your soul is GonNa, be a business bill I want to be an entrepreneur. All my life I don't want to really pursue a career that requires me to have a degree. If that's you tried and true, then really GonNa College may not make the most financial. Financial Sense not going to say it's going to hurt you, but it's a lot of time often in your prime years and a lot of money being spent on something, you may not really need because you can achieve the things you want to achieve as an entrepreneur without it now if you are not sure if you like fifty fifty. Hey, I think I to be an entrepreneur, but maybe I want to work for a little while. While maybe I want to start a business and then after that I wanna go ahead and you know work somewhere at a corporation, a degree will help you get that job. This justice, the reality of the situation there are exceptions to the rules of course in different careers one of them is programming development engineering technology. Many engineers don't have college degrees, but they're so highly skilled, and so saw after that they can get a job. Job Easily and our certification programs outside of the university structure that you can take in that field that can qualify you to get jobs. A lot of people say hey, getting your degree is sort of like a backup plan. You can always get a job if things don't work out, but that really doesn't help you answer that question of. Do you need a college degree to Be Successful Entrepreneur? I don't think you need it I. I do believe you'll. The half caused. Degrees can be successful I. do believe that people that don't can be successful as well as a matter of how you WanNa spend your resources. Your time and your money I can't tell you for certain that thing that I learned in university. I don't use at all in my day to day life as an entrepreneur. I'm sure there are some things that I've picked up that I've used. But if I'm going to be completely honest. I don't think there's enough of that. I would say would require me to have gone to college to be. Successful, so you also have to define what success means. What does success mean to you as an entrepreneur? Is Success being able to pursue a hobby that you love and make a profit is success being able to replace current income in your current job with your business success, a a million dollar business is that a ten million dollar business? Is it a billion dollar business which a lot of? Of People think that's the only meaning of success. No, you need to define what success is for you as an entrepreneur and for most people I think it should be able to make a healthy living that allows you to be financially free doing something that you really feel passionate about that. You

Ray Kroc Assad College Steve Jobs Mark Zuckerberg Dell Bill Gates Steve Wozniak Walt Disney AL Michael
Noble Ackerson

Revision Path

07:07 min | Last month

Noble Ackerson

"Three technology and bring adds to the web and has been very very rewarding for me and I would imagine like. Like especially at this current time, probably even pretty like rewarding and fulfilling in that respect. Now the work that you're doing I mean of course it's helping patients, but at a critical time like this, it's even more important. Absolutely. The world got turned upside down for a lot of people, but as you. If you've been following in the news, those at risk are the providers in the surveyors and people who are making sure. That our loved ones on infected by this virus. And aren't endanger and so more and more of the work that we do in the issues that we're seeing today with his pandemic has become a whole lot more. Relevant I guess for for on the team. What drew you to that kind of work so kind of be able use your skills in almost humanitarian away, but to be able to use your skills in in such a public facing forward way that may be as not sexy against way to put it, but. The some that. I've mentioned on the show before. How oftentimes product design into such will go into working for a company because they want to have a specific title, but not necessarily because the work that they do really helps people. I'm curious to Kinda know. What made you go that route with your skills? He came to this very good question because i. came to a point in my career started a federal to start up. We can talk about that, too. And after that attempt to add launching a product from zero to not two zero one I decided to pivot actually. Why was at that nonprofit we spoke about? How I could use my skills to to help out in areas that needed it the most advantageous This specific project spoke to me more because my dad for years owned a home health agency just like a delivered prescriptions to people who were who lack mobility were older, those kinds of things a lot of the pitch I guess when that opportunity came around hit home, and so just moving from. Folks that needed the help the most around the world with a massive organization like a National Democratic Institute moving to an enterprise application that almost did the same thing helping people through tack. have these philosophies about product. That are a little counterintuitive for somebody who who lived maybe seven or eight years in emerging tack that says basically the technology doesn't really matter solving the problems. Really does the philosophy and. What can I do to abstract? The tech from solving specific needs is paramount for me and so the opportunity to work on a modernisation project when you're going from literally mainframe systems to the Web seems very status quo, but sort of coupled with the type of people that would benefit from accurate data coming out of that say you know helping save lives that way really means more to me than the old, no offense than. Anyone. Working just anything and claiming we're changing world, but I can actually say that if I don't do my job, right? You know my loved. One might endanger.

