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Calling all book worms and bibliophiles! Listen to the latest book news, reviews and author interviews aired from leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Chris Kennedy and David Weber discuss their new book, "Into The Light"

Read Between the Lines

05:55 min | 5 hrs ago

Chris Kennedy and David Weber discuss their new book, "Into The Light"

"Today i'm interviewing david weber. Chris kennedy there. How are you doing today. I'm doing fine. Except i think a another dominion another another dimension on timing but aside from that all is good excellent So can you tell me about your books about our collaborative books because we only have one of those. Yes i know that you have. You have more books outside of that too. So if you'd like to talk a little bit those two okay. Chris sure Although i'm i have a few traditionally published works i'm predominantly an independent author publisher I've got about thirty books on my own as well as forty published short stories Almost all of those are science. Fiction and fantasy Also published over two hundred other books through the various imprints of christianity publishing at Unlike the pusher you were just talking to. I am simply a supplier. i Have let sixty seventy Traditionally published books out I guess the two that people know me for our the honor harrington series with bain books and the Safe hold series with tour But i also have some fantasy scattered through their primarily military science fiction. Although i actually think of it almost as political science fiction because i spend so much time in the nuts and bolts of the politics of my various liberate. Worlds right so actually. Can you talk a little bit about military science fiction. You said political science fiction. Because i before starting your book no idea that this was a genre and i know how is not notice but well into the light actually bins jonynas just just Just oil yeah. Yeah the only other thing. I've got that really came close to that i think is In theory born in which i Pair a female commando with The last surviving. Greek fury but Military science fiction is science fiction which is primarily in which the conflict is primarily centered around A military conflict not simply social dynamics or or philosophical You actually have people shooting each other pretty much In terms of it The reason that i said Political science fiction is that there's military science fiction. There's what i think of as militaristic science fiction tony bain actually coined that term for me. Militaristic science fiction is written by people who just went to write something. A lot of people get shot. I mean it's at is written by people who frequently don't understand how the military works at all in real life How politics impact The military so when i'm writing military science fiction i try to give the political background that is driving these people to do something as inherently Not saying as shooting other human beings if you follow what i'm saying. Yeah i typically just stay with the military side I generally don't get into the politics as much However with twenty years of being a naval aviator i do have a a decent idea of how military's work out. Show off help. Okay and well in david does too. I mean he's done so much research on military things that i'm sure he knows you know a a wide variety of military's that that i've never looked at so in. They're they're all pretty much the same under the skin in a lot of ways. Somebody just sent me a a pay stub from a roman legionnaire. That they absurd. I saw that. No i saw that thing. Yes they excavated at. What's left of the pay slip of a roman legionnaire from the from israel in And it's all about what he had to pay the quartermaster. For food and everything else. It turns out that he got paid. He paid the quartermaster and he was flat broke again. Some things don't change a lot okay so you were talking a little bit about it already. But what is your collaboration process. Look like in like there's different perspectives in this book's one of you gravitate more towards the perspectives or Okay i do collaborations with quite a i. I am somebody who is in one. Its comfortable doing collaborations and in another sense. Not i am not. I am not comfortable doing a collaboration in which somebody says okay. I'm going to put my name on the book. You write it I'm going to be involved in collaboration. I'm going to be hands on which chris found out i expected to. I mean it was your your you know your series to start with And i'm i'm kind of the the squatter in it so i. I knew that you would have many ideas for where the series was going to go and what it was gonna look like And i came in welling came in willing to work within that framework.

David Weber Chris Kennedy Tony Bain Bain Harrington Chris David Israel
m

Discovered Wordsmiths

04:28 min | 5 d ago

m

"All right. Well Kevin, welcome back to the podcast. Thanks for talking with me again before let's talk about some author stuff. And before we go back to our big discussion when you were writing your book, you've said you've written throughout your life. So when you were writing this first book that you have out and you're working on the next one's what if you learn that you're doing different. Well, I think one of the things I learned was what it is that I really like to write the most money. So yeah, I've written a lot of longer epic style fantasies and I enjoy writing those but I think what I discovered when I push myself was that I liked writing things that were a little different from that the at the end of the world is is a very different kind of book. It's definitely not Epic phone number. To see but there's a lot of magic and there's some alternate history elements to it. And when I looked at kind of what I thought I had planned to write versus what I had already actually written was that it had those elements the the alternate history and the magic wage more so than say A Game of Thrones style Epic Fantasy and I just realized oh, that's really what I like to write. I also discovered that I like to write poetry and short stories, which was something that early on. I I didn't think I could ever write a short story and I certainly don't think I could write poetry. So are you planning on releasing any poetry? I actually have I have one book very short collection out called an important Sky down. And available and in all stores that is all focused on very realist poetry. But I've got some books that I am planning to put together. They're more speculative poetry as well as eventually another collection of realist poetry. So do you think that it has hurt you at all to do the Syfy the fantasy sci-fi type and then a book of poetry cuz I know that's a big discussion a lot of others have their like, oh, I'm only doing this pen name of fantasy. And then I'm going to do this other been named with sci-fi. So it doesn't mess up the also Bots or you know, what other people like do you feel any conflict of problems with what you did? I don't between the type of fantasy that I write and the Poetry I feel like wage and my readers are probably reading widely and reading multiple genres and multiple types of things and poetry is just something that some of them will like home. I understand the the the desire and I probably actually will write under a pen name, maybe some of that Epic Fantasy because As I actually don't want to pollute what's written under my own name with an I use the word pollute which sounds degrading but but it's I don't mean it that way. I just mean that wage. Yeah, I don't want to confuse the the readers who come to Kevin J fellows looking for a certain type of fantasy with all of a sudden off some other epic or epic dark type fantasy because they're just not going to be the same readers right now. Are you going to keep those separate or you going to say Hey, you know, I write under these names with these Styles or genres or just going to be like, it's a whole nother person. I have no idea who that is. I'm going to start with that. Um, yeah. It's a whole other person that I don't know anything about them. Eventually. I can see a day where I'd say. Well, hey, I also wrote as this person birth. These books but while I'm trying to establish both, I'm going to keep them

Kevin Kevin J
Douglas Stuart Reads Kevin Barry

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:29 min | 1 d ago

Douglas Stuart Reads Kevin Barry

"Hi douglas debra. How are you. I'm alright welcome when we talked about doing this. You had originally been inclined to choose a scottish story to read on the podcast but in the end you settled on an irish one. Do you think that the two traditions are interlocked. The certainly have a very close relationship. But even in reading the kevin body still here realized how much of the pronunciation and the expressions weren't familiar to my ear and so although the close they are quite different in terms of This story it feels a little like a fairy tale in a sense. I mean it has that sort of fable like quality to it. And i feel so it may work in a tradition of irish fables. To what you think you think it's certainly in that tradition of irish oto storytelling. It starts off with You know the narrator. Saying so. I bought an old hotel in the fjord of killary and just the way he brings you into the story. You have a sense that not only as a fable but it's the type of story we would pass around in pubs and from most both and that i think is the irish tradition and certainly the scottish tradition. Because sometimes when we don't find ourselves in literature it doesn't mean we're not natural-born storytellers and those oral stories. Don't always get written down. That is absolutely true here. And i think that's part of the charm of this is just the mixture of these canisters. When you see it almost feels quite other-worldly at times. And i chose the story because first of all it's just totally entertaining but also because it made me nostalgic for a time when we could gather and and be together without thinking about the consequences about the weight that comes with with those gatherings. Yeah yeah having scenes in a in a pub with everyone talking it feels like another world. That's true did you read the story when it first came out in two thousand ten. I didn't actually. I was led to kevin body short stories. Because norma s- fan of his novel night bhutan. Jere and i was thinking about what i wanted to read. I love kevin. Barry and i was actually surprised to see. He has published many stories in the new yorker. Yeah the first one. I believe and Do you think that this one sort of fits in with his general themes it. Does i find him always writing about masculinity especially men on the margins. But what's interesting about this is. There's an absence of hard man or criminals or Petty gangsters that he often populate has novels these other short stories. These are just people who are gathering together in a pub And there's a poet at the heart of it. We'll talk some more after the story. And now here's douglas stuart reading fjord of killary by kevin berry fjord killary so i bought an old hotel on the fjord of killary. It was set hard by the harbour wall with moody amount across the water and disgracefully gray skies above. It rained two hundred. Eighty seven days of the year and the locals were given to magnificent mood swings on the night in question. The rain was particularly violent. It came down. Like handfuls of neal's flung hard and fast by a cd asli royal sky. God i was at this point eight months in the place and about convinced that it would be the death of me. It's end to the fucking world stuff out there. I said the quotas of locals and the hotels lounge bar as always ignored me. I was a fruitful blue in by their mark and simply not cut out for tough gnarly west of ireland. Living there were listening instead to jon murphy or alcoholic funeral director. Albury anything that fucking moves. He said bastards suicides tinkers. He said i couldn't give a fuck monkeys he said. Maria is the most depressing mountain you've ever seen by the way and it's gone looming shape filled almost every view from the water's edge hotel. The loans bars included the locals drank. Mostly bushmills whiskey and guinness stout and they drank them to great excess. I wiped they're slobs from the counter. With the bar cloth i had come to hate with a passion verging on the insane.

Douglas Debra Kevin Douglas Stuart Kevin Berry Fjord Killary Jere Norma Bhutan Barry Jon Murphy Neal Albury Ireland Maria
Lauren Oyler Talks About Deception Online

The Book Review

04:20 min | 4 d ago

Lauren Oyler Talks About Deception Online

"Lauren. Oiler joins us now. From ithaca new york. Her first novel is just out. It's called a fake accounts. Lauren thanks so much for being here. Thank you for having me alright. So people know your name even before this novel moseley probably as credit. You've written book reviews for the new york times booker view but also for many other places. Talk a little bit if you would about your reviewing. And how did you get into this well. I started reviewing as elliptical writer. As i think. Many increasingly many writers wrench generation will have to sort of similar background. Just about the millennial generation yes. I'm eleni on thirty years old. So i consider myself a true millennial smack in the middle and i said in english and college and when i graduated i moved to berlin and part because it was really cheap to live there and i wanted to work on my writing and the first sort of opportunity i got with to write liberals about books so every week i think for over a year i would write like a top ten list about top ten bucks three when you're sad and second your house or or whatever and you just made these like did you just come up with all by yourself or did you sort of pull friends. How did you compile them. Sometimes they would suggest something so if there was some event or you know if there was a holiday. Do something related to that. But it was really like. I could do whatever i wanted. And i think i was being paid. Twenty five pounds per article. Which means that. I had a lot of freedom to sort of cover the kind of books that i wanted to cover and do sort of weirder things and in the process of researching this column. I read a lot of criticism. I read a lot of weird sort of book websites. And i learned a lot about what was going to contemporary literature. Learned a lot about what i liked. Agent like in criticism as well. I want to hear everything you learned in all of those areas. I mean i. I guess what. What were the weird book websites. Well at the time we were living through a period which is now referred to as it right so the author but maybe many listeners will know from this movement is tau win. But there was a large group of sort of internet inflicted writers and poets and novelists who are doing sort of experimental literature. That was very much inflicted by the internet. And what kind of book criticism did you read. Where did you turn to other than us. Oh of course. I was reading really widely. But the thing that the way that i really got into it in the way that i sort of developed my style was by reading. Lots of old issues of el arbi wonder review of books online. And i just found that that you know. They're sort of signature combination of of very sort of cheeky. It's not cheeky. But it's it's very indepth in a along review. In which many sort of the books. The books are viewed for many different angles but ultimately there's a real perspective that's gone into those pieces that i really connected west. We should say at this point because it doesn't necessarily show up in your voice that you grew up in west virginia so this is like a very presumably big cultural shift going to berlin and reading the l. r. Did you grow up exposed to a lot of books and to criticism as as a as a kid or a teenager. No absolutely not. Don't overstate might rural upbringing raw. Basically not in a suburb but but something like a suburb But there wasn't you know there wasn't a lot of there weren't a lot of magazines around like i wasn't reading the new yorker. My family was reading the new yorker and my family our readers but they're reading sort of marshawn nra Stuff which is fine. And i should have to do my customary disclosure. Which is that. I did go to jail so that is really where. I got my my hose. Anything you can see the semi writing as well which is a real combination of of colloquial like mainstream kind of slang and the higher register that could be interpreted as literary or more serious. And i think that it really does come from this kind of normal upbringing in west virginia combined with suddenly. I'm at yale. And then i moved to europe.

