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What's happening in the workplace? Listen here for the latest completely safe-for-work updates, advice on how to get ahead and office do's and do not's, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from 349: Serial Entrepreneur JESSE ITZLER Shares His Top Networking TIPS for Success, How to Break Out of Your Comfort Zone, & Create Your Own ADVENTURE of A Lifetime

RISE Podcast

01:47 min | 22 hrs ago

A highlight from 349: Serial Entrepreneur JESSE ITZLER Shares His Top Networking TIPS for Success, How to Break Out of Your Comfort Zone, & Create Your Own ADVENTURE of A Lifetime

"Kevin and I took our kids camping in the winter to mount Washington. My son was 8, his daughter was 8. And it's snowing, it's freezing or in these sleeping bags outside. I said, Kevin, there's 8 billion people in the world. We're the only four people on top of this unbelievable mountain. How often do you do this? Every other month. Since I graduated college, I do something I normally went to done. I said, what are you talking about? He's like, well, instead of watching the football game on Saturday, I'll run a 5 K, or I'll take my kids fishing, or I'll go to a museum. Well, sign up for a cooking class. I'll just do something with it done. I go why? He goes, because if you do 6 of those, many adventures every year. And you're 30. And you live to be 70. You'll have 240 mini adventures that you want that had. Listen, you're fucking genius. I said, who can't take one day every other month? And do that. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast.

Kevin Mount Washington Rachel Hollis Football Youtube
A highlight from 348: How to Be the MOST PRODUCTIVE Youve Ever Been In Your Life! (Follow These Steps!) | PART 2

RISE Podcast

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

A highlight from 348: How to Be the MOST PRODUCTIVE Youve Ever Been In Your Life! (Follow These Steps!) | PART 2

"Most of us when we're dreaming when we're goal setting, we're trying to set a ceiling. Right? We're trying to aim up here. We're trying to go like, okay, this is the goal, this is where I'm headed. But you actually will achieve more results in the day to day activity if you set a floor. Not a ceiling. Think about it. If you say this is the minimum standard that I will accept of myself and you hold yourself accountable to that, every day, every day, every day, you don't have to think about it. You just do it. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis,

Rachel Hollis
A highlight from  Lisa Ling on Conquering Self Doubt

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:34 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Lisa Ling on Conquering Self Doubt

"This episode is brought to you by obey fitness, a digital platform that's on a mission to turn daily movement into your favorite form of self care. We'll explain more in a bit, but first, let's get into the episode. Hey everyone, welcome back to another season of 9 to 5 ish. We are so excited to learn from more amazing women leaders. And this season's gonna be a little different because we've all had a moment in our careers where things felt impossible, or we had to make a life-changing decision that could impact the rest of our careers, our business, or our personal lives. So this season, we are asking each of our guests about the single hardest thing they've ever done in their careers. But we don't want to spoil it too much. We hope you love listening to this new season of 9 to 5 ish. Now let's get to the episode. I mean, I've gotten pretty decent at telling other people's stories. But when it comes to myself for negotiating for myself or standing up for myself, it's really still challenging. I'm Carly zakin, and I'm Danielle weisberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you with this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Hi, everyone. Today our guest is award winning journalist and producer, Lisa Ling. Most journalists go to college first and then hit the newsroom, but that was not Lisa's path. Lisa started her journalism career when she was a teenager, working on a new show called scratch. Since then, she's worked her way up the journalism ladder from co hosting the view to literally reporting from North Korea. It's safe to say, Lisa's got quite the range, but these days you may know her best for her longtime CNN series. This is life with Lisa Ling, which just started its 9th season. You can tune into the show on CNN Sundays at 10 p.m. eastern and Pacific time. Lisa welcome to 9 to 5 ish, we're so happy to have you on the show. Thank you so much for having me. Really appreciate it. So we like to start things off with a quick lightning round. Quick questions, quick answers. Are you ready? I'm terrible at this, but I'm going to go for it.

Carly Zakin Danielle Weisberg Lisa Lisa Ling CNN North Korea
A highlight from 347: How to Be the MOST PRODUCTIVE Youve Ever Been In Your Life! (Follow These Steps!) | PART 1

RISE Podcast

01:48 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 347: How to Be the MOST PRODUCTIVE Youve Ever Been In Your Life! (Follow These Steps!) | PART 1

"They will miss the goal because they work so freaking hard on the wrong things and then get super discouraged because they don't understand where they're going wrong. They assume something's wrong with them personally and they give up. Or they're like, oh, okay, this dream isn't good enough or I'm not good enough to pull this dream off because freaking a I've been trying for 18 months or 18 years and I'm not seeing the results that I want to see. They give up because they get discouraged, not because they're at a disadvantage, not because they're not talented or smart or strong or meant for this thing. But because they're working hard on the wrong stuff. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. Here we go. Guys, we

Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from Why data dont talk with data scientist and comedian Andrea Jones-Rooy

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:27 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Why data dont talk with data scientist and comedian Andrea Jones-Rooy

"I guess today is uniquely skilled at making data fun. Andrea Jones Roy teaches the flagship course data science for everyone at NYU's center for data science. Andrea also happens to be a circus artist and a comedian. It was the audience's runaway favorite speaker. When I co hosted the virtual Wharton future of work conference earlier this year. Here's a little taste of what made Andrea such a hit. I'm a time traveler. That's right. You heard this right? I would never lie to you about such a thing. I am a time traveler. It's very dangerous for me to be here right now. You know what happens when the spacetime continuum is disrupted, but I have come back from the year 23 22 to give you several very important messages. So listen carefully. Now, I know that back in 2022, there's a lot going on in the world and we're really nervous about what the future is going to look like. So I am here to share some good news. Number one, yes, Law & Order SVU is still on the air. We're all very excited for season 224. The future looks good. Oh, oh, I should have also told you, by the way, the world does still exist. So well done, all of you. But let's go back to this data science piece because that's going to make the difference. Everyone gets involved in data science, and this leads to all kinds of wonderful things. I want to remind you data is not magic. It is but a partial imperfect snapshot of the past that we hope will tell us about the future. By the way, one more secret, Kim Kardashian did get a real job. And I'll see you all at work. So Andrew, I would love to know how you got into being a data scientist. I got into being a data scientist. The answer I give my students and that always makes them upset is a series of poorly thought out decisions. I didn't do it on purpose. I graduated from undergrad with a degree in international relations and econ and Chinese. And I wanted to go to grad school because I didn't know what else to do. I was one of those. By some miracle, got into the University of Michigan, where we I think barely overlapped. Yeah, go blue. And there, I thought I was going to write sweeping essays on the history of war and the nature of human evil versus good. All that stuff. And I got there, and they were like, oh, actually, it's mostly statistics and game theory. And I hadn't taken a math class since high school, and I was very proud that I placed out of any math in college, and I was like, I'm never looking at an equation again. Got to grad school and they were not joking around. So I for years resisted it. But through a mix of stubbornness and lack of ego to leave graduate school, I eventually came to realize that I could understand math. To some extent, and I was interested in turning the world into numbers and then doing interesting things with those numbers. And so I did finish with a PhD degree in political science with a focus on complex systems and taught as a political science professor for some time. Left academia. I was on a ten year track path. I left academia, I thought I want to see what the real world is all about. Do we need political science out there in the world? And it turns out we do need political science out there in the world, but no one wants to hear about political science because they think I'm going to argue with them about conspiracy theories and who killed JFK and all that stuff. And as I was working with companies, I realized that what I was doing was actually data science. And as I was coming to that realization, NYU called me and said, hey, you were launching an undergrad program in data science. Would you teach our opening course called data science for everyone? And I said, oh my gosh, yes. And so I've been a data scientist ever since. I do data science very much with a social science angle. So I'm particularly interested in how do we thoughtfully turn complex than messy abstract things like privilege and justice into data in a way that is representative of the world, but still numbers that we can do cool things with. For a data scientist, you have I would say a slightly unusual stance on data. I do. Namely, you don't love them as much as most of the data scientists that I know. Right. The thing that gets me revved up around data is I was working with all these companies, big global Fortune 500 tech, whatever fancy people, and they would all come to me and they'd say, well, what is the data say? The data tells us a story, and I was just like, I feel like that isn't how it works. And I really it rubbed me the wrong way, and I thought about it for a long time. Eventually wrote an es about it, and this is something that I absolutely credit University of Michigan political science program because we spent all this time thinking very hard.

