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How To Fix Our Mind | Venerable Cunda

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

6:10 listening | 10 hrs ago

How To Fix Our Mind | Venerable Cunda

"Today good morning got to noon on copy. Be Winning in Australia. You see when we see someone will say today. How you going okay? So let me introduce myself if anyone met me for on Monday. Ms Venerable tuned earlier. And this'll be my third talk of this year in Jonah grow. We Treat Center. And you'll be my last talk for this year because next month I'll be going to another Buddhist monastery overseas to support the in body monastery. We do have a few branch bonus and the monastic are required to go to different breath monastery to support one. Thank you so today's topic Always think of a topic or Someti- swinton things come out over the days a weekend and become a good topic talk about today's topic our about being restlessness a home having a crazy mine because myself and also bendable twenty anti body toucher Brenner retreat. In the weekend so I helped to Kentucky a retreat take body touched on the weekend and one the question that came up quite quite frequency was how do you do with restlessness at home and dowse quite common Christian in the weekend on the online retreat? And he's also say how do with a reminders? Going all with the placer here that's true. It's not easy has a at home in lifer that's doing crazy. Mine and one question was also was the reason why became a nasty and what stages are when to become a monastic toll. I'll try and combine all district crush together onto this talk. Okay so I'll give them a bit of background on myself before I came the body on on mystery so I was born in militia so I left militiamen quite young. Roughly twelve years old and I went to a place called silent because My parents was leaving the at the time working in the mines so so I grew up on Christmas Island and I worked here for roughly twenty years. So I was criticizing diller but I was born relation now. I moved to Australia. Roughly roughly twenty years ago. So I wasn't born the Buddha's our free finger. I want and I enjoy my locked the Max so when I was in my early S I was working up in the minds. And Yeah Spacey. Be a rebel idea. I want and I behave in pretty say just looking for fun and business did drink a lot and did smoke a lot when you were up the mindset. That's what most people at the time. Drinking Smoking and partying a lot and it was about twenty two years ago so we do not have much internet and working up in the minds. Uc's majority of the work is was basically men till became quite competitive and Yeah we say be aggressive so I call into those car mentality competing wine now. Nada and try and be a tough man. I been the website you. Yeah but I mean it was quite peaceful can after work. There wasn't much to do so most of us would just hang around in the pub drinking smoking and dismissing around. So I did it for a few years about two years. Ottawa got really sick tile and also can be up stock up in the minds not able to see my family not having a law freedom to just be my friend. Sir All go to other places because at the time I was doing my apprenticeship up in the minds so I was tactic for four years. So it's quite interesting so I started my Buddhist practices so I did notice. I was hitting quite aggressive. A developed a beer with time temperature so I used to explore in Rasiah working in the minds just arguing and fighting with before so it wasn't a good habit and a new habit plus our spacey drinking a lot lower and smoking to actually make degraded my mind and my mental wellbeing

Australia Body Monastery Brenner Retreat Someti- Swinton Christmas Island Ms Venerable Treat Center Diller Kentucky Ottawa UC Rasiah
Nowhere To Hide Nothing To Hold

Secular Buddhism

5:48 listening | Last week

Nowhere To Hide Nothing To Hold

"Let's jump into the discussion around the Zenko on that was shared in the last podcast episode. It goes like this elder ting is to lean cheesy master. What is the great meaning of Buddha's teachings lean? She came down from his seat slapped teeing and pushed him away. Team was stunned and stood motionless among nearby said teen. How at that moment teen attained. Great Enlightenment so I want to share a couple of thoughts around this specific on because I think it has a deeper meaning at least for me. It carries a couple of deep lessons. I WANNA share some of the thoughts from the Patriarch podcast community and Share some of the insight that I gained from reading other people's thoughts around this so Ramona said to me when Lynch she came down from his seat slapping and pushing king. He was answering his question of the great meaning of Buddha's teachings which is enduring suffering when the monk nearby assumed he got slapped because he did not bow team became enlightened because in that moment he realized he should invite and bow to the suffering to welcome it. Then give it respect. Perhaps that's the great meaning of Buddha's teaching. I like Ramona's thoughts on this especially the correlation between the answer to the question the great meaning of the Buddhist teachings. We know that the Buddha taught about suffering we know that he taught you know the four noble truths are the truth of satisfactory nece Duca which is often translated to suffering the truth of the cause of unsatisfactory. Nece the truth about the cessation of unsatisfactory. Nece the truth about the path that leads to the cessation of this unsatisfactory. Nece or Duca as it was called so in a nutshell. Yes the if you were to ask someone. What is the meaning of the Buddhist teachings? It's certainly centers. Around this sense of unsatisfactory. We could call it suffering that times and I do think that when we think about it that way it is kind of interesting that this master would come down and give the answer to what is the great meaning by slapping and pushing him away essentially causing team to experience and that moment probably some unsatisfactory nece or some suffering That's fun to think about. A new Ska says quote as others have said I too felt that the being slapped and pushed away as a representation of What we do when we face suffering it works on two levels for me suffering slaps in the face and we push it away but also suffering does the pushing away by interrupting US and separating us from our experience I was also taken by the last piece Why do you not bow? I interpreted that as meaning. The teen didn't bow to the teacher. Not that he should have and that in this act he didn't give reverence to the suffering. Someti- I sometimes wonder about how much time and effort we give to feeling suffering Is it excessive? And what is the right effort? We need to put into truly move past it close quote and I like what Anouchka sharing here as well and the correlation that she brings out with the concept of of of bowing to the suffering. And that's something. I want to discuss a little bit later with with my thoughts around this Cohen. Really quick share matthews thoughts. He says quote my first reaction to this Cohen was to think of how I very often asked questions knowing what I want. The answer to be that is. I'm not hoping to get an answer. But just validation of what I already think. The answer is much like the student who's Cup is two full of tea to get any from the master. Teeing I think did not get the answer he was expecting and the other monk was saying teeing. You ask a question and you got the answer. Why are you not bowing to think the master? It reminded me that I need to be more open to the answers to questions. And also that maybe I do already know the answer. Deep down inside close quote and I enjoy matthews thoughts a lot on this topic The correlation between the story of the Cup being full and certainly the concept of asking questions. Sometimes just to get validation about the answer. We think that we're we already have or that. Were going to get. I think we all do that from time to time And this is a whole different approach right. The he certainly didn't get the answer. He was expecting and ironically. That's what led to his enlightenment at least in this Cohen right so I think there's something to be learned there that often the thing that we're looking for it won't get us the thing that we want but sometimes getting the thing that we weren't expecting can get us the thing that we We were actually after in the first place. That's Kinda fun mental correlation and last. I WANNA share Nancy's thoughts who says quote I see this co on as a role play of the First Noble Truth Life at times will slap you in the face and push you away and instead of bowing and walking away which seems to have been. His common reaction teen paused stood motionless saw and pain for what it was a slap in a push. Nothing more close quote.

Suffering CUP Buddha Nece Duca Cohen United States Ramona Matthews Zenko Teeing Nece Nancy Duca Lynch
Five Ways to Relax

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

7:01 listening | Last week

Five Ways to Relax

"I lo- people on the youtube soon. Yo coming to you throw a Jonah growth in an empty hall and again I feel a bit like a food talking to Nobody feels really weird. Maybe of you are by yourself right now. Pause the video and just talk to talk to a wall or something and you get some idea of how I feel or you're in a car. Just talk to your steering wheel something like that. That's a bit awkward. But just imagine people listening to this and Ought to give this talk yesterday. And then My first initial reaction was. Are we still doing? Those talks aren't enough talks on the Internet by now. Because I've been away for a while and I didn't realize we're still doing these talks For having to do with the corona virus and at some point you. You've heard dot at like me. I've heard also money talks over the years. Its onboard. You're like I don't need any more talks. Why why do we need the talks to keep coming but don't get me wrong? I'm happy happy to we talking here although talking to To An empty hall. But it's I'm happy to do it but sometimes you like do we need to do. We need to keep expanding our knowledge. Do we need to always keep hearing more and more stuff about Dhamma or do we just reach a point where we just practice instead and just let go of all these stocks? I like all the Buddhist tech sweater. Monks nuns delay people. They would come to to Buddha and just give me a short teaching and With that Short teaching just practice and they just do that short teaching and went to a quiet place. Practice for a long time and And they usually vacation a light and just just by debt. So that shows you that. We don't need too much teachings and as I said sometimes it's just Maybe the Dhamma teachings are more sometimes for entertainment instead of information and sometimes also the opposite. You get so many talks. Catch a bit boring after a while. I mean Jim Rome. He's a great teacher but sometimes I just like Not a not a talker. I JUST WANT TO MEDITATE. Stay in my heart but Usually always still funny to talk. Extenua- reminds me of Of A little store your little joke. Actually that I heard a while ago and I've been teaching That I've been telling people and it's about the man who goes through the doctor and comes through the doctrine says Dr. My heart is burning and on my stomach. It's not good. It's like painful and my knees doctor. Can you please check me out? I don't think I'm very well. Doctor says okay. Do sit over here. I'll show we. He takes his art fame. You know what do you call it? Stethoscope or something too hard. You take this Paul's blood pressure. All these things that doctors do and then the doctor says sorry. I've got some bad news for you. Oh no the man. What is it? The doctor sure you've only got six more months to Leith. Demand is no only six months. Doctor Dr What can I do? And the doctor says what you can do is listen to talks by the monks of the voting Monastery and non of the W. A. Especially the talks of junior and imagine like. Why will that make me leave any longer will make me better and the doctor says it will make you any better. But at least it'll be the longest six months of your life and I just love that because you know sometimes all talk stuff. It just gets a bit boring. But it's like when you meditate. Sometimes it's the opposite doesn't seem long at all at the same time seems to fly by like this morning. I woke up really early. And you started. Meditating straight away Because I felt really awake all right usually when I wake up and meditated for maybe two hours or something just flew by my alarm clock to go for The work matching went Yeah felt like only like forty minutes or something or less even so this is something something shows you that meditation can be really enjoyable because you know when you enjoy yourself. That's one time flies down. They say that's at least that's Dr Expression kitching expression as well time flies by. That's right when you're having fun but maybe there is some truth. Actually in doctor's advice of listening to dumber talks to make you Physically better as well. I'm just making a bit of a joke out of it. I think that can be some truth in it as well because meditation we can learn to. Relax. Our body undermined especially in relation of the body is so so good for Helping you to fight illnesses and also to prevent illnesses in the first place

Jim Rome Buddha Leith Extenua Paul
Freedom From Suffering

5 Minute Dharma

3:57 listening | Last week

Freedom From Suffering

"Before noble truths are the noble truth of suffering the noble truth of the origin of suffering. The Noble Truth is a cessation of suffering and the noble truth of the way leading to the cessation of suffering. Today we WANNA look at the third noble truth of cessation of suffering. We have discovered that the Buddha never promised an end to physical pain rather he promised the way leading to the end of mental suffering. Mental suffering can range from dissatisfaction to anxiety and depression from an existential angst to full-blown Pagani in utter despair. The Buddhist said that these mental sufferings all have the root in craving and ultimately in ignorance since graving ignorance. 'cause are suffering eliminating the craving and you eliminate the suffering. Is Freedom really possible? The Buddha said yes freedom as possible. But it's not easy craving and clinging our evolutionary baked into our mind and body. Furthermore we don't see reality as it truly is as cognitive scientists. Donald Hoffman Explains Perception is not a window to objective reality it is an interface that hides objective reality behind veil of helpful icons as he explains natural selection favors perceptions that hide the truth and guide useful actions so freedom from suffering requires you to go against the stream of your natural biological and psychological programming. The Buddha discovered the way to end suffering but he knew it went against her natural inclinations and required us to see through appearances into the true nature of reality so on the authority of the Buddha. The end of suffering is possible. What we I have to awaken to reality as it really is. This is not easy or everyone would be a Buddha. I can't tell you from my own personal experience at the end of suffering as possible but what I can testify to is. The DEBATE IS PATH. Leads the lessening of suffering? I have been a Buddhist for about a decade and I have more peace calmness kindness and less suffering in my life. Buddhism has worked to make me a better person. My wife and son can testify to that. But I am not fully enlightened or perfect by any stretch of the imagination. I still struggle to meditate daily act wisely and every or speak skillful all the time. But I'm on the path. Buddhism has a name for the state of the cessation of suffering it is called Nirvana in San Script and Nevada in Pali Nirvana literally means to blow out. Think of suffering as caused by three fires the fire attachment the fire version and the fire of delusion. Nirvana is the blowing out of these. Three fires is a state of perfect peace equanimity in inward clarity. It is the ultimate bliss and the Buddha said it was possible it also ends the cycle of rebirth after retain nirvana you leave the conditioned realm the Pali Canon says that there is a not born a not brought to being a not made a not conditioned therefore an escape is discerned that escaped from the round of rebirth is Nirvana. It is the way out the full release from the condition drown in conclusion. The Buddha says

