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U.S. Air Force Launches Contest to Replace the B-52 Bomber’s Engine

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

6:00 listening | 4 d ago

U.S. Air Force Launches Contest to Replace the B-52 Bomber’s Engine

"Here to talk about bombers. There is news just breaking as of May nineteenth the US Air Force kicked off a three way competition to reengineer. Its entire seventy six aircraft. Be Fifty two fleet and the the competitions going to be underway. They just released a request for proposals. Steve can you talk about what the Air Force is looking for? And what that means for the companies involved. Yes so on Tuesday evening or Tuesday late afternoon the Air Force released the our fee to start Step two of the engine source election the replacement for the Beef at T.F. Thirty Three's which You know design. That goes back about sixty years. And you've got three companies in the competition. Rolls Royce with the VR seventy five. Which for this competition. They're calling the effluent thirty We also have the engine. That's on the global six thousand that The Air Force is flying as as the e eleven As a communications relay. Pratt Whitney is competing with the w eight hundred which is another business jet engine and you've got Ge that has said that they are looking at offering either or both of the CF. Thirty four engine actually started out with the. A ten In still in service with the ten. But it's gone onto power of regional jets and Also it's passport engine. Which is the propulsion system on the bombard? Da Global Seven thousand business jet. So those are the those are the three competitions with air forces looking for is a new propulsion system. That as what what they say is basically the T.F. Thirty-three has kind of come to the end of its life beyond twenty thirty. They don't really see. You're very viable way of sustaining it. And keeping it in service. But of course they've decided that the B fifty two will continue operating beyond twenty fifty so they need something under the wings of those aircraft. Keep them flying and they're looking for something that it can extend the range by twenty five percent that can add a bunch of loiter time to the B fifty two's mission set and They won't cost too much and that they can integrate as quickly as possible. So that's that's where we are with the competition Steve Guy. Can you tell us a little bit of it? Gives us a little more sense of the engines? That will be competing. Hard High State Yeah I it's fascinating to me that this is competition is underway. It's it's really difficult to believe that in the early two thousands that they looked at this in the nineteen seventies even looked. This goes back a long way. Pratt and Whitney originally proposed a you know of the upgrades the T.F. Thirty three which courses based on the original J. Three engine that Pratt went. They developed some back in the in the late. Fifties and early sixties. Rolls Royce of course came really close more recently With an offbeat till Evan Option in the mid. Nineteen nineties with with Boeing as a team So it's been an ongoing thing but that was was four engines to replace AIDS so this is different. Because you've got eight engines. Replace eight engine. So how could that possibly work? So the the reason it can work is that over the last fifty years which is really the length of the of this program The original engine. If it's hard to imagine this but the actual fan amit served Pratt and Whitney engine that the the one that's on the inevitable at thirty three is about fifty inches the inlet itself and yet the bypass ratio. Which is you know the key parameter ready for the performance of this Is Only one point. Four three two one but all of the engines that nabbing pushed through for this replacement here. We are fifty years later. They're all between four point. Two to five point five to one bypass ratio but basically in the same diamonds and that reflects the fact that all those cores of shrunk at in you've got much more efficient fan flow and that so here you are bringing in these twenty-first-century engines however just to clarify that One of those engines at state mentioned. Jeez pushing forward with the CF thirty four DASH sandwiches one option. That engine actually will be this year celebrating. I believe it's twenty eight anniversary so it's it's not a near engine itself. Likud's relative to what it's replacing it still a youngster. Really Oli others estate mentioned on new business jet engines up just a little bit of sort of back of the envelope. Calculation and based on the published data that we've got. It's quite interesting. You look at the actual weight that bear way to each of these engines and do a quick so a calculation it at the moment they the tip thirty three. The ship said of bear engines weighs about thirty five thousand pounds. That's just mean a mechanical gear on on the on the pylon not including the case sings or even sometimes accessories. If you look at the calculated waits for the others the passport which is the other g engine would actually weigh slightly more about thirty six thousand the prod engine the Peterloo eight hundred which state mentioned which is the The J. Six hundred five hundred engine is sly is actually the lowest just under twenty five thousand. Pansy got an interesting calculation going on that but basically they're all within about three inches of each other in terms of inlet diameter all within a few hundred pounds thrust so it's very complicated competition and a very interesting calculus that the Athol is GonNa have to go through.

Air Force Pratt Whitney Us Air Force Steve Guy Pratt Royce Boeing Likud Pansy GE Aids The J. Six
Flying with Thomas Middleditch

There I Was...