Moseley Ithaca Lauren Berlin The New York Times El Arbi New York West Virginia Europe
Loneliness in science fiction with Aliya Whiteley

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:37 min | Last week

Loneliness in science fiction with Aliya Whiteley

"Welcome to breaking the glass slipper. I'm mcginley i'm short bond and i'm lacey handsome space. The final frontier an empty endless expensive nothing teeming with life. But you really need to look beyond the confines of our will to find loneliness. We are currently fighting pandemic and in its wake a loneliness epidemic despite a constant striving for companionship. It could be said that to be lonely is to be human. And what's more human than exploring our hopes and fizz in literature so here to help us discuss loneliness and the human condition a seen through the science fiction lens is the incomparable leah. Whiteley thank you for joining us today. Would you please like to introduce yourself to our listeners. Even though you have been on once before but we love you so much that you all here to join us again. I have been on before. I'm delighted to be here again. I thank you for that I'm elliot wisely right strange novels and short stories up and doing that for a while. That's that's it. that's what i do. Oh i should probably say the sky is the is the new one. That's coming in march. Yes and it's very good. I just finished it and enjoy it. That's good yes. I think i was explaining to my partner like your books. I heart this. You find this compliments for me. You'll books up fabulously weird. That's definitely a compliment. Yeah okay. I like it. When books really surprised me. So i try and write books already surprise other people. Get what you think. I just don't know where this is going to go. I think that's that's kind of what i'm aiming for time so definitely achieved beauty. I'd really did. Yeah i think i really. I really pushed that. Want as far as i possibly could so successfully. No i say. I was a recommend not people was think about all well my recommending this to in it could be okay with that. Yeah they're going to be okay with it. Yeah i know what you mean you need to check with is going to be the right audience for it but i do. I do love it when people come to that one and and read it through for the first time. so let's carry on and turn our minds to loneliness. Wow yeah i want to apologize to everybody for the whole just about to sit here and talk for an hour by loneliness which might not be what anybody wants to talk about it right now. So there we go there. Is that but meziane on the coal. Let's turn it is topical but also we talk about learning. There's an understanding linus. Maybe we'll come to find some sort of feeling of togetherness and now. I feel a bit like some sort of hippie but yes that is the thing about loneliness isn't it. Is the paradox at the heart of it. Is you got to be able to describe it to somebody else to achieve togetherness loneliness togetherness and as you say. It's a little bit strange okay. Well let's let's start. So why do you think that stories of of isolation and loneliness so common particularly in saifi so. I think that i hadn't really thought about it in those terms in till you kinda said that. That's where the conversation Might go in preparation for this and Then it really reminded me of a bike. Do dote sorry for that. It reminds me of when i used to be a chambermaid. For years in my in my teenage years. I used to work hotel over the summer months and one day i was doing the rhymes and went into room twenty-seven and walked in there and just had the strongest sation that something wasn't right but i couldn't have put my finger on what it was and then i saw like a very big black fly on the wall. I just had that feeling that something wasn't right. And i saw another fly and another one i turned around in the hole behind me was just covered in flies. Just black with them. They'd kind of blocked there all over the windows while they blocked at the sunlight. And i went downstairs and said we're gonna fly problem in room twenty seven and i was presented with account of fly spray and towed to to go and deal with it tonight and i felt extreme loneliness as i walked. Walked back to that room to to deal with the fly. Problem and sort of sprayed halfheartedly with the counter fly spray at a few of them and just thought this is. This is never going to. This is never going to work and Yes i think once you start looking at the doesn't think back in truck in a strange way. Once you start looking at the loneliness in saifi then you you see. It won't twice. She said three times. And then you turn ryan. It's just absolutely everywhere. I'm beginning to think it might be the pervasive factor in in science fiction and even in literature in general it fights like the loneliness of the human condition. Yeah so that's where. I am with that right now but i wasn't really thinking about that until you asked me about loneliness now. It's kind of all. I can think about right now. So thank you.

Mcginley Meziane Whiteley Lacey Leah Elliot Linus Ryan
interview With Caleb Azumah Nelson

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

06:06 min | Last week

interview With Caleb Azumah Nelson

"Kayla. Thanks so much for joining me. I know that you have huge demands on your time because your book has just exploded. Hasn't it yeah. I've been kind of astounded by iolanthe disapora in jeopardy seeing everywhere. I think it's you know. I was a little bit worried about coming out in the lockdown and it just i haven't had to have that worry at the moment it just feels like the supposed be really overwhelming and really. I'm really grateful now. I introduced you as a photographer and writer d. You now think that that's switched. Are you a writer. Perhaps with the bisa photography feel like. I've always been a writer. I and i think photography is has been another medium in which i can communicate and express like i've been writing since i can remember likelihood you're like four or five years old scribbler. Like really terrible. Shoot stories have l-. I think the the medium of photography really allows a visual element to come into my work and very much comes through in this book open water. There's a lot about you feel the sort of the poetry the visual the creativity. I mean those are major themes aren't they about about creativity. I think the the the starting point or for any saw them. Artistic expression is feeling and emotion. And then it's working is working from that once have the feeding emotion. I'm trying to express define the best medium for in this case. It was writing but the but the writing contained these elements. Are these references to music can to to visual artists than film which took the narrative elsewhere afforded a different dimension. I i. I would have been possible if i just like kind of ryan straight pros and of course if the two characters one is a dancer. One is a photographer like you. That will so you to kind of explore all of those teams much more than living it. Yeah there's i guess there's a I guess everyone has their that. Point is expression even if is like a professional level epic. Everyone is has something that they do to express themselves in. It was important for me to to have the these law autistic expressions index the title itself. Open water for me. It feels like you're talking about freedom there but you will set talking about the dangers that can lurk in a water. Yeah it some there. Was this idea of justice. Like real ruled in almost infinite freedom. You know when you you'll standing on a beach yukon see where who had the see and like the that kind of idea but not knowing what does look like what. Dangers are present in our in our every day. I think it was important for me to have these Protagonists to have. Like the kind of fullness wholeness like range in which they good light just be in. Just have this freedom by. I wanted to comment on what happens when you find that. Freedom interrupted without giving any of the plus away at this point. Yeah a lot of this is told through dialogue. Which i know is fiendishly difficult to achieve and then at one point you sort of depart from the traditional writing style the whole kind of you say she says tell me about that. Change of structure the About giving too much away the bat point in the story. The narrative has been a bill and bill bill and then reached this kind of the apex this peak in which the image i had to switch the structure slightly so that it was hughley the protagonist kind of like spilling in a way like it was. It's like feeling a competent. And the woods at that point had just spilled over and that's what began to emerge and not not lots of the narrative using the this second person who almost away fruit was really important for me to create this kind of very intimate as very intimate narrative in which the reader can beat by the burford. An audience member nossa the protagonists themselves at an. Did you write it like that from the start or were you fiddling about with with that structure. That was really attention from the beginning. I think i'm always wondering a novel could be like. I'm always astounded by different nobles. Come across the us. Full more structured as a narrative device that this would only serve to push an artist the book has described as absolutely nailing the black experience the london black experience when you were growing up with their books for you that spoke to that or are we only now. Seeing the emergence of of works that will speak to the next generation. Yeah i think when i was when i was growing up his voracious reader like i would just read anything i can get my hands on but there were specific which was speaking to that black british experience. Like our say. The mallory blackman might really An kind of like primary and early teen years and then later on as eighty smith but it was a real struggle to to kind of find tips. The the like i instantly recognized i could. I could understand kind of relate to to various fictional works especially from the over. The pond said like james baldwin and tony morrison writes slide. Those are really integral to save my reading and writing growing up the yet only the kind of feels like now. There's a slight pushing the direction in which the narratives that haven't been beginning to be by fitness way to

Iolanthe Disapora Kayla Hughley Bill Bill Ryan Mallory Blackman London Tony Morrison United States James Baldwin Smith
Marc discusses his new book "Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics" with his co-author Mitchell Plitnick.

Coffee and Books

06:58 min | 2 weeks ago

Marc discusses his new book "Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics" with his co-author Mitchell Plitnick.