Andrea Jones Roy Center For Data Science Andrea NYU Kim Kardashian University Of Michigan Andrew
A highlight from The Bachelor, Clayton Echard opens up about monetizing off his passions post show, his $1.4M NFL contract and the money behind medical sales

Trading Secrets

04:10 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from The Bachelor, Clayton Echard opens up about monetizing off his passions post show, his $1.4M NFL contract and the money behind medical sales

"The following podcast is a dear media production. Let's talk about personal training secrets. The topic of dating. Now, we all know someone who has met their person on match, right? Match believes the most important relationship is with yourself. So in a world where you can choose to do anything or anyone choose you first because dating someone who knows what they want and won't settle for less, that's truly just sexy as hell. And you know what's also sexy as hell? No pressure for states. Matches latest study of over 5000 U.S. singles reveals that while the cost of being single has skyrocketed in the past ten years, more singles are looking to ditch the white tablecloth, an opt for easy, frill, free dates, which is something we love on trading secrets. Have a good time, make a personal impact and save a couple bucks. Now let me throw you some statistics. 84% of singles say they prefer a casual first date. For example, doing activities on a date, going somewhere close to home to save on gas, eating a home cooked meal, proceeding in a restaurant. Just meeting a date for coffee or drinks, or going to an expensive restaurant. If you do you, you already know the best relationships show up when you show up for yourself first, and there's never been a better time to try match. Download the match app today. It's a no brainer. And when you're going on a date, think about the pennies and sets because more people than not would prefer. The casual first date. Making that money welcome back to another episode of trading secrets and thank you so much for joining us. Whether you're a first time listener, are you a part of the money mafia? We appreciate you being here. Now if you haven't been to charing secrets every single episode, what we do is we ring in the bell with our main guest and then we have a recap at the end where we have the voice of the viewer come on and ask all the questions he was curious about during the interview. Well, this interview is a lot different. And that's why I have an intro. It's different because we have the bachelor, the one the only Clayton as our guest. But for the first time ever, we have Clayton join us in the recap. We have never had a main segment guest join us in the recap. Why did we do it? Well, we did it because this interview for the first time ever was live. It was live at ad week conference in New York City. Now at week conference is every year in New York City where leaders and marketing advertising, media, and tech, cover to share all ideas, discuss issues and celebrate the latest innovations that drive the industry forward. And there are all different speakers throughout the week and Clayton and I had the pleasure of doing a trading secrets podcast live at ad week. Now there are like GaryVee spoke there, Kevin O'Leary spoke there. A lot of people that have come on the podcast, we're speaking there. So it was such an honor to speak and have the hundred plus people in the room. And it was really cool because every single chair was filled. So when I ring in the bell with the main segment, you're going to hear. Clayton and I, and sometimes we're interacting with the crowd. So that is why, but we are live in New York City and ad week. And let me tell you, this is an episode you can't afford to miss. We talk about Clayton's journey in the NFL, med sales, the bachelor after the bachelor. And if I had to put one theme to this entire interview, it's the public financial misconception of what you think the reality is, but the truth is spoken in the truth is spoken from Clayton. So if you're joining us, please remember to always give us 5 stars in the Apple reviews. Let us know what guests are topics. We need to cover. We watch it and make sure you tag your Instagram because we may be reaching out to you for more help, feedback and insight. But without further ado, let's ring in the opening bell live from New York City ad

Clayton New York City U.S. Kevin O'leary NFL Apple
A highlight from Andrew Bass Jr. (Part 2 of 2)

Revision Path

01:49 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Andrew Bass Jr. (Part 2 of 2)

"Through in depth interviews you'll learn about their work, their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host, Maurice cherry. Hello everybody and welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host Maurice cherry. Now I've got a couple of just really quick announcements before we get started with the episode. First off, if you haven't seen it yet, we released our holiday gift guide just a couple of weeks ago. Now if you're still looking for that last minute gift for friend, coworker, significant other family member, et cetera, then you might want to check our gift guide out. We had a lot of fun putting it together. We've got a lot of great books and other things that are on there. So if you want to check it out, you can go to the link that we have for it in the show notes. Or just go to revision path dot com and click on the pop up that comes up, it'll take you right to the gift guide. Also, we released a bonus episode a few weeks back on the design of Black Panther Wakanda forever. It's a really deep dive conversation with myself, reside Gilbert, Jordan green, and Paul Webb and we go deep into the plot. The music, the symbolism, the art, and just the overall design of the film. Now we do spoil the entire movie in the podcast episode, so if you haven't seen the movie yet, go see it, but then definitely check out our episode and let me know what you think about it. Also, if you've listened to revision path for any amount of time this year, then you know that we have our job board. And we have the tenth collective, which is this new talent collective initiative from revision path and state of black design. Well, now the job board and the talent collective are combined. So when companies add listening to our job board, they also will get access to members of the tenth collective. And if

Maurice Cherry Jordan Green Paul Webb Gilbert
A highlight from Dr. Lisa Orb-Austin on thriving in the workplace

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:26 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Dr. Lisa Orb-Austin on thriving in the workplace

"Monday. It's our show about the changing nature of work. And now that work is changing us. Just last weekend, I was at the Miami book fair. I've been invited to speak about my new book, the family outing. And I knew almost no one there. As I walked through the hotel lobby, I saw all of these famous writers. People I loved. People like Danny Shapiro and Billy Porter. That's right, Billy freaking Porter because he wrote a memoir last year. And I thought this is so cool, I should go introduce myself to all these people. But instead, I don't know, I got nervous. I skipped the author party, I brought pizza to my hotel room. I hid out. The next day, when I went to my panel discussion, I mentioned this to another author on the panel. She smiled and she nodded. I know what you mean. She said, it's like incredible impostor syndrome. Impostor syndrome, it can be so crippling. I mean, look, I belonged in the room. I'd written a book, I had been invited, but the more intention I got, the more I wanted to crawl into my skin, the more I felt like I didn't deserve it or something, I don't know. My go to resource for understanding anything like this is doctor Lisa orbe Austin. Lisa and her husband rich, they wrote a book about impostor syndrome, several years ago. I had around the show in 2020, and her advice on how to understand and confront impostor syndrome remains one of the episodes people listen to most. Now Lisa and rich, we have a new project. It's a workbook and it's called your unstoppable greatness. It kind of loved that title because think about it. Your unstoppable greatness. It's all about learning to build the workplace culture that you yearn for. And like their first book, it's grounded in rigorous research. When they offer tips, it's because they know these tips will be effective. So I invited Lisa into the studios, and I do mean in person in, she came to the Empire State Building where we recorded this episode. It was marvelous to be in person together. Here's Lisa. So impostor syndrome is experience when you are skilled, experienced credentialed, qualified, but yet have an internalized any of those things. And as a result of not internalizing them, you fear that everyone's going to find out that you're a fraud. As a result of that fear of being found out as a fraud, you then either overwork or self sabotage to avoid that moment of revelation. And that leads to typically to burn out and to over functioning, and in a way, in a method to escape being found out. And you just kind of get caught in these impostor cycles over and over again. You can never actually get an accurate read on your contributions. You are always so connected to the idea that you don't belong in the company of the people you find yourself in that it can eventually actually mean that you don't belong in the company, find yourself. Yeah. Absolutely. Totally. So I want to talk about a bunch of the things that came up in your book, so many things that I actually made a list, which I don't always do. But I want to start with the dynamics of impostor syndrome. In fact, the dynamics of office culture and our interpersonal relationships with the people we work with, they don't come out of nowhere. They start with what we know and Intuit about how relationships work. They're connected to a family system. I wonder if you might speak a little bit about those connections. Yeah, I think one of the things that was really important with this book about talking about systems was that it always seemed so mysterious the system, the system. I don't know how to operate within the system. I don't know the politics of the system. And some of what we were so interested in trying to do with this book was help people to understand the system and understand both a healthy system and a well functioning system, but also systems that actually reinforce your impostor syndrome. And so because impostor syndrome gets started in your early childhood experiences, it's not surprising that because systems are often founded on these early dynamics and these ideas of authority that come from our parents and things like that, that we mimic that in the workplace. So then we then create an environment where we choose environments where we prefer environments that reinforce these dynamics very much unconsciously just because they're familiar, they're routine. They happen over and over again. We just blindly kind of like lean into them in a way that we wanted to make conscious in this book. Right. And so in order to do the work at work, you actually have to personally do the work on yourself to understand yourself, right? Yeah. Especially with dynamics that keep repeating themselves and feel particularly frustrating or particularly problematic for you that you're like, every workplace I have this kind of boss or every workplace I run into this kind of situation. It's usually not an accident, and we call it the repetition compulsion, your compulsive repeat something until you actually find some way to heal from it. And so that's what the book is really focused on is looking at some of not completely, but one piece of the book is focused on looking at early family dynamics that were common for you and how they actually show up in your workplace either through the way that you show up, the way that leadership shows up, the way that you interact with leadership, all of those pieces. And I should say here you keep saying we as you talk about your book and that's because I didn't mention right at the top that your co author is also a previous guest on hello Monday, your husband, which orbe Austin. Yeah. What was it like to write with your husband? It's funny. A lot of people ask us, what's this like to work together? Because we do so much together. And it's funny, we almost don't know what it's like not to work together because we met working together at a career center. So we were working on issues of career and career development. And he's actually the one who helped me kind of burge in my love for the idea of career. I used to hate it. I thought it was just a necessary evil of my profession and he kept connected for me to the thing that I love more than anything, which is identity. And so he connected it for me. In essence, work identity is a very fundamental to understanding people and he often would say the professional's personal, the personal professional, there's this interplay with your personal life and your professional life. It's so important and so rich and so full of places to explore and to change. And so he helped me to understand that that made me actually really love the work. That's so fundamental to what hello Monday is about. We're ostensibly a show about work about careers. But really at the heart of what we're talking about is about why people do any of the things they do. And of course, most of us, we need to work. Yeah. And for most of us, again, not all of us, that work ladders up into the idea of a career. Yeah. So you talk about toxic systems. And I want to step back and ask, how do you identify a toxic work culture? I think for us in the book, it was really focusing on the idea of what becomes toxic for somebody with impostor syndrome. And so for us, we were looking at the toxicity of environments in which they reinforce not feeling good enough, competing with peers, making you feel like you constantly have to over prove yourself, making you feel like you have to be perfectionistic. Those kinds of work cultures are toxic for people who have impostor syndrome because they reinforce constantly this experience of you're a fraud. You don't belong. You're not good enough. Why are you here? And those were the ones we wanted to really examine. There's many, many layers of toxicity, but this is the one that we focused