Buddha Donald Hoffman San Script Nevada
Priorities

Buddhist Boot Camp Podcast

7:07 listening | Last week

Priorities

"So many people are jumping down each other's throats lately because of differing opinions about Kovic nineteen the economy the upcoming election and so on so figured at timely for us to talk about the difference between having an argument with someone and having a discussion on the first day of each month I post a blog entry with some food for thought on the Buddhist bootcamp website and also send it over email which I typically get to read out loud and Sharon person with our monthly Buddhist bootcamp discussion circles throughout California but since all large gatherings have been postponed until we can all safely leave the house. I tried yesterday to share this month. Blog over a youtube livestream video with an open floor for Qa but we experienced a number of technical glitches so. I'm not sure I would do that again. Perhaps it would work better. If questions are submitted through Buddhist boot camps Patriot page in writing ahead of time and I will answer them publicly in a podcast episode for everyone to hear without having to listen to me on a live broadcast repeatedly asking. Can you hear me now? Can you see me is this working and I wouldn't have to scroll through a bunch of comments just to find the questions now. Back to the difference between an argument and a discussion in a nutshell. When you argue with someone you're trying to find out who is right but in a discussion. Both parties are trying to find out is right so next time you find yourself in disagreement with someone ask yourself what's more important to you to change what they believe or to gain a better understanding of how they have arrived at their opinion? I didn't include this next bit in my monthly email. But this is literally what triggered this month's topic I used to have a CO worker with a knack for nicknaming. All of our office mate's their special skills are marketing director. Who could sell you anything? You didn't even know you needed was called Costco. And our receptionist was named the director of First Impressions. And because I can load a dishwasher. Like it's nobody's business and get a lot done in a short period of time. She dubbed the efficiency expert a title of been wearing with much pride ever since while the other morning I was peeling beats in the kitchen sink and after each beat was peeled I would walk it over to the cutting board on the counter and then I would walk back to the sink to peel the next one. This went on about seven or eight times and it occurred to me that if anyone were to watch me do this. Little dance. Wouldn't seem very efficient to them at all. The piece of Information. That wouldn't necessarily have is that my priority was to use a few dishes as possible while avoiding dripping beet juice on any surface other than the kitchen sink or the cutting board in which. I was actually both efficient and successful. I wasn't trying to minimize the number of times. Walk back and forth from the sink to the cutting board my friends Julie and her husband argue about the quote unquote right way to do laundry. He loads the washing machine with all the dirty clothes. He adds a cup of detergent on top turns on the machine and walks away his to get it done as quickly as possible. Move on with his day. Julia on the other hand is a firm believer in starting the water flow pouring the soap into the washing machine and then adding the dirty clothes to the mix. They both want the same end result. Clean clothes but they go about it differently because their priorities are different. His is perhaps minimal effort and Julie's priorities to make sure the soap fully dissolves in the water before adding the close reminds me of working in the kitchen at the monastery will remember to members of the kitchen. Staff were asked to peel and cut ten pounds of carrots into small matchstick size strips. It took them about four hours which drove the efficiency expert in me crazy. Why not use the food processor? I asked the head of the kitchen that would be done in ten minutes and he told me the goal wasn't to get the job done as quickly as possible. It was to offer the students four hours of mindfulness practice in the kitchen. You see what I failed to do was contemplate the why behind his instructions. The food processor would have definitely chopped those carrots and minutes. That's true but the kitchen manager prioritized a native practice over efficiency and expediency and this was a Buddhist monastery so go figure. Why do we always assume we know what's best? I put my tail between my legs and took myself to the Meditation Hall and I sat down with my ego until it agreed to play. Nice man we sure do excel judging what people do and how they do it. But we fail miserably. A trying to understand the why behind her actions when we share a similar goal with someone but their priorities differ from our own their actions seem backward to US counter intuitive silly and even wrong take my friend. Sheila in her wife for example they both want to quote unquote make America great but she loves thinks we will get there by closing the borders to all foreigners while her wife believes immigrants make. America great in the first place and right now there are people who strongly believe the temporary financial burden on small businesses and individuals is worth. Everyone staying quarantined at home until there's a treatment for Kovic nineteen but there are also many who think the damage to the economy coupled with the health. Scare is an unnecessary. Amy So they want the shelter in place order lifted so we can return to quote. Unquote normal. We each want. What we think is best but what we think is best is determined by our priorities. The question we need to ask ourselves is what is the why behind people's actions otherwise we just go through life assuming our perspective is not only right but superior if you keep getting irritated by someone who refuses to change. Doesn't that mean you also refuse the change? I think Saint Francis of Assisi knew the importance of seeking to understand rather than to be understood and since we cannot wrap our heads around other people's logic by using our own. Let's not criticize what we don't even try to understand because once we get it. There's nothing left to criticize. Go ahead and contemplate the why behind your actions and you might find. You have that in common with everyone around you. All technical difficulties and challenges aside from the live broadcasts. There was a wonderful point. Brought up in the live discussion that we had about this topic yesterday. It was by listener. Who said that? Whenever she's in a disagreement with her husband and emotions escalate into what would turn into a full blown fight. They remind one another that they are on the same team. This essentially neutralizes the ego and accomplishes exactly what we were discussing to people. Trying to figure out what is right not who is right. Inner Peace is truly the first step we can take to live in peace with others. So let's take that first step together. Thank you for walking beside me on this journey. Even when we don't see eye-to-eye I appreciate you.

Kovic Julie America Youtube Costco United States California Marketing Director Sharon Director Meditation Hall First Impressions Julia Sheila AMY Saint Francis
Celebrating The Life Of The Buddha

Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple Podcast

5:49 listening | 2 weeks ago

Celebrating The Life Of The Buddha

"Good morning it's May the seventh. I'm pretty sure and Thursday morning and I'm live if you can't see me now hope you can watch me sometime today. It is beautiful here Crystal Lake Illinois so I hope you're having good weather where you are. Today is very special day. Today is the day that is recognized all over the Buddhists world while this season is but different cultures have different days for their official date. May the seventh today. This year is the official Visa Day. Bassac means It's it's we call it Buddha Day an English and it's the celebration the biggest celebration in the Buddhist world but it's a celebration of a Buddha's birth his enlightenment and then his final enlightenment when he dies so we're really celebrating the life of the Buddha and we've rolled all those those important dates together to basically have a beautiful celebration. That's a reminder to us of a great our great teacher and The things that he led a path for us to experience so what he did in what he achieved and what he experienced we also to experience for ourselves so having a a path finder The Buddha was for us is is is beautiful. Things of the Soviet sock is a beautiful celebration so for Buddha Day and the entr Lanka that is the this year may seventh. Is that official day so our teachers at Blue Lotus Four. Four of us are Four of the teachers. The monks are from Sri Lanka. And I'm the Western representative on the Western monastic. So it's a very. It's a beautiful day and this year is the first time that we haven't been able to celebrate it and So we're asking everyone to celebrate it to celebrate it in your home in your heart and it's a wonderful time to a- to offer Donna and if you don't have monastics nearby you can offer Donna to your community so you can offer your generosity to the community You can think of the different ways while you're still of staying safe that you can reach out to others and just share sheer the delight of the day. Share your your feelings. For what a Special Day. It is make cookies for someone. When we have the celebration and in Woodstock the those of you who have been there and those of you who help every single year. No it's we have lots of food that everyone brings and the other temples who visit US Vietnamese Buddhist temples in Chicago who are like a like a brother and sister temples for us. And they're in the Maya tradition and they celebrate with us and we celebrate BASSAC with them. They bring wonderful food and they bring the monastics and they bring The answers they open they open our altar with a beautiful dance and present flowers and we have dragon dancers and we have Indian dancers and be a wonderful short talks and chanting with our local chanting group of life. People and It's then we have a parade through around the square and downtown Woodstock and then everyone comes back to the temple and we have refreshed months and fellowship and It it's A. It's a wonderful day. We get way we get hundreds of people at this event so this year and we cram it all into one day because culture in Buddhist countries. It's usually about a week long. It's a it's a big week long celebration with festivals all over and food and it's all about giving so it's definitely not something we do to raise money. It's something that we do to offer to the entire community and so it's a very special and it's springtime so we always remember. The Buddha was born outdoors and he became enlightened outdoors under a tree. He was born under a tree. He became enlightened and then his death was out in nature and in there in the wilderness. Really outside a really small village under the shade of a Tree. And so it's beautiful to celebrate in the springtime. This this wonderful celebration of important times in the life of the Buddha

Buddha Woodstock Sri Lanka Blue Lotus Four Official Crystal Lake Illinois Donna Chicago Representative
Yokoji Zoom Dharma Talk

Yokoji Zen Dharma Talks

7:48 listening | 2 weeks ago

Yokoji Zoom Dharma Talk

"Out here all day. Well whether you're in quarantine or not Not only a- healthy Also not being upset by all the political stuff coming on the same I today. You know continuing with the thing that I'm doing I wanNA talk on Oman's Medicine and sickness and this is from the blue cliff record so The way that I'm dealing with these cones you know. I'm not not really going into having a traditional light in the sense the tolkien. My every point amusement more of a of a springboard just to talk about practice and obviously the practice that we have is a lot broader. Than Cohen Book Colin also highlights aspects The shed life that we have human beings and obviously strikes in individual ways that maybe written columns so off. I go the blue cliff. Frank Road case. Eighty seven medicine and disease introduction. Folks with clear is have known nest. Stunned Times on the summit of the solitary the weeds pound sometimes in the midst of the bustling marketplace naked and free. Suddenly they appear like an angry tight with three heads and six times so suddenly as the Sun Face and moon face they radiate light of all embracing compassion. They manifest all embodiments in a single particle a mixed with mud to deal with people. According to that time when they release the transcendental opening even bigger eyes of Buda cannot see them even. If all the sages appeared they would have to fall back. Three thousand miles. Is that anyone with the same with same attainment in the same realization example of the main case on said medicine and disease so June. One another the whole earth is medicine. Walked is the South. Some have touch my face. This the whole world is medicine. How the ancients of Baden Baden's been so mistaken the CAU- behind closed doors costing the road. It is naturally quiet an open wrong wrong. Even if your nose is up high in the sky you'll still be taken Intel so the case you know it seems a bit appropriate with The trying to find yours now call visited some progress being made some of you work in the medical fields doctors nurses and Have Really Touched by all of the assets that the the do. I know that some of you even volunteer to take extra shifts. And it's dangerous dangerous situations so very encouraging to me as a human being just that if that selflessness entering into circumstances in that way and ultimately that's what it comes down to how we can serve how we can serve people the people that are around us and live in regard environment now for all of us we. We live in different in different ways. You know up in the mountains note. Sing an awful lot of difference in terms of Ovadia Corentin Etcetera. Obviously if we if we move off the mountain way wag gloves and masks now that saw That's medicine the going down there to protect of this to those of you in the city you know maybe quarantine is Lada bef- a small apartment. You go kids family around. It is not so easy but the main the main thing is really comparison on circumstances and situations with this situation is what it is and then more than more than anything is When situations like this car is important thing is how do we really live with you? Know we have the Basic Cliche of Buddhism. Where justice is it but really the the most important thing with this is You know yet just this. Is it an account of the? Because today's but then how do we work with that and then Miami rose one of one of the things of the reassembling in him. Because it's going to be. He's twenty fifth anniversary of his death on the fifteenth. Of May you know. That's like a whole generation this past but Once in a in Adama Comeback Some. Somebody came in and just went. Just this is not a very popular thing to do time. Just this is an SOM- something on the floor and so it might seem euro. She just said well. What can of this is that you know and again it's not being folks that's full of Buddhism as a matter of being authentic you know a member dolgen would say in the Buddha Dhamma. There is no deport. Shallow was most important is ones sincere practice. That's kind of an interest in what is sincere practice in not something to each one of us has to answer for ourselves. What is sincere practice you know? Obviously there's a disease than That's the thing that needs to be treated. You know it's not like well. I'm feeling like I'm climbing. The walls kick the guarrentee so therefore I will do lots of things to take my mind off it rather than just facing up to it and seeing how the mind works and operate with midst of that you know or I'm suffering. Let's drink a whole bunch stuff you know you fill in the blank back in whatever it is it which is displaced activity. The main thing is the direct facing up to it and in many ways the middle way the is told to buy. Buddhism is not avoid extremes. It's first finding those extremes Most people don't practice until they find the extremes and they know when those things lead and when you come into a situation the most important things go right into it experience it through to the Hilton. He'd never has to be fell EXP- not out but it never has to experienced again in that

Baden Baden Oman Ovadia Corentin Etcetera Colin Intel Buda Miami
Loneliness as a Portal to Sacred Presence