"Mitchell. Good to see you man. Of course i see you all the time because we not only wrote this book together but we are now going around talking about this book all the time that we are in. So this is kind of a weird podcast. Because i'm sort of interviewing you. And i'm kinda just talking to you about a book that we wrote together so it's a strange strange thing to do. I've never done an interview like this before. But we're going to figure it out but before we talk about the book. Let's talk about the coffee. I in honor this momentous occasion in drinking arabic coffee you know what they say in palestine they call it Who out. Be it kind of black arabic coffee in. Who said lack coffee. You know people say you know. It's the turkish method. We could have a whole other conversation about what that means. But basically it's a coffee that has made unfiltered with finely ground coffee beans. I mean if ground selfies glenk cocoa powder and then they're boiled in a special pot and then some people put sugar and cardamom and all that stuff. But no i do. It said that. I do it black and it tastes good. It's powerful and it keeps me awake now normally. I'm much more boring with my coffee. So i don't wanna make you feel intimidated by my coffee preferences. The way i do with my basketball preferences taping is a sixers fan of you being nets fan. But i will ask you. What of coffee user. Well these days you know. Mostly just. I'm actually i kind of ended spectrum because i'm drinking. I'm drinking usually a blog roast. It's got a little bit of sleet near ended a little bit lighter in it. So it's almost on the but i will say whenever i go over to palestine and israel and to the region. I always drink the copy answered. Yes there's all the way to have it so i i need to. I need to get one of those little machines. So i can have that here too. I actually bought one in jerusalem and it was taken from the airport Years ago. So i wanna get another one mailed to me from somewhere in the middle east and i make sure you get one. That'd be awesome and the great thing about coffee by the way in the middle east and especially among the palestinians is even if you say you don't want coffee today if you spend time with anybody. You're going to drink some coffee. You go to someone's house. You're drinking coffee noon. You're drinking coffee. Come just have a cup of tea. The best you might get outta them. Is it the electric drink. Some tea as an alternative. You ain't going in the white house or having any kind of real meaning without coffee and probably eating eating eating something to so one of the great things about this. That was the mistake. I made the first time i ever went over there and i was over at a palestinian home. Well it wasn't a home. It was actually an outside just outside jerusalem and it was in a garbage dump and they were living and and abandoned Train car and they come out with food and give me fluently giving me food and it was actually at that time i was just no i mean they. They had nothing you know. My immediate inclination was right to say. No no no you keep this for yourself by. They were insistent. No no no you. Are you drinking this d. You are taking this food and my host. Who was with me. Who was bringing me around at that time. This is going back. Years is bringing me around at that time. He just said yeah. You're you're gonna take it. They're not gonna let you go without without eating and drinking so i had a very similar experience. I was in amer which is a for those who knows is kind of. It's not far outside of jerusalem and its reading between to kind of jerusalem in in these settlements and this is again. This is a big win like a village. It's set for demolition at the time. They made a school like tires in mud. People are worried about losing everything. And i'm talking to them about what's going on and at about fifteen minutes into just painful story about loss and being poor and trying to find money. They come out with the coffee pot and coffee. Particularly in palestinian society in many ways is one of those is one of those mechanisms for creating community for joint love of offering care and it makes people feel good to be able to offer that it's part of what it means in community so i'm glad we could talk about that is actually the most. We've talked about coffee coffee which is kind of fun. We have episode on that but talk to me about this book. People are asking. Why write a book on palestine except for palestine the limits of progressive politics. I guess the first thing. I should get you to talk about because i'll let you talk more than me. Today is why this book. Why why did we do this. Mitchell so just to give your listeners a little back on that you and i met actually over there for the first time when the foundation released piece where i was working at the time a trip for some journalists. And you're one of them and we went over there and you know we just started talking and it was a couple years later that we started talking about doing this book and as i recall it was actually a question. We were sure where what we were going to write about. We went through a whole process. Thinking about it at i. I can certainly say for me. And i feel like we came to this together that we came to this place where you know what's really important right now for us as americans to say to other american we we. I feel like what we're doing here is we're talking to our people like riley and so that's not that's americans progressives and saying the we can get together on a whole lot of issues and somehow we're not getting together nearly enough i mean there's we know of course we have our own little palestine sound already community or the peace community whatever the various different sort of shades are but you know on the whole like sort of liberal america progressive. America is not together on this issue. In fact we it sharply divided. And i know it seems to me and i'm pretty sure seems to to that. Vision is based on people who are willing to really dig deep into their own principles and decide that they can put this aside for palestine because of this reason to that sometimes it's compelling reasons know it can be the history of of jewish suffering it can be or it can be less compelling reasons if less valid reasons sort of just a sense of islamaphobia or just sort of fear of arab people brown people it can be good or bad reasons but liberal progressive. People should not have any reason to put their principles decided on this issue. I think that was to me. That was what this book was meant to speak to say. Look there's room for differences of opinion on a lot of things but principally we should all be able to agree. That palestinian should have rights the same rights as israelis and everyone else and it doesn't seem like we do agree on that. So i i think for us who are both you know. Not palestinian not israeli. Both american i think for me that was the most important thing we could try and really break open for folks and i think this book and certainly from the response. We've been getting so far. Seemed like we're doing

Palestine Jerusalem Middle East Sixers Mitchell Amer Basketball White House Israel Riley America
Interview With Author, Lynne Bertrand

What Book Hooked You?

04:49 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Author, Lynne Bertrand

"So then. What book hooked you. It's a great question. I was Sense the info on this question you know just that we could interpreted however we wanted to and i thought to myself. I'm not sure it was a hook. It was more of a net because a lot of reading in my childhood that was just part of the culture. I grew up in Partly just The nature of life before a lot of screens And then partly because i grew up in the family of a A fairly religious family so we were people of the book like anybody. Who's you know. grows up in that. You know that the buckets. In our case the bible but in other cases i think of the korean or you know the torah people reading and memorizing parts of books and becoming sort of accustomed to the idea that the book in some way is your life and your belief system and your and your way of understanding the world so there was that and then aside from any religious interpretations of the book the narrative structure of all those books in the old and new testaments or the first and second testament is really interesting stuff but then beyond that i I wanted to choose. A book called my family and other animals by gerald durrell. Who actually d'oro if you're british and incorrect. Which is the story of. It's one of many books that the zoologist durrell wrote As part of his Recollections about his life in zoology and this one is his early years on the island of corfu When he was there with his family and his brother. Lawrence still is a Novelist he wrote the alexandria quartet which will probably show up later in this interview. Because you'll ask me what series. I've never finished but gerald was Delicious writer funny kind of a smart aleck and really Captured not only his life in the field and mountains of coffee. Which is a greek island. collecting like rose beatles magpies and puppies and wall lizards and stuff but also the stories of his family. Being completely intolerable and arrogant. And you know with all their crazy foibles. Carry charming book. And i realized that if he could write like that then this could be really fun to read all my life and where in your life did you read this book. I well when i was about eight years old eight nine ten years old I used to go to new hampshire to stay with my grandparents and we were permitted because again it was a time when life look different. We were permitted to just take ourselves downtown and go anywhere we wanted and you know just as kids and we used to do things that we remembered from our summers like by a hamster you think their parents would never let us to and my grandparents just gave us a long leash least at all so i went to the bookstore all the time. There is a prep school town. I was not that kid. We were not that kind of wealthy but we had full access to the prep school bookstore. And i bought this book just thinking the cover was interesting. And i'm actually holding it in my hand. It is completely destroyed taped together with masking tape. It's Aqua the way everything was in nineteen seventy three or whatever that was and it was covered with all these crazy looking animals from that time. Sort of a collage and it has the typefaces that you would recognize from that era. So i And i read it in secret thinking that because it had some swears in it probably getting in trouble and was that sort of common use you were having to sneak books From your parents were your parents very today. Kind of investigate what. You're reading a frequently to make sure it was clean. Yeah no it's a great question. My parents are very liberal in their In their interpretation of what would be considered you know dogma but the The churches that i grew up in were more conservative so i was pretty careful. I mean that was the same era. As are you there. God it's me margaret. And you know i mean. There were things coming out that we're pretty controversial. Nothing like what. I've written and nothing like anybody else's writing now but But at that time it was you had to be kind of careful

Gerald Durrell Durrell Corfu Alexandria Gerald Lawrence New Hampshire Margaret
This Land Is Whose Land?

The Book Review

04:26 min | 2 weeks ago

This Land Is Whose Land?

"Simon winchester joins us now from the berkshires. His latest book is called land. How the hunger for ownership shaped the modern world simon. So good to have you here. Well lovely to be a thank. You bye here. We mean of course a little bit far. The last time i think you were on this podcast it was in person but perhaps it is fitting that you are on your own piece of land for this conversation. How'd you come to want to write a book about land and land ownership by used to live in hong kong and came back in ninety seven had passed back into the hands of chinese coast. Should have done then decided largely on the advice of old enough. See then new york times correspondent in hong kong. That i should perhaps move to new england and so rather than go to london. I came to the new world. I'd be correspondent here in the seventies the eighties for the guardian and bought a little cottage town code west. Saic about one hundred ten miles. North of new york in duchess county has had few acres of garden and stuff around it but there was a a plumber from the bronx code. Caesar luria who owned a fairly tracts surrounding the house needs to come there and hunt and he was very nice man and he would off to hunting each season he would leave me a cooler with venison doorways a bottle of cognac which was particularly nice then after three or four years. He said to me that he was tired of paying the taxes on this land would i like to buy it and he named price and mice but guess why not okay so i bought the land and it was pretty useless. I have to say smith scale the north face of mountainside so. It wasn't good for raising animals. Now this fake fantasy. But one day i might but it was sort of beautiful in were couple of little streams lots of trees some of them quite magnificent they oak and hickory and of course north florida pine cherry and ash of animals. We bob cat. Once there were dare of course apply. Gm rabbits and i liked it but it was not particularly useful and eventually with this sort of fantasy. I had maybe one day. Having animals i came up here to the batches. I so that sam the house done death but kept the land and then there was this sort of major shift in my attitude towards it. When in twenty eleven i became a citizen of this country. Suddenly i realized the by owning these one hundred and thirty acres down in duchess county. I was actually invested in the country. To which is not become a citizen so then became rather interested more interested in the land itself and in history so i started digging around realized overstated. I aborted from this mr aaron. He had deep fried to that body from someone else and so the chain went back until it stopped in about the late seventeenth century. There was paperwork all the way back to then. Then i know strode duchess county in poughkeepsie. They've got all the papers but then he came to a shuddering halt because it was at that time that the documents were mainly written in dutch. Where henry hudson's explores who had come up the river. That is his name but he was working there. Being for instance she was working as an agent for the dutch. And he had first acquired land from the original settlers by non who were the mckeekan indians. But they didn't have the concept of ownership say hunted and they gathered and they settled and all the rest of it superintendent but didn't own and then i began to think well the difference between their attitude land. They're feeling was that you can never own land than you could. Own the breeze with the ocean. To maya too is. This is mind. Shoo everybody away. You start at the right to do so. That was an interesting development. And i thought maybe there would be a book and so i put it to my editor and she said yes. That would be an admirable idea. But don't keep the united states only have a look at where this originated and how it's because around the world and so that was not traveling and wondering about oh beginning in duchess county.

Duchess County Caesar Luria Simon Winchester Hong Kong Bob Cat Saic Simon Mr Aaron New York Times New England North Florida London New York GM Smith SAM Poughkeepsie Henry Hudson
A Conversation With Leisl Leighton And Iain Ryan

Published...Or Not

04:35 min | 2 weeks ago

A Conversation With Leisl Leighton And Iain Ryan

"I always like a book where you learn something and enlist layton's latest. It is a whole vocabulary. Welcome back to published or not lay so thanks for having me janet. Lovely to be here. This vocabulary includes knots. Szucs carribean is monte hitches and belay ropes. What are you doing if you using these. Well you climbing specifically you're doing external climbing outside climbing up clemson things yet map mountain climbing. This has made read straightened very famous. we'll read my Hero of climbing fia. He is a television star. I'm here and his best. Might from school. They always liked to do extreme sports. And they priced videos online of themselves. Doing extreme thing particularly back love to climb the mountains in the world and they got a television series of the back of these videos. They did an exit of grew from there and he became very famous. Least to matt and climb yourself to experience some. I didn't I mean i've i i love. I love the mountains. And i'm. I'm an avid skier and been to a number of very high skiing. Places in the world is mountain climbed myself. I've done some exiling. Which i've i've really enjoyed but not the climbing match but my husband and my son are into rock climbing Actually does rock leng squad. I got along information from him. I you know i had. I had internal sources. The title of your book is climbing. Fia what's wrong. What's read Dots with him trying to climb a vice where he has climbed a lot and he can't and it comes out that six months ago he was in a a deadly accident and where his best friend of our doing a climb for the television shire and things went wrong and his friend died. Rate was injured but he is finding that he just can't climb anymore. That fear overtakes. He has panic attacks. That's one of the. The meanings of the taj mahal is is. The climbing team is sort of more internalized aspects of of the title to wound on. The country is a childhood friend. Reads natalie. She's also tasteful would she may be more internally fearful yet she's had a bit avert tragedy happened to her as well her she was married to a man who was in the army and he got. Ptsd after a couple of tours. I've says he refused to get proper treatment for us and it ended up with him shooting. Natalia and himself she survived but he did not so she says she feels the need to start a new life again and so she returns to the place that she grew up as a child that always comforted her and that she thinks it's going to be a really great place to take her daughter. Chilly in this. This place has bob bob east ethic. Everybody should have a bob in their life. Maybe that's well. Bob was actually in spot a little bit by a few people that i've met in my life one of them specifically actually who was an owner of a horse riding camp. I used to down to win when i was a teenager and there was the place called. Say missed palomino stuff. Actually mentioned in the acknowledgements signed by the raid family. And bob was the matriarch of that family and yet she was just a very special person very warm and loving but strict to to all the kids that went there. My bobby's much more gregarious than Than you know. The the read matriarch for husband. She's says she very much inspired character. But it's also little bits and pieces of other people who have been in my life as well that i just wanted to give a nod to the kind of people who have backed by nerve certain families whether those families are born or might will.