Lisa Danny Shapiro Billy Porter Billy Freaking Porter Lisa Orbe Austin Empire State Building Miami Intuit Orbe Austin Rich Burge Impostor Syndrome
A highlight from 346: Understand Your Biases, Take Back Control of Your Body & Mind & Live A More Fulfilled Life | EVETTE DIONNE

RISE Podcast

07:33 min | Last week

A highlight from 346: Understand Your Biases, Take Back Control of Your Body & Mind & Live A More Fulfilled Life | EVETTE DIONNE

"So hope is for me everything. I wake up hopeful. I wake up optimistic. I think it really makes a difference for me who has chronic illnesses. It really does make a difference. And whether or not I feel like life is worth it, like the days when I'm really tired and my body is exhausted and I can barely get out of bed, it's still worth it to get up because the world is still moving, like the world is changing better is coming, whether or not I live to see it. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. And I guess we'll just jump in to our chat. So event for listeners who aren't familiar with your work will you tell us a bit about who you are, what you do and why we come to have this conversation today. Yeah, I am a multi hyphenate is how I describe myself. A trained, I'm a trained journalist, so my day job is being the executive editor at this magazine called yes, where I focus on solutions journalism. So thinking about the biggest issues of our day, whether it's racial injustice or indigenous rights, and thinking really forward about what are the solutions to those issues instead of just presenting the problems themselves. And I would say that is something that carries across my life in my career so outside of that an author, a lot of my work focuses on gender and race and size and taking through the lens of pop culture about how we can address those issues and solve them and really think about dismantling those sorts of institutions. So that's a part of my work. And then outside of that, I speak about a lot of those issues and I do it to children. I do it with adults and really trying to get everyone on the board on board with the idea that we can imagine a new world. It doesn't have to look the way that it looks now. The first thing that you said that really sparked curiosity to me is, did you call it solutions journalism? Is that how you set it? I did, yeah. What does that look like? Is that finding experts in the field is that doing your own research? Just fascinated by how that manifests in your life. It's really being connected to and doing community building with people who are on the ground addressing these issues. So whether it's thought leaders or activists or organizers, people who are really ingrained in movements. So I think a lot about one of my favorite people in the world Renee bracey Sherman who is on the ground related to reproductive justice. So when we wanted to do a story about the ways in which activists in Latin America have become a lighthouse for activists in the United States who are focused on reproductive justice, I reached out to Renee like we need someone in Argentina and she said, I know the perfect person. So it's really having and building relationships with people who are not just focused on the problem, but focused on how do we create a better world around this issue, how do we use community to do that and how can the work that I do amplify that message? So it's not just about the bleakness of it, but the hope of it, the optimism of it, like what comes after. Well, and I think when you're getting into an awareness of a new, I hate to say the word problem, but that's what they are. Problems that are facing us in this world in our country, how do you even understand which grassroots organizations are the ones that are truly affecting change? Because I think, you know, when we become aware of something that's going on in the world, like I think of when roe V wade was overturned, and all of the sudden, it was like, I hate to sound like an idiot. I couldn't even believe that that could happen. And you know, and as it was getting closer and closer, it was like, holy shit. No way. No way, and then it happened, and it was like, oh, what do we even do? And so just starting to arm myself with information about which organizations in my local community and the nation that I could support with my platform with my money with my whatever, how have you found that it's best to identify the ones that are truly doing that have the efficacy that we should be supporting because I also think that sometimes it becomes so popular that everyone's doing it, you kind of don't know who you're supposed to look at for guidance. I always say to look toward a person who you trust and ask them about an organization. So no matter what organization it is, if there's someone in your community or even a distant friend who's involved in some sort of movement, ask them, ask them, and I also think social media has been a really great way to figure that out because people will openly criticize organizations that are not on the ground doing the work that they claim to do. So sometimes it's as simple as searching for organizations names say on Twitter or on Facebook or on Instagram and seeing what the criticism is of that organization. And then you can always make a choice of whether or not to support it, but at least you have all of the knowledge about the organization before you decide to throw your support around it or platform it or give money to it. And how did you how did you find your way into this specific type of coverage and journalism? Like, what was it in your past that kind of led you to this place? Oh, that's an awesome question. I am a trained journalist, like a straight up trained journalist, and the way in which we are trained is that we are never the story and that we're supposed to have this objective lens of an issue without any bias or any perspective. And I came to realize that was untrue and graduate school. When I really started understanding that, regardless of whether or not people are open about their biases, everyone has them, and a lot of it is subconscious. So everyone has a worldview, everyone has a perspective. And that really came to the forefront for me when I started supplementing my journalism education with humanity's education. So in history courses and in black feminist theory courses and sociology courses and communication studies, it really helped me develop knowledge outside of just the skill of journalism. And I wanted to figure out how to merge those two things.

Rachel Hollis Renee Bracey Sherman Roe V Wade Youtube Renee Latin America Argentina United States Twitter Facebook
A highlight from To connect with people, care about them, says leadership expert Mark C. Crowley

Jazzed About Work

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from To connect with people, care about them, says leadership expert Mark C. Crowley

"Hello, everyone, and welcome to just about work, where we talk about everything that might have an impact on your career. I'm your host bev Jones. I'm an executive coach, and the author of find your happy at work. Our guest today is leadership expert, Mark Crowley. He spent 25 years in banking and financial services, and it is last job he led nearly 2000 investment brokers to best ever performance. Coming into that role, Mark had no direct experience selling stocks or the other products of these employees were offering. Nevertheless, that firm named him leader of the year and his first year. He did very well in business. These days, though, mark is a speaker consultant and writer. And today he's going to tell us about the new edition of his classic book, lead from the heart. He'll explain why whether you're leading a company or a group of college students. They are more likely to do well if you lead with caring

Bev Jones Mark Crowley Mark
A highlight from 346: ASK RACH How to Escape Toxic Energy & Follow Your Dreams | How to Monetize Your Own Podcast

RISE Podcast

01:11 min | Last week

A highlight from 346: ASK RACH How to Escape Toxic Energy & Follow Your Dreams | How to Monetize Your Own Podcast

"Their community something like armchair experts that the armchairs call her daddy, their daddies, heard something I was listening to Mark Mayer and the other day. He has all kinds of crazy names for his, what's our community called? I don't know, I mean, I am very, I feel like there should be a thing. I feel like you guys should submit to the hotline what we should be called and then we'll vote and we'll choose something and then henceforth it'll be like, hey T. Rex, that that actually makes no sense. Nobody wants to be called that. We could be the podcast community that go by dinosaur names. I'm just saying, you guys, welcome to another episode of ask rage. The weekly show where I answer y'all's questions, you call into a hotline, you leave me a voicemail, like an old school answering machine, and then I answer some of the questions and today's are really good. Two questions that have nothing to do with each other, but I feel like are fantastic.

Mark Mayer T. Rex
A highlight from 345: Elise Hallerman

RISE Podcast

01:47 min | Last week

A highlight from 345: Elise Hallerman

"I always say no one wakes up and says I want to be a drug addict or an alcoholic. No one, we start drinking or using drugs as to fit in or to be social or to anesthetize some sort of pain or discomfort or anything at all. And then it becomes a little bit of a habit. And then we just start and continue and it creeps in so, so slowly. And a lot of times people will say to me, how do I know if I'm an addict or how do I know if I'm an alcoholic? And I always say, especially to younger people, the question you should be asking me is how do you get alcoholism? How do you get drug addiction? In the same way that you would be asking, oh, how do I prevent heart disease or diabetes or cancer? How can I start living healthier? Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast.

Rachel Hollis Heart Disease Diabetes Cancer Youtube
A highlight from How to have good arguments with world debate champion Bo Seo

