Business Development

Biz Dev - the intricate art of growing a company, understanding markets, pursuing customers and building relationships. Listen here for the latest advice, success stories, tips, tricks and long-term strategies, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from 285: #RachTalk EP 14: My Interaction with Hot Firefighters, Surprise Spirit Animal Visit, Private Concert with My New Guitar Skills

RISE Podcast

00:59 min | 7 hrs ago

A highlight from 285: #RachTalk EP 14: My Interaction with Hot Firefighters, Surprise Spirit Animal Visit, Private Concert with My New Guitar Skills

"Welcome to Rach talk, my weekly show where I sit here, sit wherever. Drink caffeine and talk about random things. Today I'm telling you about the interaction I had last night with a group of hot firefighters, the fact that a spirit animal flew into my house today and I'm giving you a private concert with my new guitar skills. Jack, I'm just putting some cuticle oil on because, you know, I don't get my, I don't get like nail polish anymore, which means that my natural nails have got to look salmon. So that means a lot of cuticle oil. Also, if you pull this out on the plane, the flight attendant has a panic attack. So you can't put nail polish. Yeah, okay. Like now polish on the plane. I'm always like, it's oil. But

Jack
A highlight from [AI is Here] Energy Sector AI Transformation - with Dan Jeavons of Shell

AI in Business

02:28 min | 8 hrs ago

A highlight from [AI is Here] Energy Sector AI Transformation - with Dan Jeavons of Shell

"If you want to influence AI strategy and identify high ROI AI projects, but you are not going to be writing the python yourself. You found yourself in the right place. And what you might be thinking here in the right place is, wait a second, an episode on Wednesday. This is not usual. And you're correct to say that this isn't usual because we're starting a new series. The series is called AI is here, sponsored by samba nova. We've been given the latitude to find excellent AI experts across industries and ask them two critical questions. Number one, where is AI hitting the ground running today in your industry? Where is it already making an impact? What are the places where it is really adding value today? And number two, what does that mean for the future? What do we need to do to adapt? What do we need to do to move forward? And what is this new paradigm we're moving into? And we're kicking off with the energy sector and not just any energy firm, one of the largest energy firms in the world, one that you might have heard of once or twice called Shell. We've never had shell on the program, and so this was a great excuse to be able to bring them on. And we're not just talking to anyone at Shell. We're talking to Dan jevons, Dan went to school at Oxford, spent a bit of time at Accenture and has spent the last nearly 17 years at Shell. He was last the general manager of data science, and he is now the VP computational science digital innovation in IT CTO. In this episode, Dan talks about leveraging AI to simulate the operations of an energy firm in order to achieve better business and sustainability outcomes. How can we take all the myriad factors of what kind of fuels are moving where, what kind of energies are moving to what kind of places and determine the best way to route and leverage all of those resources again to achieve our goals for the bottom line and also our goals for the planet. Companies are being increasingly held accountable to their impact on the planet and Dan also helps to paint a picture of the world we're headed into, a world of a much more distributed energy ecosystem and a world where the environment is even more power amount for energy firms. And I think he does a fantastic job of connecting the dots between where AI is currently making an impact at Shell and in the energy space. And how that impact needs to be developed needs to be cultivated by the energy space to basically prepare for the world that we're walking into. Again, that distributed energy future. Even if you're not in the energy space, I think that the topic of really figuring out where AI is making a dent in energy today should be fascinating. And I hope you all enjoy this episode. Again, the special episode of AI is here is brought to you by samba nova systems. Some manova believes that AI is here, and we've partnered with them to bring you AI trends and impacts affecting different

Samba Nova Dan Jevons DAN Accenture Oxford Shell Samba Nova Systems Manova AI
A highlight from MBA2050 Q&A Wednesday: How long does it take to grow a following on Twitter?

The $100 MBA Show

00:47 sec | 9 hrs ago

A highlight from MBA2050 Q&A Wednesday: How long does it take to grow a following on Twitter?

"For today's show comes from start your first online business. My all new ten part audio course on Himalaya learning. This is a course is gonna get you from zero to one that's gonna get you from thinking about your business to actually launching that business, getting it out of your head and into the real world. We cover things like validating your idea, creating your first product. Pricing it, marketing it, financing your business. Even creating your business website and more. Check it out and Himalaya dot com slash MBA and use code MBA to get a 14 day free trial. Again, the Himalaya dot com slash NBA promo code NBA. I said this many times on the podcast, but I'll say it again. Business does not take place on social.

NBA
A highlight from 284: Overcoming Fear of Failure | Part 2

RISE Podcast

02:08 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from 284: Overcoming Fear of Failure | Part 2

"Welcome back, guys. It's right here with today's episode of the podcast. We are continuing our conversation about the fear of failure. This is a keynote that I gave last year at my rise conference and the intention behind it is to unpack the layers of our fear to really look at in the eye and understand number one, why we are so afraid, but also what to do about it. If you didn't hear last week's episode, I would suggest you go back and start with part one. But if you've already devoured that and you're ready for a little bit more, this is our continuing conversation on fear of failure as always with so appreciate it if you would share this with someone that you think really needs it guys. We will always always always have the podcast available for you for free and all that we ask in return is that you get the word out and share it with someone who could use it. All right, I hope you dig this episode, check in with me on social. Let me know what you think and here's to being afraid, but freaking doing it anyway. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. The wrote something down that surprised them. It

Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from MBA2049 How to Improve Your Luck in Business

The $100 MBA Show

04:35 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from MBA2049 How to Improve Your Luck in Business

"Whether you believe in luck or not, you can call this several things regardless, there are things that you don't have full control over in business. As in life, things are unpredictable, but there are circumstances that allow more chances for unpredictability and no control than others. If I go on a trip and travel across the world and visit different cities in different countries, the likelihood of me getting sick is higher than if I just stayed home. Now it doesn't mean that I will get sick if I travel or that I won't get sick if I stay home. There's no guarantees in life and in business. But how can we improve our odds to get the result we're looking for? That's what we're going to discuss in today's lesson. I'm going to give you a few tips to improve your chances of good luck, of things going your way, or at least all the options that are presented to you in a situation are not all leading to a catastrophe. So let's start with tip number one. And this is probably the best thing I can give you. If you take anything away from today's lesson, it's this. Choose a market, you know very well. When you're looking to start a business, to offer a product or service, make sure the market you're about to enter. When I say Mark, I'm talking about the people you serve. That community, are you a part of that community? Do you understand that community? Do you know them very well as a group of people? As a culture, so to speak, let's say I wanted to start a business in sports. A market that I know very well and audience I know very well in that niche would be basketball. NBA basketball would be specific. A market that I don't know very much about is rugby. I barely know the rules of rugby, let alone understand who are the tastemakers in that community. Who are the people that have influence? How do these people think, what do they like? What they don't like, what irritates them. What are they looking for? What are their needs are? These are all things that can help you do a better job with your business and not get unlucky. Let me give an example a real life example where I chose the wrong market and how I got unlucky several times. And before I get into this example, you might be thinking, Omar, why would you choose a market you're unfamiliar with? Well, it happens all the time. Entrepreneurs love opportunities. They see opportunities. They see, wow, there's a thing here. I can make money here. There's a need in the market. Let me serve this market regardless of my experience in that market or me understanding the community behind it. So let me give you that real life example. One of the businesses I had well over 15 years ago is my own ecommerce store we sold custom tailored clothing for men. I started this business because I used to tailor my own clothing because if you don't know I'm 6 5, I got long arms and you know it's very hard to shop in a normal shop when you're my size. My friends love the clothing and ask me, could you make me some clothes as well? That snowballed into a highly sought after product and business, I pursued that opportunity, but unfortunately because I didn't love this community. I didn't love this market. I didn't understand it well. I was making mistakes left and right on how to price my products, how to market to them, how to even use the right copy on my sales pages because I'm not into fashion, so to speak, or I'm in love with that community, or in that market, or even a part of that community, meaning that I'm not even, I wasn't a part of any Facebook groups or forums or anything like that when it came to fashion. I don't know what was in season attic season, so I was really shooting in the dark, and a lot of times I would miss. I would miss the mark big time. And lose out on a lot of opportunities, lose out money, time, effort, all kinds of stuff. Now fast forward to now, where I'm running webinar ninja, a platform for live teaching, my likelihood of success is higher, I can get lucky easier because I understand this very well. I was a teacher for 13 years. I have multiple degrees and certifications in teaching and assessment. I understand the educational world. I know the creation world I've created products and courses and podcast episodes, as you know, all my Friends, all the people I know online are in this space. I understand eat, breathe, drink all of this all day long. All right, all right, let's move on to tip number two. Now this is harder to implement than it is to say. But here it is. Simplify. The more

Rugby Basketball NBA Omar Mark Facebook
A highlight from Ep227: How To Achieve 100K Downloads In A Year - Netta Gorman

The Podcast On Podcasting

04:18 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Ep227: How To Achieve 100K Downloads In A Year - Netta Gorman