National Democratic Institute
The value of time.

Hacking Your Leadership

04:16 min | Last month

The value of time.

"Are for this week's episode. I WanNa talk about time my father-in-law's one of those guys. Who'd rather do something himself? Then pay someone else. Do it for him. Some people are the pay others type and some are the do it themselves type. I'm the pay others type. But I envy my father-in-law's vast knowledge and a column for fixing things. At least monthly in his sixties. He was changing his own oil in his car. And I mean he'd drive the car up on little metal ramps in his garage. Get on a wheeled cart. Get underneath the car and do everything himself. It took them a little more than an hour and then he'd drive over to Jiffy Lube dispose of the oil I just did Jiffy Lube I and let them do the whole thing and the reason I do this is because Jiffy Lube charges me around forty bucks for the whole thing and they do it in thirty minutes and I can respond to emails while I'm waiting if I do it myself. I still have to buy twenty dollars with oil and filter and then spend an hour. Doing the oil change an hour. I'll never get back. So the trade becomes is the twenty dollars. I'd save doing it myself. Worth the hour of my time. And the answer is emphatically. No I make more than twenty dollars an hour. The average salary America's around sixty five thousand dollars a year which divides up to about thirty bucks an hour and that means the average person should not be changing their own oil. The processes have been streamlined. Commoditised enough to where it just makes sense to pay for the service just like most people don't so their own clothes or raise their own cows for milk and meat either. It was probably twenty years ago. Started doing this math on pretty much anything or had to decide whether to do it myself or pay to have it done. It puts an objective criteria on the decision and the only times I go against what the math is telling me is if I really have a burning desire to learn how to do something because I feel like that knowledge will serve me in some way in the future but the one place. I never thought about doing that. Math was in my actual job to job. I worked twenty five hundred hours a year doing because just like I'd never get back the our changing my oil also never get back. The time I spend working it's gone forever for all of us and IT Open Mon this. It's just a fact of life but it also means I don't want to trade away. Those hours for just a paycheck. Those hours are too big a chunk of my life of our lives. I know it's much easier said than done but it's really important. You love what you do or at the very least. If you don't love what you do it's important. The job you don't love is one that will open doors in the near future for careers you will love on last week's talent Tuesday episode. I spoke about getting back to the basics of what your people expect out of you and your organization and the very first thing I mentioned was the desire to get better at things that aren't related to the job. Things that will build their resume and make them more marketable. These are the things that make people believe the time they invest is worth it. I don't need to know how to change my oil so Jiffy Lube can continue doing it for me but even cheaper to pay someone to wash my car in ten minutes that it would be spending our washing at myself. The time with my son doing it together makes it worth it. The cost benefit analysis of time versus. Money says to pay somebody to wash my car every time but I remember watching my dad's car with him and how great it was spending time with him and that added element tip the scales the other way. If you're leader of people you'll never be able to pay anyone enough to make the job worth the paycheck. Your employees feel like they're getting something else out of it to or they'll get more value out of the transaction by working hard. The paycheck is extrinsic reward. So that means even if you pay somebody way more than the job even worth eventually the novelty of that paycheck lower off and the employer will disengage. It's no different than how we get excited about the idea of getting into a brand new car and driving off the lot knowing it's ours but by the twelfth payment the excitement is worn off and now the payment feels like. It's too much what we're getting in return. The first payment was totally worth it. We got a car and we got that feeling but once the feeling goes away we get a more accurate picture of the perceived value of the transaction. So how do you increase the perceived value of the job for your employees? You give them training knowledge skills and responsibilities that aren't directly related to their actual job. You stretch them. You develop their leadership skills. You help them accomplish their educational goals either with money or equally important. With flexibility of time and work life balance there are people all over who could easily change companies and make more money doing the exact same job if they can do this and they aren't. It's because they're getting something else besides their salary. Find out what those things are for each of your people and find ways of helping them get those things. I just how engaged they become. Thanks for listening. I have a great day.