5:45 listening | 5 d ago

Flying with Thomas Middleditch

"Of the things I wanted to ask you about is just the ability to to get through training and then to maintain your proficiency given the kind of schedule you must have these days with running hit series in London a Netflix. And the whole thing. How you do that would be helpful to all of US pilots. Because we're always struggling with time and money right whenever how much time and money as we want to put into our flying and our airplanes well. It's weird I would say like I would say that in a profession that is pretty suited to being a general aviation pilot is acting because you have time where shorts pretty busy and you know you may just get up. Get up that weekend. If you move some stuff around and make make sure you can but then sometimes in between jobs you have weeks time where you don't have. Yeah you don't have too much to do and now when my comedy partner Ben and I to our with our show I'll fly there. I worked hard to get that instrument rating which is such a challenge especially. I'm not the best student so like studying a real chore from it but now that has really opened up the possibilities of getting two gigs which has increased my flight hours substantially which is very exciting whereas before. I be like boy. I really hope it's nice weather so I can fly but then there's no guarantee I'll get back or whatever you know. It was just a little bit trickier but I would say if you had the money in the means and you WanNa fly definitely get your instrument rating it. One hundred percent allows you to fly more with the end. I also agree with you as one of the more demanding things I've done in my flying is an instrument rating because it's the combination of the book knowledge which can get very complicated and then flying procedures which have to be able to recall them immediately when you're flying and we have a person here who did some Improv in college. That's that's a big focus of yours and be part of your careers Improv. So I have to ask you. Do you see any like a sort of parallels between what you have to do an Improv. And the ability to react very quickly and to think creatively do you see any kind of those parallels with with flying maybe in terms of like quick thinking but I would actually say the flying especially instrument. Flying is a very structured way of doing things. Where is it is Improv? There's a lot of philosophy that you can get like. Let's say Improv. For performance in comedy. There's a lot of kind of philosophy that you I learn when you're first starting out and ends up feeling like structure but then the lines get blurred and you can kind of go wherever you want. What part of I think maybe part y like flying and instrument flying like there's procedures and things it tells you exactly what what to do. Yeah and to be honest. I don't mind like I think this probably happens. More than any pilot admits is like you may be skipped a step or a you got out of altitude at the wrong time or whatever you kind of bungle the procedure a little bit and HEC has to kind of like you know that was not supposed to be how it went as long as it's minor. I really don't mind it because it reminds you learn. That's how you Kinda like. Oh cool on this three hours of cross country. I'M GONNA put these these flight charts and make sure I don't do that again. But I liked the structure and I like I like nailing it. I liked getting it. Exactly how the chart told me to do it and nothing went wrong. It feels very very gratifying towards the gratifying feeling. Do you still remember you? Got Your instrument rating the first time you go out and you get your ticket wet. You're in the clouds and you penetrate through you fly approach and you come out. And there's the runway. Is that not one of the most gratifying feelings. There is life. It's so cool I mean even just the idea of I remember that that front when you're first learning was I going. I M see that feeling like Oh boy when you're coming into a cloud and then you just you're in it and now you can't see anything. It's very exciting. And the fact. I think it's like it's ride knowing that you know what to do before instrument training. You've you these clouds as like total enemies to be avoided at all costs. They Kill You. You go in there you you get icing and you plummet to the you know. It's the seem so insanely menacing honestly. Think instructors put a little spin on it to keep you away right Yeah and then Once you get the instrument rating I currently have very capable playing A. Da Forty two. Oh Gosh sticks like thing all this chaos business so i. There's a lot less worry but if I had just the gauges to just the instrument qualified and I would be going to. Maybe I'd be a little bit more apprehensive because you do have to worry about a lot of things but it's just cool to know what to do. It's know how to do it. Yeah I agree with you. It is a to realize you you got in those clouds intentionally and you know how to deal with it and you're trained to do something that's very tangible. Step that you see yourself moving to so I agree with you and also just like there's lots of cool things about flying lots of things that make you WanNa do it again. I mean to me one of those aspects. The little pie chart is kind of the beauty that you see up there and to me the sky the world is much more dramatic with a little bit cloud in there. And it's you know when you get to land at like pretty notoriously. Cloudy rainy wet cities like places in Washington Oregon or something and you can go down there. You can just feel like I don't get to do my trip. You can do it and you get to land in. It's still it's gray above you. It's exciting it makes the the sky and through which you travel. Yeah

Wanna United States Netflix London HEC Partner BEN Oregon Washington
What A&D Companies Should Invest In After COVID-19

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

5:53 listening | Last week

What A&D Companies Should Invest In After COVID-19

"Can you tell us a little bit about the Tech Vision? Report and the survey that accenture has completed of all of these. Amd Xhosa and other senior leaders Michael. Every year accenture surveys over six thousand senior executives across twenty four industries including aerospace and defense. And it's a great way to get a pulse. On how companies how executives see technology and how it can help them transform and Change Your Business and as you pointed out earlier you know. We're we're we're in a stage of of Nevers so we we got unprecedented change. However as an industry and defence almost by definition solves large audacious. And so. That's what we have basing us. And this year's technology vision shows I think a good snapshot in terms a what are what are your executive. What is what's their perspective. What are their expectations around? How digital can help them navigate and certainly Looking you know post pandemic and what's important for companies to survive long term is around systems resiliency security looking at. How do they? How do they interact with with customers? Now Remotely how do I use a? I gotta use robotics things like that to increase safety and have an interaction that you want to have a with your customer. How do I introduce resiliency under the supply chain how do I innovate? Innovation was a key area that came out initiate technology vision. And so so. The report this year shows how aerospace and defense companies can use that in order to set up to get through the short-term chaos and as well setting up for for the nest in terms of longer term and viewing with with more certainty than we as. An industry are typically. Have again looking at that. Tech Vision report digital is the overarching theme. And I see these these five focal points. The I and experience a and mead the dilemma of smart things robots in the wild. Is You guys talk about and innovation DNA? And we're going to get into each of these but John. Why do these new technologies like the one jeff just talked about have the potential to disrupt handy and coming nearest so much? Why these fought? The five trends are really brought together from all the research that Jeff is talking about earlier in in when I kind of translate them into aerospace and defense and I know we're going to dive into him. We look at it across what I'll call general kind of value chain ride starting with the customer experience and that starts on the flight deck with the everybody from the crew to the passengers in seats going. Onto HOW COMPANIES ENGINEER MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS. How they work with their extended supply chain operations in aftermarket and of course is a foundational element across all of this stuff around software and information security analytics artificial intelligence and talent and expertise itself in when we can look at some of the statistics that came out of this. In terms of new technologies disrupting or refining. Is that seventy. One percent of aerospace and defense executives believe robotics are gonNA enable next generation of services which is a pretty big component of a executives looking at robotic specifically seventy seven percent already piloting or implementing. Ai Solutions. I would just maybe not such a huge surprised me although I think we can talk more about that later as well. Eighty one percent think they're connected products and services are GonNa continue to be updated. Important Component of growth in their futures and a ninety percent believed that they need to elevate relationships with their customers as partners in engaging and engaging better technology so let's Start diving into them We might as well right away Couple of interesting statistics. I've seen in the sneak peek of the report. You guys gave me seventy two percent of Andy executives that you pulled agree. That organizations need to dramatically in reengineer and I emphasize that dramatically reengineer to bring technology into a more human centric manner John this resonates with a lot of people in the wake of the seven three seven Max issues but as you and I have talked about for years. India has been wrestling with user interface and information overload for a while. This go with that. I think I think it does and and yet I would take this at even broader sense rights at the broadest sense again going back to that maybe the value chain is loosely described it starting with the pilots and the crew and a passenger experience and then thinking about next generation technology driven improvements. They'll be taking more human centric approach. So for instance we used to talk a lot about in-flight experienced for entertainment and bring your own device but now thinking about going forward how you take. Technology and new ways of engineering product to improve comfort hygiene and safety on the aircraft for instance in in the commercial side no then move onto production operations flight controls and all the way through maintenance and we're technology is able to impact our ability to engineer products. That better accomplish their tasks and in essence. What we're doing is reporting that digital thread that we've talked about with an eye towards how people interact with technology to accomplish your jobs at every step from you know the first part of Innovation Engineering Manufacturing Assembly production and operations so it seems part and parcel to the issue has been the rise of artificial intelligence and again looking at the report here. Seventy seven percent of Andy Respondent. Say They are adopting highlighting

Executive Accenture Andy Respondent Engineer Jeff John Michael Innovation Engineering Manufac Nevers India
Stimulating Simulator Stories

EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

5:25 listening | Last week

Stimulating Simulator Stories

"Never had the three of us. Sit Down and nerd out about about flight simulation. Yeah I mean. It's one of the things that I think is a gateway drug for a lot of people I mean when you're a kid with a computer and You know you're looking for some gaming or some you know something cool to do. I mean flight Sims I think are are I think are as much a part of getting you know. Young people into Navy model airplanes were and still are. Yeah I I agree and you guys of no my My background priority. I spent eleven years at Microsoft working on the flight simulator series there subsequently got some weird biases and things but I was also been a lifelong user of Sims first. Ibm either came home. We bought the first First version one point. Oh flights them week that When that came out and I was. I was twelve going on thirteen when that happened. And here I am D- decades and decades later and I still enjoy them and it's It it's one of those things that it. It's not only refund from the aviation side but it's also to me always been interesting from the technology side to take these computers that we have on our desks in in our pockets and our briefcases and see what what they can do. Yeah I wouldn't ask you when you went to work at Microsoft was that Was that pretty cool? I mean going to work for a product that you Kinda knew already and had a you know certainly had a name for itself. I sent my wife An email and our into my first day because I've been at Microsoft a two or three years closer to four years actually for if I move to that team and I sent this email to her and it just said I am a pig. My job is slop never get there? That was back in ninety eight So got to work on some patches and supposedly stuff for flights to ninety eight then we rolled right into combat flights him in for the next several years. Sort of back and forth from combat. Flight Sim then back to the civilian one based on releases Worked as a test engineer which was really cool. It came from product support. Which meant you had to sit on the phone and try to help somebody solve a problem and then I switched to testing which just meant. You really didn't care about the solution. You just had to point out the problems and I'm good at that. I'm really judgmental. I'm picky but it can be a real jerk so So that was that was fantastic and worked from. He said the tail end of flights in ninety eight all the way through the last of FSX and a what we call DSP. What you now know is prepared by Lockheed Martin so yeah Great Times Yeah I think When I was a kid my parents had I think it was an IBM forty six In the early nineties and I only game that was on. That computer was gosh. She could help me with this. How was probably F S for? It was still wire frame graphics and it had the airplane Creator in the in the Red Baron combat similar. Oh sure yeah. So the yeah. They're the red baron was That was there from the very very beginning. You know the wire frame stuff. F S Four. That had the airplane creator. Had WHAT WE CALL IT? Sort of flat shading it was sort wire frame. It could support up to like sixteen colors of Aga time too so just starting to transition into something that was Sort of optionally wire frame or you can have some solid colors into it. Yeah that so. I always wonder how much that actually played into. You know I think. All three of us You know we say as far back as we remember we were airplane parts and I mean how your origin stories pretty obvious you know growing up at an airport But I think for my for me that that may definitely be a big part of that. I remember getting My my first flights actually wasn't regular flights him. It was combat flight simulator. And it was like you in Europe. He was European theater. Okay so that was the first one. Just yes he. F S One. Yeah Oh man. That was awesome like I remember. We downloaded that or loaded onto the computer and then a couple of buddies over and like we literally played that until like two in the morning and Just you know you died. It's my turn but What was he was the two guys that were with me? They weren't diehard airplane nuts. They thought this was like totally cool. And nobody had seen anything. Quite like that So it was really kind of interesting way to get someone. Maybe not a history buff. Not a Warburg buff but suddenly you know they were kinda rattling stuff off like oh no man you gotta go with the P fifty one you know and I'm like how you know. How do you know what is it was kind of interesting? Well you know. I think it's you know it confirms what we have said at least in private conversations time and time again that simulators almost any kind like this can. They can teach you know they can. Inspire people didn't get people excited about it. But you know before long. You're you're actually learning

European Theater Microsoft Lockheed Martin Navy IBM Red Baron Europe Engineer AGA
A Close Call

AOPA Never Again

7:27 listening | Last week

A Close Call

"In August. Two Thousand Fifteen Steve Hill. Who had been John? Sharps crew chief and I went to restore the NEMESIS ANNEX T to flying condition. Sharps Reno Racer had been stored in a hangar. At the Mojave California airport that had been damaged holding the annexed t captive until the hangar doors. Were repaired. I was to relocate the annexed t to the Moriarty New Mexico Airport so that sharp could set some world speed records before retiring the aircraft to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. Sharpen his wife Patricia. Designed and built the t around his six foot four frame and the rudder. Pedals were not adjustable even with cushions and bolsters. I was barely able to reach the rudder pedals. I was unable to perform a magneto check as the next. He slowly crept forward. During the run-up this of course was unacceptable. So I taxi back and inform sharp and the crew of my predicament hill. I returned to Moriarty to contemplate plan. B The annex t was subsequently flown to Moriarty where rudder pedal extensions were designed and installed on April twenty-seventh. Twenty seventeen I finally had a chance to fly the annex t since the winds were forecast to increase hill and I met at hills hanger early to get a leg up on the day and give me a chance to see how sharp's racer flew. The annex t has no forward visibility when being taxied so a lipstick camera was located on the right main landing gear in conjunction with a small video screen and the cockpit so the pilot could see ahead hill. Followed me out to runway two six to both assist and observe my flight. As soon as I applied power I was able to raise the tail on directional control was never an issue. I remained on the ground. Perhaps a bit longer than needed which may have been a function of the elevator. Trim position on lift off. The tee seemed very well behaved. I climbed out to the South West in order to get a better feel for how it behaved before returning to land. Although the aircraft was not unruly the air certainly was so I decided to cut the flight short and return to terra. Firma and aircraft incident or accident is almost never just one thing. It is a series of connected dots that when added up can lead to an untenable situation or worse the first dot manifested itself. Unbeknownst to me as I enter the downwind leg it had only been a few days before that I had flown the glider clubs Piper pointy tow plane. When doing so I would fly a close tight traffic pattern in hindsight. I should have flown a pattern commensurate with the speeds. I would be flying the Reno. Racer that is a one hundred fifty miles per hour on final and somewhat faster on downwind and base geared down to in the green and I started working to slow the next T- because my proximity to the final approach was far too close. I banked steeper as I watched myself fly through. Final DOT number two. I must have added a touch of bottom rudder dot number three at that point mortality Hubbard a watchful bird of prey. And the next thing I knew the next departed in a snapple. I would like to claim. It was superior airmanship skill and reflexes. That kept me from dying that day but I know better. My Guardian Angel was watching over me and only by the grace of God that I make the control inputs. That allowed me to recover at about two hundred feet or so Steve Hill was privy to all of the above and this is what he observed. The aircraft disappeared from my view and hearing to the West. After a few minutes I heard the aircraft approaching from the West and her bills radio call of left down wind for runway. Two six with gear. The aircraft appeared to me to be at a normal altitude. But maybe a little too close to the runway by this time the winds on the ground had picked up and we're gusting a little bit. The winds were mostly aligned with the runway but may have had a southern component. My perception was such that. I almost called bill on the radio. Remind Him to maintain one hundred and fifty miles per hour pattern speed. But I did not. I watched the aircraft perform a left turn from down wind base and the bank angle seemed a little steep to me. The aircraft continued at northerly heading with left-wing down at less than five hundred feet. Ag L. suddenly it appeared to snapple. All the way around and recover right I was looking into the morning sun and did not have an ideal view but I believe that the aircraft continued in a roll to the left. The maneuver happened extremely quickly. Literally in the blink of an eye. It happened so quickly that I was at that point. Not sure of what to make of it. All only that I was in a descending attitude on northbound heading and then if I did not initiate a pull up I would be making ground contact with ample speed in hand about one hundred and seventy or so. I started climbing westbound. Turn for an upwind leg while I contemplated my course of action. I reentered the down wind with substantially more distance from the runway. This time the pattern reflected the speed at which I was flying. The Annex T and the turn from base to final was made at a comfortable bank angle and speed once properly stabilized. The T flu like it was on rails. There was a bit of a southwind so I touched down left wing low as I wield the little racer onto the ground. Shortly after securing the aircraft we were in contact with sharp who was gracious enough to forgive me my transgressions and the fact that almost destroyed his wonderful creation. Sharp offer a five page explanation. Absolving me of blame but I knew better. The fault was entirely mine. The takeaways from this incident are many but mostly the recognition of how easily one can allow the deck to be against oneself. It's important to reflect on the various types of risks identifiable acceptable unacceptable and most important on identified remembering that uncertainty is always there hovering over the horizon awaiting the arrival of the unsuspecting pilot. Who has allowed his or her situation awareness to go by the wayside and for identified risk to enter the equation. I've found the episode humbling. A stark reminder of what a lack of attention to detail can lead to reality had returned with soul searing clarity. I had violated a number of tenants. Those irrefutable physics of flight and aerodynamics that cannot be violated and yet I lived to tell the tale