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:43 min | Last week

A highlight from How to have good arguments with world debate champion Bo Seo

"From standing up for what you believe in, to challenging conventional wisdom, embracing rejection, or finding gratitude every day, our show is your guide to becoming a little less terrible. Not that you're terrible right now. I think you're great, but helping me become a little less terrible. And maybe you'll pick up something along the way. You can find how to be a better human wherever you're listening to this. Hey everyone, welcome back to rethinking. I recorded today's conversation for another podcast I sometimes co host. The next big idea presented by LinkedIn. My guest is world debate champion bosio, who might just challenge you to rethink how to have a good argument. Bo, it's such a treat to finally meet you. Such a pleasure, such a pleasure. It feels like we've known each other a while now. I thought good arguments was exceptionally insightful and I learned so much from it. I was actually a little bit disappointed that I didn't read it before writing think again because I could have rethought a lot of the debate chapter in light of what I learned from your expertise. I mean, the same is true for me because I had the benefit of going off to you. I think I told you that reading that book changed my view of what this book could be. And just the generosity and attention you've shown to the community and thinking about how it's lessons could translate more broadly. That was really instructive for me. Well, honored. And I just learned a ton from your book. And I'm excited to be able to both dig into some of the greatest hits, but then also expand beyond them with some things I'm curious about. The place I have to start is, you are the world debate champion. How did you become that? I want to hear the story. 15 years or something like that. I moved when I was 8 from South Korea to Australia. And I didn't speak English at the time. And I learned that the hardest part of doing that was adjusting to real live conversation, and that the hardest conversations to adjust to were disagreements. And I was also wary at that time of drawing attention to my differences from my peers. As one of the few Asian kids in the suburbs of Sydney. And the combination of those two things made me resolve to be very agreeable. And the thing that broke me out of that was a promise that my 5th grade teacher made me, which was that in debating when one person speaks no one else does. And to someone who had been spoken over and interrupted and spun out of conversation, that sounded pretty irresistible. So it was a kind of a fit, really, and once I was in, I was hooked. And competitive instincts took over the joy of learning. The sense that there was a set of procedures and wisdoms and actions and drills and skills that you could trust almost blindly and hope that the results would follow. That's what I took to. And I started competing for my state and then for Australia and then for Harvard, where I did my undergraduate education and it didn't feel so much like chasing the prize of winning the world championship so much as giving into this current that I think had been running before I joined that will run after I've left this current of teaching people to make an art and a craft out of argument. Well, that's a huge part of what I want to talk about today. I guess for starters, what do you think that most people get wrong about debate? One thing that comes to mind is that it's an essentially destructive activity. One of the skills that people learn to master is dismantling, critiquing, finding holes in, noticing the ways in which authorities incomplete. But one of the things that you learn very quickly is judges and so debates have an adjudicator, someone who says who's won. And they are a kind of a proxy for the audience who's listening. They usually don't look for reasons to vote against someone. They look for reasons to vote for someone. And in order to do that, there's a limit to what criticism can achieve. And so if you can think of two couples arguing about where to go on holidays and one of them is suggesting Hawaii and then the other person is finding all the problems with that and then they say, you know, what about Mexico here all the problems with that? And imagine the person who was proposing all those destinations, getting fed up with all the criticism and saying after a while, what do you propose?

Bosio BO Linkedin Australia South Korea Sydney Harvard Hawaii Mexico
A highlight from $1,000,000 offer to leave Barstool? Barstools Brianna Chickenfry LaPaglia on the $$$ behind her career, the reality of influencing and staying grounded. All sparked from hangover videos!!

Trading Secrets

05:15 min | Last week

A highlight from $1,000,000 offer to leave Barstool? Barstools Brianna Chickenfry LaPaglia on the $$$ behind her career, the reality of influencing and staying grounded. All sparked from hangover videos!!

"She has grown a social media falling to over 400,000 followers on Instagram 1.6 million on TikTok and continues to see her following grow. Each and every day must be nice, Brianna. You have to tell me the secret. Rihanna has established herself as a social media icon and it all started by going viral on TikTok while being hung over in college. We'll get into that. To some it may seem crazy, but Brianna has been able to capitalize on her unexpected rise to fame in more ways than one. We're gonna do a deep dive into how Brianna has been able to create and hold such a strong social media following. What her life at barstool sports looks like and what other ventures she sees herself pursuing moving forward Brianna, thank you so much for being here today. Thank you. What an intro. You like that? Never had one like that before. Did you guys do that on the BFFs podcast? And now we're here with our whatever it is. It's fucking working. All right, we're gonna get into it. I wanna kick it off with this clip. I saw this clip and I said to my manager over here, I was like, it's not that we want her on. We need her on. And so for everyone at home, I'm gonna play the clip. And then I just wanna kind of dive into this a little bit. What also pisses me off and why everyone in the influencer realm gets fucked as no one talks about money. Yeah, it's crazy. And I don't know why it's such a niche thing like if everyone talks about what they got paid for brand deals and how much money they were making, then we would have benefit all of us. Yeah. Like people just don't talk about it. So then you don't know your rate. There's no one to ask. There's no one to go. There's not an influencer coach. Yeah, that's also true in like regular work world too. Like a 9 to 5. Okay, so that's a clip. That's a clip where I was like, we got to get you on. You said it right. That's the crux of this podcast. There is nowhere to go. You have no idea what your value is. So through your crazy journey of how fast it's been and your rise and following and just attention and engagement. have you been able to find out what your value should be for the stuff you're doing? Well, I still don't know my value almost because nobody talks about it, but when I first started, I remember I got my contract with barstool and it was, it was like, I don't know, $75,000 for like a year, but I was like, nobody edited and I followers. And I was like, this is amazing. This is crazy. And I didn't know what other influencers were making that for a swipe up. And I'm like, this is going to be my salary, which I thought was amazing. So I didn't know that yet. And then I got into barstool, and I started talking to people, and even people at barstool didn't want to tell me how much they were making, which was really frustrating because I didn't know what to base anything. I didn't know anything. I didn't know what my coworkers were making. I didn't know what someone with the same level is like followers was making as me. So I didn't know idea where to go. Okay. So that's where I kind of went to Rhea to reinforce. I've been on there. I've been on their show up for questions. And we've come on our show. Yeah, yeah, so I went to them and I'm just like straight up. We weren't even that friends yet, but I was like, how much money do you guys make? It looked at me like I had ten heads. I'm like, I guess that's a crazy question because everyone makes it a crazy question. Yeah. Then they flat out just told me, and I went straight to my boss and I'm like, here's what it should be making. This is what I should be doing. But I was so scared to ask people because it was like, it was such a taboo topic. Yeah, it's interesting. So when they came on, they were saying, and I think this is genius. They go into their annual reviews together. And they said at least they get paid the exact same. So they each know each other makes, and there's never a question like, oh, well, who's bringing more value? It doesn't create attention between them. They're like, we all get paid the same. Do you have anybody in the barstool circle that like you go in together with that you understand exactly what they're making or is it just you on your own? It's just me and this is where it's hard and I think a lot of people that are influencers or do what I do struggle with is I come. My parents have no idea what I do. So they can't help me. I can't ask them for advice. They don't know what I should be making. They have no idea what I do. With barstool, you really don't have management. So I don't have a manager. I'm just at barstool. So I go into these meetings alone and I'm almost like gauging everything off of my knowledge and by myself, which is probably the most intimidating part about it. Sure. Yeah, so I don't really know what I should be asking for, and that's why I made that clip. I started talking about it. I started talking to other influencers. Like, hey, how much money do you guys make? What do you make for a swipe up? What do you make for a brand deal? That's helped me. And one of the tough things about the whole industry. And this is what ended up me starting our own. We started our own talent management company. Because I got off the bachelor, and then there's all these deals coming in, right? And there's all these different agents. And what's crazy is I would have three different agents, pitching me the same brand, the same deal, the same delivery, and the difference in the price point was like four X. So I'm like, where the fuck's, how? Everything's the same. How the hell am I getting paid one fourth of what someone else is offering me from the same brand? It's because there's so many hands in the pot. So even when it's challenging to benchmark your value against other people, in this world, you can't even benchmark your value against yourself because of all this shit going on. It's crazy. It is not. Let's take a little break, and I'm going to tell you about how you can get up to $500 instantly. So here's the deal. Fourth

Brianna Rihanna Rhea
A highlight from aqw: WHAT I LEARNED FROM OPRAH

RISE Podcast

06:44 min | Last week

A highlight from aqw: WHAT I LEARNED FROM OPRAH

"Hey guys, it's Rachel, and this is a quick word on what I learned from Oprah. Story time. I have loved, loved, is the only word I can use. Loved and admired and idolized Oprah Winfrey since I was a little girl. I am what you call an Oprah baby, meaning I grew up I was a latchkey kid and every day I came home from school and I sat down on the carpet in front of the TV and I watched The Oprah Winfrey Show every single day. I'm sad for the next generation who don't understand how incredible or important she is to people in our generation, but that's neither here nor there. I love this woman. One of my life goals was to speak on Oprah Winfrey stage. You've made me heard me talk about this. I wrote it down in my start today journal. Every day, every day, every day. I speak on Oprah Winfrey stage, I speak on Oprah Winfrey stage. And I honestly didn't know how this would manifest for me. I just knew that every once in a while she would do these tours for like super soul Sunday or super soul Sessions or maybe I would do something with own. I didn't know what it was. I just was laser focused on the idea that someday I would have the opportunity to do this thing. And at the beginning of 2020, which feels absolutely insane that this happened in 2020, I had the opportunity to open for Oprah on her, oh golly, I can't even think of the name of the tour. Is she did this like ten city tour where she went to all these big venues. It was like 15,000 people in the audience and she would have celebrities that she would interview and she'd have speakers come on. And they had reached out to me her team and said, we'd love to have you speak and I stopped crapping my pants long enough to just be like, oh my gosh, yes, absolutely. This would be amazing. And I was so excited. They were like, you know, we'll pay you to come and do this. And I said, I don't even need money. I just want to bring my girlfriends because it was Oprah Winfrey and it was Michelle Obama so lucky I got to be there when Michelle Obama was her interview and we I just wanted to bring my best friends and it was so funny because when we were there, we're all just like having the best time and freaking out and people kept saying like, oh, is this your publicist? Is this because people have an entourage? They bring all these people. I'm like, no, these are just my Friends. And people were so confused backstage. You just brought your friend. I'm like, yeah, 'cause Oprah's here and Michelle Obama's here and this is amazing. We had the best time, made me heard me tell the story before where I sort of knew that my typical style of speaking maybe didn't exactly align with what miss Winfrey was putting on that day. She's a lot more like spiritual and there were like sound bowls and your girls over here jumping up and down to macklemore and telling gross stories and I was meditating that morning on do I kind of downplay what I would normally do or do I just show up on stage as myself. And I decided to show up on stage as myself and I opened my keynote telling a story about losing a tampon inside of my body, which is, it sounds very gross right now, but I promise you it is a hilarious story and every audience is dying when they hear it. And as soon as I start telling the story, I'm like a few minutes in and Oprah, I did not tell you this, but Oprah was sitting in the audience. And so I had known that in advance, like, oh, she's going to be down there, which was terrifying to me because I thought, oh, my lord, if I have to do this, but she's watching, I'm probably just going to implode. But I somehow kept it together. I start my keynote. I'm telling my story and I'm speaking for about 8 minutes, the audience is laughing. I'm having a great time. And I see her stand up and leave her seat. And when Oprah stands up, I mean, there's like 57, there's like a S.W.A.T. team and the Secret Service. There's just everybody, her security team takes her off and I'm like, on stage, and it's a really weird thing, but when I am speaking, I can also process what's happening in the room. One of my Friends is a musician and he was saying the same thing. Like he can literally be performing his hit song. And in the back of his mind, he's also thinking about something as a weird compartmentalizing thing. In any event, I see her stand up and in the back of my mind, I'm like, oh my God, she hates my speech. She literally hates my speech. So the remaining time of my keynote, I am giving my keynote while in the back of my mind freaking out because my hero hates what I'm saying and is totally pissed off. And I'm like, oh my God, I've offended her. She's invited me here and I've messed this up and I've done a bad job. And the voice in the back of my head is like, no, it's fine. You're being dramatic. This is great. And when my speech is done, she comes on stage. And she says, the first words out of her mouth, she goes, girl. I'm glad you figured out where that was going, 'cause I was trying to understand what on earth you were talking about. So in front of 15,000 people, she's come up on stage and made me very aware that what I was reading when she stood up from her seat was accurate. That she was not happy that I was telling a story about a tampon, right? And I, on that stage, I die, y'all, I die 1 million thousand deaths. And because I'm like, oh my God, this is my hero, and I'm this is the worst. It was horrible. So she's interviewing me. She's asking me questions, and I'm just like, I'm trying to keep my shit together. And the last question was, she's like, wow, you know, your book, it sold millions of copies, you've been on The New York Times Best Seller list for over a year, like I just keep seeing your name on there and you've had all this success. What do you think it is about you and your work that