Jiffy Lube America
Employees Not Coming to Work and Giving Back the PPP Loan

The EntreLeadership Podcast

03:04 min | Last month

Employees Not Coming to Work and Giving Back the PPP Loan

"All's weather's in California hypo welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Hey what's going on guys? This is my situation out in California. We got a bunch meaning meaningless store owners out here. You know we do. We can't for employees. You Know Sneeze Guard's face shield everything and what's happening. Is that with the six hundred dollars. GotTa newsome decided to give to people each week on top of whatever you get on unemployment. We have employees. There's not showing up to work and we're not firing them there where they start choosing not to go to work and then they're filing for unemployment in over here. There's just the unemployment the way they're checking. It is still backed up some ness that. What do we do to prevent this from like fraudulent unemployment? Because then that money comes out of our pool. Yeah that's true. Well it's not Gavin. Newsom was the feds Gavin newsom as their state at a state unemployment. The feds gave Came out of the care. Act Six hundred dollars additional unemployment from the Federal Government until July twenty fifth. And so. I don't know I think you've got clogged up. Bureaucracy these folks and firing them is going to set them up to me if you fire them. You'RE GONNA set him up for unemployment So in reporting them for fraudulently doing it I don't know I mean if they're taking it anyways feel like you. You fire them you documented and they're going to collect unemployment either way. I'd rather them collect it and not be paying that do you guys took. The loan is correct. No Yeah we have quite a PTA loan and know working on that and whatnot. But you don't want while I wouldn't I mean because it gated to keep your employees if you're going to get that thing forgiven and so I would say tap the breaks on the loan? Get rid of the team. That is collecting unemployment. Not Showing up and hire people who want to work. You GotTa let them know. You're going to hold them accountable. You don't have to get into the bureaucracy side of it but I'm GonNa tell you something right now. There are people that need to work. And I'd start you know hitting the bushes and telling people. Hey we've got opportunity you to make money right now. Unfortunately though Dave we talked about this with art laffer today. This is a real thing. This cares act has created this incentive to stay home and asking to be laid off her. Yeah they're making way more money because these are hourly wage earners Danielle and so they're making way more. But here's the reality you know July twenty fifth is looming. Okay it's coming and and you know a Lotta people who need work and so I'd move on. I absolutely move. I Say I'm GonNa hold you accountable. Nothing against you but we've got to get people in here that want to work and I'd go get people that want to work well and I went business owners right now to realize that they do not have to participate in the incompetence by the Fed. I mean that Congress has best day is is your worst day and I know. Some of them are trying and other trying to put stuff together to help. I think their hearts are probably to really help people out but they're competent to design a plan. That was going to question. The truth is that you can't wait on Congress to get this problem solved. You got to solve it.

Gavin Newsom FED Dave Ramsey California Congress Federal Government Ta Newsome Laffer
Ariane Goldman, founder and CEO of HATCH: Building a brand that means something

Skimm'd from The Couch

01:28 min | Last month

Ariane Goldman, founder and CEO of HATCH: Building a brand that means something

"So in listening to you. It's very obvious like we both are smiling. When you're talking about growing up ambitious and kind of the natural hustle that you very clearly had an. I think like an authentic sense of confidence. I WanNa understand what your mindset was in the early days of hatch. Did you know that it was gonNA take off and it was going to take time? Did you have self-doubt around it? I'm curious kind of where you were from a head space standpoint. I went at it with nothing to lose so I let myself a few hundred thousand dollars from two birds to build the website and to get samples but I didn't know what I didn't know which was the blessing because if you understand what a big beast it is to build a business. I would have gotten started so the way I approach. Things was just to kind of build from ground up. I didn't have kind of an end goal because I don't know I didn't know how to grow at the time million dollar company a two million dollar company. I was just trying to get product in front of women who wanted it and so that's just day by day ground up and that's been my approach to growing hatch from the GECKO. I'm not necessarily trying to work backwards from this end goal. I'm trying to build a brand. That means something to women where they can look when you hear the word hatch smile because in someone's life we made a difference whether it's beauty or community or fashion. We mean something to people that to me is what it's like to build a brand so when you start that every day is different Challenge experience failure but because you're building from ground up. I was building kind of support underneath me every time I fall. I wouldn't fall too hard because there was nowhere to