Steve Hill Moriarty Moriarty New Mexico Airport Smithsonian Air And Space Muse Mojave California John Reno Firma Patricia Hubbard
Understanding the Use of Rudders

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

9:00 listening | 6 months ago

Understanding the Use of Rudders

"Aviators. While what an exciting in time it is as we move into the holidays here I just feel I feel so excited about aviation in general and just everything. I've got going on here at the finer points. I don't know if you guys heard the podcast cast last week about the magnetic compass But that was really interesting for me. You know one of the standard procedures. The probably know that I teach our flow checks that start with the magnetic compass and check the heading and you know kind of do that. Lightning bolt flow around the cockpit. Backed up with a climb checklist for climbs or cruise checklist for cruise and descent checklist for descent. So I often get asked the question about the magnetic compass last week we kinda got to that topic and after talking to Peter had a chance to go fly it and sort of pivot the compass around and really tested in climbs or descents. And I've always been teaching thing that procedure Even just for the procedural value itself but it was nice to know that you know once you confirm there is no heading. Change in a steady state. Climb climb or descend most. Compasses are indicating accurate. So interesting stuff. The IBOOK has been updated if you're interested in those standard procedures or other standard standard procedures. pre-takeoff briefings passenger briefings callouts. All of that stuff and why it's important. Please go check out the update to setting the standard available now on on the I tunes bookstore. I guess training is an interesting thing because flying really flying the kind of airplanes we're flying has not changed in the last hundred years right so teaching it is an interesting thing because we've been unsuccessful in a lot of ways over those one hundred years so constantly looking for new ways to talk about things or new ways to label things to prevent certain types of accidents. This is kind of what keeps happening in cycles. Almost every fifteen or twenty years so one of the ways we talk about flying in today's language is about stall speed increasing and bank angles right. We hear that all all the time when you roll into a bank you're stall speed increases and the behavior that I'm seeing manifest out of that can sometimes be really strange. Actually dangerous right. So the stall speed does increase in a bank angle if you hold your altitude if you release stick and and don't allow the airplane to accelerate. It will continue to fly at one G in the stall stall speed will not increase but all this talk about the stall speed increasing in a bank angle has created some strange behaviors For example yesterday I'm out flying with the student. The student you know great I got a certificate a long time ago. Hasn't flown in about eight months and goes to make the first turn in the airplane and sort of push is hard rudder. This is you know once he gets to fifteen degrees of bank yaws the airplane around the turn across controls the ailerons to prevent the overbanking tendency and starts to pull back a little bit. And I've seen this before I've seen it you know. I think it's a result of US talking about the stall speed increasing and bank angles. That students students are so apprehensive about banking the airplane and uncertain about what happens that they they do one of two things they either you know. Push hard rudder in the airplane around around the turn which is bad for holistic reasons? We'll get to in a second and the other thing. They sometimes do is sort of dive just thinking. Well if my stall speed increases and I'm going to roll into a bank bank I better keep ninety or one hundred knots of airspeed on this. Maybe even they're thinking of I don't know if you saw that recent fight chops. Video whiff if Dan Greider talking about minimum. Maneuvering speeds on that that are used sometimes in jets. But you know whatever the reason this is this. This is strange behavior either thing and it's a result of not really being comfortable with the airplanes performance the airplanes capabilities and the performance envelope. So here's at. That moment sounded lake when I was flying yesterday with. Danny you gotTA turn with Bank. You're turning and he got to work on that a little bit talk taught that you're holding rotor boss controlling the term so we got back on the ground and we. We really needed to debrief this. I needed to make sure he understood it. So here's the debriefing. The audio from it exactly as I said it to him. And if you're more of a visual person and you WanNa see this debriefing as I say it The video is available to patrons at Patriotair Dot com slash. Learn T.F. It's important to stay coordinate. And so what. I'm seeing you. You do which I see other people do. This isn't as uncommon as you might think it's usually related to people being a little bit uncomfortable banking steep close to the county but your airplane will hit like a certain banking on like this and instead of continuing to roll into a bank. That would cause you to turn what you're doing is pushing inside rudder. Yeah inside riders swings the outside wing through the the air adding airflow which causes it to over bank and to prevent that. You're cross controlling your kind of turning with your left foot to go and then cross controlling Part of the the problem with that is. You're already Bank of little bit so when you saw your not it just yawns from a level plane. You're yawning toward the ground. So whether you know it or not you're also inadvertently because the the pedal would be causing more ground. So you're cross controlling pulling and pushing inside rudder which is how you spend. Now you're not going slow enough awesome senior not pushing the edge of the envelope that we've made me think. Oh my God we're GonNa Student but fundamentally I just want to make sure your understanding the only reason the rudder is there to roll the airplane into a bank and then you neutralize it and it's the horizontal component of the bank wing. That pulls me through. Yeah I got you so for over one hundred years. We've been trying to explain this concept of how pilots should use rudders and after doing this professionally for twenty twenty years. I struggle sometimes to figure out why this is so difficult and clearly it is because loss of control. Accidents are still the leading cause of fatal accidents. So so how do we teach rudder used properly. I mean really teach it teach it so that it makes an impact. I'm definitely combating the laws of privacy and a lot of students just because it's not taught well in the beginning so it's hard to correct but even with my students the ones that I can take from day one and tell them everything I want them to know. It's still difficult to to get them to actually do it in the airplane in really. Let's think about it. I mean flying the airplane if you keep the unlike the concepts that I'm trying to teach that we're trying to teach that for for a hundred years we've been trying to teach are pretty simple. I mean keep the wing flying. That is air flowing over at sufficient velocities in keep both wings meeting the relative wind at the same time. Basically so so you're coordinated right the same amount of airflow over each wing when you use ailerons to roll roll into the bank which causes airplane at turn when you use ailerons to role in it creates lift on the wrong side right so the adverse aileron yaw would pull you away from the turn. Therefore we have a rudder we use. We need to coordinate. The use of AILERONS and rudder rolling into out of banks so that's one skill so coordinated use Aileron and rudder rolling into and out of banks and I think that's skill by the way deserves a little bit of attention straightaway so going out for multiple lessons just working on slowing the airplane down and working with different role rates. Different air speeds. Making sure that you understand how to do that. How to coordinate ornate effectively the use of Aileron and rudder through various air speeds and then the other thing is managed the Torque of the engine and I am saying Torque of the engine and I know that that we've changed it to left turning tendencies in that there are three of them factor slipstream and and Torque but the language we use to describe what we're trying to teach is incredibly important? That's what that's what we were talking about at the beginning of this podcast and if you go back to the nineteen forty forty seven bucks stick and Rudder by Wolfgang Language. She he talks about Torque Managing Torque. And I like it. I think there's something that immediately connects that concept except to the engine and this is a behavior we're trying to build into a pilot's skill base manage the Torque of the engine managed the left pole of the engine engine. That's the second skill you have to have with rudder now whenever you add power obviously you'll have to manage that torque or left poll of the engine. I'm anytime you're flying. Hang slow or in a climb. You'll also have to manage that. Torture left poll of the engine. So you can separate that into as many left turning tendencies as you want but if it doesn't manifest NFL into a behavior that causes the pilots. Push the right rudder when the power's added then we're still missing a connection