Oprah Winfrey Oprah Michelle Obama Macklemore Rachel Winfrey Secret Service The New York Times
A highlight from Dorie Clark on Reinventing You

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:55 min | Last week

A highlight from Dorie Clark on Reinventing You

"Hello Monday, our show about the changing nature of work. And how that work is changing us. Okay, so quick question, don't overthink it. What's your plan B? What are you going to do if your job goes away? In your industry flat lines. Because this is definitely part of what's going on this year. Take media companies, I spend most of my career working for them. And I've been really crushed to watch so many of my friends and former colleagues really talented people get laid off. And it's got me thinking, as we prepare for this next big shift, maybe we just shouldn't be looking for a job like the one we have. Maybe it's time to look for something else. So how do you begin to do that? If anyone has a good answer to that question, it's my fun Dory Clark. Dory's a master at reinvention. She's actually written a book on it called me inventing you. She's written a couple of books, and she's a coach, and she teaches. She's taught recently the business school at Columbia and duke. Which is to say that she's qualified on paper, but I'm here to tell you she's also qualified in person, a couple years ago, I called her up for a drink when I needed advice on my own side hustle. Why Dori? Well, she's all action, tips, ideas, and she's always in your corner. That and she speaks from experience, Dory lost her job after 9 11. It really shook her. Here's Dory. It's something that has been on my mind for a long time. Honestly, because during one of the last great national calamities in 9 11, I lost my job as a newspaper reporter and was unemployed and was given four days of severance pay and suddenly had to support myself. So I really dove head first into the question of how do you deal with being laid off and losing your job in the midst of a truly terrible and frightening economic situation? So I definitely have a lot of thoughts and ideas to share. Wow. So as a journalist, I will say that every year that I have been in this profession, I have seen layoffs at the institutions I've worked for. And that is not targeting one institution. It's every institution. It is an industry that's deeply troubled. But 9 11, that's going back nearly 20 years. What was your life like, then what did you think you would do before that happened? Well, I think that somewhat analogous to our current situation, right now, if you are a journalist, let's say, it's not really a huge surprise when people get laid off because that's a thing that happens to journalists. But in 2001, it was a stunning and shocking thing that a journalist would be laid off because we forget it now, but the year 2000 was literally the best year all time in history for the print journalism industry. It was dripping in profits. It was so lucrative and then I totally remember that. Not to stop you. But I shortly after that period, but within a decade after that period, I went to work for fortune magazine, and they always talked about that trip to Hawaii for the entire editorial staff in the year 2000. And I was like, this is the life that I want. And that's what I thought I was signing up for, Jesse. I thought it would be all trips to Hawaii, and yet no. So I was really in the first wave of people that were laid off. And it had literally just never occurred to me that this could happen. I mean, first of all, it was my first job out of grad school. So I didn't know what was what, but I just never thought the journalism wouldn't be a secure industry. And I think for a lot of people who are experiencing a layoff now or who might feel that they are threatened with such a thing down the line, I mean, no one foresaw a pandemic like this. And so it's not like people have necessarily had a long time to think, oh gosh, I see all my friends around me being laid off. I should probably be cooking up a plan B for many people who are experiencing it today. It is coming like a bolt out of the blue and suddenly they have to deal with this very rapidly and very quickly. If you are in a place where you're needing to come up with something new or you suspect that you may in the future, how do you even start to think about what that means for you? Well, there's a couple of ways to think about it. So the first is about the urgency level, essentially. Because if you are in a position where you don't necessarily need to earn money tomorrow, but you think, oh, okay, this is a wake up call. I need to start planning for it. Then whenever there's a longer time horizon, you can be a little bit more thoughtful a little bit more deliberate. And you can start taking what I will call longer term steps that will position you better down the road. And so there's activities that you can do in that situation. Maybe it is starting a blog or a podcast or starting to write and create content on LinkedIn, something that can establish your expertise in your field, whether you want to continue in your current one or maybe you want to plan a longer term pivot and transition to another one. And those are great ways to get started and lay the groundwork. I want to jump in there and really hammer that home a second because this really is your superpower Dory. You are personally very, very good at it. One thing that I think is new about the time that we live in right now is that it used to be that if you were a journalist, as you began, and as I am, then it made sense for you to be writing on these platforms branding yourself as it were. But today, kind of anything that you want to do professionally, you're going to better position yourself for the future if you brand yourself through content. And I think that's really overwhelming for a lot of people. And a lot of people ask me, and so I would ask you, where do I begin? How do I know what is useless and spinning my wheels and what matters? I will second what you're saying. I think it really is important because ultimately, when you are creating content, we are putting something out into the world, that is the way that people who do not already know you personally can get a better sense of who you are as a person and what's powerful about that is it eliminates a large part of the risk that's involved in hiring you. And whenever you can do that, it is way better for your career. If you can make it less risky for people to pick you rather than someone else, that is a great thing. So one of the best ways that you can get started is literally to just make note of all of the questions that people ask you all the time. You're at a cocktail party. You're hanging out with people, and they have questions about your field, your industry, they want to know certain things. Maybe there's myths or misconceptions that bother you. You might have a contrarian opinion. You might say. No, location based interfaces are not the future of XYZ. Well, okay, tell us why, share your opinion. Put it out there. If you don't feel ready to start putting your own opinions out there, something that I tell people is a fantastic way to get started with training wheels is to interview other people. To reach out to colleagues or senior leaders or even somebody potentially who has a book out, I can guarantee that for many people, if you're not talking about world renowned level, almost anyone with a book wants to promote that book. And if you say, hey, can I interview you? Can I talk to you and write something about it, even if it's for your LinkedIn page, or if it's for something on a platform like medium where anyone can contribute, the odds are, they may well say yes, and it's a great way to help shine a light on someone that you admire and also begin to create content under your name and to hone your own thinking about professional development

Dory Dory Clark Fortune Magazine Dori Hawaii Columbia Jesse Linkedin
A highlight from Andrew Bass Jr. (Part 1 of 2)

Revision Path

02:17 min | Last week

A highlight from Andrew Bass Jr. (Part 1 of 2)

"Through in depth interviews you'll learn about their work, their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host, Maurice cherry hello everybody and welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host, Maurice cherry. Got a couple of quick announcements. First off, if you haven't seen it already, we released our holiday gift guide. Just a few weeks ago, we did a kind of earlier on because we know that, you know, there's still supply issues in terms of shipping and all that sort of stuff. So instead of us releasing our gift guide in December like we usually do, we did it much earlier in November. So if you haven't seen it yet, go check it out. It's all revision path dot com. As soon as you go to the website, just click the pop up that comes up, it'll take you right to it. I'll also put a link to it in the show notes if you want to check it out. Had a lot of fun putting it together so I really hope that you enjoy it. Secondly, we released a bonus episode a couple of weeks ago in case that hadn't hit your feet yet. We did a episode on the design of Black Panther Wakanda forever. It's a really great conversation with myself, Jordan green, Regina Gilbert, and Paul Webb. And we not only go into the plot of the movie, but the music, the symbolism, the art, and the overall design, really great. If by chance you're on Twitter and you've seen Hannah beechler talking about the production design, this episode is an excellent compliment to what she's doing there. So you see the movie, go check out that bonus episode. We did it right around. I think a week after the movie came out, so make sure you go check that out. Also, if you listen to the show for any amount of time this year, then you already know what I'm going to talk about next. It's the tenth collective. So the ten collectivist kind of changed a bit over the month since we launched it earlier this year. Of course, it includes our job board, which is now the tenth collective job board, but the tenth collective is also a talent collective initiative that's from revision path and state of black design. So if you're a company and you want to add a listening to our job board, you now get access to members of the tenth collective. And if you're a black designer looking for work like if you've been impacted by any of these layoffs that have happened this year in tech and design, you want to be a member of the tenth collector because what that is is a

Maurice Cherry Jordan Green Regina Gilbert Paul Webb Hannah Beechler Twitter
What Is the Value of a College Degree?

the NewsWorthy

01:15 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Value of a College Degree?