Layton FIA Janet Leng Skiing Matt Taj Mahal Natalie Bob Bob Natalia BOB Army Bobby
Promoting Your Book And How to Get More Interviews

Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

05:24 min | 3 weeks ago

Promoting Your Book And How to Get More Interviews

"Here's the problem with most marketing and promotion of an expense inevitably. You're going to do paid ads. It might work. It might not but what if you could do some marketing and promotion without having to spend much money if any money at all. My solution interviews. Now i get a lot of people will say. Well i done interview and every time i do it. I don't see any instantaneous cells. stick with it. this is one of those things that's going to require a lot of stacking the more interviews you can land the more visible and more discoverable. You will become because it's going to take a little bit of time for you to build the no like and trust factor so thinking that you're gonna get one interview or two interviews and you're all of a sudden going to become the bee's knees and your niche unrealistic. That's why it's time we talk about how to get more of these interviews. But where do you go. How do you even get book for an interview in the first place. Believe it or not is rather simple folks. Don't want to overcomplicate the process. Let's started out with the very first thing you need to do as preparation because this is critical. If you don't have anything prepared don't even bother going and getting booked for podcast or youtube channel whatnot. That's easy for me to say the very first thing you're going to need is the press kit. Now you've probably going off great here. We go here we go. He said i wasn't gonna spend money but now he's asking me to spend money necessarily not necessarily you can get by with whatever you have at your disposal. The very first thing you're going to need prescott is going to be headshots. Notice said head shots. Okay not a selfie. You got to get somebody else. Shoot it for you so your hands are free and you could look normal instead of like someone on instagram gay. You're gonna wanna make sure you get a few of these headshots now. I would recommend if you have the know-how or you know somebody someone that's semi pro. Have them clean up your amateur shots get it to where it looks a bit more professional. And you don't need to look like you went to you know glamor shots by any stretch Or rowland mills in my dating myself on this one. But you're gonna wanna make sure these shots look nice in its presentable. I'm also going to recommend that you have the regular shots. And then get some with the transparent background with a p. and g. if you can get a background removal of some sort of for instance removed. Bg has a free service available to. I believe in even sticker mule has a free one and you can get the background completely removed and save it as a p. and g. file the reason you wanna have something like that is when you get booked onto a podcast or youtube channel whatnot. They can use that transparent background image on any number of assets and it makes their life a little easier. And they're gonna go. Oh my gosh. This person's prepare soul things. You want to make sure your. Wow ingham right out the gate you're going to need a short bio in links now notice said short bio it should not be a page long paragraph tops. We're talking hundred to no more than two hundred words. Two hundred words you go on a little long you at least have something to work with. Relevant links means. Get the things that you absolutely need and put it in a prioritized order because chances are very likely. If you've got three links or five links or six links the host is probably going to go. okay. I'm going to pick this top one and just say this one so it could probably be your author side. It could be your facebook page. It could be your youtube channel. It could be your email list. It could be your book that you're promoting. She's probably a good idea. additional information. That'll sell who you are. And what you bring to. The table should be included. So if you have any kind of accolades or awards or anything noteworthy that really builds relevance to who you are and why you should come onto a specific interview. Then it should be their brief brevity. It's so important. It's you wanna the of great headshots. You wanna wild with a great bio and some relevant links in any accolades but don't go so overboard that they have so much stuff they don't even know what to do with it. One really cool extra thing Puts the chef's kiss on things. It is a media kit. You probably saying wait hanging a at a press kit immediate the same. Gosh sort of a media. Kit is more like a one page or two page report of sorts. That has all the stuff. Condensed down onto a pretty form. Now this is the part. I'm going to tell you. I do my media kit through canada. I don't spend a dime on my media. Gets i know. I've done a video on five or where they can have it done for you. And that's a nice little bit more strapped for cash. I would recommend going to cambe canvas. Probably going to be a good solution. It will require a little bit of time and you can take one their templates and just go through. And i honestly i just go in and do my stuff through camp. All you gotta do. Is this look media or press kit over on cambe. Pope some different variations. And you just gotta fill in the blanks from there. It's just super super super simple.

Rowland Mills Youtube Prescott Ingham Facebook Canada
Ordinary Dude Creates Meditation Books for Men

Side Hustle School

05:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Ordinary Dude Creates Meditation Books for Men

"John. Wailer has been meditating since he was seventeen years old. He says that it's helped him. Overcome anxiety panic attacks and even saved his relationship with his now wife was actually his girlfriend at the time. But unlike a lot of meditators. John doesn't completely by into the hippie culture surrounding meditation though. He says that there's nothing wrong with that. He found himself wanting to connect with people outside that space especially hoped to encourage men who had previously written off the idea. That's his desire to write an ordinary dudes guide to meditation john to dispel the myths and preconceived notions about meditation. But this wasn't his first experience with writing professionally. John works as a freelance writer and published his first book a few years before called backpack abroad now through that first publishing experience he ran into many pitfalls it a difficult time. Learning how to self publish on amazon says that he didn't have a great cover which makes a big difference so he's changed since then taking all that he'd learned he wrote him publish his ordinary dude guide. Unfortunately the second book didn't do well eater and the first six months. It only sold twenty copies. John was disappointed. He really believed in his book. And even though it was nonfiction he knew he had a novel idea. He couldn't find any other meditation. Books that catered to men and especially non that had a beer can on the cover. That's when he discovered amazon advertising he started using it an invested. Just twenty five dollars a month i. He sold twenty seven books in august that year and then released a paperback version september. Once again he saw a significant increase in sales. He hit his first five hundred dollars in december of that year when he spent one hundred and twenty five dollars on advertising from there he figured out that marketing was his key and he began to write even more books. In fact between october twenty eighteen in september twenty one thousand nine hundred. John published four more. Titles like the meditation guide. The new books also centered around themes of enlightenment and mindfulness. They were all directed towards his target audience of well ordinary dudes. Sales didn't really pick up until his six called a dude's guide to the couch. That one wasn't unexpected. Hit regularly bringing in five hundred dollars a month on. its own. the whole time. John was writing. He was also focusing on improving his advertising strategy. After learning how vital it was to the sale of the first book. He knew that learning as much as he could be invaluable to the future of his business. This meant expanding beyond amazon. Putting all of his advertising eggs in one platform basket was dangerous as he saw it. He was playing on someone else's turf when they wanted to change the rules his sales could plummet actually happened from time to time which served as a good warning now. John uses many strategies although he's had a blog for years it wasn't until june two thousand twenty. He began posting on it frequently in september. Twenty twenty he began using this service q promote to boost his blog. Posts using this service has posted racked up over twelve thousand shares in just the last four months. Not only that but his sales went up by twenty percent. According to john this is one of the techniques finally allowed him to break through making a thousand dollars a month consistently and get the biggest bang for his book moving. He currently has six more titles. He's in the middle of writing six much more prolific than me. But he also wants to spend more time freelancing which is his main source of income. Not only that but he wants to do this while still expanding his knowledge marketing for a while. He was pencilling in way. Too much work and his health began to suffer since then he's decrease the workload taking care of himself more and his businesses thrived in response. John confident that he will continue to rise to the challenge spreading the word about meditation one ordinary dude at a time. So think about this idea of a large market that we associate with a certain type of person whether right or wrong. Maybe there's some stereotyping there when we think about meditation for example. Obviously it's not all hippie. Women who meditates but what john observed is there are a lot of men who didn't connect to it or didn't relate to at least on a surface level so that's the question. What other markets can we associate with a certain type of demographic or psychographic where the topic the actual thing can be relevant for lots of other people if only the messaging is changed. Somehow i think about in portland. There's a woman owned school for carpentry and other trades and it's not just women owned it's classes for women to learn about carpentry and all these kinds of traits story there. But i assume that at some point they thought you know there could be a lot of women interested in this but historically women are not targeted by other schools workshops or classes. There's been association that it's mostly men who are doing it anyway. It's not all about gender you can think about something entirely different. Think about genealogy think about gaming think about something that you might not associate with younger people or with older people or something totally different. You get the idea here is like you take popular movement consider who might be missing out on it and that's where your opportunity is

John Wailer Anxiety Panic Attacks Amazon Portland
Chang-rae Lee on His New Novel: Its Kind of a Crazy Book.

The Book Review

06:43 min | 3 weeks ago

Chang-rae Lee on His New Novel: Its Kind of a Crazy Book.