Tara Brach

9:35 listening | 3 weeks ago

Loneliness as a Portal to Sacred Presence

"Amnesty and welcome. This is the sixth of a series. And I have no idea how long it'll go on called sheltering in love and last week and this week the focus is on really facing the pain of separation and loneliness the vet Murthy was our recent surgeon general in the United States up until twenty seventeen I also a physician and he did a road trip across the United States. Talking to people. All different types of people now is written a book called together and I mentioned him because he's a key figure and bringing into our societal awareness. The huge huge suffering really. How loneliness is a major public health concern. And he talks about how for so many that he encountered whether it was drug addiction or poverty are arena fiscal diseases that the root suffering was a sense of isolation being stuck in struggle and all by oneself. He shared a number stories but one that struck me. He met with a man several years after this guy had won the lottery and this man told Murthy that the day he won the lottery was the worst day of his life and when Murthy said well explain please. He described how he had been working in a bakery and he had know he was needed there and appreciated for what he did. He had friends in his neighborhood and after winning he stopped working. He moved into a gated community. He got really really lonely. He developed diabetes. He felt pretty continuously angry at what he perceived snobbery of other people. That live there for many of you listening that this isn't hard to understand or imagine and what strikes so much is that loneliness is a disease that hits all classes people in all sorts of life circumstances. There's a really well known teaching story that I love were student asks a spiritual teacher. What's the difference between illness and wellness? The teacher writes those words up on a board any circles the eye of illness and the we of wellness. And we know it that we're not happy when the world is centering around I. Those are not the moments that were happy. The trajectory of the spiritual path is shifting from an identity and a self concern and focus where our fears and our thoughts and all our intentions and motivations really around furthering and defending a self. It's a shift from that. To really recognizing in a cellular way that were connected and then the experience of that is a caring. That's all inclusive. That's one of the definitions. I have of radical compassion. That it's that awake sense that we belong and of course we care for each other. We belong to each other. What's so interesting to me. Is that many evolutionary psychologists and philosophers. Also consider this the trajectory for our species that there's an increasing movement and capacity for collaboration and for compassion with the understanding that we belong to this web of life. What happens in this web affects? All of us sensing were part of Earth. Were part of what's described as guy at this whole system that's synchronized and self organizing on the same boat. So we claverie. 'cause the truth is we belong now of course as I say this you may be instead of thinking of the the long arc. Maybe more focused on a short stretch of time that we've been having recently and it certainly doesn't appear claver to give and embracing and caring of each other which is why this week and last week Really relooking at the suffering of separation and loneliness that many are calling an epidemic and we talked last week about how loneliness surely forgetting our belonging quite literally makes us sick it shortens our our life expectancy and that given where such a social species we have a longing to belong and very real pain of loneliness and it's in our DNA to feel that because for most of human history it was really dangerous to be separate or outside of the group not a member not feeling our membership So it's easy to see how in current days loneliness is exacerbated by this global crisis by the pandemic there's so much anxiety so much fear around health and economy. We see each other. Were afraid of of getting this. Potentially deadly virus from each other. So there's distancing and many are living alone it's a real setup one person Couple of days ago from our DC. Meditation Community who lives alone told me she said. I'm afraid I've had the last hug in my life and I wasn't even aware of it at the time and that really struck me just that sense of really. What if I never feel held again? There's so much suffering the comes with feeling lonely. It often appears as depression. You might not even be in touch with the loneliness. It appears as depression which is a pushing down that rawness. 'cause loneliness is so painful. I'm it appears as anxiety because the more separate we feel the more we feel vulnerable. The more we feel threatened. It's not as appears as anger blame because when we feel lonely really we feel rejected in some way and threatened by others that makes us angry and bottom line core. We feel shame we feel shame because to not belong translates to most of us as something's wrong with me lot of pain. Statistically it's shown that the loneliest age group is eighteen to twenty but it's really all ages now I heard a story that I love It's about this gentleman who knocks on his son's door and he says Jamie he says Jamie. Wake up and Jamie answers. I don't WANNA get up. Papa father shouts get up. You have to go to school and Jamie says I don't want to go to school. Why not ask the father three reasons this Jamie I? It's because it's so dull second. The kids tease me and third. I hate school and the father says well. I'm GonNa tell you three reasons you have to go to school and I because it's your duty second because you're forty five years old and third because you're the headmaster not everyone goes around like on lonely but we all have this existential tendency to feel separate. This is this is deep in us. I find that Rumi says the best on this. He says that everything that comes into being gets lost in being drunkenly forgetting its way home and what he means by lost in being is that we lose the sense of our belonging to the hall and we identified with a separate self this I and all of our thoughts and activities just circle around what I want what I need. I'm afraid of this furthering and protecting ourselves. Now what's kind of important to understand? Is that if in growing up. Our basic needs for safety and love and understanding are Matt. Then that self-focused is there. But it's a wholesome one. It's not exclusive versus sticky. So we can still remember in a very fundamental way are belonging but when our personal lives when in our personal lives. Sir Spin stress and trauma and very little healthy bonding healthy attachment bonding with caretakers by nature. We become more self fixated more self protective more aggressive in kind of defending. And that's where we get really imprisoned in the I That separate lonely feeling with so much suffering

Jamie I Murthy United States Depression Papa Father Rumi Meditation Community DC Matt
A Poets Path To Awakening With Norman Fischer

The Wisdom Podcast

9:02 listening | 3 weeks ago

A Poets Path To Awakening With Norman Fischer

"Zen priest. Norman is the author of many popular books including his most recent publication. The world could be otherwise imagination and the body Safa Path in his fascinating conversation. You'll he norman share stories from his own spiritual journey from aspiring young poet living in the woods of Northern California to meditation teacher and celebrated author. Norman talks about how early encounters with death predisposed him to religious and philosophical inquiry. And how reading? The existentialist would pave the way for a fascination with sin. You'll also hear Norman discuss the topic of doubt rather than providing faith certainty. Buddhism provides a pop a set of questions in which we discover what life is and who we are. Lastly Norman talks about what it means to be a teacher of the Dhamma as well as his own relationship to himself as a teacher of Buddhism. I so much enjoyed this conversation and I hope you do too. I did have the first question that came to me and it was when I was just sent yo bio and it said that you have a title Zo Kit Sue. I don't know if I'm pronouncing it correctly. That's new to me and I was just wondering what that means. And what does it represent? Well it's not a title it's just it's just my name. So so maybe you're aware that in Zan when you or dane either as a lay disciple or has a priest and a lot of people will I. Dane is a lay disciple and then later ordains a priest. That's fairly typical. Get your given a diamond name. And everybody has a person's personal name and the personal name usually has four characters. So there's and and and it's a two two character names so Zo Ketziot is to character Zo and Keto and those are the first two characters of my four character personal name and the characters translate as Elephant Cave. Zo Is an elephant. Like there's these Japanese water dispensers with like big long snouts on. I don't know if you've ever seen in those are called Zo shitty or something like that L. Elephant container so so as an elephant and catch you as a kind of a cave or grotto where people meditate so The they say that In Asia in ancient times when they were looking for caves to meditate in there would be caves where that elephants would be drawn to because the caves would have like some kind of. I don't know if this is true but somebody told me this. The cage have some kind of mineral in the walls of the cave that the elephants would like to lick on and eat for their digestion. So the elephants would go into these caves in search of this mineral and then they would over centuries. I rub their flanks against the Cave. Making the cave like really nice and smooth and pleasant and then later on meditators would go in these caves and they called him. Elephant caves for meditation so That's very unusual name. I've never there's a lot of names that are common in Japanese character names. You hear a lot of names. A lot of them are names that were given in the past that famous monks nuns. You know but this is a really unusual name. I don't know why I have this name. My teacher gave it to me and when I ask them like how come you gave you the name. He didn't seem to remember having done it. And that's because I think that he was a very busy person and he had a lot of students. I don't think he really particularly noticed me. So he just probably have random names assigned to people randomly so. I don't think there's any special reason why I have that many but it's so people yeah people often think it's title they think. Wow this is some very special title. I never heard this before but the thing is I don't like titles I I don't I don't ever like to use any titles Nobody calls me Rossier Censeo or anything like that. They just call me by my name and in fact hardly anybody calls me Zo Coetzer. They just call me by English name. I had that impression that you want to into title so then when I sold that bio and it intrigued me and I was like wow. Maybe he's I've never seen that title before. Maybe he's got the highest one I've ever seen before. And so he might be compelled to use it. No no no. It's not a title so Who was a teacher that gave you that name? Richard Baker Richard Baker. And and. How did you meet him? Well let's see. I was studying zen in the Berkeley Zen Center and but the Berkeley San Center did not have the opportunity for monastic practice. So the San Francisco Zen Center which is a much bigger organization. Had A monastery at that time just just opened a few years before call. Tuskuhara and I went there for visit and I really wanted to go and do monastic practice and so in order to do monastic practice. You had to be a student of the San Francisco Zen Center system so I started attending. Dharma talks by Richard Baker and And that's how I met him just by I. I didn't really I eventually. Of course got to know him personally and still know him personally now but in the beginning I attended his Dharma. Talks like a lot of other people and I was one of the many many Younger people who were drawn to the San Francisco Zen Center in the very early nineteen seventies. So he gave you the names. O Kit Sue and that was your deigned name is that is that right. Well I I got that name as a lay ordained disciple and then when I was dating later as a priest I retain the same name I'll k. And normally it's full syllables. Did you say yes? Yeah well Yeah the last. Usually you only go by to The last two syllables are a wrench. Oh so my second. My first name Elephant Cave and then Rancho can be translated in various ways it the character's mean something like to to to face something and to shine Saw My my route teacher from Berkeley Mel Weizman translates that second game as turning toward the light which is a really wonderful translation. So so my England in English. You could say my name is elephant cave turning toward the light. I love it. I don't know I'm fascinated by this. Fan is very elastic. The Japanese in fact I've given dominating so many many people over the years and it means a lot to people right because your teacher in my case. I don't think my teacher particularly no mayor new. You know why he was giving me that name as I said a minute ago but usually when I give names I know the people right so I give them some poetic name from the Dharma and they appreciate it right because it's like. Oh Yeah I have a new name now. This is sort of my new destiny my new sort of path in life and so it is a beautiful. It's a beautiful thing to have these Dharma names. People enjoy them and they take them seriously and the in charge them. Yes and you said when you're explaining it. You said that you grew teacher. Mel Wise Men gave you This had had a translation. What did you mean by route teachers interested in that as well? Well he's you know you can have as you know you can have a lot of A lot of teachers a lifetime. Most people will have more than one just one teacher. But there's one teacher who is closest in whom usually it's the teacher that you start with an imprint. Sue initially in Dharma and so Mel Who's still alive now. He's in his. He's ninety. He was my first teacher. And when I introduced me to the Dharma and later after my initial ordination when it was time for me to receive Dharma transmission and full ordination. He was my teacher for that process. Allow so he. He's been my my main really my main teacher and the person who's Dharma. I am following more than anybody else. And so that was at the Berkeley and center. Well well we. I studied with him at Berkeley senator about five years and then after that as I said I wanted to do. Monastic practice in the monastery for about five years and then after that. I remain with the San Francisco Zen Center for the next baby. Twenty some years and moved from the monastery to Green Gulch farm zen center where I lived for another fifteen or twenty years. You would be Abbott Co Abbot of San Francisco Zen Center eventually. Yeah Yeah

San Francisco Zen Center Elephant Cave Norman Berkeley And Center Berkeley Zen Center Kit Sue Zo Coetzer L. Elephant Zo Ketziot Richard Baker Richard Baker Berkeley San Center Richard Baker Berkeley Northern California Rossier Censeo ZAN ZO Mel Wise Green Gulch
Nanchuan's It's Like a Dream

Everyday Zen Podcast

7:19 listening | 3 weeks ago

Nanchuan's It's Like a Dream

"Well tonight we're studying the fortieth. Case of the nucleus record nonchalance like dream and I apologize because I think we probably I think At least a couple of you asked about the case number. I think we got the case number wrong. It's case forty. Nine forty four nonchalance dream. Who's the pointer for the case cease and desist? Then an iron tree blooms with flowers. Is there anyone is there? A clever lad loses his prophets. Even though he is free and seven ways up and down and eight ways across he cannot avoid having another another pierce his nostrils. But tell me where is his error to test. I quote this case. So this story that we're about to hear is one of the great stories of all time. And there's a commentary to the Blue Cliff Record Hawkin and ten K. hotlines disciple and when I consulted that commentary. Hukou says there that he studied in past this gone three different times. And even when he starts thinking about it he's he's trembles all over and I think the key to the beauty and importance of this case is right here in the first line of the pointer cease and desist then and iron tree blooms with flowers. Later in the commentary will hear about cutting off your life which is more or less the same as cease and desist and these expressions point to the most radical teaching which is essential zen teaching the part that makes everyone tremble when they even think about zen practice. Because really it's true that in the end our practice is about cutting off our life which is probably not what most of us had in mind when we first took it up cutting off your life. Complete seizing from all outward activity and grasping and going forward and living and seeing that all of that was always impossible and that the only real possibility is to die to all that and be completely willing to disappear into whatever is in front of you or inside of you just dying moment by moment into your life which is the same thing as giving up your life moment by moment and as our pointer says when you do that. Iron tree bursts into bloom flowers spring up everywhere even where there seems to be no soil at all. And if you don't do that eventually you're going to be brought down like the clever lad who loses his prophets in practice really and truly. This is the only way give up. Let go throw away your life. It's over already. There's nothing to do nowhere to go when you have that. Spirit there's beauty and there's love otherwise you're doomed so this is a pretty radical thought. Don't you think and this is what this case is about to? Here's the case as the officer. Lucia John was talking with nonchalant. He said Master of the Teaching Jaw said Heaven Earth and I have the same route myriad things and I are one body. This is quite marvelous. Nonchalant pointed to a flower in the garden. He called to the officer and said people. These days see this flower as a dream. No one thing to realize here at the outset is that officer. Liu Isn't incorrect in his practice or understanding officer Liu has beautiful understanding and he really appreciates and really sees the Dharma so maybe we could say this is the Buddhist part of the story and the officer is a beautiful Buddhist. He really has faith. In intelligence he really sees and practices. The Dharma wholeheartedly and the Dharma is great. It's inspiring and uplifting to know as the officer knows that we all things are radically interconnected one body but then comes as an part nonchalant says to him. Come over here. Look at this flower. Can you see it? Can you really see it people? These days can't see this flower. They see it as if in a dream. So there's an part is the part that will ever let anything stand that insists on realism on honoring the constant this integration of the truth not not understanding and not not having faith in Darva but not only that also immediately right now and all actions of body speech and mind in perception in thought and sensation in intention just being there just willing to accept all conditions just dying just melting away all the time making the Buddha's awakening real and concrete in your living.