Ace Your Next Interview with Jeff H Sipe, International Career Coach

$6.99 Per Pound

06:14 min | Last month

Ace Your Next Interview with Jeff H Sipe, International Career Coach

"Just to get started. My burning question is how do you even I wanna get inside recruiters head right now just like with all the layoffs that has happened so many Americans are out of job and the space is more competitive than ever but the jobs are pretty scarce. So if you can just talk from your perspective just your observation about the whole situation be great to start off and I think this is just kind of more high level for life right. We have to look at this situation and see the opportunity in all and so I think as people are out there and feeling scared and having all those emotions with what's going on. How do you flip it? How do you flip the coin? You flip the script and make positive for you because you'RE GONNA get up every morning and you're going to have a plan and you're going to go and really try and follow through with some really strong actions that are going to make you have success. And that's the opportunity that a lot of people have and so I always try and take any situation and look at the positive. And that's what I'd I'd love to do for the audience. Today is really talk about some of the positive steps they can take off of for for. I mean maybe I should a phrase it this way but usually there's opportunity in crisis you know what I'm saying literally so do you. I mean what about for you because you know your coach and you try to empower other people to help them with their search like. Have you personally been experiencing more outreach and are you writing more pieces to help other people out like how has affected you? It's a great question. And Ironically if. I wasn't aware of the circumstances going on on in the world. Nothing has really changed for me. My business has stayed very consistent so I haven't seen an uptick. I haven't seen a downtick. I do believe that there is a potential downtick coming because some of the big tech companies have kind of acknowledged including soon dr at Google that they're going to slow down or stop hiring zone just kind of waiting to hear that and see that you mentioned a great point about how I sharing and I think I need to. Maybe do more of that. Maybe a little bit more on the writing side of things to really help people out you know. I did release one video on Youtube to just kinda take a slightly different approach to covid nineteen and and how people can look at the job search and one of the things. I'm always trying to do is just talk about some of the things that other people aren't talking about you know making sure we're giving people good to get through this 'cause it it is a tough time for sure and speaking of tough times like how do you. I'm just imagining myself. As like maybe someone who's recently been laid off and I'm like okay. I need to start building a network and my instinct is to like okay like maybe setup some informational through some emails to people. But like how do you even want to? Is your advice in like phrasing that outrage of dislike. Hey I get that. This is like uncertain and challenging time because like we obviously need to acknowledge it and I think this is a time where it feels weird to you. Know kind be opportunistic even though because it is a pandemic that's affecting a lot of people's lives right like so. How do you kind of elegantly approach intro You know just so like people are like hey like you because you never know who's had space that person is at right maybe there personally affected or maybe they just don't have time for right now. So how do you approach Networking and this time? And what would your opening email be? Yes so I think it's it's a great great question. It's kind of like there's a two tiered answer to this. First we start with the warm people right. The people you know you stone with that warm network and I know that that's going to be different for every person but you reach out to the people who you think truly will help you. And of course that's not a unique strategy so let's flip to the second strategy real quick which is a give. I model so clean's I got a highlight that real quick before you go further Jeff. 'cause I like the way you said that man. Can you say that again for us? Give a first model. You're saying. That's what I emphasized. The people men nothing in the world is freeman constantly. You're not gonNA constantly get it. You know what I'm saying. You gotta give for you to have something in return. You know what I mean. But yes course. So on linked in Lincoln is GONNA be your number one networking tool in. Hey it's a bad tool right. The you is terrible but it's but it's a monopoly in it's the thing we have to use and so what I find is really successful on linked in. Is this give I so? I always advise that people do something really simplistic and that simplistic piece of advice is create a plan for how many to people you're going to reach out to on a daily basis so let's say it's five people. Let's say it's ten people and let's call them product managers so you have ten product managers your new target a few companies you target a few specific people and you say sue came across. Your profile profile looks awesome on just wanted to share this really cool article on a new trend that's happening in product management. Hope you connect with me on link debt. And that's that's all you do and you do that ten times a day for people in your target audience people you WanNa connect with and you repeat that over and over and over again and it works and I know this strategy works because I used it when I was laid off at the end of two thousand nine and this was the exact strategy that used to get a job in two thousand

Google Youtube Freeman Jeff Lincoln
Your words matter. Choose them wisely.