"Another episode of the podcast on podcasting. Thank you for being here, podcasters. Today we're going to be talking to someone that has started a podcast and got a 100,000 downloads in one year. And that's wonderful because I'm hoping that I can extract some of the things that she's doing that's allowing her to be able to get to a 100,000 because you know what the average is and neta, do you know? Most people hit 10,000 downloads after one or two years. That's the normal. So it was your first year that you already hit a 100,000. Is that right? Yeah, just over a year. Yes. Okay. If you're listening and you're like, Adam, tell me more about neta, her bio is in the show notes. You can scroll right down, but there's a couple of interesting things that I'll start mentioning now. We're going to derail our podcasting conversation for a minute to talk about sweets or the lack of sweets. Now her podcast is called life after sugar. Life after sugar, it took her 45 years. She was doing like the three mils a day like everyone is taught. She is in Canada, but in the U.S., we're certainly taught that too. Three square mils, they gotta be square, they gotta have a lot of breads and they've got to have fruits and vegetables. You know what's funny? The reason that I was excited to talk with you are reason because there's more than one. Is because lately I've been doing a lot of fasting, intermittent fasting, sometimes I'll skip a few days, sometimes I'll try to see what my body does. If I only eat meat for a certain amount of time, only eat sardines, which people are like, yuck, but I actually like them now. Only eat sardines, or I've even tried a fruitarian diet. It was only like 6 days that I could last. I had to eat something else. But do you mind sharing just a bit of that background? Kind of what got you into doing life after sugar and eating the way that you eat now and kind of what that looks like. Only because it's interesting, not everybody does it, and I think it'll definitely help us understand why you started your show. Well, here's the thing. I have absolutely no background in nutrition or health and wellness or anything like that. I can hear them originally from England and I teach English as a second language in the French speaking town in Quebec, Canada where the whole of Quebec is French speaking. And I live in French, I work in English. This has nothing to do with my business. I am a teacher. This is as far away from a business person as you can get in mindset. The thing was that for my health, I never had a white problem, but I had a lot of digestive issues, won't go into the details, but let's just say chronic constipation was one of them. The problems that I had, I was told to do all sorts of things up my fiber intake, especially. And none of it was helping. It was actually getting worse and worse. By the time I was 45, I was going to the bathroom like once a week. I was just in pain, a bloated eggs and pains everywhere. And it was suggested to me by a nutritional therapist to cut sugar one other things to and flour and sweeteners. I mean, that's pretty much like 90% of food on the shelves to see if it could help. There were other issues that we also address, but this is one of the things. So she suggested this to me back in 2015, I was 45, and I said, no, no, thank you. What are you crazy? Who would do something like that? So I resisted it and I rejected it for the longest time. What happened was that I wasn't feeling any better. And so it was really either do something that you've never tried before, or carry on with what you've been doing and feel no pun intended, but feel like crap. I ended up trying what she said for just two weeks, cutting out all forms of refined sugar flower and sweeteners for two weeks. Because I thought, well, you can do anything for two weeks. So that was long story short. After those two weeks, first week I felt awful and I had detox symptoms, as it were, which I wasn't expecting because I didn't know what the heck I was letting myself in for second week I started feeling much better much more energetic, the few pounds that I did have to lose started melting off me. I just felt like I was going back in time and feeling younger. Again, you know, I was writing on my Facebook world just to sort of keep myself countable and I kept doing that.

Neta Quebec Canada Adam U.S. England Facebook
A highlight from HIBT Lab! UNLESS Collective: Eric Liedtke

How I Built This

07:47 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from HIBT Lab! UNLESS Collective: Eric Liedtke

"More voices, all ears, NPR podcasts. When building a business, there are tons of moving parts, one that's often overlooked is having the right network. Thankfully, with AT&T business, you can pick the best wireless plan with the features you need for your small business. For example, your teams can work remotely with phone to laptop tethering and up to a hundred gigabytes of hotspot data on the best plan from AT&T business, wherever business takes you, AT&T business has the features you need. Visit ATT dot com slash BI Z uy W after a hundred gigabytes with their AT&T unlimited elite plan, hotspot speed is slowed to a max of one 28 K BPS. How I built this is sponsored by Meryl, a Bank of America company. Did you know that people spend 5 hours a day on their phones? No surprise, right? That's how you're listening to me right now. But while you're on your phone, why not make your money work harder for you? Meryl helps you pursue your goals, whether it's buying a home, securing your child's future or your own retirement. Digital investing tools so impressive, your money never stops working for you with Merrill, a Bank of America company. What would you like the power to do? Learn more at Bank of America dot com slash Merrill wondery. Investing involves risk, Merrill Lynch, pierce fenner and Smith incorporated, registered broker dealer registered investment adviser, member SIPC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Bank of America corp, investment products are not FDIC insured, are not bank guaranteed and may lose value. Hello everyone, so my big news, I got COVID. You can probably hear that in my voice. Anyway, I wasn't able to do any interviews this week, but we wanted to make sure you have brand new stuff to hear in your feed this week, so we're releasing this additional brand new episode of how I built this lab today. And if you haven't heard the lab, well, think of it kind of like a sandbox where we explore all sorts of big ideas connected to entrepreneurship. Anyway, we'll have another lab episode out this Thursday and then next week we'll be back to our regular schedule of releasing a new episode of how I built this on Mondays and how I built this lab on Thursdays. Thank you so much for your support and understanding. Now, onto the show. Hello and welcome to how I built this lab. I'm guy Roz. Today's guest is Eric LEED key. He's spent nearly 30 years working for Adidas, which is actually how it's pronounced. It's one of the biggest sportswear and apparel companies in the world, and he started there in an entry level job in the 1990s, eventually making his way up to the executive board and becoming global brand president. It was actually Eric who pushed the company to partner with some of the biggest names in the entertainment industry, leading to collaborations with Kanye West and Beyoncé. And along the way, he helps revitalize the Adidas brand. But while he was climbing that corporate ladder, Eric also came to see the environmental impact of the fashion industry. So much of the performance sports apparel Adidas is known for the shoes and t-shirts and running shorts and backpacks and water bottles. It's all mostly made from plastic, which eventually becomes plastic waste in our landfills and oceans and rivers and lakes. So Eric began pushing Adidas to make their clothing more sustainable using more recycled materials, including recycled plastics recovered from the world's oceans. But that wasn't enough. So in 2019, Eric left one of the biggest jobs at one of the biggest brands in the apparel industry to start his own clothing company, unless collective, which makes clothing entirely from plant based materials. No plastic at all. So at the end of that T-shirt or jacket's life, it can actually decompose. Eric LEED key, welcome, thanks so much for being on the show. Great to be here. All right, 26 year career at Adidas. And what you really became known for was a an obsessive focus on sustainability. So first of all, when we think about the apparel industry, right? Not many of us think about sustainability. And I did ask one of the biggest apparel makers in the world. Tell me how, you know, how you sort of had this kind of epiphany that things had to change while you were there. Yeah, I guess it goes just to give you a little context. We were doing a turnaround for the brand. The brand had fallen to its lowest level in years. It share price was trading in the $50 range. Wow. Investors were up in arms. Activists were warming up. The press was calling for our CEO's head. And it was kind of a tumultuous time. And instead, Herbert hire the CEO at the time, didn't decide to step away. He decided to change up the board. And that's when I came into the board. And what he looked at me said, hey, you need to reset the brand. And whatever you do, don't ask for permission. Just ask for my advice. And with that, I kind of got to work. Because those are words I actually live by to this day, because I really like that kind of attitude. But anyway, with that, we got to work. And we really became a much more consumer oriented brand than we ever been before. And really focused on through sport, how can we change lives and really took that on ourselves? And so when we looked at that, of course, as a sports brand, you want to make product that can run faster, jump higher, do whatever the sport necessities are. But we recognize that the culture of support doesn't stop when you leave the playing field when you lead to court. It goes into the stands. It goes into the hallway. So it goes into the music venues. So we started to unlock that potential of the brand and that's where things like Kanye West came in or Beyoncé and those things kind of added into the brand. But then the third thing we kind of looked is like the world is kind of a tumultuous place and it's on 24/7 with our consumers. So if you're focusing on your consumer, it's like, yeah, you have to care about helping them in sport. And yes, you have to be relevant in the culture of sport. But you also have to kind of make the world a better place for them. And how do we do that through sport? And so we started to tackle some big social or climate issues. And the one that really hit home to me was the impact that the fashion industry has on the environment. And once you see and once you hear the degradation of the planet and fast fashions, planned obsolescence, contribution to that, you can't unsee and not hear that. And so I really just committed myself committed the brand to changing that. And I'm super proud of what we did there. But also, you know, kind of flipped a switch in my head and knew that this was going to be my life's calling. I remember because I've seen you talk about this, of course, and we've met in the past. And something that you would say is, there is enough plastic in the world to fulfill all of our new plastic needs for the next 50 years or something like that, right? I mean, if we were to recycle all of it. Yeah, it's what I like to term is plastic is a forever material, which means there's not a piece of plastic that's ever been created that's not still with us today in some shape or form. So if you think about in plastics is kind of a recent invention, if you will, really, really didn't come up until the late 30s and really started to hit its heyday in the 50s and it was a miracle material. Unfortunately, it's very good. And so it just doesn't go away. And yeah, I think in the fashion space, you've got arguably 60 to 70% depending on what brand and what performance features you're looking for are made out of polyester, which is a form of plastic.