T.F. It United States Peter Patriotair Dot Wolfgang Language Dan Greider NFL Danny One Hundred Years Hundred Years Twenty Twenty Years Fifteen Degrees Eight Months Twenty Years One G
The Downing of PS752

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

8:18 listening | 4 months ago

The Downing of PS752

"Hello and welcome to episode seventy-five seventy five of APP talk. I am passionate here as always with Jason Rabinowitz. Hi Ian. How's your New Year's? Hello Jason the New Year in personally. The New Year is off to a decent start but it has not been a good year so far now. The past two weeks at were recording on January fourteenth. The past two weeks has been a very long year. I'm done I'm happy to be done with twenty twenty already. All right. You're twenty twenty one hour bring it on. None of that's right. That's not how it works now. Okay I think we have to address reality all right. Well then then let us address reality a quick recap up the last two weeks and then we'll take things in order as has it works by piece the time so the year since we last recorded we've had a Falker. One hundred in Kazakhstan briefly left the ground and came back down skit along the side of the runway in impacted. A building thing that led to the first fatal accident of the year then there were missile launches from Iran into Iraq in retaliation for for the US killing in Iranian general that led to changes in. How Airlines were using the Airspace that same night. A Ukraine international airlines seven. Three seven was shot down while departing Tehran by Iranian surface to air missiles. All the while the seven three seven Max Saga continues with the additional release of documents since and messages between seventy seven pilots. That do not paint a pretty picture at all on the stranger side. Confederal state and local officials are hunting mystery drones in Colorado Nebraska and Wyoming and in not quite breaking news but happened happened earlier today. A Delta triple seven dumped fuel in return in preparation for emergency returned to Los Angeles and the Fuel Oh fell on a school playground so we have enough news in the first two weeks of the year to fill many episodes of the podcast. So we will I guess. Just start where. Where do we go from here? I don't WanNa know really do not want to know now. Well fortunately we have a bullet list that we sometimes read off of those. Just go top to bottom there. You go it okay. So on the seventh into the eighth of January January the Iranian military fired missiles towards a base that houses Iraqi at US troops in Iraq so is missiles caused some structural damage. And things like that but but no one was killed as far as is reporting. I I've seen what then happened was a quick succession of no temps issued the the coakley notice to airmen named long before So they kind of the anachronistic title but saying from the FAA saying don't fly over Iraq. Don't fly over. Iran don't fly over the Persian Gulf. And don't play over the Gulf Mont Right which only impacts airlines are based. I believe just based in the US which would impact very few if any fights. It's actually operating in that region right so at the beginning of the night after this happened it looked like there wasn't going to be much impact to who aviation because of this particular kind of retaliatory missile strikes and there were other airlines. That said we're GONNA follow those. It's an not necessarily follow the. FAA's prohibitions but we're we agree with them and we will also not fly over right. I think notably British Airways was one of if not the first I to make a u-turn and find another round right. They were coming up from. I believe it was a flight from one of the British Airways destinations in India back to London and they reached Kuwait to wait and decided that they were going to go through Saudi Arabia and Egypt rather than travel up through Iraq so as the night went on other airlines made made made changes to their flight paths and even earlier in the week. A few airlines had announced that they weren't going to fly over Ronnie in airspace notably Singapore her with announced on the sixth of January before the missile strikes that they would not be flying over around anymore. They moved their flights to the north up to you passing through kind of Azerbaijan and Tajikistan on their way to Singapore from their European destinations and it looked like there would be kind of a headache is for civil aviation concern to you no longer routings. Flights would have to fly around but there there there wouldn't be a huge impact right. This is all things. We've seen before their unfortunate geopolitics are annoying. Sometimes fights have to add had literally on top of already quite long flights. But it's still you work with it right and like we've talked about especially with the Pakistan India Afghanistan Afghanistan airspace closures in early twenty. Nine hundred thousand. These are things that the airlines are closely following. They're planning for. They have contingencies season. Things like that then in the early morning hours in Tehran a Ukrainian international airline seven three seven departed started and about two minutes after departure. We lost the DSP signal and then there started to be reports that the aircraft had crashed right it. I mean when we first started looking at the ads data is pretty clear that something absolutely catastrophic had happened extremely quickly as the data look normal like they were on their regular departure path from the airport like every other time in every other fight before them that day but then the data just is kind of stopped and that's not something you typically see in crashes or incidents like this usually. There's some sort of indication that something is beginning to go wrong. But this this was just a stop of the data. Exactly there was no change in speed or altitude or or anything like that or even heading that would provide an indication that something happened in past incidents in crushes. We've seen you know a dramatic increase in vertical speed negative vertical speed in increasing ground speed at a loss of altitude or some combination of those. Here you're all three receivers that had been receiving data from seven five two stopped in the same second. The data just stopped comic nick and that was an indication that something catastrophic had happened. And we didn't know what yet and so for the past week. A number of organizations have done some incredible reporting in some incredible open source reporting through verifying video and things like that and that led to on the eleventh of January the Iranian government taking responsibility for shooting the aircraft out right and and pretty much watch from the second word had gone out that an aircraft was down the Iranian officials. Were immediately blaming it on mechanical issues of some sort which is impossible to know that early on especially in the complete absence of any transmissions from the flight crew on board that aircraft for obvious. Obvious reasons they didn't make any but that was the initial word out of Iran in that prove obviously to not be the case. Yeah and so the pressure. Her that arose to conduct a proper investigation from Ukraine From elsewhere really kind of drove a A an unrelenting kind of drumbeat of what actually happened