Officer Hukou LIU Darva Lucia John
My Panic Attack

Buddhist Boot Camp Podcast

7:24 listening | 3 weeks ago

My Panic Attack

"Originally intended to record this episode back in March but that's when the corona virus hit the US in full force. So I put it on the back burner to host live. Qna's instead highlights. From which are uploaded as podcast episodes but once our front doors open again. The sudden stimuli of crowded stores and roadways might overwhelm us which brings me to this unlikely story. I want to share with you about a panic attack. That had earlier this year it turns out. There's a good explanation for why it occurred but it was quite unnerving when it was actually happening. What got me through? It is what can get us through. What's happening right? Now after? Six years of accumulating airline mileage points from flights and credit card charges. I finally had enough points to cover an absolutely free round trip. Flight and five week backpacking trip around the Philippines earlier this year and setting up a tenth on the beach or as I like to call it. A five billion star hotel made the trip in nature lovers paradise but quite a few shots. Vaccinations for things like typhoid and malaria were either necessary or strongly advised prior to boarding the flight. I am fortunate enough to not be on any medication. generally avoid even taking aspirin unless. I'm in severe pain but considering all the time I was about to spend sleeping outdoors in a third world country. I took the malaria pills for two weeks prior to departure as well as during the trip and for three weeks. Afterwards I didn't bother reading the possible side effects because not taking the pills wasn't an option but it didn't take long to notice that the pills made me sleepy for example so I just took them at night. I later discovered. They also cause vivid dreams and a slight fever which was no big deal. The whole point of the trip was to maximize time on quiet deserted islands for some peace and tranquility and to avoid major loud cities like Manila as much as possible. Since as far back as I can remember. I've been hyper sensitive to certain types of noise. The high pitch of CRT monitors beeping alarms the sound of someone snoring chewing the auditory assault of emergency sirens screaming children wind chimes and even certain. Birdsong would all drive me crazy. If it wasn't for two things one I can usually meditate and breathe deeply through the noise until it stops and I can return to the bliss of silence and to almost always have earplugs on me just in case. The sound is louder than my meditation consumer. Whether this miss a phony ah is a symptom of being somewhere on the spectrum or something else. Altogether avoiding noise isn't an option especially when dealing with major airports and public transportation. I can usually gear myself up prior to leaving the house in preparation for what's to come and wear noise cancelling headphones which more often than not keep my anxiety at bay anyway. The trip involved wonderfully warm ocean breeze on white sand beaches beautiful hikes and surprisingly freezing temperatures did not expect to experience in the Philippines but enjoyed immensely nonetheless on us. Sunrise hike to one of the highest peaks in the country clear blue skies and great food. Add into the mix one bad case of getting seasick on a boat between islands two cases of food poisoning which I actually think was from drinking the water. Not NECESSARILY FROM ANYTHING. I eight and you've got the complete experience which was still great in the grand scheme of things but at one point returning to the big loud and busy city of Manila after a couple of weeks of reading books in a Hammock on a quiet deserted beach. Hit Me really hard. The noise of construction traffic blaring. Tv's and radios car horns and the fast pace of everything and everyone around me shot my anxiety through the roof and sent me into the worst panic attack of ever had. I'm not going to play it down for you. I completely lost it. I truly believed it was the end of timber as we know him. That Buddhist boot camp would come to an end and that I would have to check myself into a mental hospital upon returning to the states. If I don't kill myself I that's how bad it was. Suicide was more inviting than another minute of noise from which I couldn't escape even with earplugs or noise cancelling headphones I truly wanted to die. It was my lowest point and I didn't even recognize myself. I mean this is me. We're talking about the guy who feels anger threatening to surface and starts contemplating what other feeling I'd rather choose but in this case this down to Earth Guy you've grown to know over. The years was no more. What got me through this sudden spiral of mental instability. As I was rocking back and forth was repeating to myself. This is temporary. This is temporary. This is temporary within an hour. I fell asleep probably from exhaustion. It's incredible how much energy the body uses to feel something anything so strongly. When I woke up the next day I was no longer on edge but still seriously questioning my mental health. Was this my own psychotic breakdown. His this what everyone was saying. Britney Spears went through in two thousand seven. It felt like years of meditation. Mindfulness and all the practice of had to remain calm in the midst of chaos. Meant nothing so I decided to do some research and discovered that severe panic attacks are actually a common side effect from the Malaria vaccine. I was taking and it all made sense on the one hand. I was relieved that it was merely a chemical reaction to the pills but has felt so real in the moment of panic. I couldn't access all those other parts of my brain that would have otherwise kicked in with logic and reasoning to talk me off the ledge but whether real or chemically induced the mantra. This is temporary. Helped me through it? All temporary can mean a minute or two an hour a week month year or lifetime. No matter how you look at anything. Everything is in constant flux. I guess what pleasantly surprised me. The most is how quickly I was willing to accept my mental breakdown. Prior to falling asleep I contacted a friend to recommend a therapist could see immediately upon returning to the states. I asked another friend whether the mental institutions depicted in movies resembled the real ones. He sees in his medical practice and then all reminded me of the near drowning incident that I described in my memoir and how I'm merely observed what was happening rather than reacting to it. I guess I wanted to share this story with you because perhaps all of the years of mindfulness practice didn't go out the window in the moment of panic and the gap between impulse response. I didn't react to what was happening. I reminded myself how temporary it all was. Mindfulness Meditation can really help us. Not In the moment of meditation but at some point down the road when we need it most a got me through the four hours of being seasick on the worst boat ride. You can imagine it. Got Me through the panic attack and it got me through the whirlwind of change to which I returned when I got back home for starters I found out that I had to move out from where I've been living for the past two and a half years but rather than react or dubbed the unexpected experience terrible or unfortunate. I found a new place to live. That is everything of ever dreamed of. And then this corona virus exploded and I can't think of anywhere on the world where I'd rather be quarantined right now

Manila Philippines Malaria United States QNA Fever Aspirin Typhoid Britney Spears Assault Birdsong
You've Got to Remember that God is an Idiot with Vinay Gupta

Buddhist Geeks

9:57 listening | Last month

You've Got to Remember that God is an Idiot with Vinay Gupta

"Okay we'll welcome vinegar to have you on the Buddhist geeks show. I've been following you on twitter for. I don't know it's been a long time so great to finally connect and talk to this you. Do you do interesting work? Thank you I I. I'd I'd say that you interesting work but I'd say that'd be an understatement I wanted to mention a few of the things you're into at the moment and then of course we'll jump in and just. Kinda have a conversation about a number of these things so at the moment your current Major Gig that I see you doing a lot of stuff around is you're the CEO of material. Which is a new project. That's recently launched as I understand it so we've been in development for about two years and Ten Days Google So we've actually long congrats. We're open for services congrats and you launch the product while it just gets into a little bit of the detail So I mentioned that I'm you also ran the launch of the Athenian Project which was One of the most important crypto projects to launch This decade next to Bitcoin and And I also was kind of familiar with you a little bit before that and really appreciated the way that you were translating. All of these sort of crypto. You know Programming kind of Esoterica into language and concepts that there were pretty understandable for for the you know fairly well educated layperson So so I think pretty critical in getting a theory out there in no small part because of the way you're translating for the for the Super Geeks to the kind of regular people thank you. Yeah I mean I certainly tried to make this stuff accessible to people Because I mean it's very It is very very technical stuff right. Yes blockchain's our house complicated as we know how to make technology and it's very very hard for people to relate to like what it needs to them personally. It's easy enough to think about it in the abstract but when we get to the all important questions like so. How does this affect my life? It's pretty hard to see like over horizon even in the from ably up until maybe the launch of the iphone in two thousand. Ten people didn't really understand that the Internet was going to become pervasive forcing their lives. So here we were with our kind of like. Hey we got the single the internet and we were trying to talk about. What is it going to look like in ten years when it's fully mature when it's fully accessible when all the difficult user interface work is done and all the rest and for the to work you have to get the communication down from the obstruct ruin to the particular? The personal man. I'm glad you think that was useful successful because it was it was no easy to do and it was included that we were getting it right at the time Yeah I. In retrospect it seems like a pretty good damn job on the launch. I'll thank you. Yeah yeah absolutely and you know before that you also designed interesting. Project called the heck seared which is kind of low cost housing solution that I heard about it from burning man but of course. That's not what you designed it for us. I understand this is really more a response to this sort of growing refugee crisis that that we see a lot of different countries And it's a low cost housing solution which is pretty pretty interesting. Yeah so invented the Heckscher. Two thousand two and you know conceive that it was gonNA take thirty years to get from having invented it to large well. You know widespread global deployed capacity for handling knowing what I expected at the time to be three hundred billion climate refugees. You know I've worked pretty hard on climate from a variety of angles but the main thrust is humanitarian mitigation. So kind of everything that I'm doing in my life is driving toward an underlying goal. All you know. Get THE AD deployable capacity to build temporary cities permanent cities to absorb the hundreds of millions of people that we expect to be displaced by climate. Change really none of the humanitarian agencies. Rethinking of that CAN SCALE UNCERTAINLY. None of them have the capability to make thirty or plums. So I've really been you know kind of Alo- knocks or in that space with the clear vision of from two thousand to everything in my life has pointed getting shelter for three hundred million people in thirty years and we're now eighteen years into the. I think that we are five years behind schedule but only five years behind schedule. So that's a project that you continue to to work on. So the hosing is not enough right. You need housing. You need critical infrastructure for water and sanitation. I put a good number years. Work into 'em you need digital identity because otherwise how are we gonNA pass for those people? So I've done a bunch working digital identity at you. Need access alarmed? And I'm brew beginning at dug into access to launch us by current area focus at an annual physical asset tracking because these are going to be very very austere environments so. We need extremely efficient disposition. Physical offer an. That's a long a large chunk. Hope to get done with material. Okay so material fits into this larger vision. It sounds like in a way like you've been driven by vision and I don't know if you'll appreciate or hate this comparison but it reminds me a little of Elon. Musk those kind of having this sort of clear vision of why he's getting into you know to business soon and that being sort of the driving force behind you know the different projects he engages. I hear something similar in what you're doing. Is that an accurate way to put it. I mean the differences Elon. Musk truly successful right. Like he's actually super getting this stuff done. I made a bunch of bad. Decisions vary are wheeling in those processes of helped me buckle on. It's only having seen anyone musk's worked example. That's a load of course correct like I would not be. Ceo of the company. If I hadn't seen Elon Musk make that work. So it was kind of like I spent time trying to avoid capitalism and work in the open source world to solve these problems and a long time to give up on an approach interesting to see the cure for capitalism economy more capitalism and at this point nothing else works toll because everything else is basically eroded so at that point. The only thing that you're left with his Eddie possibility of jury capitalism's more. Capitalism has run a company but a lot of thought was a very conscious course corrections. Like look you know everything I wanted to this. The results are really not nearly as good as I hoped. Hence the five year delay. Okay we've taken over burning non but you know. The charities are still totally resistant to the actor So there was definitely sense having stop and think and set back but okay. I'm doing this wrong. He got it right wrong. I'm GonNa do this his way now. Here we are. You know. There's something you you shared on twitter recently under an I'll just mention your at leashless folks that want to check you out night. I I really enjoy your tweets You're you're talking about for you. You came around. This issue came to the realization that it was really the industrial revolution. That's that's sort of the underlying problem not capitalism per se of curious if you could save a little bit about that because that had me released start to think differently about about the whole kind of broader Kind of economic issues at play here and I've been sort of in a I don't know if you'd call it an anti-capitalist or just you know becoming disillusioned with capitalism and wondering are there viable alternatives. So that was an interesting thing to hear you say so. Lots of people trying to alternatives to capitalism for organizing industrialization. You know we've seen communism we've seen socialism. We've seen various varieties of capitalism. We've seen several phases of capitalism. But y'all still fundamentally houses problem which is at its extractive at one ended polluting on the other. Yes and the extractive. Polluting nature is industrialization and it seems to be. It does matter how you organize. Industrialization with currently available technologies. All Forms of industrialization are extracted at one end. Putin on the up so you just you know it's like if you just don't have enough food. It doesn't matter very much how you'll portion food that are worse ways of doing it but even if you apportion the food perfectly will still have people hungry so I feel like kind of industrial. Capitalism is like it might be a sub optimal way of organizing industrialization but there is even if all industrialization with technologies optimally organized. It's still gonNa suck so got you thought point you either have to question industrialization in Oscar the we could go back to the laund- on the short answer is no on. Why would you want to or we have to push forward and we have to fix the extractive aspect of capitalism but closing manufacturing running clean thoughts still going to leave you with a bunch of social problems caused by capitalism but social problems could be fixed with social change an engineering problems Ecology unmerciful tool of capitalism is engineering. Limits don't social limits. We get very confused about this.