Bank Of America Adidas Eric Leed Merrill Meryl Beyoncé Eric Pierce Fenner Smith Incorporated Sipc NPR Kanye West AT ROZ Fdic Herbert
A highlight from MBA2048 Must Read: The Minimalist Entrepreneur by Sahil Lavingia

The $100 MBA Show

08:53 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from MBA2048 Must Read: The Minimalist Entrepreneur by Sahil Lavingia

"Going to be some terms in this book that you might not understand. And that's okay. You can look them up if you're using a Kindle, you can actually just highlight them and look them up yourself right away. But if you are a beginner, it's actually a good book to read because it's going to kind of set up your mindset in the right direction in the right way. Now, in essence, this book is written to advocate the idea that a minimalist entrepreneur somebody who builds a sustainable, profitable business, and grows at its own pace, not at the pace of somebody else, like a VC, like an investor, somebody who's pushing for growth and a return on their investment. He really enforces the idea that you got to be profitable. Right from the start, from day one. And to think in those terms. And I actually really strongly agree with him because if you do this, you're setting up your business for success. You're making sure that you can continue to build and grow and do what you love. Listen, if your business is profitable, it's making money. You're not losing money and you enjoy what you do, you can keep doing it forever. You're playing with house money. This is why profitability is so important. When you're profitable, you're in control. You're not indebted. You're not weak. You're not reliant on the help of others. You can run and keep the business alive on your own. The other concept he really stresses in the book is community. And this is something that I don't hear enough about in the business world. And he's so right. You need to build a community a movement around your idea around your business because your community is going to be how you power your growth and your marketing really. Because they're going to tell other people, they're going to be believers of what you're trying to do, and they're going to spread the word. And you can't do this unless you contribute to a community. So it's really important for you to start thinking about that. Start being part of a community, certain networking start talking. This is what I'm talking about. In terms of sharing your expertise and helping other people, I've talked about this in previous episodes. And you can simply do this by choosing one social media platform that you enjoy. If you don't get any joy from Facebook or Instagram or TikTok, don't worry. You don't have to be on there, but choose one that you feel is most comfortable for you. For me, it's Twitter. And this is where I invest my time and try to build relationships and be part of a community and contribute to my creator, my coaching and teaching and learning community. Another concept that he talks about that again, I don't really see a lot of people talking about it and it's build as little as possible. Now he's talking not only about MVP like a minimal viable product, but also think about what you can outsource what you can automate to other people or services. And in today's day and age, there are so many options. There are people are building whole software companies with no code because there are no code options now. The reason the services like Amazon and Google to power their businesses. People are reusing resources or buying resources like elements of UI like tailwind UI if you're in the design world. People using templates and already made products and just plugging them into their existing business. And in terms of your MVP or your minimal viable product, talks about shipping early, meaning share it or allow your users or allow your customers to consume your product early when it's not perfect. You don't want it completely polished. You actually want it to be at its very basic state so that when you give it to a customer, they have something to say. They have actually feedback to give you to tell you this is what they want. This is what they would change this is how they improve it. This allows you to not have to do or redo work, creating something in a couple of weeks and putting it out there and then getting feedback and iterating is far more productive than working on something for months or even years than putting it out there and realizing nobody wants it. And then you've got to start iterating and you're ready a year or two behind. One of my favorite parts of this book is where he talks about selling to your first hundred customers. And he talks about educate your customers, don't sell to them. I love this. Don't try to convince them of anything. Show them why your product is worth buying. Teach them how your product can help them. You can even do a head to head comparison with your competitors. Why are you better? That's what they're thinking in their head, show them and teach them why you're better. And if you can't become better, you have to change the product then. And use this process to learn more about the problem so you can solve more problems for them. His insights on marketing is actually very unique and quite good. He talks about the best way to market your business is by being yourself. No one can be you, okay? No one can create an exact clone of you. So you're going to be unique. And this is going to allow you to stand out. So share yourself share your own experiences, share why you started this business. And why are you so passionate about it? For example, I run a software company. It's all about life teaching. Webinar engine. I try as much as possible to share why I started this company. Well, because I actually was a teacher for 13 years in the classroom. And when I started becoming an entrepreneur, I thought it was fascinating to be able to teach at scale across the world. And I wanted to make it easier for people to just focus on their content on what they're teaching and just focus on being on a great teacher, and not on the technology. Now, why do I share this? Because it's a unique perspective. It's my story. It's who I am. It's my why. And when you share something that's personal unique and other people resonate with it, it's incredibly strong. And this is one of the best forms of marketing. One of the things he mentions in his marketing chapter is to spend money on ads last. That should be a last resort or the last step in your journey. Meaning, work on building your following on social, work on building an email list, okay? Work on being a part of your community, speaking on stages, being a taste maker. And when you've exhausted all that stuff, are you become an expert at all that stuff, and you've had success, move on to ads. I got more on teddy's most read the minimal entrepreneur but before that, let me give love to today's sponsor. Support for today's show comes from novo. Fortune favors the bold, the strong, the brave. For your business to break out of anything holding you back, you need business checking as brave as you are. Introducing novo business checking. Novo is powerful, simple business checking. An unlike the traditional banking model, novo has no minimum balances, no transaction limits, and no hidden fees. Instead of a one size fits all approach, novo is customized to your business to save you time and free up cash flow, with seamless integrations to stripe Shopify QuickBooks online and more. Sign up for novo for free and join the community of over a 150,000 fearless small businesses who found the customizable business checking solution that admires the brave. If you're a listener of the show, you know I always say it's important as a first step when building a business when starting a business to open up a business checking account. The separates your business expenses versus your life expenses. This makes accounting super simple. This makes it easy for you to track your progress from day one. Even before you make your first dollar, sign up for your free business checking account right now at novo dot CO slash NBA. Plus, $100 MBA show listeners get access to over $5000 in perks and discounts. Go to novo co slash NBA to sign up for free. That's a novo dot co slash MBA. Nova platform Inc is a FinTech, not a bank. Banking services provided by middle 6 federal savings FA member FDIC, terms and condition supply. The minimalist entrepreneur by Sahel lavinia was a powerful read. I want to give you a few more insights that I got from the book. He shares this idea of growing at your own pace, growing mindfully, not only yourself but your business, but also not running out of energy. This is a void thinking you always have to do more and earn more and grow more. This will burn you out. He also talks about how to build a house you want to live in. When you're building a business, you're building your own little world as their exhibit says. Your own little utopia. Build a business that's based on your values. On the way you want to live on the way you want to work and who you want to work with and build a company that actually tells the world

Instagram Amazon Novo Facebook Twitter Google Novo Dot Co Teddy Novo Co Nova Platform Inc NBA Sahel Lavinia Fdic
A highlight from MBA2047 Why You Should Offer a Faux Free Plan + Free Ride Friday

The $100 MBA Show

05:23 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from MBA2047 Why You Should Offer a Faux Free Plan + Free Ride Friday

"I was on a call with Patrick, who is giving me some advice when it comes to pricing and packaging. And in the discussion, he mentioned the term faux free plan. And I asked him, what's that? Well, he explained to me, it's not exactly a free plan, but it's such an inexpensive plan. It gets people to try you out. It gets people through the door. And it covers your expenses, and this could work no matter what you offer, whether it's a software or an online community or a library of materials, whatever it is. If you have a reoccurring membership of some sort, you can launch a faux free plan. And by the way, even if you're selling physical goods like in ecommerce, you can do this. Who's the biggest ecommerce business out there? Amazon. And one of their moneymakers is their membership. The Prime membership, which is a monthly reoccurring. So as I teach these lessons, think about how you can apply to your business and don't be afraid to be a little bit creative. So let me give you an example of a faux free plan. Now, like I said, faux free plans work really well for businesses that whenever a customer comes on board, there is an expense involved. There's something that's going to come out of your pocket to pay for the service to pay for that member. So here's the example. ConvertKit, ConvertKit is an email marketing software, we use ConvertKit, it's fantastic. Their founder Nathan Barry has been working super hard on it for about 8 years now, and him and his team have done a fantastic job. Now, even though ConvertKit has a free plan, they also have a faux free plan. If you go to the pricing page, you will see that their first plan is $9 a month billed annually. $9 is pretty cheap. You don't even think about it. Yes, the plan only comes with 300 subscribers. But it's enough for somebody to get started. Just like a trial, or a free plan. I think this is a brilliant, brilliant idea. It gets people through the door. But not any kind of people. Serious buyers, people that are willing to put a little bit of money. A little skin in the game to try you out. And in exchange, you get a customer, a paying customer. And you stay profitable on a per customer basis because obviously somebody who's paying very little money every month, they're gonna get less as a member. And utilize your services at a lower scale. So if you have a product, if you have a service, if you have a for whatever it is, and you're thinking about, you know, I'm gonna go with maybe 49 and $99 a month, maybe a higher tier at one 50 a month, and you'd love to get into freemium. You'd love to maybe offer a free plan or even a free trial, but the free trial might be abused. The free trial might be costly on your side. can't afford to service these people, then a full free plan is brilliant. Because like ConvertKit, you can offer a really low, low priced entry point. $5, $9, whatever it is. And this allows your customer your potential customer to say, there's very little risk here for me to get started. Worst case scenario, I pay for one month, it costs me the price of a cup of coffee. Something I probably don't think twice about. In some ways, it might even be just as appealing to sign up as a free plan. Now what's great about this is that now that you're actually charging the customer, you can offer a more full experience. Most of the time, people can give a great experience to free members or free plan, holders because they just don't have endless support staff. So maybe email supports available to them, but not chat support. Often a lot of companies have free plans. Don't even offer support to the free members. So by charging somebody, even as a small amount, you're able to say, hey, I can serve this person and make them feel great. And have a full experience so they can later on upgrade and grow with me. Now, I'm going to give you a huge benefit of the faux free plan option. There's no development or planning or building costs. When you're trying to offer a free plan or a free trial with no credit card on file or a limited trial or whatever it is, there are some things you're going to need to do in terms of your offering or in terms of the technology to limit that free user. We're talking about limits of features, limits of time, making sure that they're locked out of their account after the trial is over. All that kind of stuff and making sure they can be upgrade. There's a lot of intricacies here. And believe me, I know, we have a free plan. We've had a free trial for years. And the point here is that it is a lot of work to offer a freemium model, a pure freemium model is a lot of work on the company. It also opens you up for a lot of vulnerabilities, a lot of bad actors, people that are signing up and abusing your service. You don't have to deal with any of that with the faux free planned concept, because it's literally another plan. It's just another pricing choice. An acts just like your other plans, but it's just much more. Affordable. It's less expensive, and you don't have to worry about restrictions or time constraints or locking them out who are making sure they can upgrade or any of that stuff. It's just so simple to implement. This is why