Iraq Iran United States Tehran Ukraine FAA Jason Rabinowitz British Airways Twenty Twenty Kazakhstan Pakistan India Afghanistan Afg Persian Gulf Los Angeles Singapore Falker Colorado Coakley Kuwait
U.S. National Aerobatic Champion Patty Wagstaff Recounts a Cessna 185 Flilght

There I Was...

9:37 listening | 4 months ago

U.S. National Aerobatic Champion Patty Wagstaff Recounts a Cessna 185 Flilght

"Welcome to another edition of there. I was a podcast where we put you in the cockpit with pilots in interesting situations and we learn learn how they flew out of them. I'm your host Richard McFadden today. We're delighted to welcome back our inaugural guest on there was podcast three time. US aerobatic robotic national champion. Paddy waxed how do you thank you for joining us again. And we're delighted to have you back on the podcast ace. Richard is great to be back. You're doing a great Javale this podcast. So I'm thrilled to be back. Thank you well great and thanks to people like you. They're so willing to share your circumstances in your situation with all all of us so that we can learn from you had a recent incident on your birthday of all days and you reached out to us to want to share the story about about what happened in the lessons learned. That came out of that. So do you mind sharing that with us today exactly. Yeah it was. My birthday was nine eleven and it was my birthday so all in all not such a great day. Hi It's it's a tough birthday anymore. It's kind of an emotional day anyway so So this was when my bonanza was wrecked in. Had An accident. Might Bonanza of all things I've never had an airplane accident before I've had a few promptings and things like that that for sure but Alone up to everything that I've never had a real accident and just to back it up very very slightly before I started flying i. I was in an accident in assessment to six in Alaska when I first started flying small airplanes up there. Flying in smaller planes in the airplane had Flipped upside down at the end of the runway. We didn't get off the runway and the pilot didn't use the full length of a muddy runway. And so so on so forth so I had been upside down on the ground in an airplane before you and of course those kinds of things really stick with you and so that actually comes into play in this incident. Yeah and people should know they. Probably don't know you for Bonanza flying but you fly one thousand nine hundred fifty eight K.. Model Bonanza that you have flown for a while now Inbetween your aerobatic events which are not so well for right. It's a great little plane to get around in As he says Kay model It was I bought it in nineteen in two thousand twelve and before that I'd had serious in in barons and this was the first detail that I'd had and I re- I really liked it Great little airplane. It was fast and comfortable double and so we miss it yet now. Is the airplane going to be repairable or might be cutting to the chase hurt. No airplanes total. Sorry now aw it was sixty years old so there was a lot. Got A lot out of it. You know for many years later a lot of people enjoyed it and I understand you were flying with an old friend of mine. China Jeff. Rochelle of former Air Force thunderbird pilot is that right. Yeah exactly. He's one of our instructors in good friend and So you were on different front years I think you were you. Were quite a bit later right and the meaning a much younger than he is. I think. That's okay yeah so He's an instructor in your school down there and Saint Augustine. He as instructs for us both in airbags in an upset that training and he also went with us to Kenya this year to give training to Kenya Wildlife Service. Wow fantastic and so you guys were were you coming back where you out on a training sortie Jordy or can you set the stage where it's what kind of flight was this. Sure so this was a we were at a meeting in Titusville about upset training and the weather is nice. Nice no problems in we as we got on the plane to leave. Jeff said Hey What an I fly and I said well you know it's left seats a little tricky to know plane there some little things things I want to show you? And I said it's it's getting laid out the slide this time next time. I'll put you in the left seat because he hadn't actually flown this airplane before and also there's no brakes on the right. Let's see the rudder pedals but they were stowed. I just didn't want to deal with with all that. And he goes okay so I jumped in the legacy but my seatbelt and and we took off and flew back. Who's better forty minute flight back to Saint Augustine? Yeah so important for people to know that. bonanza in this model of detail. Bonanza it has the throw over yoke doc and it also has the rudder pedals that you can stow so the idea. Was the person in the right seat. If you don't want them to has no ability to control the airplane whatsoever you take the okay the rudder pedals and it's just a nice comfortable seat for them. And that's how you had it configured for this Flight Right Act and I certainly wasn't worried about jeff flying the airplane plane. I just didn't want to have to deal with the checkout. It's got a it's got. These older details have The Piano Keys. And that's what controls the flaps APPs in the gear and the reverse from the newer airplanes so even a highly experienced pilot like jeff need to check out on how that works and it's a little awkward to operate. Operate those from the right seat upshur so till two different airplane for sure these these older planes And you have to be very careful not to go go back muscle memory with a new plan so I jumped in the left seat. We flew back Everything was eventful was nice weather. The traffic pattern was uh-huh nobody in the patrimony. Got Back to Saint Augustine and we were cleared to land landed. I landed a little bit long because my hangers down at the far end of runway. One the three To the South we touched down. The centerline Everything is very relaxed and fine and I was rolling out ahead about half flaps on and we were rolling out. I hadn't applied brakes yet. I was very careful with that airplane. It's an older plane and I never haunt on the brakes or you know applied the milliard sure. Yeah does it. Have the old goodyear breaks or or had it been upgraded to Cleveland Breaks. Has Cleveland breaks but I never want to put a lot of side load on the gear so so so just rolling out and all of a sudden the plane sort of ears right into the grass and jeff and I looked at each other. I grabbed the yoke can pulled it back and looked at. He said it's going into the grass. Like I said. Check the power because I have my hands full holding the outback and he checked the his hand on this model to make sure because it idle and meanwhile I tried to steer it with the brakes or the absurd with the rudder pedals and got nothing. I couldn't move them I thought I was just about to slow down and it hit a berm. The small firm. You wouldn't one of those in the grass that you would know is there and the plane started to go over over and we looked at each other and he said it's going over sh and it did it just went straight over tail over nose and ended up upside down on the graphs. Sounds like it just happened so quickly it was quick and It was really surprising. And just you know I mean you just just you in disbelief for a few moments. Just can't believe this actually happened. That's aviation sometimes right there. You are typical normal landing. Everything's fine then. You're slowing down to exit the runway and next thing you know the airplanes starts veer to the right. You run off the runway. You're upside down in a matter of probably less than a minute or two. When all that happened I don't know it's probably just you know thirty seconds? I'm guessing twenty seconds or something like that and I remember somebody saying to me longtime ago you know when accidents happen. They happen very very quickly. It's not something you can prepare for ahead of time. Yeah of course you can prepare everything you can for the you know the worst but when it actually happens you're not can have time to organize things And so as the plane was in. You guys realize we're going over. Did you have time to do anything. They're canaries for impact. Do anything you just have to brace so couple of things that were interesting won. The seat belts are older and the shoulder shoulder. Harnesses are a later addition to the plane. They didn't come shoulder harnesses in the initially and our shoulder harnesses where the kind of Chris cost kind that weren't on an inertial real. We had been wanting to change it but we had the older kind so that when they were on they were a little tight and it was awkward to reach Ford and Change Few uh uh switch fuel tanks and do some other things so what I normally would do is take off with the shoulder harness on and Then take it off in the air when I get up to altitude so I could switch tanks and things like that and then fly without the shoulder harness and a lot of times I have to say. I didn't put it on for landing. Even though I know a lot of times I did but there were times. I didn't in this case because it was a really short flight from Titusville and I knew I didn't have to switch tanks. Thanks consider some Feel management in these older planes. I left my shoulder harness on which was a little unusual for me if I hadn't left. mysolar harness ars on. I probably would have gotten hurt. And Jeff had a shoulder harness on too so we were really lucky with that so we had our differences on. Were upside down and I looked over and said are you okay and I remember being upside down on that Cessna six in nineteen eighty. Maybe to No earlier than that is probably Nineteen seventy-nine in remembered the pilot saying be careful. Be careful her yourself when you get out because there's been a lot of. I think there's been a lot of injuries for people when they upside down. They rip off their seat building. They hit their head and said okay be careful and I remembered it. So it's amazing. How these things are they stay with