Twitter CEO Elon Musk Google Musk Elon Blockchain Putin ALO Eddie
Befriending Yourself

Buddhism Guide

7:55 listening | Last month

Befriending Yourself

"Episode is called. Befriending yourself in this special punt cost. I took about two practices. One that will help you deal with anxiety and the other one will help you to support yourself during this difficult time novice day. Everybody thank you for joining us today. So tonight on gun talk about two practices. One is a breathing. Practice on one is a guided. Meditation in both of them will help with anxiety so the first one is the the belly breathing exercise a lot of the time when we become anxious. We stop breathing format chest when we're breathing from the chest it means at Brest Fast Shallow. That's how we breathed when we're anxious Oxygen these getting into Monday which means we become more anxious so we need to be breathing from

Brest Fast Shallow
Yokoji Zoom Dharma Talk

Yokoji Zen Dharma Talks

9:22 listening | Last month

Yokoji Zoom Dharma Talk

"Good Morning I hope you can. You can all see me again Me and my heart goes out to all of those that have passed joins grown virus. I hope that you guys are doom. While in your horn tainted non heart independent on what's going on With this Quarantined in many in many ways. It's I don't think any of early through Before I was looking at this pandemic of of Nineteen nineteen the night. My father who passed away out Twelve years ago a gun through that I think he was bowling at that time so he had no experience. So They I. We're in a you know similar similar place and I was thinking just in terms of of one. Study is a lot of these collins that a written would do if we didn't have like a direct lineage. We wouldn't have people that have gone through the Really really seeing into one's nature and then pass that onto on today in on down to today a lot of the collins that we have basically our precedent you know people actually realize this they. I mean this. They realized this and appointed no doubt. And that's you know that's an amazing thing and so that's historical precedent to to Real deep experienced Zad. Today again is that I don't know we'll all of you do in terms of Of Your own practice you know hopefully as being filled and you have a little bit more time to deeply reflect on how life is going on today. I want to pick up one of these precedents from the passage of master rinse. I thought of the reason that And picking up his last last week that told about mass designed show. Who's in this in this co- on this involves San Jos teach master inside so I will begin? This is a case the teen and it's Rennes is blind donkey from the Equanimity preface to the assembly devoted entirely to others oneself is unknown a straightway eliminating dominoes. You shouldn't be bothered by that. Being no lot. Mean treatment blight breaking wooden pillow should be used. What about when his time to depart main case attention when riddance? I was about to pass away. He charged Sancho after I depart. Don't let my True Dom. I'd the extinguish Sancho said. How could I let? You'll true? Dom idea extinguished resign counted. If someone suddenly asks you about it. How do you reply? Son Show gave a shout and Rinse I remarked. Who would have thought to the my true? Dhamma will be extinguished on reaching this blind house appreciates reverse at midnight. The robe of faith transmitted to Wayne. Seven hundred upset bunks on yellow plum mounted a swings. Monastry Truth Dhamma. I have written size limb. The blind US extinguished it and people despised minded mind together sealed ancestor to ancestor transmitting. The lab season mountains. Being level a giant fish becomes a phoenix is just the Such splendid words are hard to compare with anytime as a device. He commendable votes. That's kind of interesting in this. You know a Lotta people. Critical of master rims is expression the standard Because you know in the early days you is famous for the for the for the Shout and the the hidden with a stick. I in many ways you've taken on the expressions of the time when he became older. Like in this case you know it is understanding pretty subtle. You may not think so on this on this particular level but you know put yourself in his place you know. Masters INS is about to die. You know what would? What will you be doing at that time? That's kind of interesting Have met people. Are there to data in various wage. Some that have a lot of fear. some some able to Very content with a lie and has done the best that they possibly can really appreciate live on the spectrum in between and so it you know. Death doesn't have to be such thought up in a negative way or even put on one side in the shadow is the one of the things that helps me to appreciate. Living is the fact that I'm GONNA die. You know so it's just like how can I really appreciate this you know? How can I live this moment in time? Nice kind of you know again. It's interesting master inside. He's on his deathbed and You know a lot of people not not that you know quite often not that concerned about what's going to happen afterwards. Then we'll Sud- whatever's going on however you know I've met Practitioners Students Teachers that have been in that position and that main concern is full of the next generation. And this beautiful thing I remember. Some of you know Kevin Reilly He died the. Nothing's colon cancer at the end of his life. It was it was basically making sure that his children had good advice. At the good they would be happy and content in their lives and the financially they'll be somewhat secure on the other hand you know. I've met people who are far more concern whether they feel that they're volatile a basically and they get back with a partner or something like that in many ways that somebody relevant to to the situation that that is currently and so is he's on his death that what's he doing you know. He's making sure that students I'm show has has a good appreciation of lives and that he will take on that that. Promise that he'll pass. He'll pass this on for future generations after remember the whole religion. Buddhism is is about the appreciation of this. But not that it's necessarily personal. You know the Buddha would talk about even though you know he had the we talk right here the Truth Dhamma I. He talks about the Tattoo. Gaza Buddha who has attained to to the snus? He doesn't say you live. In the greatest in the world has standing light made light you see a lot of curves that teaches in many different relation in religious each And knowing that this has so much benefit is transmitted to future generations. And there's a good chance that the suffering of appreciation appreciating this You know will will be out of the way and this appreciation communally owned I. So you know it goes. He says to his after I depart. Do Not let my true Dhamma. Ibm extinguish. Obviously you know this is. This is memo whatever that has been taken from the time of humility right down to the present day so When Jack Moody said Democracy Yep you have the treasury of the true dome. Alright Bob Willis mind on the formless full mid no for now a To you

Collins Sancho Rennes United States Bob Willis San Jos ZAD IBM Show Jack Moody Colon Cancer Wayne Kevin Reilly Partner Buddha
Three Approaches for Doubt and Mistrust

Secular Buddhism

6:41 listening | Last month

Three Approaches for Doubt and Mistrust

"And now this jump right into the discussion around the Zenko on that was shared in the last podcast episode. So this Cohen says one day. Chaozhou fell in the snow and called out. Help me help me help me up. Held ME UP. A monk came and lay down beside him. Chow Chu got up and went away. And that's it. That's the Cohen. And I WANNA share first of all some of the thoughts that come from the Patriot community. Because as you know I've mentioned we we have discussions around the podcast in around the Cohen. And I WANNA share some of these thoughts so ellen says quote this is what the Co on makes me think of when experiencing difficulty emotions like grief or depression and your loved ones. Want to help. But there's no way to pull you out of those feelings or make them go away so often. The best way to help is just to be with you. While you're feeling them the feelings can run their course with someone you love by your side until you have the strength to get up on your own close quote and I agree with Allen's assessment here I think oftentimes we try to help someone and our way of helping isn't helpful and other times. You know all we really need to do is be with someone and just by being with them like in this case the monk lays down beside him and that's all it that's all he needed. Chaozhou got up and went away is what it says. Okay Matt says quote I think it is an example of reactivity chow falls and his initial reaction is to panic. He fears that he cannot free himself from the situation. The monk comes in lies beside him to show him that. The situation is not a crisis he too is lying in the snow and did so voluntarily in doing so one can see that there is no emergency lows quote. This is an interesting take on it. I hadn't thought about it from that perspective but I think again with these. Cohen's you know this is a an invitation for you to extract meaning or whatever you're going to get out of it for you and it's Kinda cool. That Matt stalled this. This is kind of a different angle to it that I think is accurate. And a lot of instances in life where we are in a situation and we're thinking how Megan to do this but it's helpful to know that somebody else has been in this situation and they were able to find a way to to cope with it or deal with it then I can too and I know I felt that before and honestly I think a lot of us are feeling this. Now with everything that we're going through with the lockdowns in the With with the covert nineteen. I was telling my wife this the other day how much more difficult it would be to face these uncertainties in terms of jobs and the potential financial repercussions. If if I knew this was just happening to me but somehow by knowing that the whole world is trying to figure out what to do about work in about Income and things like that somehow makes it so much less stressful. Because I know it's not just me. We're all trying to figure it out and that's kind of what Matt is talking about here so I I like that thought. I think there's something there to it. Suzanne says quote this Cohen. Really resonated with me and I was reminded of the key. Idea of Montessori. Education helped me to do it on my on. Chaozhou asks for someone to help him help them up. Which would be quite a passive way of reacting to the present situation like a child asking their parents to do something for them. Instead the monk lies down and shows Chow Chu the passivity of his response. Once having realized this Chaozhou is able to act for himself it up under his own steam and walk away and then she says it it also reminds me of the raft analogy the monk and his compassion are the raft which enables Chow Chu to get up and leave behind the monk. Which is the wrapped? Close quote. It's always fascinating to hear other people's perspectives on these stories. Because we're all in different places in life we've had different experiences in life and we see things from a unique vantage point. And that's what I thought of when I was reading Suzanne's take on this. Like what a cool way to see that again from a perspective that hadn't crossed my mind and the correlations that she's drawing that hadn't crossed my mind and I liked them They make a lot of sense to me and then I wanNA finish with one more with Nancy's thoughts so nancy says quote. This Cohen makes me think about when I have a problem or situation that is troubling me and I turned to a friend or a loved one for help. The best help I have received is when that person simply sits with me and listens close quote and that's getting back to kind of the way Ellen talked about it and what I kind of took from it. Which is that sometimes. The best help is the help. That's just being with someone and not actually trying to help that certainly a lesson. I took away from it and I think sometimes we see this in our own lives that the best way to help someone to just sit and be with them and to not try to help in fact. Oftentimes the trying to help makes the problem worse. I know I've experienced that Both as the receiving on the receiving end of that but also on the other end where. I'm the one who's trying to help and I'm catching myself that my health is not helping him. I don't know if you've experienced that would assume some of you have. You can kind of correlate this also with the concept of teaching people to fish instead of giving fish I've correlated this a little bit with the thought of with my kids like teaching them how to think rather than what to think so. Yeah my mind has gone to a lot of different places with this co on. But at the end of the day I like visualizing Chow Chu Falling in the snow. And calling help me up helped me up. And then among laying there next to him and Chacha just gets up and walks away These little stories can always be unpacked to gain a lot of perspectives and thoughts and teachings and again. There's never a right answer. The point wasn't the answer. The point was what did it make you think of in the process of thinking maybe learned something about yourself. I think that's what's cool about these. Cohen's

Cohen Chow Chu Chaozhou Matt Ellen Suzanne Zenko Patriot Community Allen Depression Megan Nancy
Daniel Goleman: The Mind and Meditation

The Wisdom Podcast

9:41 listening | 2 months ago

Daniel Goleman: The Mind and Meditation

"I have the pleasure of speaking with Daniel Goldman to claim psychologist and author of several books including the international bestseller emotional intelligence. Why Can Madam Molden? Iq Daniel has written extensively on the connections between human psychology science and contemplative practice and their practical applications in both leadership and in everyday life in this conversation. Daniel talks about his early years at Harvard where he earned his PhD in psychology and how encounters with great teachers such as Ramdas took Kunar remedy and many others would pave the way for his research on meditation and Non Western theories of mind unlike he studies in psychology which largely focused on the content of the mind. By-pass enough focused on the process. Which was tremendously exciting Daniel. He then discusses how mindfulness and meditation topics not will receive. Graduate advises have evolved within the United States and within American culture most profoundly. Daniel discusses his most recent work on climate change. He off is extraordinarily astute insights on how the human mind grapples with the difference between imminent verses symbolic threats and how these translates into the world of capital consumerism and personal responsibility he also shares his thoughts on how Donald Practitioners My contrbute to these calls. Especially I so much enjoyed this conversation and I hope you do too so I thought to start with awesome you so. You're a graduate student at Harvard and went to. India is that is that rushing seventy might travelling companions on the trip. Were someone known as Jeff. Cable? Who's called Krishna? Dos The devotional singer. Another friend was released for DOS. Who just lose writing books with Rhonda's because I had met Ramdas quite by accident cosmic what you would say tender auspicious coincidence or something but My Freshman Freshman Trish during graduate school. I was writing a paper suicide over the Christmas. Oh holiday and I get a knock on the door of my apartment in Cambridge in. It's a woman why never seen before. And she had run into a friend of mine who had been in a communal house in Berkeley. Who's going around the world? And he had sent a letter to me that she was the currier four and she had been in a monastery in Nepal where she met a an American. A guy named Bongolan not rundown. Yes and basically she. I have two things to do here. One is delivered this letter to you. The second is to visit this guy. The BAGUA DOS it. I really shouldn't need and the third was to go to my sister's wedding but she backed out and so that was why she came to America. So I said well I'll take you to meet this person you know. Your Christmas is writing on suicide. We ended up driving up to New Hampshire in there in this farm house. Luxuriance funhouse in a small room. Upstairs was this guy all white along there but no Julia was and he had all these weird pictures on the wall turned out to be Hindu deities and we watching remit and nobody said anything. I never been in a social situation where nobody said anything but I went along with it. And then after a while he spoke and it turned out he was Richard Alpert now. Rhonda's just come back from India and it turned out also that he had been fired from the program at Harvard that I was enrolled in a graduate student. Also I was on the graduates to school colloquium committee which meant I could invite him to come back and speak. Nice which I which was the first time he'd been back to Harvard since he was fired. And so you know he was on fire. He was really full of shocked as they say just back from India and he started. He came give a lecture started. Seven ended it too and to bribe janitor lettuce sticky two. Am to work. And I began to go to a kind of a summer camp that he was running his father's place in the Hampshire where I visited him. This was in the summer and after two rounds I found out that might fill ship to harbored included. A traveling challenge ship nice and I had a wonderful mentor at Harvard David McClellan who actually had hired fired leary and so what did he think about your little excursions to bomb. While he was a devout quaker and he was very interested in meditation so it seems glad that I was getting into this because none of it all is other graduate students. Were like all its study the need to achieve from the you know also you riding on suicide just WanNa go back to that in. What was was there any in that compelled you to write. Oh I had been at a teaching assistant in a course on death and dying talk. Guinan and I had gotten access to about several hundred suicide notes for Bailey Corner. Yeah and you know it's just a you know you study stuff in doubt. I mean I wasn't suicidal. But yet you had interesting death and dying or was that interested. Dr. Not like a personal interest but kind of academic academic India okay and so I should give it back on. My father was professor humanities and my mother was a social worker and I think I got a a kind of implicit value system. It was a very ecumenical. He taught a course called autobiography of civilization which was world literature so it a very lot instead of Sanskrit actually version Among other languages his best friend was the guy who founded the Asian Studies Department at Berkeley? No so I had this kind of view of the world which was larger than just Western yesterday so I was very interested in going to India but I found could In graduate school because Ron dos made me think oh I'd love to meet his guru yet girly Bob Him. You Know No. I'd never met anyone like him of the KARMAPA sixteenth city. Zuma Sitter Sixteenth Mama's yeah and They meant didn't see each other enough. Say met but Lama nor law whose retreat master for College Berries who was close to carmont stayed within croly Baba for two years and I think maybe he told them I never got the story of how he knew anything again. But anyway and Because this was nineteen seventy s very early. A lot of the wonderful lauman's the very shall we say far advanced llamas on the path from Tibet were still alive and Christopher Dawson and I met coup Air Fiche who is very humble. Wonderful being reviewed seem around dawn. You know mumbling all money. I when I saw going around the Stupa and people come and see him day and night and he was always happy to see. Whoever came which I contrasted with my professors at Harvard were world famous psychologist. You could see them like two to three on Tuesday office hours so anyway. Long Story Short coup. Who was wonderful and I didn't know till decades later with he was the teacher of the Dalai Lama on Compassion Chari out the time. You would certainly never say so. He had been offered the kind of the presidential suite with top sweet. And the monastery top floor didn't want he stayed in a very small room had little wooden bed. That was it was very simple. It beautiful way so I met him and kind of made it my business to look around I. I ended up studying the Pasta with Joseph Goldstein. Who was in residence of the Burmese? Mahara I think. Joseph was little horrified that other Westerners were showing up and Manindra had invited his friend going Kaji to give up his second course for Westerners and I went back and gave a talk at the conference on Yoga and Therapy Deli and told people there that there was going to be sub ten day retreat and when the people audience was named Sharon Salzberg cow and so she came to book Guy Learn how to meditate the rest is history was charged with Joseph of course so we go way way back to nineteen seventy really