"Chang. Rae lee joins us now. His new novel is called my year. Abroad chang thanks for being here by pebble. See you are joining us from hawaii. Which leads to an obvious question. What are you doing in hawaii. Other than carrying out. Perhaps every quarantined person. Who's not in hawaii corentin fantasy. Well there are plenty of those people here. Those ex-pats well. We try to come every year income last year because long ago i was the writer in residence at the punahou school barack obama's old school and a lot of other famous folks and we had a wonderful year friends on the faculty Miss seeing them so we do the usual things. Eat a lot of asian food like the body board. Wow yeah i think now any any or spiring authors like putting this on their list of aspirations onto like to be the writer in residence at obama's old school so my year abroad is your first novel since on such a full sea which came out in twenty fourteen. Did you start this book immediately. After on such a full sea do tend to start your novels before the new one comes out. I'm curious how you kind of work that well. I started probably about a nine months afterwards. Attended a waiting period as it were before. I start something in earnest because i don't write short fiction. Sometimes i write short on fictional Essays about me my family but but with a novel. The commitment is so great. And i know the road ahead will be difficult. So it's really hard for me to get to committing to a book. I'll sketch you know three or four different versions of a book on. Sometimes they're different books for the first six to nine months sort of a thing on doing right now and then. Finally i'll bland on one and decide yes. This is the one that i think. I can sustain that may be consistency. Well it was going to ask. What is your starting point with a new novel. But maybe i'll change to. What are your starting points like is it. The is at a premise. Or a challenge to yourself as a writer. It's actually a diverse range of things. Sometimes it's a character and right now. I'm working on like maybe three or four things. It's a premise. I like this idea about the summer camp. That went do that was for korean. Kids only green christian kids. Then sometimes it's atone a lotta times. I've i've felt as if starting a new novel. That's kind of a reaction or response to what i been doing before. And so i just wanna change of mood change of a certain kind of sound and maybe that's something that has followed me throughout my work especially at the inception stages a certain kind of sound overtakes me and either. That's personal voice for the character or the narrative voice or even just the kind of atmosphere mood of the piece of what i think the world of the novel be. And then i'll i'll just around with that for a while. I wanna talk about that certain kinds of sound and also the reaction to on such a full sea but i have to pause and ask you about that camp. What was that camp was that in the. Us it was. I grew up in in new york in the city and then in the suburbs so it was a camp that was run by an association of korean churches in the state area so for two weeks. Every summer from the time i was five years. Old to ice think was probably fourteen. Maybe thirteen fourteen. It definitely didn't go past there because they didn't want real teens at the camp because they didn't want to invite a different set of problems right because it was a church base camp so they all got together and i guess rented a camp for two weeks north of westchester. I think putnam county somewhere. I can't even remember where it was may be brewster and so for two weeks this place and it was a very low in camp. You know there. There were no jet skis or no horses. There was hardly any fields. Basically there was a volleyball net and just kind of a high grass in really spare unheated cabins with barely running water. But i tell you it was some of the best times i've ever had also has camps. Go they introduce you do all the problems of the world but on a scale that you know the kids kids can understand jealousy corruption out just all kinds of things that go on but but the funny thing about it was. It was my time for two weeks to to be with only korean kids. In american kids was out by your parents sent you like. Did they want to kind of help. You reinforce in an affirm. Your identity is a korean american. I think that was their hope and they weren't religious people so so even though there was a bible study element to the camp. That was the part that we all didn't want to Kind of slacked on but yeah. I think they were absolutely hoping that. I would connect with other kids not speak the language because we none of us really spoke korean because many of us didn't come from an ethnic enclave saying in queens or something and so as i did in westchester did not grow up with any other gets all so it was our time. We'll read about this summer camp. I hope in your next novel. Hopefully it'll be one of the threads that you're currently working on that wins out. 'cause i'm i find that fascinating but to get to the novel my year abroad. Tell us a little bit about it. And then i want to talk about in. What way is it was kind of a reaction to on such a full sea. Well it's a kind of a crazy book in particularly. I think for people who know my work. It was sort of a surprise. you know. i'm sure my editor was surprised by what she got in quite describe it the way it turned out but It's a book about twenty year old college kid who's at loose ends in every way in his life not very moored in his comfortable but drab suburban existence than he meets up with a local entrepreneur. A chinese fellow. who's not quite chinese-american. He's really just chinese but has made a big time life in the suburb in new jersey and has businesses all over the world than this young man named tiller gets taken up by him and they go travelling together and i guess they have what might fall business adventures but those adventures get quite intense. I would say

Hawaii Rae Lee Punahou School Barack Obama Association Of Korean Churches Chang Westchester Putnam County Brewster Volleyball New York Queens New Jersey Tiller
Hollywood Monsters  with Mallory OMeara

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

06:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Hollywood Monsters with Mallory OMeara

"History is written by the winners by men early editors of science fiction anthologies choice to exclude by women and in doing so made many believe that women did not write science fiction in the genres earliest years. This is just one example. And by no. Means the only one mallory mira self-confessed monster lava and film. Ned discovered a similar story in one of her favourite monsters. Millicent patrick was one of disney's earliest female animators and went on to design one of the greatest film monsters of the creature from the black lagoon but a jealous smell. Coworker ensured that there was no prestigious career. A rating millicent. Mallory decided to set the record straight in her book. The lady from the black lagoon. Hollywood monsters and the lost legacy of millicent. Patrick and reestablish. Millicent of monster design mallory. Thank you for joining us. But before we get stuck into things would you please introduce yourself to our listeners. high Yeah thank you so much for having the ottoman cited to to talk about this with you. Three i m author of lady from the black lagoon an fulltime author. And i'm also fellow podcasters. I host the show reading glasses every week with my friend. brea grant. what did you hope to achieve by. Unearthing the story of million patrick and setting the record straight about her contribution to monster design. Well a few things honestly the impetus behind me working on in in writing from the black lagoon was just i wanted to know. Millicent has been my hero. Since i was a teenager and i wanted to satisfy my own personal curiosity i found out about her when i was seventeen and it just seemed creature from the black lagoon like nobody even knew if she was still alive. She didn't have a website. She didn't have a wikipedia entry. Nothing about her online. So i personally just really really wanted to know at as i started digging into her life and her work and in this book i i also just. I wanted people to know that we've always been here. You know i. I actually started working on this book before the metoo movement happened and while i think it's amazing that there's such a huge push right now to get more women in front of the camera behind the camera writing doing everything women everywhere in cosigned for me but i also think it's really important to have people know that women have always been here. We have a legacy here and millicent. Patrick is proof. That and if i could only unearth her story and bring it to the world than i could could prove it is funny. You say that. Because i remember i was a massive star trek fan still but i remember in high school being completely obsessed with original series star trek and then discovering that d c fontana was a woman and i was like women have been there from the beginning. We right star trek. Yeah so i. I definitely can get on board with excitement. It changes everything. I mean finding out that a woman who designed this incredible monster that i became completely obsessed with it changed my life. It made me realize up until that point all of my heroes in the monster world. Where met you know tom. Savini rick baker. Dick smith jack pierce. It never even occurred to me that women did those things and seeing just one single photo of seeing a woman working on the creature from the black lagoon. It broke my brain open. It was like being struck by lightning. And it you can. You can make a direct line from that moment in time in front of my computer. Seven seventeen to me becoming a filmmaker later on up reading a bit about medicine on. You mentioned that you back. Then she didn't have a wikipedia entry. She does have one now on your on it as well. Yes i mean we're competing is basically all from the bottom up until that point there was no there was really no biographical information about her and the stuff that was out there was largely false Sometimes because of Militants own she liked to fabricate biographical information about which was very fun for me to deal with as biographer But it's now now actually people who she is and she has a wikipedia. Entry people You google tons of stuff comes up. It's really it makes me really really happy. So how did she become raised from history in the first ice so the her boss at the universal studios monster shop and she worked there in the early nineteen fifties was a man named bud west more and he was part of a very very famous big family of makeup artist. The west morris His father actually. George west was the man who invented the idea of a makeup department so they were huge. Deal in hollywood at the time he had a massive amount of power and influence not just at universal but in the film world is a whole unfortunately he was also known for taking people's credit being very jealous of the other artists that worked with him if they were more successful or more talented than he was which wasn't hard to do And she designed creature and they shot the movie and it became very clear that the movie was going to be a huge hit. They the universal studios publicity department wanted to send millicent on a press tour to promote it and up until that point in history know in the fifties. There was no twitter. There was no. Imdb there is no way for people to really look into the details of of credits on films. You know back then. There was no like ten minutes end. Crawl at the end of a movie like we get now. There was only like these cards that gave the heads of department Credit for the things that they did so no matter. What but didn't design at on a movie increase in the credits creature. It says makeup. Bud west more So he never was challenged. People always just assume that he designed everything that came out of his shop

Millicent Millicent Patrick Brea Grant Patrick Mallory Savini Rick Baker Jack Pierce NED Disney Hollywood Dick Smith Fontana West Morris George West TOM Google
Writing About Illness Without Platitudes

The Book Review

07:47 min | Last week

Writing About Illness Without Platitudes

"This week an episode about memoirs. I up. how do you handle diagnosis of cancer. At age. twenty two salako jawad joins us to talk about her memoir between two kingdoms. Then what makes for a great comedian. Memoir the times's comedy critic. Jason cinnamon will be here to talk about some of his favorites alexander alter will give us an update from the publishing world. Plus my colleagues. And i will talk about what we're reading. This is the book review podcast from the new york times. It's february twenty first. I'm pamela paul silica. Juha joins us now from rural new jersey. Her first book is called between two kingdoms. A memoir of a life interrupted salako. Thanks for being here. Thanks so much for having me camera. So this book came out originally. I believe from a blog that you did for the new york times. Called life interrupted key. Start with how that blogger came about and what it was about through. I received a diagnosis of leukemia. Was twenty two and in those early weeks of being in the hospital and going q. I had all kinds of grand ambitions about whatever's going to do with the strange time on bedrest. I had packed a suitcase. Full of books including were and peace was on my bedside table but you know as the treatment can and and the side effects started to set an i had so little energy i never read a single one of those books and a kind of despair began to sink in as i realized that my life had bifurcated the resist before a diagnosis. This after and i really struggled to figure out what i could possibly do from the confines of a hospital room and so i returned to something. I've always leaned on in difficult times. Just keeping a journal. And i wrote every day. I had made this commitment to myself. An didn't matter how good the quality of the writing was or how long it was sometimes over a couple of sentences. Sometimes just a word occasional rain the f. word but i think i was trying to make sense of the circumstances i'd found myself an and over the course of keeping that journal turned a kind of reporters notebook. I'd had aspirations of becoming a foreign correspondent the for my diagnosis and blah. I couldn't travel or interview. Anyone really leave my hospital room bubble. I began to report from the frontlines of my hospital bed on a very different kind of conflict zone and that journal and became the source material for the life. Intrepid calm and i was interested not just in kind of excavating the experience of us but thinking through the way in which age impacts how we experienced major relation tractions for you at the time. Of course it was the before diagnosis. And the after diagnosis. Obviously from this vantage you've been healthy for about six years. It feels more like a between period. Thus perhaps the title of your book between two kingdoms. This idea of interruption was hopeful one. I had this belief that i needed to endure the treatments than once i was well i get to return to my life into the person that i'd been that that didn't happen. I very quickly realized. After nearly four years and treatment that i couldn't return to the person. I'd ben bc before cancer and that in fact the hard work of killing did not end with the cure. It was really where healing began. And i found myself in this strange of in between place. The title of my memoir between two kingdoms is a reference to the berlin susan song tag. Who wrote about how we all have dual citizenship and the kingdom of the sick and then Bell but even though i wasn't sick on paper anymore i felt as far as i possibly could her from being the healthy happy twenty seven year old woman that i had hoped to end the other side of this. And so you know. The book is an examination of this year's of and the impact that it had not just on me but on my family my entire community but really it's about aftermaths and why we do when our life is ended and we have to learn how to love again. Describe a little bit what you mean by the difference between moving on and moving forward so when i finished treatment i has a solution that i needed to move on from illness and i very quickly realized that moving on is the kind of meth and as much as i tried to do. Just it wasn't possible. And so i really needed to learn how to move forward with my illness and its imprint on my life on my body on my mind and to carry thought wreckage with me as i try to find my way forward. I wanna give both sense of what that meant by contrasting it a little bit with the person you were before your diagnosis. So each twenty two you graduate from princeton u move to paris. You have a plan. What were you thinking you were going to do with your life. At that point. I always loved to write and i grew up in a household with a father who was literature professor and a mother who a painter but the idea of writing as a career wasn't something that i really entertained as a possibility and so i got a job as a paralegal at a law firm in paris and i hoped to become a journalist. Journalism seemed like the more practical daytime version of writing which given that. I'd graduated shortly after the great recession. And retrospect strikes me as incredibly. You've but that was my plan. I hope to travel back to tunisia. Where my father's family's from and rare but was later known as the arab spring was underway and to start reporting on the guy experience. But i never got to do any of that and overnight. I found myself on a plane headed back from and i never returned. My job never returned to my paris apartment at what we did. You realize that something was wrong. Was going wrong with your health. And do you remember the moment when you got your diagnosis. During my senior year of college. I had this mysterious etch and it wasn't a metaphorical it's to travel the world or senior some quarter life crisis but it was this literal physical nadan each and i didn't realize it at the time that was the first time but over those months after graduation i started to fall ill with colds and bouts of bronchitis and my skin turn so pale that it looked almost translucent