"Hi brian. Thanks for coming on the newsworthy fisher. I appreciate it. So i let me just ask. What's your take on the value of a college degree in today's world. Shoot we wanna value in having that college degree but when it comes to employment and job opportunities in some ways it's becoming less valuable because of how competitive the labor market is become as you look up and down the labor market from not just hourly employees retail employees but salaried up and down the continuum what companies are finding is that there's not enough people for all of the jobs that they want to hire for so one. They're relaxing a lot of the historical constraints that they've had on the jobs that they're hiring for and that includes things like previous experience educational certifications and different degrees. That people have had so a lot of companies in particular across the last two or three years have been relaxing many of those constraints. The other thing that's going on is that for people that might have some of those degrees or experiences or whatever it may be. They're also able to ask for more money in the labor market so the other reason why companies are expanding their horizon of who to hire. Is that for people without college degrees. They're able to find that job and they're willing to extend an offer them. But perhaps at a slightly lower compensation level than people who do have a college degree

Fisher Brian
How To Keep Your Job On Vacation With Hubspot's Pamela Bump

MarTech Podcast

02:14 min | 1 year ago

How To Keep Your Job On Vacation With Hubspot's Pamela Bump

"Pamela as marketers. Get a break as well. Some of us wanna take a vacation but you know marketing never stops how marketers keep their job while they're on vacation i think there's two elements to marketing teams keeping their jobs while on vacation. I you look at the marketer the marketer which i'll use myself as an example we've all been through a wild year we've had a lot of pivots. Twenty twenty was so wild and unprecedented. We all wanna break. I wanted a break. Everyone on my team definitely wants a break but we want to take that break without throwing any of our processes off so one of the things that i do is focused on really strong communication. I regularly have one on ones with teammates that i work with most often and at these one on ones i might give them a heads up saying. Hey i'm gonna take some time off at this time. If you're going to take some time off let me know. And then we'll come up with a plan of how we can best prepare each other for this time off so we make initial plans there and then on top of that. I will email my team. And i'll say just a heads up that next week. I will be off from this date to this date. Here is my out of office. Plan for example when i'm running emails. I usually schedule the blogs emails a week or so ahead of time. If i'm going to be out. But i will pick another responsible person. A. dr is what we call them. A designated responsible individual to take over the email of something needs to be changed or content. Isn't gonna go out that we've scheduled so that's one of those things l. Include in my out of office plan of who to reach out to. If something urgent happens. And i will also remind people of when they can reach out to my manager could she can make calls for me usually end. That's just a good way to remind people that i'll be out. Usually nothing urgent will happen in the summer. When i when i have taken time off but it's good to have that information and people know whether something is something they should email me about and i'll return the message as soon as i get back or if it's something needed to reach out to another teammate. About but i usually try to schedule as much in advance as possible and then make a little out of office plan.

Pamela A. Dr
The Theory Of Relativity in Consumer Decisions

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:45 min | 1 year ago

The Theory Of Relativity in Consumer Decisions

"All know about uncle. L. e. equals m. c. squared. But that's not the relativity calculation that i'm talking about what i'm talking about is a calculation that we pretty much all make before we make a purchase certainly before we make a non essential purchase and it goes a little something like this. Let's say i'm at the pub. And the price of a state is four dollars more than the price of a boo coincidentally. The price of a beer is also four dollars so now the relativity calculation. I need to make ease. Do i have a stake and one beer or do i have a burger and to bees. Pretty easy decision. Or let's say you booking a flight and the price of an upgrade to business class is two thousand dollars now you could use that two thousand dollars when you get to the other end to have two nights in the suite at a fancy swanky hotel in town so the relativity discussion and calculation. You need to have is. What's the relative value. Is that gonna give me more value at the other end or am i better off spending the two thousand now to sit in a slightly bigger box and maybe have metal cutlery. Instead of plastic utensils on the plane these are the sorts of calculations that you will consume as a making whenever. They're buying something especially when it is non essential so you need to be aware of that when you have both setting your pricing and also sending your marketing you need to make sure that you are conveying the values and the benefits of your product. Because you know damn well that they are making a calculation relativity calculation of what else they could be doing with their money so when you think about the theory of relativity you've got uncle. Albert's theory equals mc squared uncle trance theory. It's all about how many bees you can have with your steak

Albert
The Manager and the Vaccine

Manager Tools

02:08 min | 1 year ago

The Manager and the Vaccine

"Cain that pandemic of cove nineteen has made our lives much more interesting to say. The least interesting is the word we're gonna use for the purposes of this context and the roles of us at work and of us as managers at work have become much harder as we've been saying for years. Remote management is much more challenging then managing in person and most managers. Let's be honest. We're barely keeping up before they moved remote and now this new world the remoteness of it all the complexities. That come with all of this whole situation throws even more at us. Remote management the lack of communication zoom. Burn out with shop. Priorities supply chain disruption travel restrictions budget. Layoffs tension challenges. I mean there's a lot and here we are one more to add to. Our list of stressful items is vaccinations. What is the manager's role in terms of nations. And how do we do our duty and as always we've got the answer for you so we are gonna cover four things today. I private organizations are within their rights to mandate vaccines second managers. First responsibility is to the organization third. The manager must support organizational vaccine roles. Fourth and finally effective managers will communicate frequently with their directs. We start with the fact that a private organization is within their right here. Yup obviously we have suspect or we assume that you know this and in case you don't private organizations at least in the united states are entitled to enforce any reasonable precaution that is in the service of the organization's mission mission and

Cain United States
It's Time to Reconnect With Your Early Year Business Goals

Purposeful Social Selling

01:19 min | 1 year ago

It's Time to Reconnect With Your Early Year Business Goals

"A little bug. I want to put in your ear. want you to be thinking about the last ninety days of this year and i want you to ask yourself when you sat down and wrote out your goals january one this year. Are you where you wanted to be at this point this year and i want you to get honest with yourself of why you think that is and maybe what store you might be telling yourself of why you haven't either gone as far as you thought you would or you haven't hit your goals or may maybe why started to negotiate on your goals. But you know the last ninety days of the year. It's the last quarter of the year and it truly is a really critical time breda dig in create a lot of consistency and create your sustainable business habits now because the work you do now is going to position you for the fruit that you're going to see the first of the year because that's a lot of people you know. They have some christmas money. They're ready to buy of you know if you're in the wellness wellness industry. That's when a lot of people are ready to recommit to their health goals. The new year is a really big time of year for this industry. So i really want to encourage you to be thinking about that now and how you need to be serving and adding value to your audience. Because like i said the work you put it now is going to help. Create the results for the first of the

Breda
How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:06 min | 1 year ago

How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

"Let's go through the stages of purpose you broken down into three different stages. What is that all about her right. So think of like this our first stage or what i often call are doing stages imagine when you get paid to do something that you could be flipping burgers working at a gas station or whatever that may happen to be. It's task oriented. Where really you are a meat puppet. You know you're just doing something for the money and also you're trying to just cover your basic needs your maslow's hierarchy of needs in the grand of things and the next level is where you're at your knowing phase and you are maybe getting paid for knowing something's got to be a white collar job But then you go through your next phase in life for your at your being phase and that is where you're paid for who you are not what you know not what you do and i think there's a fourth level to this so this is different than the stages but the force level is being a full human expression. Not just a human being meaning to to express yourself where you're being rewarded for your expressions in life now. What does that mean in terms of the first second and third stages so first stage is the basic needs. The maslow's the second stage is The experiences you're providing in the third stage has to do with true transformation your true purpose in life where you've done the work you know who you are. You know your greatest value. Your unique abilities are what we call your superpowers and you found a way to provide huge transformative value. But here's the big kicker. The highest state is when you help other people find their purpose and you help them. Identify and and In help them achieve and be in that state all the time so that is really usually the final stage of most people's lives is helping people identify find live inside their

Maslow
What It Means to Understand Your Power

RISE Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

What It Means to Understand Your Power

"To recap last week. I talked about the first step in having resilience. Which is this ability to bounce back from hardship to stand back up and go again. What does it mean to be resilient and to be strong and to keep going last week. I talked about the idea that for me. I think the first step is making peace with what is and the way that we make. Peace is through our mindset and the way that we look at things so that's what last week's episode was about. Go dig in and start there but assuming you've already consumed that one this week. I wanna talk about power. I wanna to talk about your personal power from a few different perspectives. Because resilient really is about string and nobody comes into this world resilient you come into this world completely dependent on other people to keep you alive in fact my friend. Tom and i were just talking about this. And it was in tuesday's episodes if you didn't listen to my interview with tom bill. You go check this out. He talks about this idea that humans are the only animal that come into the world with just zero skills and ability to keep themselves alive. Think about a horse horse comes into the world and twenty minutes later. It's walking we come into the world and we can't do anything and if you're designed in such a way we have to presuppose that there's a reason for that yes. We are much more complex than we can think and we can speak and we can do things that animals can't do and so it's easy to think that it takes longer to evolve and become functioning human beings because we have more things to evolve but you could also look at it another way and ask if there's something more at play than just the facts that your wiring more complex maybe what's at play is the reminder that we always have the ability to grow and evolve.