Harvard India Daniel Goldman Graduate Student Ramdas Rhonda Joseph Goldstein Berkeley Madam Molden United States New Hampshire Richard Alpert Donald Trump
Dealing With Isolation

Buddhism Guide

6:10 listening | 2 months ago

Dealing With Isolation

"Don't ever do your devices doing a digital detox and limiting the amount of time spent on your phone or laptop can help reduce anxiety and prevent you from failing negative. I understand that stopping using your phone. Completely isn't very practical. Says set yourself. Time limits make a commitment each morning to only use your phone at certain times and for a set duration may be thirty minutes in the morning again in the afternoon and then in the evening. It's true to say that social media can be a great way to keep in contact with friends and family showing self-isolation but we must keep in mind that our views he's known to have a detrimental effect on your mental wellbeing. Three news overload. There is such a thing as being too well informed. News overload can cause a lot of anxiety tin stress as social major. You should limit your exposure to it rolling news on the UNSETTLES US so limit your news updates to mornings and evenings for start a hobby. The maybe something you've wanted to start doing for a long time. Now is the perfect time to start. You could learn cooking painting sewing writing or podcasting. Only keep your mind pied. It will also teach you have to be mindful when we're focusing on something. It prevents our minds from wandering off to dog places. Five do daily exercise. It's a well known fact that exercise in releases all important endorphins. Which boosts your mood? There's no need to set up a home gin you could do to. Butter pilot was Zomba. There are many good videos on Youtube. That will help you if this six get some fresh. He may be in isolation. But it doesn't mean you have to shut out fresher. If you have a private garden thing go outside each day if you have a balcony go and sit on that if all you have is a window than permit wide and go and sit next to it just failing the sun on your face. I'M BREATHING IN FRESH. Air will boost your mood and help you shake off mental health issues. Seven time to meditate and be mindful. Meditation and mindfulness are great ways to banish feelings of anxiety or restlessness when we allow our thoughts to control us they can take us into some deep dark places especially when we're having to isolate so meditation and mindfulness helps to take back control of our minds. One reason to meditate is to stop the endless chitter chatter in your head and to find the stillness and silence at Lurks Ravine. It will help you to let go of those destructive thoughts lead to anxiety and panic on the Buddhism. Guide Webpage unto guided meditations. There's a meditation called allowing your thoughts to flow in this guided meditation. You'll learn to see thoughts as just owns and so you don't need to blindly follow. Everyone mine from this practices will also bring your mind back under your control through bringing awareness to whatever. You're doing the quickest and most simple ways bring yourself into the present moment is to watch your breath or your five senses. All you need to do is start. Whatever you're doing close your eyes and focus on your breath. Just become aware of flowing in and out of your body does not need to judge. Joe Change the rhythm of your breath. Just observe it. You could also five because on what you see hear smell taste and touch again. Don't judge just observe so look around you at five things of different color touch four different textures. Listen to three different. Sounds become aware of two different. Smells and see if you can taste one thing in your mouth. Both these practices will bring you into the present moment and helped me to stop fixating on the past or the future. All of these points may sound quite simple but even the smallest of changes to your daily life can bring about substantial results when it comes to mental health joining this time relation. I'm conducting live. Mindfulness Meditation Practices on my Buddhism. Guide facebook page so go to the page and checkout the timings. If we can't connect personally at least we can do it. Virtually please stay safe. Stay healthy and stay informed.

Zomba Joe Change Facebook Lurks Ravine
We're All In This Together.

Buddhist Boot Camp Podcast

5:42 listening | 2 months ago

We're All In This Together.

"The reason I wanted to talk with you today is because I keep being asked to offer some words of inspiration during this whirlwind the thing that is really important for us to remember right now as people are freaking out in panicking is that people don't know what we don't know how long this is. GonNa last and we don't know if this is just going to be a week or this is going to be a year and a half and we become aware that nothing is ever certain nothing ever was certain so the only thing that we've lost during this time of transition is this illusion of security in this false sense of stability. It's not that we used to know and now we don't. We are now aware that we've never known we never know what tomorrow is going to bring. We never know how long things are GONNA last. And so we're getting more in touch with reality now than we've ever been and that can be scary for people because especially control-freak Because they like feeling like they are under control. I think I have it all figured out. They know what's going to happen tomorrow. They have plans for next month. They have reservations for next year. They know where life is going to take them. And all of a sudden the rug swept out from under you and it doesn't necessarily have to be a virus. It could be a divorce. It could be getting laid off work. It could be a number of things that death in the family. Your own death the death of someone else it could really you know. Pull the rug out from under you and we've often posted when something like this happens in life just yell out plot twist and keep going and so this is a major plot twists and if we treat it as such then there's a sort of release an acceptance in. Dare I say surrender in the most beautiful sense to come what may to allow to trust to witness often. Invite you guys to treat everything in life like as an experiment. The what can I learn about myself from this? These are interesting times and actually I. I WanNa talk about that. I WanNa talk about how the words with which we describe our experienced dictate our experience. So if you're using adjectives to describe what's happening right now as horrible and tragic just use the word interesting and say this is interesting. It takes the negative weight off of it still honors. What is happening that people who are getting sick the People? Who are dying. I'm not in any way nullifying the the heaviness of that. It's very interesting that we are called upon by something practically invisible to stop being selfish. This fires doesn't care about your race. It doesn't care about your income bracket it treats all equally and maybe we can learn something from this by. Maybe we can understand that. This is a time for us to come together and be kind not greedy. Not hord people are running out of toilet paper but it's for one reason and run reason only it's because so many other people got way more than main he did and I'd like to think of us as a human race as as the roots of big tree you know when it rains which is nourishment for the tree. It's important for all the roots. The ones that are close to the surface in the ones that are deep down the ones that on the left the ones that are on the right to take as much water as they need not more and then let the rest seep through to the other route so that everyone can get nourishment because if once out of the tree or one route says no. I'm going to gather all the water right here myself. Then it's going to kill the tree. Does that make like we have to take the whole tree into consideration because trying to save one route will not save the tree? It's important for the nutrients in support for all the gifts that we received to seep through and nourish all of us for the sake of all of us. I think the sheer awareness that your experience is not unique Hugh in the sense that we're all going through this. That to me helps tremendously because one of the challenges we have is that we think we're alone that no one else understands what I'm going through. Well that's not the case in this situation. Everyone understands what you're going through. Everyone is going through that whole whirlwind of what level? Panic is too much panic. In what level of carelessness too careless. Where do I find middle ground of honoring the situation in myself in my decisions and also not going overboard in either direction? The invitation is for all of us especially now is to question some of our reactions. Why am I reacting the way I am who modeled this behavior for me? And why choosing to emulate them the power of this pause we are all given is to take inventory contemplate. Who In my life has inspired me and I wanNA take a step beyond inspiration because inspirational alone is almost some form of entertainment if he would whereas motivation has more to it. Because you're not just inspired you're motivated to modify your behavior to be more in line with your values with the behavior that you've witnessed in someone else and said that is how I WANNA be. Even though I've been one way for thirty forty years I want to change the way of and I want to be a better version of myself with knowing what I know

Hugh
An Open Source Economy of Abundance with Marcin Jakubowski

Buddhist Geeks

11:07 listening | 2 months ago

An Open Source Economy of Abundance with Marcin Jakubowski

"Hello everybody Vince Horn here for another episode of Buddhist Geeks and today I am very very delighted to be having a conversation with Martian Jukovski. Good to have you on the show Martin and thank you so much for taking the time to chat with the Buddhist geeks. I'm really excited about this conversation. Because so much of what you're doing. Feel a resonance with but it's also different from what we're doing here Buddhist excited Dick's where the intersections excellent. So let's dive right in. Okay I've got my bathing suit on and I'm ready to go seven Fahrenheit and sweet Maysville Missouri. But I'll join metaphorically awesome are you. Are you at the factory farm right now yes. That's the Kansas City area. Okay cool and I and I understand that. You have also google fiber out there. Oh and that's an addition since about a year now and that's why we can have this conversation hopefully seamlessly today. Yeah no mood. That's a big game changer fiber. We spent the money on a week. We got the pipes run here. Trenched bury them and the whole facility with Up to four GIG. Wow that's awesome. See if you're kind of you're living the dream for me. Which is you've got high-speed gig multi gigabit Internet and you're out on a farm building Chit Really Cool. I'm excited to talk about your work so so I saw. I saw your tedtalk a number of years ago. Odds probably about ten years or so ago now Something like that and and just immediately was like okay this person and your partner Katharina. Y'All are doing really interesting work with the open source ecology movement and In that talk you spoke about the global construction kit which you know. Last time I checked this is like a fifty fifty or so different items that you're looking to build open source that the kind of you would be necessary for human civilization to To to this global village construction set fifty industrial machines to create small-scale civilization with modern comforts essentially the critical machines from tractors bread ovens production equipment energy equipment and and Carson everything. You need to create infrastructure. That's the basis of thriving than so we can talk about then getting meditative but you have to provide some basic needs. I yeah you can't you can't just Meditate without without some basic needs Yogis the the people they had their comfortable caves and flame. That's right that's right. Yeah and some nettles to eat right and and and you're going to see the vision that you'll have is is going well beyond that. I mean you're talking about being able to replicate modern comforts without having to rely so much on the sort of centralized modern systems that we've all come kind of dependent on. Yeah exactly the idea is. Let's distribute the economy. So right now we're in a state of centralization but the fund that by fundamental design we have a distributed world and I think that comes from the first principle of energy energy is distributed. Solar Energy is distributed. That's pretty much where all the power for today's economy comes from. It's from the sun right so by nature. We have a distributed system but the way we created we kind of reformulated as humans isn't into a hugely centralized one so to get back to more in touch with those principles of distribution decentralisation that gives power to everybody literally and metaphorically to tell me more about like the journey that you've been on with the global village construction set because I saw you've you've made a tremendous amount of progress on that front. You know it's one thing to hear someone give a Ted talk about about something that's like an inspiring idea prototypes. It's another to see your ten years later. Like have made real progress on the stuff again to hear about that. Yeah definitely maybe you know you can say at the time of Ted Talk. Were a few percent down right now. I would quantify it as like one third done so we've got hundreds of prototypes Twenty or thirty unique prototypes everything from tractors to CNC machines. Three D. PRINTERS HOUSES. Akwa punit greenhouses. In fact we actually added the house as a critical machine since we kinda thought well. That's a living machine. Actually belongs in the global village construction set but the power is yet getting a comprehensive said along a construction setup route. So we're looking at it more as building blocks and to derive from how Lennox Open source. Software has there is one of the keys to success was large modular break down into very small parts can have thousands of people working on at the same time. And that's exactly what we do with hardware breaking down into modules and development steps for each module sewer inching along at the time of the Ted. Talk I kind of felt like I missed my great opportunity because I had so many people contact me. And all of that and we didn't have an organization. We hardly have an organization right now. We really don't yet. Were not at that level of having a business so to say like a real solid organism. But we do have a lot of foundational work. I think we are. I would call ourselves an exponential organizations laying a solid foundation with all the prototyping that we have done now ready to to convert that to economic impact so transitioning from the Playing prototyping to to the to the next step which a lot of open source Projects Forget and that is a product. So what what are the products that we can offer that anymore? Anyone can use okay. That's cool. I mean it's interesting. I'm thinking back to win. I got even more kind of interested in Y'all's work and I think at a certain point I started to really feel this kind of poll to be sort of subtract myself out ourselves out of the sort of capitalist system a bit more to be able to offer meditation teaching more freely. You know to be little less dependent on a pay for service model and you know one of the big questions that comes up is like okay. We'll around like housing costs. And how do you? How do you reduce your cost like housing is like one of the major costs and you all were some of the only people that were talking about being able to build an an ecologically sustainable you know house for like twenty five grand? Yeah and that's unheard of you not to be able to hit those kind of Knows numbers and that's what I think is really interesting about what what you're trying to do is you're really setting a goal of kind of price reduction that really competes with the capitalist markets on their own terms in a way. That's hard for them to be. It'd be hard if you're actually able to pull this off for companies to To to have any response to tenth the Price House or tractor or brick press or all the things that you're building. Yeah that's exactly right so let's dive into. There's actually a very interesting page like when I look at the WIKKI statistics. There's a page on our wicky open source ecology that org slash wicky which has cost of living. And you said it. The number one cost of living is housing on average. I have some stats here in. Its sixty eight hundred dollars a year. Then the second one is your car. Thirty four hundred dollars a year and then food twenty six hundred dollars a year and yet it adds up to about twenty thousand or so. Just let's see the the number actually is twenty thousand per year per person according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics for a household doesn't sound too bad but Ideas let's so let's go for example to the CDC home just to show you like a very tangible example so in a CD go home. You mentioned twenty five thousand dollars okay. But where's the Labor that's materials so the model there is a client? Pays probably like ten thousand dollars service fee. We host a workshop where we swarm on the build with about fifty or so people and build that in five days and I think that the more like a turnkey cost to the client. We more like seventy thousand. That's kind of what if we if you'd actually start full cost accounting like the twenty five thousand dollars as materials. Yes so you'd have to figure out how to do it but we did with a swarm based build the idea there is you are providing an immersion education. So basically you're selling inexperienced. People participate in get a lot of skills have a lot of fun shatter some of the limits in their mind about what's possible in terms of effective building using very collaborative learning rich learning environment. That's very supportive. So that's the product we're trying to develop and probably if you look at economics probably like seventy thousand dollars for a a house builder a basically the House. The person who wants to have the house before fourteen hundred square foot house so still about was Chris in the cost of industry standards. Right we actually roll this out. So there's a whole organization to behind it and sell. That's kind of how it looks right now. Now of course if you're a skilled guy and you've got a family that can build that while you're not gonna be able to do it in five days but over a month he can take our modular construction methods because everything in the system is designed to be handled by people not not example cranes or large machines the way we designed modular construction method lends itself to a swarm belt with normal people and really reducing the skill set by essentially trying to turn this into. Lagos as much as possible That's interesting and and from what I gathered like everything that you're doing the documentation around the processes like everything is part of the open source model like everything is shared shared. Absolutely everything. There's two levels so one is design seconds. Dente price design. And that's that this is where we talk about the concept of distributive enterprise. Yes the idea if we do it. And it's good for the world. Everyone can use it and and people in modern society. People think that you have to be proprietary or you have to have a competitive advantage based on Ip Order to win here are competitive. Advantage or collaborative advantage is the the opposite. Is the fact that we're collaborating? And if you think about it you're in kindergarten you'd understand because at that point we kinda were talked to to Cher but from High School Into College. Johnny were completely taught the opposite and right now. There's a huge cultural barrier that prevents people from comprehending that. Hey we can actually do. More together. Annihilate the AB- the material scarcity issues that are still central to life in the west end in the developing