Salako Jawad Jason Cinnamon Pamela Paul Silica Juha Joins Salako The New York Times Susan Song Cancer Leukemia The Times Alexander New Jersey Princeton U Paris Berlin Bell Tunisia Colds Bronchitis
Marvel Comics X of Swords

Covert Nerd Podcast

05:40 min | 20 hrs ago

Marvel Comics X of Swords

"The podcast arcade network bake you for listening to the covert nerd. Podcast i really appreciate the fact that you take the time to hear what i have to say. Please pause this episode right now and think of somebody that you might know who would be interested in this topic. Family member franco worker. Whatever and share it with them and let them know about the podcast. I would really appreciate it. Please go to covert ner dot net for all the different ways you can get in touch with me. Let me know about different topics you might be interested in. I would really appreciate any feedback and without further ado. Let's dive right in and out. Welcome everybody we've got. Tim are rainbow comics expert. Comic extreme. Who wears the man who knows all jim thanks him. We've been trying to record this episode about x men forever but life just seems to get in the way but finally going to tackle ten of swords and of sorts. It's been a while. We're we're recording this in mid mid to late january We got a new president. Now that's weird But it's been men tennis sorts ended in december. Think and it's it's been it's twenty two issue Epic that in x. men. And i it's i've read every issue. I haven't read every issue recently so i'm going to be a little bit rusty but i'll do my best. If if we make a mistake we apologize ahead of time But i don't make mistakes. And i refused to apologize so there you have it well the tennis towards obviously we know. Jonathan hickman is the the man behind the latest x. Men run in is a tiny teeny teeny. How our there sorry pronounced. I don't know online name. Got art by pella raise. And i know one of your favorites did a very cover peach moco. Yeah really quick. As an aside i i. I was super lucky to get my starman piece from her star star man I got a piece from her like last year and her rates had already gone up in the year because of your prior was thinking about getting a piece from her so i got one last year and now she's exploding at my store almost every week having about four or five different variants at peaches and she also doing her first interior work for marvel here in a just a couple of months. She's going to be doing an x men book that's reimagining x. Men is like japanese folk heroes kind of and it looks really really fun. That's my aside for peach moment ago. I know you're big fan. So i saw her name pop up on several of these so i think she's got a future marvel. I think she's young guns this year. Okay what we're doing this. If i have her covers behind the counter notes sure and get some of those. What about the run itself. What was let's do kinda ten thousand foot view of tennis. Towards what was your impression of that. Let's let's talk about what ten of swords is so ten of swords basically. Oh should is we're gonna spoil the heck out of this. We're going to do her best There is so many moving parts of the story. That is completely bonkers. We will not be covering everything. It's impossible it's huge. It's so big. And some of it is less important to the overall story than others. Like helen's was was a huge standout but has almost nothing to do with. The main story was hilarious. It was really good but any ten of swords basically the the concept is cre coa. Which is the island upon which the sovereign mutant nation exists. Used to be part of another island called araca araca. Excuse me cra coa araca. And they used to be one entity they got split. Krakatoa is in our world. Araca is in there in a completely different dimension and the bridge between those dimensions is other go and there's a fight and the leader of other world whose name is opal luna saturnine. I got a whole name breath. No no no. I reread creation last night. I didn't and i was like i need to know what the catalyst for this but opal luna saturnine. Saturnine is probably how referred or it could be sattar nin or s- attorney or i don't know how to say i'm gonna say saturnine 'cause super white and that's what it looks like but But she basically says hey. Y'all wanna fight will set up a tournament and we'll have the ten swords a fight each other but there's technically nineteen so words. You're you're one of them kind of exists the split the blade and it's very weird so basically arbitrarily we're setting up a fight between the mutant nation of krakatoa and araca over raka.

Tennis Jonathan Hickman Franco Pella TIM JIM Araca Opal Luna Helen
Little Atoms 674 - Francis Spufford's Light Perpetual

Little Atoms

05:24 min | 23 hrs ago

Little Atoms 674 - Francis Spufford's Light Perpetual

"Award the undoubted your prize and the desmond elliott prize and was shortlisted for the walter scott prize stark fiction. The rathbone folio prize the clip best last novel award and the british book awards w novela the year he's also the author of five highly praised works of nonfiction in two thousand seven. He was elected a fellow of the road. Scientific literature and cone still teaches writing at goldsmiths college university of london today. We're going to talk about his new novel. Which is light perpetual francis. Welcome back to let lots of having me again. First of all tell us how you would describe. Light perpetual new. It's novel about london. Changing over the decades seen through the eyes of five working class south londoners all born around thousand nine hundred forty. They will die in the first few pages because avi to falls on them in a in a branch of woolworth's whether their mothers have taken them to to buy soil spoons which is something that really happened in the woolworth's in new cross. And that's all my way to work at goldsmiths walking past the the plaque on the wall that and being kind of progressive more and more haunted by the thought that these dead children through fifteen people in that who children missed the rest of the twentieth century that they they never saw extrordinary ways in which in which london has changed. And you know and stayed the same definitely the same place but a place in in metamorphosis so the book is a way of. It's not about literal dead children. Some of these people are still being remembered by real life families. And i wouldn't want to mess around in clever clever way with real people's real grief. Say that five completely imaginary children in fact imagined the complete london borough to go around them not so shoehorned it in in between lewisham and new cross and catford pretty much and in the book. They are able in a sort of provisional way to live the rest of the twentieth century the catches up with them every fifteen years or so. It's got that in common with the bbc's up series of documentaries but it's not an accident that they all die at the beginning it's a way of trying to put a kind of frame of fragility or darkness or possibly light around the rest of their experience. A way of keeping it in mind for the reader that like all our lives. It's a bit arbitrary that this one is is happening. A tool on a won't ciphers. It's possible for people to read it with kind of one eye on the fact that these particular people needn't have been there tool i won't life to look gratuitous in both senses being a bit like a gift and a bit like kind of something which is no reason. And then there's the book draws to an end and their lives drawn into because they will get to live to be old in the book eight says the scenery becomes a bit more transparent and the strangeness of them being there it all comes back into view. Hope if i've done it right. Yeah no absolutely values what happens towards the end. I want to sort of elaborate on this idea of a bit. Because i guess your previous golden hill is volatility. Great adventure story read but it's also full of like funding rhetorical excess and playing around with the narrative and this story seems on the face of it mall straightforward beyond this concept. That as you've said that we know from the beginning that none of these characters for once in a better word really exist. Because they've died at the beginning of the book unethical coal The lives of these characters is added poignancy yet of calls and alexandra sloppy per rhetorical affect votes. Every single novel ever written about married too. So i want to talk about. Hey you clearly having something to say about the concept of diction it. So will yeah. I'm probably am in some ways. Just funding away. To underline or double underlined. Something that's part of the the artifice of fiction. Any way i wanted the lives to seem as real as possible so it's not like the kind of artifice you get in one of those books where the author is constantly breaking the fourth wall. And reminding you that it's only novel you'll reading. I wanted to be an actual kind of tension between how kind of sullied and well specified and for want of a better word ordinary. What come back to that would in a minute. Just kind of dependably recognizably. No out of the ordinary. These live off and at the same time being true that there is a kind of flimsy nestle strangeness about them not because i want these. Two seem like specially flimsy all strange people because the reason that quality really looking at human life from a certain not taking it for granted. Kind of angle. It's often associated with russia's derek with people who have a really pronounced sort of fair of death philip block in for example one of the great moustafa death fears talks about the the million pedaled bloom of being here and that's because he was constantly comparing any experience.

Desmond Elliott Woolworth Goldsmiths College University London Walter Scott New Cross Lewisham Francis BBC Alexandra Philip Block Moustafa Derek Russia
Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey

Backlisted

04:08 min | 1 d ago

Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey

"Hello everybody is a soft opening to this episode about listed because you hit gonna hear the music in a bit. 'cause we recording this withdrawn dean for thing. We're very lucky that we've got vow for a woman. We were just just testing out the bongos in the base in the drones. This sounds shange foul our you. I'm very well. Thank you s. I had my first jagger week ago. Some i'm feeling that i'm good. Start of the light at the end of the tunnel. That's very good. My mum's had their first jobs. That's good. I'm hearing about other people getting their jobs. That's all good vow. We in the show. John i normally took about what we've been reading over the last week or so but the truth is i've been reading the novels of joseph physically. He's never want to start reading being run out them with can't do too much take contact just to say what a pleasure. What a pleasure to be given this as a task theropod cost is wonderful. Thank you so much for this discovery for both of you. Yes all right. It's new for me. I thought i'd read. But in fact i was making fatal error of confusing her with montreal. In which i'm also wonderful who's also very good. But i thought the book i thought i'd rather had By route three. Now i'm i'm i won't crack be i've binged let us know percent otherwise thou- so i'm gonna ask you. Have you been reading this year. All sorts of things Many of them the usual things that i read a lot of debut novels for my New blood panel Crime rising festival but for me the big excitement. Going into lockdown was The imminence of allie smith summer the final novel in her seasons quartet and did not disappoint. She's extraordinary writer. I love her paroles. I love rhythms and i love the way the even when she's writing about dark and terrible things. There's always a spark of delight somewhere in the book. And i think she's the great the great novelist of hope I we we've covered three of those four novels including the most rosemont various points. In during the last few years battisti's we're both really big fans those books so magnificent bit of publishing and author ali such brilliant reader as well. If you're lucky enough to see her read any of the opening sections of any of those novels. She's she's incredible right. She really leans into it and really performs it very very intense. Do you have a favorite of the four seasons. I don't think. I have a favorite. But i think what i want to do. Probably as we come into spring again is read all four again. Yeah no. I've been discussed the joy of rereading during lockdown as i love other people have going back to old favorites than almost talismanic. Wait times so that really is. Is everything from shali schoolbooks through the christie to fill is not i kind of comfort thing or just because you go more time. I think it's a comfort thing as well but also having more more time theoretically more time to read although it doesn't seem to fill light more time but but you doing events with people is a great excuse for plundering their backlist as well. I didn't invent with mccarron last week. Which gave me the opportunity to revisit. Not just the host levels is earlier oxford mobile so it just felt like an absolute binge of lakes having the biggest box of chocolates in the world one of john's great ideas over the last few months this winter take on the the reading for the republic of consciousness price. So i think he's telling for rereading have you. Have you done any reading here. No i mean not not this year. I mean reread. The susan cooper's that we did for rum that we did for the christmas post. That was rereading. I no.