Nathan Barry Patrick Amazon
A highlight from Ep226: How A Meetup Group May Help Your Podcast Grow- Part 1

The Podcast On Podcasting

05:42 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Ep226: How A Meetup Group May Help Your Podcast Grow- Part 1

"So if you are trying to grow your business and what you're doing to be able to get more exposure, a meetup group might be something that you want to consider. So let's dive into that now. Most hosts never achieve the results they hoped for. They're falling short on listenership and monetization, meaning their message isn't being heard, and their show ends up costing them money. This podcast was created to help you grow your listenership and make money while you're at it. Get ready to take notes. Here's your host, Adam Adams. What's up podcaster? It is Adam Adams and as you might have guessed, we are talking about meetup groups. How they might be able to grow your podcast, how they might be able to grow your business, how they actually might be able to grow you as a person. Let's dive in. So as I record this episode, we're just a little over two years past the beginning of the pandemic. That really started back in like march of 2020. And not long ago from the time I'm recording this episode, airlines started letting you back on the planes without wearing a mask. So it's kind of an exciting time. And people are starting to feel a lot more comfortable about getting out in person. They want to go to events. They want to have that IRL experience IRL means in real life. Sure, you might have your podcast and that's of a lot of benefit when you look at the three pillars of influence. Your thought leadership platform is critically helpful for you to be able to do more deals. To get more business. And additionally, meeting people in person is one of the other three pillars of influence. So meeting people in person is a pillar of influence where it's going to allow you to get face to face with your customer with your client with your investor. So you can do more deals. Do more real estate deals. If you're a coach or a mentor, you can do more of that if you're an attorney, you can do more of that. So it doesn't matter what you're doing, having a meetup group can allow you to be face to face with your perfect avatar. You're a perfect person that you would be doing business with. And just since we mentioned two of the three pillars of influence, the third one is social media being somehow active on social media. We're not really speaking of the three pillars today, but those are them. So that you can understand. We are talking about meetup groups. And now that it's been well over two years, people are going back. People are excited to be able to be on the planes without their masks or most people are. There are still a few people that are wearing those masks as I record this when they go to the grocery store and there's a few people that wear them when they go to the gym in a few people that might wear them on planes too. But that's more of an exception than a rule. It seems as though 90 plus percent of people are stoked that they don't have that additional thing. And what that says to me is that meetup groups are going to be really starting to blossom in flourish just like they did when meetup first started at the end of 2001. If you remember where you were during I certainly do, I remember the exact moment that I heard planes were running into big buildings and maybe The Pentagon and things like that. And I was like, holy cow. I was in Los Angeles in 2001, and I was scared because LA is a pretty big city too. And I thought to myself, I might be in danger, and I was at this huge mall. And that's what was going on. Well, meet up dot com, the meetup headquarters. They were created after 9 11. They knew that people were looking for that IRL experience. of know this because I actually was at meetup headquarters. I flew out there a long, long time ago. In 2018 to speak at an event that they were hosting. So I was one of 6 meetup organizers that were asked to speak in front of their top 150 organizers from around the world. And it was kind of a really cool experience to just meet so many organizers at the time there was 255,000 meetups. And they only flew a 150 of us out and had 6 of us speak. And so that was a wonderful experience for me. It makes me feel really good that my meetup was that well recognized from meetup headquarters. But additionally, I had some extra time that I got to spend on the 6th floor. This is in Manhattan. Meet up headquarters, at least in 2008, was in Manhattan. So they flew me out to New York. They paid for all my wine all my food. My flight, my hotel. It was just a wonderful time to kind of connect with all those organizers. But one of the highlights that I got was when I went up to the 6th floor of meetup, this is where all of the engineers are. It's just a huge floor with tons of engineers. It's an open floor plan. You see everybody sitting at their kind of like a cubicle, but they're not boxed in. You can see everybody. And I got together with about 12 engineers. Now, it might have been ten or 13 or something like that. But I did not count. And it's also been several years, but I sat around with about a dozen engineers at the 6th floor of meetup. And I was basically asking them why was my meetup pushed in front? Why did I get to be one of the only speakers at this event? I felt really honored, but they mentioned that there were some key things that allowed my meet up to grow.

Adam Adams IRL Meetup Headquarters Pentagon Manhattan Los Angeles LA New York
A highlight from HIBT Lab! ClassPass: Payal Kadakia

How I Built This

08:17 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from HIBT Lab! ClassPass: Payal Kadakia

"And the place where we schedule episodes and move them through our production pipeline. So our remote team knows exactly where each project stands in real time. Without it, we'd have to use multiple tools and maybe you can relate to this. We already have enough online tools to juggle as it is, so yes, you could say that in a way, you can thank air table for helping us make sure our episodes drop every week. Airtable brings teams together and helps teams like ours, run smoothly. Give it a try for free at air table dot com today. That's air table dot com to get started for free. Ready to turn your small ecommerce business into the next big thing? Clavio can help. It's the easy to use email and SMS platform that gives you everything you need to build genuine relationships with your customers, and even if you're new to marketing, clavio can help you become an email expert with drag and drop design templates, simple insights, and made for ecommerce reports and recommendations. Give it a try with a free account at clavio dot com slash built that's KLA bei O dot com slash built. Hello and welcome to how I built this lab. I'm guy raz. This is the place where we break format and experiment with ideas and stories that you might not hear on our Monday episode and also a chance to find out what happened to some of the founders of interviewed on the show in the past. So back in June of 2020, I had pile kadakia on the show and you can go check that out in our podcast queue. Pile cofounded the fitness brand, class pass, it's basically like Expedia or kayak, but for fitness classes. In January of 2020, class pass raised around a financing at a $1 billion valuation. And for pile, it was an incredible validation of a business that had its ups and downs. In its early days, class pass was a way you could sign up for all kinds of classes, photography, cooking, singing, you name it. But over time, it became a really powerful force in the fitness industry. All seemed to be going well until of course march of 2020. When the pandemic all but shut down, fitness centers across the U.S. and around the world. When Powell was last on the show, she was dealing with layoffs, and even uncertainty over whether class pass would make it. But late in 2021, class pass was acquired by a company called mind body for an undisclosed amount. Now, piles just released a book about how she learned to become a leader and live a life of purpose. It's called life pass, drop your limits and rise to your potential and pile is here to talk more about it. Welcome back. Thanks for having me back guy. All right, let's pick up where we left off in June of 2020. At the time, as we all remember, gyms and studios across the U.S. were closed. Actually, across the world. And I think around that time class pass had to lay off. Almost half of its employees. And I remember on the show at the time you were so generous because it was a difficult time, and you were very open about what was going on. I remember you said, we're going to have to go backwards before we go forwards. So tell me about the rest of that year. The rest of 2020 and how you managed. One of the hardest things about the last two years was the uncertainty and the sense of things are going to open back up and rebuilding marketing strategies to get our customers back into class and then all of a sudden having another wave, right? I think that was the hardest part of this journey because, look, we as a company, I think, had always been resilient and I had always been able to change, right? And I even at the top of the pandemic, we flipped over to video and live workouts, and it was something that we knew as a company we had to keep people moving, and we had to keep revenue moving to our studio partners. But the longevity of this was one of the hardest things, but you know, it's interesting because I don't now think about it as going backwards because I think what we actually did was really worked on making sure that the efficiency, the cost structure of our company, was honestly at a place where it should be. And I think you probably know this from all the people you've talked to. When you're a high growth startup, you just go, right? At all costs. You just move. And it was actually a nice place to be to be able to reassess things, to be able to create efficiencies, to decide if we really needed X, Y, and Z product on there or not. And we never really got a second to have that breath. So of course, this uncertainty was the hardest part because every single time we wanted to, like I said, get everyone back on to the program and get a relaunch all the memberships. We would all of a sudden be faced with. We need to go backwards again and we need to take everyone back. But in the midst of all that, I will say that I think the company definitely found positive ways to move forward and that was obviously less in terms of impact and purpose, which is what is always most important to me, but more in terms of operational efficiency and the bottom line. You guys, I remember you were saying that you were kind of back in startup mode, which was kind of exciting. You said, you know, you were trying all kinds of things. You're thinking about maybe cooking classes or offering comedy classes. And you told me you were kind of throwing things at the wall to see what might work. What were some of the things that you guys tried? Yeah, we had different live experiences we were trying. So we saw people wanted to do magic at home and different experiences that people were still doing, but they were finding ways to bring them to their homes, right? Obviously with a small group of people. And so we started looking at that. We just saw that it wasn't exactly a scalable. We had obviously done a lot of video innovation and testing, which stayed on the platform. And then the other one, which actually did stick, which was something a part of something we had actually tried right before the pandemic was we went into beauty and wellness. And that actually ended up sticking because what we realized is people were more comfortable with more of that one on one experience versus the group experience, which comes more in beauty and wellness. So we actually saw that take off more than we thought. And we did end up investing a bit more in the wellness category of our business. What did you, what did you learn about yourself as a leader during that time? You know, this was also, you know, there was a lot of conversations going on about representation diversity, all of that, right? So I think there was just so much emotion going on. And I remember going to some team meetings and I've always really been a pretty emotional human being. You know, I talk about that a little bit too in my book. But I like to lead with a sense of heart and empathy. And I knew that everyone needed it. And I remember there was this one session. I think we were talking about Black Lives Matter and all that stuff. And I think I almost cried. I literally had tears in my eyes. And I remember afterwards thinking about that vulnerability. And I think that's really what people needed because we were all human going through such a tough time and to remind everyone that this is everyone who needs to get through this, including, you know, even me as a new mom who had a three month old, there was real fears in the world, right? I mean, people were losing people. It was not an easy time, right? And we knew that, of course, the business mattered, but the lives of our team and actual humans in the world mattered the most during that time. I remember there was a moment where I said, you know, are you scared? Are you worried that you might not make it through? And you said, you know, class pass, I've been at this for 8 years at that point, and you said, you know, we've been through so many ups and downs, so many crisis points that