Tom Bill TOM
Can I Use Another Job Offer in a Raise Negotiation?

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Can I Use Another Job Offer in a Raise Negotiation?

"You tell your company got another job offer it could signal to your employer that you're looking elsewhere. Then they could start thinking of you as a short term employees here for a good time but not a long time and looking for the next big opportunity. You don't want your employer to think of you this way you are. Employers are more likely to give you more opportunities at that job if they think of you as a long term investment. That said i do think that a new job offer can be excellent leverage. You just need to approach it delicately but a word of caution. You should factor in the possibility that this conversation may affect your relationship with your employer or be prepared for your employer to call your bluff and tell you go head. Simon take that offer by. Don't let the door hit you on the way out. That's why you should never make up a second offer. If that doesn't exist for everyone else out

Simon
The Importance of Having A Clear Vision Towards Your Goals

The $100 MBA Show

01:33 min | 1 year ago

The Importance of Having A Clear Vision Towards Your Goals

"The end of the day it starts with a clear vision. I didn't make this up. I actually picked up from out of all people. Arnold schwarzenegger arnold schwarzenegger is probably the best example. I can think of when it comes to vision. He says it's very important to have a very clear. Simple vision that you can look at the. You can imagine your head in a second because that's your driving force for him. He had multiple visions so at start. It was becoming mr olympia. Which is the highest title for a bodybuilders. And then he wanted to become an a list actor and then he the fill that vision that he wanted to be the governor of california which is the largest state in the us. And i think the eighth largest Economy by gdp in the world. And i picked this up in his book. Total recall his autobiography And it's really important because there are days that are tough. There are days that are harder than others were. You're required to do things each just don't feel like doing Your might be a little burnt out. You might be a little bit tired and might be dealing with are annoying thing and I often have to go back to the vision and say to myself okay. This is what i'm doing this for. This is why it's worth me going through this slog a little bit because it's one step closer to my vision by doing this. It gets me closer to my vision. And that's how arnold schwarzenegger puts it together like every rep. He did got him. Closer to mr olympia. Every set he did gone closer to that. You know that title.

Arnold Schwarzenegger Mr Olympia California United States
A highlight from 344: ASK RACH How to Accept & Love Yourself Fully | How to Deal With Toxic Family Members

RISE Podcast

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 344: ASK RACH How to Accept & Love Yourself Fully | How to Deal With Toxic Family Members

"Spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. Before we

Youtube Rachel Hollis
A highlight from 343: My 10-Step Morning Skincare Routine (with Products!)

RISE Podcast

01:20 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 343: My 10-Step Morning Skincare Routine (with Products!)

"You know, I think it's easy to, if you're not into things like skin care, if you're not into makeup, if you're not into doing your hair or like all of these sort of beauty things that you see on a YouTube or that you see people doing on social media, I think it's very easy to be dismissive of it and to think these people are crazy. These people are vapid, why are they so into it? Why are they spending that much money or spending that much time? And for me, I really think that it's a form of self care. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast.

Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from The four-day work week: luxury or necessity?

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:26 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from The four-day work week: luxury or necessity?

"Thanks to Deloitte for sponsoring this episode. Hey everyone, it's Adam grant. Welcome back to rethinking my podcasts on the science of what makes us tick. I'm an organizational psychologist and I'm taking you inside the minds of fascinating people to explore new thoughts and new ways of thinking. I'm excited to bring you one of my favorite conversations I've had this year. It happened at the World Economic Forum in Davos. When a government minister, a global CEO, a policy leader, and a social entrepreneur, all walked in for a panel I was hosting. I'm shortening the work week. Get ready to learn from Hillary cottam, Jonas pricing, Anne Marie slaughter, and ahu del rumi. They've all played major roles in rethinking and reshaping how we spend our time. Welcome everyone. I am thrilled to welcome you all to the four day week discussion, which I'm very glad we're having on a Wednesday instead of a Friday because then maybe no one would have shown up. I'm Adam grant, I'm an organizational psychologist and author. And I've been fascinated by this question of why do we work the amount that we do for a long time? I study work for a living. But I don't think it should necessarily necessarily define us. And it was about a century ago that Henry Ford not exactly known for his enlightened views on management and taking care of humans, reduced the workweek from 6 days to 5. Because he found that people were more productive, morale went up. There was more loyalty. There was lower turnover. And he said it was good for business. And then we could start to wonder, well, why are we now stuck on 5 days? Was that ordained from on high? Or is this in fact a human invention that deserves to be rethought? A lot of organizations around the world are rethinking the work week right now. You've seen the trials by the Icelandic government by Microsoft Japan. There's a New Zealand insurance company that's been doing it for years. And the data are really encouraging so far. It's still early, but for the most part, performance has either gone up or stayed the same. And people end up having more time to live their lives. And if there is a silver lining of COVID, it has to be that we rethink our priorities. That we may decide, we don't want our jobs to be the center of our lives. And we want to plan work around life as opposed to vice versa, which too many of us, particularly in the west have done for too long. So the purpose of the panel today is to talk about, is the four day week actually viable. If so, what should it look like? And how do we make it happen? Because I have met some people in Davos who do not think we should even work as few as 6 days. So I think we have, we have some minds to change. Let me start with social entrepreneur. Hillary cottam. Hillary, can you give us some history and walk us through? How did we get to 5 days a week and where should we be going? Okay, so let me say to start off the question was necessity or luxury and I think that this is a complete necessity for environmental reasons for human well-being flourishing reasons and also for economic reasons. And I think what's really interesting is that when you ask me about history is that we think time is a mutable, but if we look at the history of work, it changes. So we used to live by prayer time, some societies still do. Then we moved to agrarian time. Then we moved to industrial time, which you've referenced, which was really complicated. I mean, the reason that we have in Western Europe and maybe in the U.S. kind of big clocks in our town squares is because the biggest problem industrial leaders had was getting people to work on time because working to a clock with such a kind of alien idea. And now, of course, we've been internalized the clock. But when industrial time started, people thought that there would be radical experiments. And one of the most interesting is Kellogg's in the 1930s. It was one of the biggest factories the breakfast cereal, he offered his workers 6 hour shifts from 8 hours. For exactly the same pay. And what happened was that people flocked to kennels, journalists, that Hoover administrators, social scientists, their amazing household studies of what happened because everybody thought industrialization would lead to less work. And so what's really interesting is that at Kellogg's productivity went up, dramatically, accidents went down, the economics of the company really changed. And people's lives improved. People said that they had, quote, more life that they could fit in, taking care of people. They had time to make things, they ran their own sports teams, things fitted into their lives. And what we know now is that, in fact, that wasn't the kind of experiment that it's very interesting why not, which we probably don't have time for, but even before the pandemic, the ILO and WHO said that work was killing us. And for the last two years, I've been running workshops with workers and kind of post industrial places. And what they ask for is not a four day week. What they ask for is a rethinking of the linear life with less work. So I think it's a necessity, but it doesn't go far enough. Because four days is a male solution to this problem, because basically it doesn't think about care because care of our children or our parents or just being with friends doesn't happen in four days, it happens around the day. So what we actually need to do is rethink the boundaries of time between work and care and rethinking the linear life, of course, doesn't mean just the work study kind of in blocks. And maybe we need some new boundaries so that we do have time to play and to be and so on. So a four day working week, a necessity, a start, but I think not the picture. I think we could get on board with that. To be really clear and how many days you think we should be working total though. Are you advocating for a two day week a one day week?

Adam Grant Hillary Cottam Jonas Pricing Anne Marie Slaughter Ahu Del Rumi Icelandic Government World Economic Forum Davos Deloitte Henry Ford New Zealand Japan Hillary Microsoft Western Europe Kellogg Hoover U.S. ILO
A highlight from If you pay 50% of retail prices, youre paying too much! Queen of couponing & TikTok star, Kiersti Torok reveal$ what YOU need to know to save BIG on Black Friday, Cyber Monday & beyond

Trading Secrets

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from If you pay 50% of retail prices, youre paying too much! Queen of couponing & TikTok star, Kiersti Torok reveal$ what YOU need to know to save BIG on Black Friday, Cyber Monday & beyond

"The following podcast is a dear media production. I got a trading secret for you you got to listen up to, especially if you're single. Matched it a study in 5000 U.S. singles revealed that the cost of being single has skyrocketed in the past ten years. But I'm also writing a book on financial independence in the relationship between money and love. And being financial independent is so imperative. So hear me out here. This information all comes from match, especially if you're single and you're going on dates. 84% of singles say they prefer a casual date. 30% of them prefer to do a free activity. 29% of them want to go somewhere close to homes. They save on gas. 26% would rather home cooked meal versus eating in a restaurant. 25% are just fine with meeting for a coffee or drinks. And 24% think they're going on dates in inexpensive restaurants are better off. So if you're in the dating game, you don't have to empty your wallet. You don't have to spend an exorbitant amount. You could do free activities. You can meet the right people. And through the match app, you can do that. Match believes that the most important relationship is with yourself. So, in a world where you can choose to do anything, or anyone, choose you first, because dating someone who knows what they want and won't settle for less, that's sexy as hell. You already know, the best relationships show up when you show up for yourself. And there's never, ever, been a better time to try match. So, download the match app today. Give the match app a try. And trust me when I tell you through their studies, these are individuals who are looking for a casual fur state. Download the match app today.