Allie Smith Battisti Dean Joseph Montreal Shali John Christie Mccarron Oxford Susan Cooper
Afonso Cruz

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

03:58 min | 2 d ago

Afonso Cruz

"He's written more than thirty books. Plays picture books. Young adult novellas essays and novels including kokoschka doll which won european union prize for literature. Jesus christ drank. Beer was considered the best portuguese novel of the year by timeout lisbon and where to umbrellas and up on the two thousand and fourteen portuguese society for authors would. he's also a columnist an illustrator an animated film director and a member of the band. The soaked land afonso cruz. Welcome to meet the writers and you. That is quite some cv. They're covering so many different art forms. How would you describe yourself. I don't know all his work river illustration and and drying and painting and we'd images mostly. That's why i work so many years as a animation mortgage director but i also Been a reader all my life and then so the reading become a second nature and and then one day the just pop out and and become something else like writing and i it was Just a natural I didn't shows an annual bills things that just stop i dunno. I wonder then how much your background in animated film making influences. The way that you write. Do you use the same technique to i do. And i. i was eating workshops on writing r. I realized that method. i was Using it was a common think in the literary context. But i thought it came from animation for instance Mansion you usually. This is the rule. Of course you can change it but usually if you wanna move your hand from left to right freezes you start with with the first drawing then usually people think that then you must draw the hand close to go the first one and then a third one and then the fourth one and so on but what what we actually do is is drawing the first hand and the last hand and when you have these two extremes than you you will draw something in between which are the thing between drawings and you always work like that with 'in-betweens and i also rightly we'd like like that's not i mean When i have character that desires anything Something that is the end that is the extreme is is there elect. Something a wants something. That's the ban point of the action. And then you have to to fill in the the the in betweens and so it's it's It's a an technique that you can read You've been incredibly prolific in literature. You i level that was The flesh of god in two thousand and eight is that right. Yes yes not the first thing. I wrote the the first thing i published. Tell us about that book. Actually the book is out of print. And i at least four. Now i i i. I don't have a intentional of Is that because it's because some writers tell me that when they look back at their first work they feel that actually. It shouldn't have come out that it was just a learning process and quite happy that work to be forgotten shamed. It's it's the thing is that it's it's not me anymore But i i'm not really shamed of that book.

Kokoschka Afonso Cruz Lisbon European Union
100 years of Folha de S.Paulo

Monocle 24: The Stack

04:59 min | 3 d ago

100 years of Folha de S.Paulo

"In chief saturday villa plus monaco's leonardo's pays a visit to the best news kiosks in barcelona and a new austrian title talking about muslim culture and society enjoyed the show from madeira housing london. This is the stack thirty minutes of bring industry analysis. And i am. Finland used shameful. I on the show a very special date for brazilian newspaper. Fully some powell the paper is arguably the most important daily in the country and it is celebrating one hundred years in two thousand twenty one have grown up reading it since i was like nine years old so it was a pleasure. Speaking of savage davila de editor in chief of forty. He tells me about the plans for the paper this year. And what a hundred years means for folio. It's celebration you're right about that but it's it's been a modest celebration as these zoeller tradition in fully up in the face of this catastrophic times that we are leaving defendants Has taught a few lessons in. Acapa has to do with professional journalism in journalism. That we do at foley one is that journalism is by people not places we have now three hundred reporters working from home who put the newspaper to bed but also feed the website. Make videos casts newsletters photos. The other last time is that people value professional journalists when information is a matter of life and death as it is right. Now our record we are experiencing record in audience. Recently foiled another media outlets. It's i think this is a proof of that and finally in a very competitive environment such as the brazilian media we found common ground to two beautiful search of data regarding covid. Nineteen face of the government's refusal to release timely and accurate numbers. None of that would happen if if it wasn't for a on outlets such as familiar if wasn't established outlet suggest foyer. We are in this business for a hundred years. This is matters the time like this now less as for celebration bear in mind that it's very difficult for ordinary business to to survive for one hundred years in in brazil even more difficult if you are a newspaper almost a personal offense if you do the type of journalists that we tried to do it for you even though Here we are in. We are aiming for Two hundred years celebration. While i've been a a fully read since i am a kid and you have very long experience yourself Can you tell us. When did you start working there. Because you've done quite a lot of jobs you've covert you know you were kind of a foreign correspondent as well among other things. Yeah i've been with full of for a quarter of Centauri a i started as a reporter than i was the editor of our cultural section that is called illustre which means illustrated dinner correspondent in the us for a decade from two thousand to two thousand ten in in that period of time. events such as nine eleven bouche obama's elections the rise of social media companies. Especially when i was a knight fellow at stanford university and the start of the tea party mentality that led to trump both tomorrow in others like them a rise to power in this fear of time. I covered the iraqi war as as well. I was the only brazilian reporter in baghdad win. The war started and not. I stayed there for thirty five days with my fellow photographer. Who covered allah. We were the only two proceedings covering the event in baghdad was a very defining moment for me themself. journalism an income housing intended came back to to brazil to become the executive editor. For in that position. I helped to transform the newsroom into a digital newsroom which we are right now in two thousand and nineteen. I a few months after the devastating for me devastating loss of w. yes few. I became editor in chief of the newspaper. I am the first professional journalists to hold his job in thirty five years.

Muslim Culture And Society Savage Davila Acapa Zoeller Madeira Monaco Leonardo Barcelona Finland Powell Villa Foley London Bouche Obama Brazil Government Baghdad Stanford University Tea Party United States
April Is Around The Corner, And Were Standing By That

Nerdette

07:49 min | 4 d ago

April Is Around The Corner, And Were Standing By That

"And we made it the last friday in the month of february coming up. I'm going to chat with a woman who has been waking up before sunrise every day to go swimming in a very cold lake. She says it's helping her get out of a pandemic funk. If there's open water we're swimming dear jar will leap off of the ladder. And she does thirty strokes out thirty strokes back so if we can swim we swim. Then we'll get a preview of a word season before the golden globes this weekend. But i it's our panel on the week that was with two very exciting guests. First up we have musician and author desa sl welcome back to internet. Thanks for having me. And the host of the public radio show snap judgment glynn washington glenn high. Hey okay so. I think we need to start this week as we have with many weeks by talking about the covert pandemic perhaps unsurprisingly This week we hit a very grim milestone. half million people in the united states now have died of krona virus. Meanwhile the fda approved another vaccine. And there's more talk of another stimulus package coming from congress. All of these things would be allowed to process in any given week let alone whatever individual personal and professional trauma. All of us have been getting through. We're also nearing the one year anniversary of shutdowns. That started across the us. I'm curious to talk to both of you about the idea of a pandemic wall. This is a phrase. That's been circulating for a couple months now. But i don't know i feel like i'm really feeling it. I'm curious what that looks like for you. Glenn what do you think. Y- yeah. I have a boy and a girl and we're done with this whole pandemic nonsense but i'm trying to tell them. We are almost over this hill. The bay the like the the cases are plummeting that if we wait just a little bit longer that we're going to get to the promised land but i just don't know i'm saying it and i don't know if i believe it but i think it's called said we're going to start planning now for that time when we can do stuff again. At that time we can see people again. Injustice planning seems to brought cheer to our a little bit. Yeah so what about you desolate. What is pandemic wallich lake for you. These days you know like i think it was in the nineties. Those like gladiator shows where where people would like. You know run. An course. I feel like there's so many like literally hitting walls. Yes i feel like i there are a multiplicity of walls. At least for me. I feel like the first three months really different. You know but now. I feel like i'm reckoning with the idea that it might just be so long that there is no returning to the The kind of world. That i knew it as an artist artists careers are. We're not may flies. We're not like gymnasts. They're not for years long but they're not usually like sixty years long either and so to figure out like if there are no concerts for a year you know that's a different prospect to grapple with and there are no concerts for two years or three years. When do you think you're gonna get back on the road. Well yes so you know. In the beginning we used to put like dates on the calendar. Like just in case. Dan you know what i mean. So i've met them just in case dates up now for like september. But i see it's for me. It's a coin flip. I think if those if those are run. I mean it started like you know the relay race like you can't start from standstill so you just like jog a little bit before the dude behind you passes you the baton you know so. We're just kind of continually pushing. These dates a quarter by quarter but those summer festivals just cancelled last week. So same here. I mean i know this. I don't want to see another zoom thing of any type from at circumstances for any reason. I don't want to see that and i don't i certainly don't wanna make it. So what is it. W zoom videos. They looked like prison. Like we have two videos like send money. It's like true life. Yeah what we got to stop this. I don't know. I mean. I i get what you're saying but especially as someone who lives alone like i'm so hungry for any approximation of people coming together that it's like if that's if that's all i can have. I'm still going to participate. You know see. I live alone too and i was. I feel like. I'm getting way more erotic and i was already sort of leaning into that. All the regular checks and balances. I think have sort of eroded i live alone as well. The kids go back and forth but and wonder how broken i'm going to be going for. The fact of the matter is that. I kinda like being by myself a little bit more than i suppose to. That actually worries me not more than anything but like we're going to have to put pants on like kidding. Offer that nice sweatsuit game is tight. It's all about that lounge where i will say this and this is this is completely opposite of what i said but i did. Just order a reflective silver suit yesterday so something else that happened this week that i was really curious to get. Y'all's take on is former president. Barack obama dropped a podcast. Where he he talks with bruce springsteen kind of their like co hosting it together or something. I'm curious if this is something that is like remotely interesting to either of you. Desa what do you think yes. It is interesting to me. I mean i have a lot of strong feelings about it. But i can't reconcile them. Do you know what i'm saying. We run into each other. Because it's called renegades House like that feels like not to throw shade but like that feels like an aspirational title renegades. Every president bruce springsteen. I looked up just to make sure looked up the definition. I'm gonna read it because this is a bad time at all. I'm going on record. Great great go on a person who deserts and betrays an organization country or set of principles. I will definition. That wouldn't have passed the focus group. That i had and listen to a little bit of it and i was like you know i am really interested in what both of these people i just i was. I was sucked in a surprising way by of them. Had to say that's interesting. What do you think glen. I think honestly this was actually inspires me. That two people at the top of their game are out doing stuff. Yeah neither of them has to do anything ever again. But they're out trying things out. This could be a failure. They're out putting themselves out any artists that actually has a career. We'll tell you the art is maybe thirty percent of how you spend your day twenty percent most things like that the rest of keeping the lights on if you could flip that equation on a little bit and then actually focus on what you're doing. That would be just beyond phenomenal. And i love. I just love the these guys if they can put it out there. Still get the booze and catcalls go with any creative endeavor that i think is great. Yeah that's really that's a really beautiful way of looking at it. Speaking of work nother story. That caught her attention. This week was about the guy in arizona who made it look like. He was kidnapped to get out of

Glynn Washington Glenn Wallich Lake Swimming Golden Globes United States FDA Glenn Congress Bruce Springsteen DAN Barack Obama Glen Arizona
Little Atoms 673 - Sara Seager's The Smallest Lights in the Universe