Clavio Expedia U.S. Powell
A highlight from 283: Overcoming Fear of Failure | Part 1

RISE Podcast

00:52 sec | 6 d ago

A highlight from 283: Overcoming Fear of Failure | Part 1

"And this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. Now

Youtube Rachel Hollis
A highlight from MBA2046 How Im Outsourcing My Networking

The $100 MBA Show

04:29 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from MBA2046 How Im Outsourcing My Networking

"That I've gone to know over the years in business, I would say in the last decade where I've really dedicated the time to build my network has been invaluable. These people in my network have helped me grow my business, have helped me introduce these to the right people, find great town for my team. Get me out of jams where I had an issue and they knew the right people to fix it. My network has given me speaking opportunities has even just let me know about events that I would be interested in attending. So I'm a big believer that you need to spend the time to build your network. But I want to spend as little as time as possible. I want to get all the benefits, but at the same time, I want to make sure that I'm not spending too much time all over social attending countless events. I only want to go to the things that really will make an impact. Basically, I want to do the activities that will give me the maximum amount of results to grow and maintain my network. So I want to share with you some of those things that I do and how I use automation and how I pass it on to other people to do things for me. As well as build systems to make sure my networking is easy, it's not time consuming and it's not a burden. My first tip I want to give you is probably the one thing if you just did this, you would be miles ahead of most people and it will help you tremendously build an incredible network. And this is a strategy I learned from Jordan harbinger who is the host of the Jordan harbor show, an incredible podcast is highly successful podcaster. I'm lucky to call him a close friend. But he taught me this and basically he got me to write down a list of 90 people and a spreadsheet. Who are these 90 people? Well, these are 90 people that I find interesting people that I want to maintain a relationship with. People that I find that I admire, and these could be people that you know have their contact in some way, whether you follow them on social or you have their phone number or their email, but basically there are people that you want in your network. People that you really want to build a relationship with and maybe close friends one day. If you're not already. And basically when you sit down and write down all the names, they start coming in, they start pouring in, you start thinking about all the people that you'd love to get to know a little bit better. And the point here is that you're getting a little systematical about it. Now you have a list of names. Now what I do is every day I take three names from that list and I contact them I stay in touch with them, I do something just to know how they're doing every day. So three people every day. And it's literally like, a WhatsApp message saying, hey, what's up, man? Did you catch that game last night? It was crazy. Hope you're well, reach out if you need anything. Or it could be a DM on Twitter. Hey Kate, I just heard about your new book. Congrats. Let me know if I can support you in any way. These are really sentences that I write for each person. This takes me less than 5 minutes, but what this does is that, at the end of 30 days, I have stayed in touch or built a relationship or did something to build a relationship with 90 really cool people I want to get to know or get to know better. And these are genuine messages I don't script these. I don't have somebody else write them. I just write them off the cuff based on that day or what's going on with them. Now what this does is that by the end of the year, you have contacted them and reached down and checked up on them 12 times. That's more than the average person and that's somebody who's a real friend. And what I found is that you'll go back and forth during the month with a few people or maybe a handful of people, and those people you start to become closer and closer to. Now, over the years, I refined my 90 people list, and one of the things I picked up on is that it's actually quite helpful when you're choosing your 90 people is to choose people that you're actually interested in knowing. People that actually you connect with or nice personalities feel that you would be friends with and go out for dinner with. The other thing is that amongst those 90 people, they're going to be people that are actually pretty well networked. They know a lot of people. These are like your super Friends, right? Because they will ask you, hey, do you know this person to have a conversation yesterday? That's what they said to me. If I go, I don't know them. Oh, they might introduce you to you. They might tell you something about them. You might learn something new and follow somebody new on social. The point here is that the system is incredible. So implement it today. The next thing is gift giving.

Jordan Harbinger Jordan Harbor Kate Twitter
A highlight from 282: #RachTalk Ep 13: Getting Hit On By Strangers, Stealing To-Go Orders, Walker County LIVE Performance!

RISE Podcast

05:19 min | Last week

A highlight from 282: #RachTalk Ep 13: Getting Hit On By Strangers, Stealing To-Go Orders, Walker County LIVE Performance!

"Random things. Today I am introducing you to walker county, my new riding buddies, an incredible band at an Asheville. We are hanging out in Nashville. We're talking about thieves. We're talking about flirting. We're talking about my relationship. We're talking about. I can't remember what else we're talking about, but it's gonna be funny. You should totally hang out. Welcome to Nashville, guys. Have we ever we must have shot at some point of rage talk on location, but I can't remember it. I've shot a rage talk like by myself with random camera. Do you remember that time I was in a really cold place in the middle of winter. It's gotta be like our first season of rage talk. I was doing my audiobook. It was January in Michigan course. There was Michigan, of course there was a biker gang. I am in Nashville. I've had Jack come out to shoot with me, 'cause I just thought it would be really cool to mix it up, shake it up, do the thing, and because I'm in Nashville making music, I could pull in some fun guests, which you're gonna see a little bit later to, you know, make Rach talk a little bit more exciting also, I am this shirt, I love, but there's sweat here. And so this is why I'm doing this. I was trying not to go like this. It's also the same reason, if you've ever wondered, I don't know why you would. But if you've ever wondered why I always wear jackets on stage. It's because also how do you whistle? This how I whistle. I know. I know my older siblings used to say I looked like a rat. Which was rude. But probably accurate. I don't know how people whistle like this. Like with your lips purse, I only know this. Rat. We were in Nashville last week, Jack, if you'll recall. Jack came here. Last week I was here. I was shooting a podcast, Jack came out, and can we just tell this story? It's the most Jack's story I ever in my life. I asked Jack, I said, hey, are you available to come to Nashville to shoot this podcast? And he's like, yes, of course I am. I'm thinking, let's knock out some rich talks while you're here. Let's get an on location moment. So I sent a note to the team. I said, hey, when does Jack land in Nashville so that we can shoot these right shots? They said, oh, he's driving. He's driving from Austin, Texas to Nashville, Tennessee. Why? 'cause he thought he was supposed to, 'cause he likes a road trip 'cause he wants to drive for 12 hours straight. Did you think I wouldn't fly you here or you just wanted to drive? Okay, okay. 'cause the way I heard it was, oh, he didn't know. And so he's like, and I was like, what kind of monster makes someone drive their own vehicle across state lines? It was so crazy. But we did get we did a podcast that was so amazing and I am really, really pumped for you guys to get to see it. It comes out soon. There's gonna be a whole theme. Y'all, if you don't like music, you know, get ready because it's gonna be a big part of the stuff that we're working on. So it's gonna weave its way in. But got to sit down with an incredible songwriter like a really like one of the greats and talk about songwriting, so I'm really excited. But because Jack drove, we didn't quite have enough time on the ground last week. So he came back out, he flew, don't worry, he flew this time and we're here and we're doing this thing. And I got a list, Jack. I got a list of things to talk about. Okay. I love that I have this note on my phone for raids talk conversations and this is in caps. That's how serious I am about it. In Cali, if you want to get your car wash, you go to a place, you get out of your car and someone takes your car through and then people like clean it all and whatever, and here's your car. In Texas, to my knowledge, I don't even know where that would be. You don't get out of the car, and nobody's cleaning inside your car. There's drive-through car washes, okay? Have you been to a drive-through car wash? Yeah. Drive-through car washes, and some are like, at the gas station, you sort of just put in your info. And then some are like, this is a legit. This is we're committed to this, right? This is a business. And there's like college kids who are like scrubbing the car before it goes through the long tunnel with the whirring and the whoo and the shh and the and all of it, okay? When I go to the car wash, you go up to the screen and it says, do you want the basic? Basically like, do you want tall venti or Grande or whatever? Like, what level of car wash do you want? I get 20 bucks that I do my car so rarely that I want to treat her. Here's my question. How does the car wash tunnel? No. That my car got the $20 wash.