U.S.
A highlight from Chris Rudd

Revision Path

07:01 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Chris Rudd

"Check out our post that we put on social media. We have one on Twitter, one on Instagram. There's also a link to it in the show notes. We have a lot of fun putting it together. For those of you who may not know, we've put together a holiday gift guide, I think every year we've done her vision path, except for 2019 that was a bit of an outlier, but if you want to check out what we've got on the list this year, go check the link. I hope you'll enjoy it. Secondly, we released a bonus episode last week on the design of Black Panther Wakanda forever. It's a really great conversation with me, Jordan green, reginae Gilbert, and Paul Webb. Talking about not just the plot of the movie, but also the music, the symbolism, the art, and the overall design of the movie. If you haven't seen the movie, it's got a lot of spoilers, so maybe don't listen to the episode, but if you have seen the movie already, definitely go check out that bonus episode. We really had a lot of fun putting it together and we hope that you enjoyed that as well. Now if you've listened to revision path for any amount of time, you know we've got a job board, of course we just listed some job listings at the top of this episode. And of course you've heard me talk about the tenth collective, which is this new talent collective initiative from revision path and state of black design. Now, unless you've been under a rock for the past few weeks, there have been tens of thousands of people displaced and put out of work because of layoffs. We're talking Amazon. We're talking Twitter. We're talking meta. Lots of people right now are looking for work. Present company included, by the way. So we put out this talent collective called the tenth collective as a way to really help you in your job search because we know that there are companies that are out there looking to hire black designers. And if you're a black designer looking for work, then you should join the tenth collector so you can be matched up with these companies. If you're not a member, it's free to join, you just have to fill out a short profile and you're all set. We'll put a link to it down in the show notes, and it's really super, super easy. You'll only get contacted by companies when they're ready to talk to you. You can hide your profile from companies or you can remain completely anonymous. The tenth collective is really meant to be a resource for you, whether you're looking for your next opportunity or not. Just great to have in your back pocket because you're going to be sending out resumes, you're going to be talking to people left and right. Let us help you out in your job search as well. Head over to the tenth collective dot com to join or check out the link in the show notes like I mentioned before. This episode of revision path is brought to you by hover. Building your online brand has never been more important. And that begins with your domain name. Show the online community who you are and what you're passionate about with hover. With over 400 plus domain extensions to choose from, including all the classics and fun niche extensions, hover is the only domain provider I use and trust. So what are you waiting for? Go to hover dot com forward slash revision path and get 10% off your first purchase. Now for this week's interview, I'm talking with Chris Rudd, founder of shy by design in Chicago, Illinois. Let's start the show. All right, so tell us who you are and what you do. Chris Rudd, founder and CEO of shy by design. And my world is to give leadership to the organization as we practice our antiracist design and systems and social service work around the country. House 2022 been going so far. It's been good. It's been busy, I think, because our work is again centered on anti racism and designing antiracist outcomes. After the racial awakening of 2020, lots of organizations and institutions are trying to figure out a, how are they perpetuating systemic racism and then B figuring out pathways to stop and from our perspective, hopefully, to heal the communities and folks that they've harmed over the past. So yeah, it's been a lot. Great work, but also heavy work. Yeah, I can imagine. So I would guess you probably got like an influx of work during that summer of 2020. I think there's a lot of people I spoke to on the show where during that summer are like right after that summer, they just kept getting hit up with requests to speak or to consult or to work or anything like that. Did you kind of have that same swell of interest during that time? Yeah, a lot of speaking, I think during that time, particularly people were really trying to wrap their heads around what it was. And so there was a lot of, can we just talk to you? We want to hear what you're thinking about this. Then the work started to pick up, but we actually developed a rubric for our firm on what we would do and what we wouldn't do. So we really started to vet the organizations that wanted to work with us to see if they were actually about the change that they say they were or if it was just we want to put a black face to the work to somehow validate the efforts, even if they knew it was going to fall short. And even if they didn't know, we would work with them to say, hey, here's where we see your shortcomings. And if they were willing to understand and accept that, then we could move forward. If they weren't, then we were happy to walk away. That's good. 'cause I can imagine people probably came all out of the woodwork that found your firm and was like, wait a minute, that's a black guy. Let's talk to them. Let's see if we can help it. Yeah. And then really, you know, they thought they knew. That was a lot of them. All we gotta do is just, it would come out in this way. All we have to do is just make this one simple change. And boom, racism is gone or, you know, we will function differently. And the hard part for us is helping them understand that changing an organization changing a system, an institution is a huge shift or requires large scale shifts from top to bottom, not just in terms of personnel, but also in terms of philosophy, practices, policy, right? All these organizational structure. And so that was a hard thing for folks to deal with, right? It's been doing this thing for so long and from your perspective, you've been doing a great job, right? Profit margins may be through the roof or you've put out a couple of surveys of rate us and for the most part you send them to people that like you and you're like, yep, that was a great and then the negative ones that come back. You're like, oh, they don't really get it. And so, yeah, it's been interesting journey. Well, let's kind of dive in more and talk about your firm's shy by design. What you describe as a collaborative and cultivating space for designers of color, like that already just that hit me like a ton of bricks there. Tell me more

Chris Rudd Jordan Green Reginae Gilbert Paul Webb Twitter Instagram Amazon Illinois Chicago
A highlight from A guide to surviving layoffs

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

05:11 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from A guide to surviving layoffs

"It's been more than three years since I have been creating this show most of that time with our fearless producer, Sarah storm. And in all that time, we haven't had a moment quite like this in our economy and at work. I'm talking about layoffs. Any other I've been moments where there have been a lot of layoffs. The beginning of COVID, for example, all of a sudden it seemed like everything was in flux, but that moment was a cute, and it shifted quickly. This fall feels different. There's been a long prolonged even time of resizing and rightsizing companies with names you would never expect to hear layoffs from our reducing their staff by significant numbers. And maybe you're one of the people who has been impacted by that. Today's episode is for anyone who has layoffs on the mind. I don't know that we have the answers at hello Monday. I don't know that we have new jobs. I don't know that we have a promise that everything is going to turn out okay. But what we do have is experience so much collective experience of the listeners who've gone through these experiences. And of me and Sarah and let me tell you, Sarah, in particular, she's kind of an expert on these things and deeply passionate about them. And so this week, Sarah is going to host a very special episode on layoffs. Here's Sarah. Thanks, Jesse. My spouse and I are no stranger to layoffs. Between the two of us we've experienced several over the last decade. The reasons were different every time, but that never made it second, any less. Each time we ramped ourselves into survival mode, we freaked out, sometimes we fought no matter the circumstances we felt so scared and so alone. Like Jesse said, we can't stop layoffs at hello Monday. But we were thinking maybe we could help with the scared and alone part. So if you're newly laid off or you think you see a layoff coming down the horizon, today's episode is especially for you. For the next half hour or so, we've got your back. First, we're going to hear from some hello Monday listeners who have been through layoffs of their own. Then I'm going to sit down with Andrew seaman. He is the host of LinkedIn's get hired and he's the guy at LinkedIn to hear from on job search and careers. He's going to offer some tips and advice for how to make it through from wherever you are right now to your next job. First up, we'll meet swetha regmi. Sweaters a career and resume strategist and CEO of her own company, teach and do. Here's her last story. When I got laid off, everyone's like, hush hush, like on my body it's my fault. You know, I'm so embarrassed. People need to hear. They're not alone. I was laid off in one minute over the phone when I was actually working from home. I was sick. So the other people were let go before me. I think 9 of them. And then I was supposed to be on that batch. So they did it over the phone. I was in the banking field, contact center. Yeah, and I was managing team. At that time, I had a leadership experience of more than a decade. Sweater had a sense that something was up. But that didn't make it easier. After the fact, swetha realized that her identity had become totally bound to her job. And she needed to do something totally different to work through that. I was relating myself so much with a title. I felt like I was nobody once I lost that title. Once the title was taken away, I did not know who I was. And I really had a self doubt and very, very low confidence. And I did not have a career clarity. How do I bounce back? And I wanted to go out there and do something really meaningful, so I could feel that I am, you know what? I'm not at the worst moment, and there are a lot of people out there in the world. They probably do not have basic needs. So I decided to go volunteer back home. I'm from Nepal. So I pick one charity. We used to sponsor a lot of kids there. I wanted to meet them. Those are my kids. I felt empowered and an I felt so blessed when I came back. I was fully charged, and I thought, hey, you know what? They took my title away, but they can never take my brain in skills and that was the emotionally healing moment for me. After that, sweater tried to go back to her old industry. But she wasn't happy there anymore. Instead, her side hustle started looking more and more appealing. I was doing this career coaching career consulting to newcomers and immigrants in Canada already on the side but not charging them. So these were my impact that I was feeling it. I'm very good at it. And then I was so good at promoting my direct hire as well. So I thought, you know what, this is the industry I want to be part of it. So I started helping people out for free, free reviews, free coaching, and interviews, and results were really great. So I said, you know what? I'm going to officially launch and now I'm going to charge people as well. And that's when she founded her company teach and do. Now she helps others

Sarah Sarah Storm Jesse Andrew Seaman Swetha Regmi Linkedin Swetha Nepal Canada