Ted Talk Buddhist Geeks Google Kansas City Missouri Vince Horn Dick Martin Price House Cher Partner Trenched Bureau Of Labor Statistics Carson High School Into College Katharina Johnny
Finding Peace Amidst Chaos

Secular Buddhism

9:19 listening | 2 months ago

Finding Peace Amidst Chaos

"So let's jump right into the Zenko on a shared at the end of the last podcast episode. Two monks were arguing about the temple. Flag waving in the wind. One said the flag moves the other said the moves. They argued back and forth but could not agree weaning. The Sixth Patriarch said Gentlemen. It is not the flag that moves. It is not the wind that moves. It is your mind that moves. The two monks were struck with awe. I think this Cohen is very appropriate with the topic of the discussion today and quite honestly with the observations that we make on almost any Argument that you see on social media or in person right in this picture. These two people standing there arguing about whether it's the win that moves or it's the flag that moves and we see that in almost any conversation right two completely different perspectives. Both trying to get the other one to see what the the way the other one perceives it and I shared this on the Patriot group and got some thoughts that I wanted to share from some of the people who are in the group and the first one comes from site who says quote okay so my initial reaction was to argue with monks by thinking the flag and the win the both move why rush to impart my own judgment. We Nang reminded me why my mind moved close quote. I really liked that. I think like site today. It's very common for us to approach this immediately. Have our answer and say like citation said the the flag and the winner both moving data will of course that makes sense because that's how I perceive it but that's the reminder right the right then what happened. It was my mind that moved now. I really liked that. Thank you say and I wanNA share with Stefan shared in the group as well. He said Both monks are seeing the same thing and proceeding it completely differently. Neither is wrong or right. Who Nag noted the sense? They were physically seen since what they were. Seeing was the exact same thing. The only difference was in their perception and therefore they're moving mind was the only variable in this situation close quote and yes again echoing citation said. I think that's that's a really neat way to look at this. That the variable Stefan says is the moving mind and man. Isn't that true in? Almost anything can take almost anything. This is the what's at the heart of the teaching of the six blind men describing the elephant right. You have this thing. That's the same thing in everybody's perceiving that completely differently and that's the that's the situation that we're faced with. There's no way for us to be able to make everyone perceives. Something the same way. Just can't happen and you we all know this. We know this from any news article. Any conversation on social media any and you're going to have to people Come and approach it entirely differently ensures. Sometimes you get someone who uses the same way you do but we've all encountered somebody who see something very differently from how we view it and and that's what was taking place here that's what what This co on teaching. So I WANNA share with. David said David says it seems that this co on touches. Perception and interdependence there is an external world out there and we can only proceed through our senses and ultimately our mind so both monks perceived the same object the same objective reality differently that in the end it is just the way their mind interprets it and this is also related interdependence the flag and the wind are both needed to generate the experience amongst are observing and so is the mind the that observes the phenomenon. I I like what David is expressing their with that concept that of interdependence in this without the wind you don't have the flag moving without the flag moving You don't have wind blowing and that's how all things are right. So seeing the interdependent nature of things in this co- on is a really cool way to interpret it and finally I want to share darlene thoughts. She says Quotes what a fascinating co on. My interpretation is that the flag and the wind are concepts which only exists in our minds. We eventually perceive reality filtered through language or narratives about the world and our nervous systems and mistake these perceptions for unfiltered reality. Therefore the movement is a product of our minds. Close quote and yes. I think that is a common concept that is found in Buddhist teachings which is that the external world that we see exists in our minds in other words. The way I see what's out there has everything to do with what's happening in here and and we tend to think that what's happening here is happening because of what's happening out there and sure that's true to a certain degree but if you're going to recognize that you've got to recognize the reverse. Which is that was happening out. There is interpreted the way we perceive it. Because of what's happening in here and this to me point said Alan Watts concept of the do happening. I think I've mentioned before word. Is this like this constant interplay between the doing and the happening and things are happening so that causes the doing and because things are being done that causes things to be happening. So everything's just that balance of the do happening and that to me is what Darlene is kind of explaining here where the way the mind perceives affects what we perceive what we're perceiving makes the mind perceive in a certain way in the end they play on each other constantly happening that way. Now I WANNA share some of my thoughts around the same teaching and then correlate this with the topic of the podcast episode for this week so the idea of finding peace amid chaos. I think this is good timing Like I mentioned the last podcast episode the whole world for the most part. We're all experiencing a very similar experience right now. This is why you need at least in in modern times that were were all sharing a very similar experience. That's unfolding similarly for people all over the world the intensity and the scale is different based on where you are but it seems like there's no part of the world now that's untouched by the corona virus and the spread of this Kobe. Nineteen earlier this week. I was asked to share some of my thoughts regarding how we can find peace amidst chaos considering that again. We're all in this chaotic time. And I wanted to share the audio of my response to that question because I think that fits in well with Cohen and and with the concept of moving mind. Here's the audio of the response that I shared with regards to the question. How do we find peace in the midst of chaos? I WANNA share some thoughts regarding the idea of finding peace in the midst of chaos in the midst of the situation that we're going through with this corona virus and the thoughts. I WANNA share pertain to the idea of wanting to find peace in the midst of chaos. I think The very fact that we're looking for peace in the midst of chaos sets us up with the mindset of trying to avoid discomfort and oftentimes are discomfort arises because we're trying to not Experience any discomfort and the truth. Is that at times. Life is uncomfortable and as we're all experiencing now sometimes it's very uncomfortable and the fear that arises out of uncertainty is real the discomfort that arises from the break in our ordinary routine. It's real because we're creatures of habit. We're social creatures when we can't socialize the way that we're used to that creates anxiety and wanting to not feel that discomfort only aggravates the discomfort so the thought. I wanted to share around. The idea of looking for peace in the midst of chaos would be to perhaps look inward into reflect on. Where does that need for peace? Come from in the first place. Why am I not resilient to The discomforts that arise in life in other words. Can I become more comfortable with discomfort? And I think that's a good place to start with when we're looking inward because the truth is we can't control what's happening outside of

Stefan Darlene Cohen David Patriot Group Alan Watts NAG Quotes
Facing Pandemic Fears with an Awake Heart

Tara Brach

9:56 listening | 2 months ago

Facing Pandemic Fears with an Awake Heart

"Poet Martha Pasta Wages. Create a clearing in the dense forest of your life and let these moments right now. Be a pause were you inwardly and feel what is here. What wants attention. Been unwilling to feel. Let yourself touch. What really is living in you right now. Your own perhaps sense of owner ability sorrow fear. You might ask the question that as I as I face. This collective suffering what is being called forth in me. What is it that's being called for? How do you want to be? Who Do you want to be in the midst of this? These are important questions. My French important. Because our prayer as our sensing who do I really WanNa be through this? That has the power to guide us. Many of you know in love this teaching from Zen Master On I circulated at some in the last week or so and it helps me every time I reflect on it. He writes that when the crowded Vietnamese refugee boats met with storms or pirates. If everyone panicked all would be lost but if even one person on the boat remained. Calm and centered. It was enough. It showed the way for everyone to survive. So here we are. We're in the midst of this huge unprecedented uncertainty reactivity in fear and confusion a lot more. Can we be that person? Because in a way we've been training for this each of us in our own ways we've been training how to open more in our personal life to the joys and the sorrows to the fears to the losses within away car. We've been training so if you're intentional right at this juncture in time. If you're intentional how you want to move through this the suffering that arises concern you towards your deepest resources we kind of get back into it into our bravery and into our wisdom and our our love and I'm sure you've seen it in your own life how it's often the periods of suffering the real losses the failures when we actually grow when our consciousness wakes up SOM- so we'll look together now at how these very circumstances of our times the dangers that are presented to our bodies our health our life our loved ones or financial security have these various circumstances can be grounds for compassion. We'll explore that together and I'd like to do this in two parts. I how what's going on and what's coming up in us how we can then create find an inter refuge of love of presence. How can we do that? And the second part is how we can find refuge with each other because if ever there was time for Sanga Ev- ever this world is going to experience truly moving through something holding hands. Whether it's we might call it. Virtually but our hearts together. This is the time so we start with the first and I'd like to name that it's important as we practiced with the fear succumb up as we seek in refuge that we remember that fear is utterly natural and appropriate. When we're facing danger loss I love the language. It's nature's protector. It's telling us to take good care. And in many ways in some parts of the world and with some of US say the United States. We haven't been awake and scared enough to do. We needed to do to prevent as much loss as may becoming. So fear's intelligent part of us and so often when it comes up. There's a sense. Oh I shouldn't be experiencing this. There's something wrong with me for feeling fear in a sense that we should just try to get rid of it so for me. One of the most powerful little practices I do when fear comes. Up Is Mentally. Whisper this belongs. It's like it's a wave in the ocean and it belongs so fear's natural it's intelligent and the challenge as we know is that if we don't know how to be mindful of fear. Fear possesses us. Panic can become truly debilitating when we get hijacked by fear we lose contact with our with our most recently evolved part of our brain our frontal. We we lose contact with compassion. We lose contact with perspective with humor with all executive functioning. So I'm it's matter matter of degree of course but fear when it takes over causes a tremendous amount of suffering and in a pandemic it's contagious so can become widespread and it becomes one of the greatest dangers of pandemic. So again that question. Can we be that person in the boat who feels the intelligence of the fear but knows how to hold it with? Mindfulness and with compassion. Because this is where the training and mindfulness comes in and we're going to explore it bringing rain which is a we've of mindfulness and compassion to fear at first to say on many of you are probably aware that along with my colleague Jack Cornfield. I teach a mindfulness teacher. Certification Program and a number of people in the current cohort are from China and several of them reported in. They told us that the Chinese government has just officially recommended that to reduce stress and report community during these times. Everybody in China. She practiced mindfulness meditation. So I heard this kind of celebrated. It's pretty cool. And some of you might know that I and a couple of colleagues are currently offering webinars. Mindfulness webinars to the House of Representatives and staff. So here we are now waiting for the official word that we're supposed to do physical distancing washing hands quieting our minds and arriving in presence. May It be so so? Let's take a look at. We find that inner refuge of calm in the midst of the storm for ourselves and for the sake of others and we begin. I'd like to start by saying when fear is really strong. When it's the level of panic and trauma were what's called outside the window of tolerance. And that's A. That's a phrase from my friend and colleague Dan Siegel Great Psychiatrist. And he describes the window of tolerance for within a fears within it. Then we can bring mindfulness and compassion and really transform our relationship to it but when it gets outside the window of tolerance we first need to calm down our nervous system. We need to do some a reducing of the activation of the sympathetic nervous system of fight flight freeze so there are a number of ways we can do this and you are probably familiar with them. They're all forms of nurturing ourselves. Helping US feel some sense of safety in love and one of them that is so helpful is breathing along deep breath breathing and counting to five and the in breath and then coming to five and the out breath and if you can do that for a few minutes ten minutes fifteen minutes you totally shift your nervous system. Route other ways of calming fight flight freeze grounding and that means feeling gravity feeling your belonging to the earth part of grounding might be to touch the fabric of what you're wearing into sense the the surface of the desk or the material of your chair named something you're seeing in the room so that you're bringing yourself into the here now with your