Nashville Jack Walker County Michigan Jack Land Asheville Rach Texas Tennessee Austin Cali
A highlight from MBA2045 Q&A Wednesday: Should I learn how to build my own app or should I hire someone?

The $100 MBA Show

01:33 min | Last week

A highlight from MBA2045 Q&A Wednesday: Should I learn how to build my own app or should I hire someone?

"I worked on the beta version. I am a very amateur engineer developer. In fact, before we sold it, I had to get another engineer to help fix my mess because it was not ready for prime time. It was ready for customers because I'm not that great of an engineer. And in that moment, I could have said, I'm going to dedicate time and learn and become a better software engineer, but I decided not to. Because I just don't want to spend time doing that. I enjoy the other things in business, like the marketing, like the sales, like the content I like to teach, I like to create great content for my audience, like to be helpful. I like to empower other audience members to show them that, hey, you can do this too. That's what I enjoy. So I wanted to spend more time doing that and I just didn't want to dedicate the time to learn how to build an app or become a sophisticated engineer so that I can grow with the company. I wanted to find somebody who is really good and that's what I did. I found somebody that can fulfill my vision so I can stick to doing the things I enjoy in my business. I got more on today's topic, but before that, let me love today's sponsor. Support for today's show comes from Rutgers university. Guys, it's a no brainer for me to vouch for Rutgers university because I went to Rutgers. So it's a proud moment for me to be able to support my old university. And have them support the show. Listen, the rapid growth of technology has generated increasing amounts of data, which has led to strong demand for individual skilled and analytics. The

Rutgers
A highlight from 281: THIS is Why your Anxiety is getting Worse

RISE Podcast

01:34 min | Last week

A highlight from 281: THIS is Why your Anxiety is getting Worse

"The normalization of feeling suffering because all the people around you are feeling it too doesn't mean that you're supposed to just live in it and drown in it. It's like a frog, boiling in a pot of water, right? Like you're slowly raising the temperature higher and higher and the frog boils. Your anxiety is getting worse because it's been normalized so you don't think you need to do anything because it's normal to feel anxious, but if you're not treating the symptom, it's going to get worse. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. Nobody

Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from Keys to Creating AI-Enabled Digital Products - with Matt Berseth of NLP Logix

AI in Business

02:00 min | Last week

A highlight from Keys to Creating AI-Enabled Digital Products - with Matt Berseth of NLP Logix

"We're talking about a transition from light involvement with data and data science to a much more deep involvement, a transition that many enterprises will go through in many of their AI deployments. In other words, there's a lot of transferable lessons in the adoption ideas we talk about today. Number two, we bring back an analogy from some three and a half years ago in a great past interview, which we call the lasagna versus pizza analogy. I'm going to have to leave you hanging on that and listen to the episode to be able to find that one, but as a key dynamic to the adoption of artificial intelligence and one that we touch on today in this episode. Our guest this week is math per se. He is the cofounder and CIO of NLP logics and logics as an AI services firm. Servicing both the public and private sector based down in Florida, very fast growing. And Matt speaks with us this week about leveling up data powered products. So what does it take to get a current digital product, something maybe hosted online that users use, maybe internal users in an enterprise, maybe our customers out in the world. And eventually, make that application smarter. How do we take the data being leveraged by that product and use it to maybe help the user save time or give them more convenience or open up new capabilities? It is a gradual process is not all done at once, and we talk a little bit about how to play at the surface and leverage data. Learn lessons from that surface level and then go deeper and rebuild some of the core components of a product. There's a way to do that Willy nilly, and there's a way to do that in a smart kind of trajectory and Matt does his best to articulate that smart trajectory from much of his rich experience in this space. So if you have digital solutions that are on their way to becoming more data enabled, possibly more layered with AI to unlock new capabilities this might show you a little bit around the corner as to what that path is going to look like. I think Matt does a pretty good job of painting that picture. This episode is brought to you by NLP logics to learn more about emerge media and what we do with AI services firms who want to reach a global audience, stay tuned to the end of this episode, but without further ado, let's fly right in. This is Matt burce, the CIO of NLP logics

Matt CIO Willy Nilly Florida Matt Burce
A highlight from MBA2044 My Favorite Video Marketing Tools in 2022

The $100 MBA Show

00:45 sec | Last week

A highlight from MBA2044 My Favorite Video Marketing Tools in 2022

"High production value, videos that seem would cost me thousands of dollars to produce. I also like using tools that save me time that are smart that are intelligent, that are easy to use, and are not a hassle to learn how to get around. Producing great videos, whether they're live or recorded for your business. Is a great way for you to leverage your personality, leverage your content, your expertise to build trust and rapport and credibility with your audience. So I want to share with you the tools that have worked for me and why I recommend them. So you can create incredible videos for your audience. Let's get into it. Let's get down to business. Support

A highlight from Ep225: Strategies To Creating Excellent Workflows In Podcasting  Rochelle Groh

The Podcast On Podcasting

04:03 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep225: Strategies To Creating Excellent Workflows In Podcasting Rochelle Groh

"Blog, a vlog or a podcast. And you chose podcast podcast and and the the reason reason why why is is because because you you wanted wanted to to have have those those conversations conversations or can you save that reason one more time? Like a couple of the reasons was one, it was a lot easier for me to get ready to do a podcast versus a blog because I wasn't comfortable writing, like at the time it wasn't my strong suit. I've gotten much better at writing, so I can actually write blogs and write my descriptions from my podcast. And the second was a vlog, which is kind of a combination between a podcast and a blog. And I was like, well, I don't want to get ready. And I'm also not ready to kind of spit out organic content in front of a video. And I just thought that would be so much more taxing, editing wise, lighting wise, like I wasn't ready for that yet. So podcasts cut out a couple of elements of that organic conversation that I would need to have with a camera. And I also didn't need to get ready with hair and makeup for delivering a podcast. Okay. And what have you learned? Is it harder than you thought it was going to be or easier than you thought it was going to be? Definitely. It was a lot harder than I thought it was going to be. I think for a couple of reasons, one I really underestimated the workflow that goes into the production and post production of an episode. We as listeners hear maybe 30 minutes to one hour of a show that typically it takes a good two to maybe four hours from pre-production all the way to post production when it hits your ears. So I think as a listener, you really underestimate how much time that person and the team puts into actually creating that show for you. It's strange because I also underestimated the workflow. And I know a lot of people that do, I think that's interesting. And then you mentioned something like it takes four hours from start to finish and it takes my team way longer. I think we spend probably at least just on the editing, probably at least four hours. And then I have another team that does the show notes and they spend a couple of hours to make sure that the show notes are good. The video production because we do video. So this doesn't count on yours if you're not doing it, but the video production usually takes us a day of editing to make sure that's ready to go. And then we do marketing and email it to our guests and do social media. Like when we have clients and we do all that stuff for them, it ends up taking almost three days worth of work to do one 30, 40, 50 minute episode, but I definitely underestimated it in the beginning. And when I started, even if with this company, when we very first founded the company, I wanted the prices to be as low as possible. And we kept losing money. And it was like, oh, okay, I'm definitely underestimating the workflow even now. So if you're listening, that is a good takeaway, don't underestimate the workflow. There's a lot to do across the board. Rachelle, what else did you learn like, I think you've published like 40 episodes as we record it today. Is that right? Yeah. So what else have you learned and how long did it take you to learn some of those lessons? Sure. So I definitely want to touch on understanding the different softwares that you need to record. So you like to use zoom, right? So you could use zoom. I like to use zen Caster to split like my guest audio and my audio, so it's separate, so I can edit the files on two different files, right? And then where do you store those files? Will they automatically get uploaded to Dropbox? How do you get that to your editor? How's that workflow get to that editor when that editor's done? How do you know that it's done? So I think understanding how not only your workflow, but the softwares that need to be utilized in order to actually move it through the workflow. How are you managing your workflow? I use Monday dot com.