Jeff Saint Augustine Richard Mcfadden Titusville United States Instructor Alaska Paddy Kenya Cleveland Breaks Kenya Wildlife Service Cleveland Rochelle Air Force Ford Chris
For the Pilot's Spouse

AviatorCast: Flight Training

9:03 listening | 4 months ago

For the Pilot's Spouse

"Welcome aviators to another episode of Aviator Peter Cast. My name is Chris. Palmer has my pleasure to have you here. Hope that you are well wherever you're at and you are taking steps forward and aviation to reach your goals thousand dreams and aspirations whatever they are whether that before getting a flying job or just for fun whatever it is now. Today's going to be a little bit different because I am going to speak and want to speak directly to your spouse your significant other year Your girlfriend boyfriend. Whatever your partners okay? Hey those people in your lives that are meant to be supporting you in aviation. This can be a confusing world for them sometimes. 'cause they don't quite understand so I want you to invite them to listen to this. You're welcome to listen with them. They can you can just kinda stand by and auto agreement as I go through some of these things and they can maybe get a little bit more insight into why you want to become a pilot or how and really and how they can support you in doing this so I'm going to paint a picture throughout this on. Why why you want to do this for them? So sparks discussion. Hopefully that the two of you can talk about on on wire wanting to do this in maybe maybe Enlighten them a little bit on this process. So I'm going to try to discipline myself throughout this. I'm going to attempt to speak directly to the spouse okay and I think the most common thing here here is probably a spouse some that married and the most common thing as well is The the mail going through the process us and not the the wife Even husband in some cases. So that's what we're GONNA do so we're going to go through that process us of just simplistically me talking to the spouse and Assuming that the the flyer is a male okay. So there's something we talked about in aviation and it is my controls and I even use this with my wife and And when we are flying an airplane we make sure that someone is flying the airplane at all times and so when someone else wants control they say my controls and then I'll say your controls actually be something out the other set and the says your control so it's a three way process so in other words Mike Controls. I'm taking taking this away from you. Usual podcast listener watcher and is my controls. I'm GONNA be taking the controls here for or the spouse okay and this is going to be exactly for them so all tempt to shape it in that way. This is helpful for you in understanding your your significant other. Okay where you're so in this. podcast cover several topics that Kinda landed on where your loved ones passion for flight. May they come from. 'cause that's what matters the most is. Where is this Dr for flying even coming from sometimes it comes out of the blue it seems like maybe even after after many years of being married and suddenly they're excited about this? Why aviation make complete your loved one in a lot of ways? So that's an interesting thing. Have you know they. They've been incomplete this whole time. But I'll talk about that. It's it's fairly interesting. Some interesting interesting insight. The role of time. This is where a lot of discussions going to come in the role of time money and dedication to becoming a pilot and how you as a spouse can help The truth of aviation safety because I think at the end of the day we want our loved ones to be saved. We wanted to return home. We don't want them to do anything inherently dangerous So the the truth of aviation safety and how directly it is connected to quality training. So we'll talk a lot about that. That's probably GonNa be where spend the meat of the time here. 'cause I got some good questions from you spouses in the community and Where why your role as a supporting loved one will make make or break their dream? And that's kind of a big statement but you really are the catalyst the cornerstone to make this happen or four or break this process so I know that there are many of you out there. That are supporting your spouse. I think you for that. This is something that is very very deep for them deeper than they probably know or have articulated yet in a lot of cases and and I commend you for allowing them to follow their dreams and pursue this. Because I know that that's not always easy to do. I know that for my wife and I don't want to necessarily speak for her but I think that she would find. This accurate is that my wife does so much behind the scenes to support. What I'm doing in aviation that that I can't even begin to thinker? 'cause I could not do what I do with this company with my flying without my wife. You know there are times that she's at home with the babies and I'm out having fun flying and it's my job but I could not do without her so I really appreciate appreciate and honor those of you. That are supporting your spouse's so I wanNA start there in in thanking you for even entertaining this. 'cause I know that it can be a little a bit scary and odd and weird and you're not quite sure where it's coming from and And you know you need a little bit of knowledge to kind of understand. So where does this his passion come from from your loved one Strangely enough it really goes probably deep into the past now. Passion is a word that I use a lot in. I think a lot of people in aviation use it because it's something that we definitely feel with with aviation as one of the best word to explain it and I actually looked at the definition and it said a strong and barely containable emotion and that is definitely true when it comes to aviation shen. It's also hard to define why we are so excited about it but that is that is the passion of aviation we. We really love it. We don't necessarily know why but I want to maybe shed some light on the UAE Possibly this passion is such a thing for your loved one so it probably goes back to an early age in probably a lot earlier than they realize. I've thought of this myself self and where it came from and I'm not sure exactly when it started but I know that when I was a young boy I played outside a lot. is Kinda before the video game era and I got the airplanes flying over my house all the time and it just kind of fascinated me to see the airplanes on the same path every single day one after the other landing at our international airport in always fascinated me. I remember seeing the lights off in the distance lined up to land on the runway at our International National Airport as well and then I really enjoyed at an early age World War Two and the story of Aviation World War Two and and how there's that fight fight of good versus evil and of course you know every young boy seems to like battle and and And those those stories of heroes and things in so I connected with that quite a bit it can also be something that came because of a family connection which is always a very powerful emotional. Oh connection maybe your your loved one had a grandfather A great uncle father would ever be. That was a pilot of some kind and feel like they want to honor that part of of their heritage by becoming a pilot or they feel that it is in their veins and in this actually just came to mind myself but I just realized that my mother reminded me that my grandfather took some flying lessons and back in the fifties and really enjoyed aviation. I don't ever remember talking about that when I was a young boy with my grandfather. He apparently gave it up for a family. But I just you know it can be a deep family connection it can take just one or two flights or or going to the airport and looking through the fence that can connect the child to aviation I also remember when I was about eleven or twelve years old old going on my first small airplane flight with my dad and a colleague of his to go look at some real estate and I remember being the back very cold but I really enjoyed way too