United States China Sympathetic Nervous System Martha Pasta Sanga Ev Dan Siegel Jack Cornfield Executive Chinese Government House Of Representatives Official
Facing Pandemic Fears with an Awake Heart

Tara Brach

4:58 listening | 2 months ago

Facing Pandemic Fears with an Awake Heart

"I'd like to reflect on tonight is very much. What is right in the Times as what it means to face a pandemic time of really widespread. Fear how we can do that with a compassionate heart and I really invite you as we will be doing some experiential reflections and so on as we practiced together. It's so powerful to keep remembering and visualizing that you are joining in with humans from all parts of the globe like you who really want to live with presents encourage love through these times because it's so important to realize togetherness I don't need to name at relay. These are frightening times and I imagine like myself. Most everyone listening has some real fear Maybe for yourself or for others that are close in our maybe itch severe for so many in our world That are are struggling and what is going on now feels quite different than personal suffering. What I mean by that is in contrast to if we get that cancer diagnosis or a relationship. Fouls were all in it. There's that well known saying. Be Kind everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. And what's growing clearer than ever? Is that each of us is having to face a different pace but face our vulnerability and it feels out of control and it can feel scary. I WANNA share personally. If we were in a live group. I'd be asking us to kind of talk to each other and share will. How is it for you right now for me? My daughter-in-law's pregnant and she's a nurse. Working at the largest hospital in the San Francisco area committed to staying on so she super higher risk and my son's father who's a very dear friend lives with them because he's very L. has a severe heart condition so he might not survive the virus and it's very likely to be brought into that home. It's complex but that's scary and then of course I have. Many more friends inquired teen as probably so many of you and manion many friends who are financially on the edge and we know pandemic extra toughest on those for most vulnerable. It's been like this to history so those with the least access to good jobs reliable incomes to the resources really of our society. They're the ones that are most likely to contract the virus to die of it and if they don't die to be financially devastated so as I imagine this says I think of this and it's very much my heart mind of the close ones in and those that I know in those that I don't know and how are hostile sir. Quickly running out of supplies. There will not be enough beds. There won't be enough ventilators. We'll comes up in me just to name. It is very real mix of a fear. I feel grief with my kind of my heart's anticipating real loss. I'm there's a wrongness. There's a a tenderness and with all that is also a sense of possibility that the possibility that this suffering in so deep and so wide will wake up. Our hearts in the collective way in many of you are familiar. I know with the body sought. Aspiration body sucks as an awakening. Being and the words are may what ever arises what ever circumstances arise May. They served the awakening of compassion. So I want to bring that into our shared reflection because this prayers really in very deep in me that may the suffering awake in this hard and all hearts may may help make love go viral. That's really the prayer. So maybe I'll pause for a moment and just invite you dissension. What is it like for you? In these times of global crisis were many of already suffered many much suffering yet dot

Times San Francisco Manion
There Is Nothing I Dislike

Secular Buddhism

7:34 listening | 2 months ago

There Is Nothing I Dislike

"Before jumping into the podcast topic for today. I want to discuss and share some thoughts around the Zenko on that I shared in the last podcast episode. And this is the Cohen goes like this lean. He said there is nothing I dislike now. I'm I mentioned in the previous podcast episode. This is one of those lifetime co onset. You could really work with us for for the rest of your life constantly analyzing and asking yourself. How is that possible to to reach a state where there's nothing that I dislike and like I said I I like this co on a lot and I like to revisited? Think about it often. I WANNA share some of my thoughts around it. I I want to share some of the thoughts that were shared in our discussion group so on the Patriot community for the podcast we have discussions around the podcast episodes around the Zen coonskin and many other things but these are some of the thoughts that came out of the discussion around this specific Cohen. So Christina said open quote there are parts of me ego states that disliked things and suffer from these emotions but I the IM parentheses can choose to access other parts ego states. That will help me find inner peace about these things through. Mindfulness and meditation through choosing I can think enact more skillfully despite disliking the person or situation and then she goes on to say it's also fun to think. There's nothing I like. You can play with this and ask yourself. Are there also times when I don't even like the things that people I almost always like? Who am I in those moments close quote and I really like what Christina shares here I like that. She's showing the other side of the same coin. If I'm going to say there's nothing I dislike. The similar analysis would work say there is nothing I like and I think that's accurate when we when we'd really start to break this down and that's another fun way to work with it when you find yourself a person or a situation that you really do like to ask yourself well Do I really like what part of me likes this person in the same way that we do with things that we dislike now. Bob Shares a slightly different thought. Here he says so. This Cohen amuses me since my current focus seems to be observing. How often I arises within me. This Cohen reminds me that disliking is not possible when there is no I close quote and I think that's one of the powerful parts of this Cohen for me is the recognition of who is the I in the statement. There's nothing I dislike and when I understand or have more. Skillful contact context around this. I that supposedly goes around liking and disliking things than yes. I suddenly discovered there is no I to be disliking anything and in that sense. There's nothing I dislike is accurate because there is no I I I like that interpretation. Morella shares this. She says open quote the Cohen. Made me think about equanimity and non attachment. There's nothing I dislike. When I observe without getting attached it is an invitation to look inward and investigate. Why am disliking something or someone? I usually find that the reason I dislike something or someone is because of cravings versions or fear and I love the idea of using the CO as a reminder to look deeply into the causes of my dislikes and work with my cravings versions close quote and yes I really like what Morella is bringing up here which is what I try to mentioned with all of this right. This is always an invitation to look inward and to find the reason why we dislike something or someone rather than focusing on on the dislike or even the like as if it was this thing that is not that has nothing to do me and I think that's where we get stuck. Sometimes we treat things like if there's something that I don't like it has everything to do with the thing I don't like and doesn't have much to do with me when in reality if there's something I dislike it's me that's doing the disliking so it's it's about looking in and finding that what. What part of me doesn't what I'm experiencing this person that I'm with and for me. My thoughts regarding this Cohen. I really like investigating the I in terms of impermanent send interdependence again this notion of when I can see through the illusion of there being a permanent or independent me that exists going around this world and liking things are disliking things when I start to see myself in the context of impermanent bean impermanent and being interdependent in other words the impermanent me is the me that one day. I like this another day. I don't the interdependent me. Is that under this set of circumstances. I like this under this other set of circumstances. I don't like it and when I recognize that that gives me a a big sense of freedom because I can recognize I may dislike this thing now but in another place or in another time I might like it and also from another vantage point. You may like this and I may not like this and if I were you I would liken and dislike all the same things that you like and dislike. I think. Sometimes that's hard for us to really understand because we really do have this tendency of thinking that the way we go about experiencing life is the most accurate way to a certain degree it is. It's not that it's the most accurate it's that it's the only one that makes sense because we've only ever experienced life from one vantage point the one that we're in right now in this present moment and it's really hard to put myself in someone else's shoes maybe to some degree. If I could say well I've been there before so I can see why you view this this way or that way. Or why you like this or dislike that because they've been where you are that's a little bit easier. But that's still an incomplete picture because I've never been where you are right now where you are right right now as there were. I am right now is here and those are not the same place. They can never be the same place. I can only ever be where I am here. And now therefore my perspective and my interpretation of reality is unique. It's mine it's it's the only one that I'm capable of of experiencing and to me that's really helpful to know because I can take your interpretation of reality and when you give me a description of your likes and dislikes. I can at least understand that. Wow for you that must make perfect sense because my picture of reality makes perfect sense to me and there. I think there's wisdom to be had in simply recognizing and acknowledging that well if I were you and I was in your place in time with every single set of circumstances in causes conditions. That have allowed you to be who you are right here right now. I would probably be doing and saying and thinking the exact things that you say in thinking do

Cohen Christina Zenko Morella Bob Shares
Desire and Addiction (Part 2 of 3): Voices of Longing Calling You Home

Tara Brach

9:45 listening | 2 months ago

Desire and Addiction (Part 2 of 3): Voices of Longing Calling You Home

"We are discussing tonight. The second part of what's now a three part series on working wisely with desire addiction and I start with Buddhism because the Buddhist talk about the Middle Path as many of you know in approaching desire and it's to me desire with without any grasping but living at fully living fully what our hearts are experiencing with an open heart and wide open hand. I mean I love the cartoon of a dog and the caption is Zenda dreaming of a medium-sized bone. So this is our opening to exploring Some more work with desire and addiction and in the Buddhist cosmology one of the universal psychic domains is called the realm of the Hungry Ghost and the hungry ghosts are being who are drawn pictured with these narrow necks in these large bellies and it represents the fact that the riddled with desire but they're unable to satisfy themselves and really this refers to the universal way that we human suffer that we we all experienced to a degree that sense of something's missing. Now's not enough. I need something more. There's a kind of leaning forward so that the next moment contains with this moment does not and when it's intense it leads to craving and to addiction so whatever the degree of wanting mine that you may discover in yourself grasping when you investigate will take you from the one place where love and awareness and realizations actually possible. It takes us from French. Any amount of wanting and we're not really fully here to contact what we truly long for. I remember a long time ago. I heard a little story of a conversation between a man and God and the man said to God. How long's a million years to and God said a million years to me is one second and then the man said how much is a million dollars to God said well? A million dollars is one penny so the man screwed up his courage he said God. Can I have one of your pennies and we know it that when we're caught in wanting mind we lose sight of what truly matters to our hearts so the key inquiry and we'll explore this in in this class is what drives. Montaigne grasping an addiction and when we examine what we find. Is that under all of them? There's the stress of unmet needs in other words when our needs for belonging for love refueling seen when they aren't met more wired to grasp after some substitutes give us a sense of reward. And we get just enough reward from the substitutes to keep us hooked now some grasping an addiction substitutes are culturally accepted. My for instance. The unmet needs for feeling loved and respected and secured fixate on accumulating wealth or a. Hologram ARE ON POWERING OVER PEOPLE. Control and dominance are maybe in deceptions spinning things. It's assume will happen. Our maybe our substitute is exercise and we over exercise addicted to exercise. I can speak personally that over the years. Jonathan my husband and I've kind of tracked where we go for substitutes and the paired substitute we both end up going towards our combination of caffeine and then over work I mean there's some soothing and and pleasure reward from fuelling productive and we have shifted our caffeine and take over the years. We're both now during Macci which has in many ways as a as a very healthy green tea and it's still a addiction. It's not for us because if I stopped. Let's say tomorrow I'd have headache and I'm attached to it. I wouldn't be as productive so Jonathan because of different challenges of sleeping has decided. He's GonNa try to wean himself an experiment for a month without the Macho. Not so I thought I'd share with you. I just sent him something I encountered. It's a cartoon and it's got these two homeless guys that are sitting on a park bench. One sang to the other. I USED TO BE A. Ceo of a multinational had three homes private jet and then I switched to decaff. So here's the deal with substitutes and substitute gratifications. That are condone. We can still be hooked and we're hooked for good reason. We're afraid of being without them. They satisfy something. But some substitutes as we know are considered bad they're not societally condoned and they cause more obvious harm and this is where we're talking about the addiction to substances to gambling to sex violence to anger and when an addiction to a substitute is not condoned not only. Is there the suffering of the addiction? But then there's the added suffering of social condemnation and self condemnation and we're going to spend some time with this piece here because you might consider if the cause of addiction is UNMET NEEDS. How do you imagine condemnation impacts the addictive patterning? What we find is that it intensifies it it intensifies our needs for feeling worth and value and belonging and then it just drives the cycle of addiction the single most crucial part of healing addiction that I have found in my life and working with others is removing condemnation. I can speak for myself that probably the most challenging addiction for me In My late teens and early twenty s was overeating binge eating at times and really through the years. The single factor that most unhooked me was learning truly the process of self compassion. So that'll be. The focus of this talk is how do we bring compassion to ourselves when we're caught in addiction and it begins for some people are maybe let's say it's most helpful. When there's some understanding about how biologically and psychologically compelling addiction is beyond any sense of our own control. Read you a quote this is Robert Freedman and he's from Cornell Medical College as a psychiatrist I have yet to meet a patient who enjoys being. Addicted to drugs are compulsive overeating. Then it goes on to say we now have a body of research that makes the connection between stress an addiction definitive neuro. Scientists have found that food recreational drugs have a common target in the reward circuitry of the brain and that the brains of humans and other animals who are stressed undergo biological changes that makes them more susceptible to addiction now. Stress is a kind of a vague big word. So let's let's anchor this little bit. What happens when the brain is stressed by UNMET NEEDS? So let's say as a young child. You've been neglected or abused and what that does is it creates biological changes in the brain that the animal make you more susceptible to addiction and the way it happens. Is that that stress. As a young child creates fewer dopamine receptors. At means that you then become more driven to seek substitute rewards to compensate rewards like Saxon Food and money and drugs because they release dopamine and they have a sense of pleasure so craving fixate on behaviors that will light up the pleasure centers in the brain. And here's what happens. After that. In time the brain rewires and the use of the substitutes further decreased the number of receptor. So it takes more and more to get a reward and the craving gets stronger. In other words this less sensitivity to the rewards also and I didn't know this 'til recently with less dopamine receptors due to that stress. There's less activity in the prefrontal. Cortex which means that impairs critical thinking and the capacity for restraint

Dopamine Caffeine Zenda Saxon Food Montaigne Macci CEO Jonathan Robert Freedman Cornell Medical College