Rachelle Dropbox
A highlight from PODS & Red Rover: Pete Warhurst

How I Built This

07:09 min | Last week

A highlight from PODS & Red Rover: Pete Warhurst

"Welcome to how I built this. A show about innovators, entrepreneurs, idealists, and the stories behind the movements. They built. I'm guy Roz, and on the show today, how Pete warhurst wanted to simplify how we store our stuff. So he built an entirely new system called pods, then launched another moving in storage business to compete with the first one. The United States is a nation of hoarders. The average house contains 300,000 items, and it's estimated that one out of ten Americans pays to rent storage space. Stuff that let's face it is probably not worth paying to store. And that's you I'm talking about. I'm not trying to shame you. I also pay for storage. Boxes and crates filled with my kids first grade dioramas and craft projects and old books we've convinced ourselves we can't part with, and even a dried pressed rose I wore on my lapel at my bar mitzvah. Yes, that is in storage, my Friends. So shame on me. Because one day, long after I die, someone probably my kids will have to go through that stuff and if I'm being totally honest with myself, they'll throw it away. And I will have spent thousands and thousands of lifetime dollars keeping that stuff safe. But none of this is an indictment of the actual storage industry, because if you think about it, it's an amazing business. For starters, you don't need too many employees. The overhead is relatively manageable, and only a fraction of the storage units need to be rented for you to make a profit. It's why the global self storage industry is expected to reach a value of $67 billion within the next four years. Now, about 30 years ago, Pete warhurst was a very typical self storage business owner. He had a single facility outside Clearwater Florida. And he wondered, is there a way to build innovation into this business? Could you actually improve the existing model? And one day, Pete got an idea. What if, instead of going to the storage facility, the storage facility could come to you? That was the beginning of an innovation that would transform self storage. A company Pete founded called pods. The idea is actually pretty simple in its elegance, but very complex in its execution. The company deposits a storage container in front of a customer's house, the customer fills that container with stuff, and then the company comes to pick that container up, put it on a truck and bring it to its own storage facility. The idea took off almost immediately. Franchising and spreading to locations across the U.S. and around the world. And less than ten years after he launched it, Pete sold the company for roughly $450 million. But actually, that was not the end, because it turns out Pete thought there were additional pain points in the moving and storage industry that needed solving. So at the age of almost 70, he decided to start another kind of storage business, which he calls red rover. But as you'll hear, even before he built either of those businesses, Pete started with an entirely different concept, one that had nothing to do with storage, and everything to do with his first love, working as a firefighter and paramedic. Pete warhurst was raised in a family of four kids on Long Island in New York. His mom taught elementary school and his dad had what Pete called a tough career in the poultry distribution business. We used to call him a chicken plucker, but he would go into the city around 2 o'clock in the morning and come home around 3 o'clock in the afternoon. And they would receive poultry and all prepared as far as cleaned and raw, but they repackage it basically. And delivered to shipyards, hotels, airlines, things like that. And so they were sort of the middle man between the farms and the end user, the high end users. So he would go into the city every day. And as far as you knew, I mean, did you ever go in with him? Did you ever see that? Yes, I did. Yes, I did. I enjoyed going in. It was an early morning, and they made sure they put me to work, but I want to say there was maybe 6 7 guys in the actual warehouse repackaging and they had a dozen drivers or so. So your dad was gone by the time you woke up and probably asleep, really by the time you kind of were getting ready for dinner. Yeah, no, he'd go to bed 7 o'clock. He was two. There was the occasion that I'd be coming home at two and he'd be going out and he'd just shake his head. When you were in high school, high school, and after high school, yeah. All right, so I think in high school, you got a job at a gas station, which I identify with because one of my first jobs was at an art co AMP mini market gas station in the San Fernando valley. Very important job. I learned how to chop onions at that job. I learned how to make the burgers for the, this is probably a different kind of gas station. Was this a full service gas station where you worked? Yeah, it was full service though. When I was there, it was unheard of for you to pump your own gas. My primary responsibility was to go out and be pleasant and pump the gas and squeegee the windows, clean the gas pumps when I've got downtime and so, yeah. There was something that happened one day while you were working at a gas station, which would have an impact on decisions you would make later on. Tell me what would happen. Yeah, I was out at the gas pumps. I think I was pumping gas or I was cleaning the palms. I mean, my station was out of the gas pumps being ready for the next customer. And all of a sudden behind me, I heard a screeching of the brakes and a thump and yells and horns and then I ran up there to see what went on. And a little girl had gotten hit by a car. And I stood there and I walked and I really didn't know what to do or how to do it and stuff. And I ran back into the gas station and called the local fire department, which literally was a quarter of a third of a mile away.

Pete Warhurst Pete ROZ U.S. Clearwater Florida Long Island New York San Fernando Valley
A highlight from [AI Success Factors] - Improving Railways with AI - with Adam Bonnifield of KONUX

AI in Business

02:41 min | Last week

A highlight from [AI Success Factors] - Improving Railways with AI - with Adam Bonnifield of KONUX

"We cover one enterprise AI use case with a measurable ROI, and we talk about what made that project successful. What were the things that the teams and companies did to work together to actually bring that project to life. And today, we're working in the transportation space. When you think transportation, you might be asking, okay, we're going to be talking about airplanes today. We're going to talk about big shipping containers going over the oceans. We're going to talk about autonomous vehicles. Well, today we're talking about rail. That's right, trains. Now you may not know this, but the rail industry in the United States contributes many tens of billions of dollars to our GDP here, and in many countries in Europe and in Asia, rail is an even bigger deal. This week, we speak specifically on the topic of maintaining railways. What does it look like to adopt predictive maintenance in a space that is very old indeed? That is what we go into today and our guest is Adam bonifield. When I first met Adam, he was the VP of artificial intelligence and analytics at Airbus, Airbus is a $70 billion company in terms of revenue. So very large defense and aerospace firm. Before that, he was a White House presidential innovation fellow for two years. And after his four years at Airbus, he has since become the CEO of connix. Comic supplies their AI technology to the rail space. And today we're talking about a use case between comics and network rail or rather a large railway firm in the United Kingdom. The use case in this episode is unique. We do not talk about computer vision in the rail space very often here on the show, but it's really interesting to see how predictive maintenance is applied again to a very old industry. So many of you tuned in are working in old industries. Many of the aspects of adoption and working with subject matter experts are going to be directly transferable to you the listener. But in addition to that, we end with the challenges of achieving ground truth data. This is especially hard in the heavy industry space, but it applies essentially to every AI project. Adam walks us through why achieving ground truth data was so critical for this project and what it looked like to work together with network rail to be able to make those key distinctions in terms of computer vision and an imagery that would define the success of the project and the eventual expansion of their project with network rail. So an interesting use case, a great takeaway and great to be able to have Adam back with us. People often ask, how do you get your great guess? Luckily, in many cases, the answer is they are listeners. So I am grateful as heck to have people who are VP of AI at $70 billion companies like Adam, who have been fans of our show, and when I found an excuse to bring them back on, he's working with a new company doing exciting things. He reached back out and we made this happen, so it's a pleasure to have him back with us. It's a pleasure to have him as a listener and it's cool to have some of our listeners share some of what they've learned with other listeners, and that's exactly what Adam's doing here today. So without further ado, let's fly right in. This is Adam bonifield with connix

Airbus Adam Bonifield Connix Adam Asia White House Europe United States United Kingdom
A highlight from MBA2043 Guest Teacher  Mike Moll  How to Leverage Video to Generate More Sales

The $100 MBA Show

05:32 min | Last week

A highlight from MBA2043 Guest Teacher Mike Moll How to Leverage Video to Generate More Sales