Little Atoms

04:38 min | 4 d ago

Little Atoms 673 - Sara Seager's The Smallest Lights in the Universe

"This is little atoms. A radio show about ideas and coach with me naoto any this week. Astrophysicist sara seager on her memoir the smallest lights in the universe. seager is an astrophysicist and a professor of physics and planetary science at mit have research which anto macarthur foundation genius grant has introduced many foundational ideas to the fairwood event so planets and she led nasr's probe class to the team. For the star shade project she is now at the forefront of the set for the first earth like planets and signs of life on them and today. We're going to be talking about sarah's book the smallest lights of the universe which is memoir. Sarah walking back to little atoms. Thanks thinking now. Longtime listeners to the show may remember that we spoke back in the summer of twenty twelve point. One of the things we talked. Abou- was at that time. The future project that you recently basically started working on which was keep stats which would eventually become a project code. Steria that has now come to fruition. In the twenty seventeen spacex launched asteria in case so festival. Remind us what asteria was yes. Well a syria was a tiny telescope. It was only about a six centimeter aperture diameter and the goal of hysteria was actually to test technology to show that we can point a small package whether it be a telescope or anything very very precisely. Our ultimate goal is to send a constellation dozens of tiny telescopes. Each one would stare at its own star a bright sunlight star for as long as needed just to check if there is a transiting earth sized planet. Going in front of the sun like star. What was it like to see that finally launch. It was amazing. Our project A miniature version of any other space mission in that. It was very complicated. It went over budget. It took longer than expected so all of that was kind of not amusing but just life so when a stereo was finally ready to go Interestingly enough to of the team members literally took it on an airplane and they bought a middle seat ticket for it so we knew that it would be safely transported from where it was built at nasa jet propulsion lab in california out to where it was delivered to be ready for launch in florida and date is a story of the book about how you took it on a plane. Apart aversion on the plane earlier this is an argument with the The akron about whether or not you should go right lakers. Have you seen how aircrew can treat packages suitcases. And so we. We had taken a prototype britain earlier version to test the camera on a night sky in new mexico where the skies are incredibly beautiful in. Yes we were on our way home and it was designed to fit as carry on the people. It was tiny play small plane. You know when you take a small plane from town tune airport where you connect to a bigger plane in. Yes they wanted to put it in the cargo area in the book. You move onto walk-on a project that i just mentioned in the introduction stuff shades that s one of two nassir projects on this one. You you become the lead on it and first of all star shade is it. Wasn't i doubt that had been around for a while. wasn't it. it really was actually and just back up a little bit. I support our work on many ideas that can help us find another earth and star shade wasn't designed initially to find another earth but the goal was to have a very special shape very large screen and two attached this large screen to a spacecraft and launch it into outer space and the star-shaped would work together with a telescope so that star-shaped would block out starlight so that any planets around that star could be detected by the telescope and yes star shade. Was i thought about in the nineteen sixties eventually ends up. Being designed is of a very particular shape and the won't talk about. Why how we get to that shape. The prototype ends obeying crazy shape. It looks like a giant flower and it is that shape because of the diffraction of light light can act like a wave and if we were to put a giant circular screen in space than in blocked out starlight where stars just a point of light. You know it's amazing. We wouldn't be blocking out the light because the light would actually act like a wave and bend around the edges of a giant circular screen.

Sara Seager Anto Macarthur Foundation Naoto Seager Nasr Abou Spacex MIT Syria Grant Sarah Nasa Lakers New Mexico Britain Florida California
Monocle Reads: Bonnie Kemske

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:54 min | 5 d ago

Monocle Reads: Bonnie Kemske

"This article reads. I'm georgina. godwin had my guest. Today is bonnie kamsky. She's born in kanawha but raised in the us on the initially trained in modern dance and ballet nuke city before travelling to japan to study the zen buddhist art form of chanu you following this. She undertook a phd at the royal college of art becoming ceramicist and researcher. She's written two books on ceramics. The latest being consumed the poetic meant which explores the unique tradition of repairing pottery with visible often. Gold leaf covered joined bonnie. Thanks so much for for coming on the show. I wonder if you could just tell us from the practical side. I mean you'll book introduces us to consider these techniques and materials. Tell us a little bit about that. Lots of people think that considering is actually about ceramics but it's actually not a ceramic technique. It's actually a lacquer technique. That's used for sir. So that's the first thing to understand the lacquer japanese lacquer in particular is used has an adhesive and also as filler and then The gold which is not actually gold flake. Sometimes it's gold flake but usually it's powder gold and sometimes tiny little balls are then sprinkled onto the scene where the wet slackers ended it sticks and that's been part of so that's why it looks like its solid gold so you have this piece that's been put back together. And every seem is is lined in gold. What's the history of kentucky. Well it's not quite as clear as you'd think it might be in japan. It's almost a a non thing When i went to japan to do the research for this book i was really struck with how few people knew very much about it so we were seeing some of the most famous say japanese people's in japan that have kentucky repairs and the curator's had no idea when the repairs were done or who had done them so we think it developed around sixteen hundred thereabouts and it was really about four different things that came together. I you need to have ceramics to have kentucky you need to have the alushi or which is the japanese lacquer and then you need to have the gold and then the final ingredient is japanese tea ceremony. Because without that that was really the impetus for the development and the originally it was done by artists who work in what's called makki which is sprinkled gold pictures and that's because they were the lacquer artists and it would have been a sideline for them.

Bonnie Kamsky Royal College Of Art Becoming Japan Kanawha Georgina Godwin Bonnie Kentucky United States Makki
Episode 430: Connie Walker

Longform Podcast

02:10 min | 6 d ago

Episode 430: Connie Walker

"One of your three co host. The other two are aaron. Lamour and max linski hey guys. Hey hey guys. Evan who's on the on the old program this week This week i am excited to have connie walker on the show. Connie was a longtime reporter for the cbc and canada and then over the last five years she reported and hosted this amazing podcast series called missing and murdered which is about the disappearance of a digit us women in canada and issues around those disappearances season one of that show is about a woman name alberta williams who was murdered in the late eighties That they investigate and season two which is called. Finding cleo is about a woman named cleopatra's maginnis who was taken from her family. In something called the sixties scoop which is a situation in which the government removed indigenous business children from their homes forcibly. It's a pretty well known thing in canada Now and probably should be more well known here. So that's the context of those two earlier seasons that we start talking about and she also has a new show coming out this time from Gimblett spotify which is called stolen which is about a similar situation in the us of woman that went missing Just two years ago in montana. Let me be the The next person to recommend these Seasons to people particularly finding cleo was Was just absolutely incredible. I'm so glad she's on the show. If you've got a bunch of recommendations for things like podcasts. I love when i see a newsletter recommending this show you could start an email newsletter with male champ and make your first recommendation That people either listen to our show or connie's show or whatever show you are enjoying right now do with mail chimp. They make it easy and they make the show possible. Thank you to malcolm and now. Here's evan with connie walker. Connie

Max Linski Connie Walker Alberta Williams Maginnis Canada Lamour Evan Connie CBC Aaron Cleo Cleopatra United States Montana Malcolm
Under the Dome (2009)

Chat Sematary

06:23 min | 6 d ago

Under the Dome (2009)

"Hey everyone i want to tell you about another. Stephen king podcast. This one is hosted by kim. See who has a university creative writing fiction teacher and she knows way more about the writing process than i do and she is covering lesser known. King works in her. Podcast the year of underrated stephen king. You can find a link to her show in the show notes and she is now fifty episodes in so there's plenty of content there for you to check out and i hope you enjoy it before we dive in today. I want to let you know a few ways. You can support the podcast. The biggest one by far is word of mouth. If you enjoy this. And you know. Other stephen king fans please tell them about it. Share the episodes on social media. It really does help. You can also follow us on twitter and instagram. At chat cemetery their links to those in the show notes. And if you are really dedicated to the show you can become a patriotic supporter. Where i will have bonus episodes going up. I am covering all of the stephen king related comex over on patriot. So there's definitely going to be a lot more bonus content coming this year and now let's get into that episode. Hey everyone chat cemetery is back. I'm your host. Diana chapman and i am joined once again by katie schaefer. Talking all about under the dome which is a very very long book. I considered making a rhyme there. Katie and. I think you know what i would have been going for. Yes oh god this was. This was a really interesting piece of work. I think i mean the thing that struck me about it. When i opened it is that it's like okay. This is another town one like needful things or it's and it seems like each one. He does have those changes and i think this one was better. A more tightly written and better paced didn't some of his town books which is wild to save for a book. That's over a thousand pages. Lock so wild and he credited at the end of this. He credited his editor with that. He said that she just wrote him in hard about like note faster faster and it's funny because even though this book was so long you didn't really feel it necessarily there were some stories of kings. Tommy knockers comes to mind immediately where you really feel the length of the book definitely and this one i agree. You don't necessarily mean the book takes place over a week. i think. I think the dumb comes up. Yeah after it goes down. Their whole town just goes to shit in that week. Oh completely and it's funny to mention some of these town kind of stories that he's done before to a lot of them are long. It was also over a thousand pages. At least my copy was needful things. I think fell somewhere in the six to eight hundred range or something along those lines and find interesting. Is that salem. Lot is the only short town book really. Yeah and that one. I think it has fewer characters in it but it's still very much town but yes you do get fewer like main characters will call no opponent. 'cause they're all set maine. It really salems lot really picks and chooses who were going to get that perspective of Gives us a few outside ones and those color the rest of what's going on. Yeah and i read a hardcover copy of under the dome. Did you read a physical copy or did you do the audio book. I did the audio book and let me guess. It was forty something hours as long like a week and a half to listen to listening like every day. Yeah i think it was thirty. Six hours i was close. And it was narrated by raul esparza. Food did a fantastic job. Very very well done lots of different accents and some of them didn't feel like main but i have spent maybe two days in maine as a child so i really have no idea what that accent is. And what the variations are Let some of them are just bought on with that. All that we're drawl. the mainers have. Yeah and i can imagine that this was a lot to listen to. Because you know as someone who works on podcasts. All day long pretty much now. It's one of those things where i don't have the attention span necessarily to do that all day and then listen to an audio book so for me. It's like reading either. A physical or digital. It doesn't matter is up break for my ears so for you. I'm sure because you know you don't work on podcasts. All day it's a bit of a different experience but with something that long. Were you taking notes while listening to it. I ended up. Not doing that. And i had planned to initially but i kind of listen to this one in chunks able to make some time outside of my work day Listen to these while. I'm working on my more down working days when it's all spreadsheets. So i was able to track pretty well. What was going on in the book and felt like you said this terribly long. It doesn't feel that long and because it happens over that short period of time felt easier to recall it for some reason. I i don't know why because it's totally just of my head thing but i was. I was by the end of it. I was like wow i really feel like. I retained a lot of this book. I'm hoping i retained a lot of this book. But i do want to note that there are so many characters in this that we probably won't focus a ton on every single one but the fact that king felt the need to include a character list at the top of this book tells me something about just how involved the story is right off the bat because the character is almost three pages long by itself. Oh yeah and like when.

Stephen King Diana Chapman Katie Schaefer Tommy Knockers Instagram KIM Raul Esparza Katie Maine King Twitter Salem