Hacking Your Leadership

04:07 min | Last month

Your words matter. Choose them wisely.

"Welcome to hacking your leadership. I'm Chris and this is talent Tuesday. This weekly segment dedicated dolphins talent related for this talent. Tuesday episode. I WanNa talk about the way we speak to each other a few days ago. I happened to catch a documentary about Mister Rogers. There's been a lot of new content about an recently to the Tom Hanks movie on his life. That came out a few months ago. One of the things I learned that I found fascinating was a description and analysis of the way Mr Rogers spoke a longtime producer of the show was interviewed about how the crew had coined the term fresh referring to the language that Mr Rogers had supposedly admitted and it wasn't a new language specifically rather was very intentional way in which he spoke and the reasons behind it. The entire premise behind this way of speaking was the concept of anticipation meaning. Once he decided on the message he wanted to land and chose the words he wanted to use. He then played out the conversation in his mind and anticipated how a child would react to hearing those specific words. If the reaction was shaping up to be negative or if there was room for misinterpretation of the message he would rewrite the words and try again. This conversation within his own head would go over and over until he was confident he'd never inadvertently cause stress or anxiety in child and this meant literally every word on the show was carefully selected and scripted. There are no accidents and there was no advocating. A basic example would be how he never used the phrase your parents with groups of children because not all children know their parents. So instead he would say your favorite grownups. There are several examples of this process. Online where you can see the progress of these conversations and it's so smart if you have a minute after this episode Google Fetish steps and see what I'm talking about. I bring this up because I believe that when it comes to leadership our words matter to our message matters and I don't think enough leaders really consider this when communicating way back in September of two thousand seventeen. The eleventh hacking leadership was about the concept of intent versus impact and the importance of each. Lots of people argue that one is more important than the other and will. Each situation is unique. It's pretty clear that the people who consider both intent and impact are the people with the best interpersonal relationships. But something tends to happen when it comes to these discussions. Even our eleventh episode is guilty of it. The trade off between intent and impact is typically discussed in the context of potentially offending someone or giving them the wrong impression of your character where it typically isn't discussed is in the context of landing a message with your team in a compelling way away that means they both understand the message and are bought into it. A famous allegory reads give me six hours to cut down a tree and spend the first four sharpening my axe. It has real world implications on the prep-work required to get literally anything done right. No one wants to do the boring tedious work. That comes before they do the thing. Whatever that thing is no one wants to sharpen the x. Before cutting down the tree they just WanNa start chopping away. No one wants to stretch before working out they just WanNa start picking up weights. No one wants to check all the fluids in the tire pressure in their car. Before taking a road trip they just want to play on the music and drive many leads playbook or set of instruction when it comes to rolling out new strategy. They're told what the strategy is. What success looks like what the expected behaviors are and how to validate those behaviors and armed with this high level information? They scheduled time to disseminate everything to their people. But what many of them failed to do is spend time purposely crafting their words in a way that is most likely to land the strategy with their team. While eliminating room for misinterpretation in essence they failed. It'd be fresh about it if you're leader of people the next time you scheduled time with an employee or group of employees. Take the time to write out what you plan on saying and then practice it. I with yourself then someone else. Put yourself in the shoes of your employees. Think about how your words are going to be interpreted or potentially misinterpreted consider with you. Some confident not just confident in the fact that you know the information but confident your ability to demonstrate belief in the strategy. Lastly make sure your language doesn't inadvertently exclude anyone from the strategy over time. You'll find you get better at this process of preparation and eventually you'll be able to do it in your own head. In fact on some level you probably already do thanks for listening and have a great

Mister Rogers Tom Hanks Chris Producer