"Today he's here to show you how to optimize your sales or conversions in general using video. I'm going to pass that on to Mike now, but I'll be back to wrap up today's episode and give my takeaways. But for now, take it away, Mike. Hey everyone, I'm Mike mall. And thank you for joining me today. Today, I'll be teaching you about how to generate amazing leads using custom video outreach. So let's get down to business. The reason I'm so passionate about this subject matter is that I have done all kinds of lead generation or lead generation attempts throughout my time in business. That's everything from running ad campaigns, going door to door, making phone calls, sending emails, everything. I've done it all and this method has worked so much better than anything I've ever done. And so it's a passion of mine to be able to share it with other people so that they can generate not only great leads, but also build great relationships along the way. So in today's lesson, we're going to talk about why building relationships in sales is so important. The ways that you can reach your target audience using video, and then I'm going to give you the exact script that I use to achieve a 60 plus percent response rate to my cold outreach. So let's take a step back and think about why this method is so important. So ever since COVID happened and I've been using this method since before COVID, but ever since it happened, there have been a ton of trade shows canceled. People are displaced within their offices. So the idea of setting up a booth at a conference or doing a luncheon learn at an office has become very, very difficult, which means that email sends have increased dramatically. Not only email, but outreach on LinkedIn, outreach on Instagram, and people's inboxes have just been flooded with correspondence and people asking to purchase their product or their service. And if you think about how you get contacted, I would say for me, it's maybe every 40 to 50% of people that reach out to me is an automated robotic, hey, thanks for connecting message, you know, we do this service. We really want you to hire us, you know, here's my calendly, right? And the way that that makes me feel is that this person took no time to understand who I am, what I'm trying to accomplish or anything like that. And it kind of just sets a really bad tone from the get go. And for me, I don't want to be lumped in with another version of this. So I came up with this video methodology to do it. The other piece of this is that working with a new vendor or switching from an existing service provider can be a headache. You don't know that the person that you're going to be working with next is going to be any better than the original person. And so there's a built in reluctance from anybody that you're pitching to not necessarily want to go through the process of switching, which may make them not want to take a meeting with you. So there's all these barriers that come and sending something that's the text, whether that's email or on social media, or cold calling, it's just very easy to find a reason to say no. And skim through the writing or the copy that that person sent you and just kind of ignore it. So this is a different method, and this is a way that I found really impactful. So how can you reach people by video? My personal favorite is by connecting on social media. The simple reason is that when you link a video in an email to somebody, two problems happen. One, the video file is probably too large. And it probably puts it to Google Drive or asks you to host it somewhere else and provide a link. Or if you make a video through bomb bomb or loom, which are really great and powerful marketing tools, the challenge becomes in the email you actually have to put a URL. Now as soon as you put a URL in an email and it's from an unknown sender, I know when I receive it personally, I have a reluctance to open it because I don't know if it's a scam. And with the rise of online scams and finching schemes and things like this, I feel that sending a link to someone you don't know is probably really difficult to get them to open it. So my preference if you offer the right type of service is to connect with the person on LinkedIn or Instagram, those are my top two choices. LinkedIn being the number one and I'll go through the reasons why I like which ones I like and why. So if you're connected with somebody on LinkedIn, you go through the app on your phone into the messaging piece and you can actually send them record a video on the spot what happens is that video pops up on their screen and it takes up almost the entire message space and it's just a big old picture of your face with a play button. Now there's something undeniable about receiving a video like that. You almost have to watch it. When it's text, it's very easy to just kind of skim over, take a look and decide. Yeah, okay. I see the keywords that this person is using. I don't care right now. But when you send a video, there's this, there's this curiosity that's peaked. I know that I get that on my end and you can do this with video or strictly audio. And these can be recorded directly inside of the LinkedIn messaging platform. And when you send them, again, there's this temptation that you create. Is this person going to be a weirdo?

Mike Mall Mike Linkedin Instagram Headache Google
A highlight from MBA2042 The 3 Pitfalls to Avoid When Growing Your Email List + Free Ride Friday

The $100 MBA Show

02:49 min | Last week

A highlight from MBA2042 The 3 Pitfalls to Avoid When Growing Your Email List + Free Ride Friday

"Focusing on quantity over quality. The best analogy I can think of is buying a bag of lemons. Let's say you bought a bag of lemons and you just look at those lemons before you bought them. And you're planning to make a huge jug of lemonade, okay? You go home, you open up this bag of lemons, and you realize 70% of these lemons are all rotten. You can't really use them. You can't even make juice out of them. So you toss out 70% of those lemons, and you keep the 30%, you squeeze those lemons and you realize I only have like a cup worth of lemonade, not really a jug. Compare that to me going to the market and hand picking a bunch of lemons that actually look perfect for my lemonade. Perfectly ripe, high quality organic. I go home, I squeeze those lemons, and I don't have a whole jug, but I have like three cups worth of lemonade. When it comes to the number of lemons when a hand picked the lemons, it was far less than what was in the bag. But 70% of the bag was useless. Now, thanks for putting up with this bad analogy, but the point here is that the quality matters because you may not really think about it initially, but having subscribers that are not meant to be on your list that are not ideal are not meant to be part of your audience, are costing you money because any email marketing software is going to charge you for a number of emails. And it's actually better to have less emails that are engaged, engaged people that are thrilled to get your emails versus a bunch of emails that just are duds. So tracking your ideal audience members, your ideal customers is incredibly important. And you do this by knowing what your audience needs, what they're struggling with, what they want to hear, what content they would love to consume and deliver in a great, fun entertaining way. Instead, most people, they just say, I'm going to create some sort of ebook with a flashy title, run some ads, get people to go and grab that ebook, and they don't even read the ebook, let alone even enjoy it. If they do decide to read it. But worse off, you're just attracting a bunch of people that are looking for freebie, and you just basically try to lure them onto your email list. Without even thinking about, do I actually want the moment you list? Are there the kind of person that will eventually be the perfect customer for me? So this takes a bit of thought and most entrepreneurs when they get started, they don't take the time to do this. They don't actually describe who's only perfect customer. Who would be ideal if I had a thousand of these types of people, I would be super happy in my business would be thriving. You'd actually described who they are. Well, what do they need? What is a good starting point for them? Maybe it's a mini course. Maybe it's a cheat sheet that will get them on an instant result.

A highlight from Ep224: False Assumptions On Podcasting And How To Avoid Them

The Podcast On Podcasting

04:49 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep224: False Assumptions On Podcasting And How To Avoid Them

"Or if you're an about to be podcaster, meaning you've been thinking about it, you're trying to learn how to do it. Either way, I want you to be on the show. There's a couple of options. You can either ask me questions, like get my advice, ask me one, two, or three questions. I'll pour in to you and other people will learn the same stuff at the same time. Or you've got a story. You've got something to share. And that could be shared because something bad happened to you. You almost lost money or something good to you. You got a really great guest, or you got a certain amount of listeners, or you hired the wrong company, whatever it is, pros or cons, I do want you to come on the show and share that with other people. So last episode, last solo episode, I talked about how we are have been moving down. We're moving to two episodes a week. One solo a week and one interview episode a week. And at the end of the episode, I mentioned how on the next solo episode, we're going to get into this. That's what we're about to get into. We're going to get into an issue with one of our clients. Now, not an issue that has ruined or destroyed a relationship, not like that. But it is actually a bad thing and a very bad thing on my part. It's a mistake that I made and I want to pour into you so that you don't make this mistake. And also I realized that I will learn more and grow more from sharing this story with others like you. So here's the thing Alex Atwood he's been a client for over a year now. Alex is an amazing guy. I look up to him. He's got a few things that he's in a place and it's so random because I don't understand it, but I look up to respect and admire him so much and every time I tell him that he always says he looks up to admires and respects me so much. And it's like, I think he's doing better in his business. I think he's a better person. I think he's learned more in every way, I think I can learn from him and every time I tell him that, he reverses it on me and he's like, no, no, no, it's you. This is kind of funny. Alex, if you're listening, mad respect for you. Here's the thing. Alex and I, we just had an end of the year call. The package that he chose is the all inclusive package. He was able to get to, it's like the top 2% in the world. Although he was paying for the top 10% in the world, he got ranked much, much, much higher. So kudos to him. So we really crushed it with that. We crushed it with a lot of things with Alex. He's got great artwork. Here's where we fell short. And it's all about communication. All of it. Number one, Alex, rebranded his show. About three quarters of the way through. Maybe just a couple months ago. He rebranded the show. So he went from what it was called and now it's called the alchemist lounge. Please, to my editing team, my post production team put the link to Alex's podcast down below. If you're listening and I know you are, I want you to listen to the alchemist lounge, because I think you're going to love Alex's content. He is amazing. So here we are in our phone call. After a year of working together. And the three negative things are, the three that negative things that came up was, a, when he rebranded, he had to reach out to my team. Or he had assistant do it technically. But he felt as though my team during the rebrand process and it's probably because during the time he was rebranding was there was some significant bad weather. You know how I had an employee in the Philippines, Michelle who passed away during a typhoon recently, like her whole house collapsed. Unfortunately, it took her child, her spouse, her father, and her uncle, were all in that house. And they all got buried and when they found them, they were no longer alive. That's been hard for us. Well, with Alex, those three things are number one is there was a another typhoon that like wiped out most of the Internet and power and water supply for a significant proportion

Alex Alex Atwood Philippines Michelle
A highlight from HIBT Lab! Blogilates: Cassey Ho

How I Built This

01:11 min | Last week

A highlight from HIBT Lab! Blogilates: Cassey Ho

"Lab. I'm guy Roz. Today we're talking about the creator economy with Cassie Ho, the personality behind the fitness YouTube channel, blogilates. Cassie's channel has more than 6 million subscribers and her videos have been viewed more than a billion times. But her fitness videos, most of which are free, are just a part of a larger business she's built. Today, Cassie runs multiple businesses, including an apparel brand, several product lines, and a Pilates certification platform, and the amazing thing is that Cassie sort of fell into her life as a fitness and fashion entrepreneur, somewhat accidentally. It started with a basic exercise video she uploaded to YouTube back in 2009 for her Pilates students. But somehow, word got out and lots more people started to watch the video. First, thousands of people, then tens of thousands, and they kept asking Cassie for more. More Pilates videos, then workout clothes, water bottles, yoga mats, the works. That was more than a decade ago, and Cassie's business is just getting started. Cassie Ho, welcome to how I built this lab. Oh

Cassie Cassie Ho ROZ Youtube