Mike Controls UAE Palmer Peter Cast Chris International National Airport
Invulnerable to Danger - Part 2

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

10:49 listening | 3 months ago

Invulnerable to Danger - Part 2

"Talking about affecting the safety mindset of pilots that appear to feel invulnerable and we were using the Kobe. Bryant crashed the pilot from that crash is a kind of example now. We don't have the final report on that accident yet. But we do have a lot of data and I've had a lot of great conversations and I think I'm finally getting my head around some strategies that we can use to avoid making the same mistakes I mean first of all. Let's just review. There's been a lot of data coming back about the Kobe. Bryant crashed but we're using that pilot as an example because at the end of the day he was flying at about one hundred and sixty knots three hundred feet off the ground in very very marginal conditions and died doing something that kills more pilots than other weather events combined rights lightning icing thunderstorms microbursts wind. Share I mean you name it right all of that in one bucket via far into IMC kills more pilots right. So how did this eight thousand two hundred pilot? Eight thousand two hundred hour pilot not know that right. He must have known that. There's there's no way he didn't know that yet he's still going at that. Speed three hundred feet off the ground in conditions that were extremely marginal and at some point. He realized I can't do this anymore. I'm not I don't have visibility. I'm getting too close to the ground. And he executed an abrupt pull up into the clouds. We don't know why it was so abrupt. We don't know if he was thinking. I'm just GONNA pop up through this layer or or what but you can go to the pilot's. Handbook of Air Nautical Knowledge. Look up the section on spatial disorientation. This is textbook. There's something called elevator allusion when you introduce that upward force. Your tendency is to pitch down and just before the top of the clouds just before the helicopter broke out. That's exactly what happened. It started diving left. Turn and hit a mountain going. Four thousand feet permanent down right so the pilot unless he became incapacitated or had instrument failures. Let's just you know. Let's go with the obvious. Right comes razor. The most obvious answer tends to be the correct one he. He was spatially disoriented which would make a ton of sense because he's doing something that kills more pilots than all other weather events combined and he exposed himself to this elevator illusion. The real question is how did he feel as though this was not a problem for him how did he. Why was he going that fast? And some people say well hey look. There were pressures to fly Kobe Bryant. And Yeah Okay. But it doesn't mean you have to be on one hundred sixty three hundred feet off the ground. I think the behavior of if you watch the flight path and think about the mindset of this pilot. This is somebody who wasn't feeling vulnerable. Maybe right up until the very end. So how do we affect that? A lot of you know my work and I I in my book setting the standard a large part of. What's really become my thesis and Flight? Training is that we need to emulate the commercial operators standardize our behavior around accidents. That have occurred so that. We're modifying behaviors based on accidents. That have occurred whenever possible. We make those procedures redundant and then we force our own compliance But still even even knowing that there's still the right amount of pressure under the rate circumstances at the right time or the right combination of events that will get even the most experienced pilots. You know that to say well just this once. I'm going to. Maybe they even get away with it and it becomes normal right and they normalized this deviant behavior that they didn't even know was deviant because they keep getting away with it. I got some really interesting feedback about how in some other industries like law enforcement for example or construction others unknown concept that with a certain amount of hours or a certain amount of experience you become complacent that experience equals that and then flying we kind of do the opposite. We think more hours is more experienced. The is the safer pilot. And maybe that's true in the in the professional world where you're going back in for recurrent training every six months But maybe not so much in generally vacation one of the people I talked to a gentleman named David Dow. Who's a safety expert for confined spaces particularly in construction? I believe in any case. Consider what he had to say about safety. Classes that were required in the workplace couple hundred fatalities each year and trenches and excavations and confined spaces and was my specialty so to speak a lot of safety classes I met a lot of times with skepticism from participants and they basically had the attitude. If I've been doing this work for years and I've never had a problem So safety really isn't a concern. Just have not had a problem in the past. So why am I here for the safety class? I sometimes joke and think of it like you know. There's an expression that if a company is not growing it's dying. I always say if a pilot's not trying to get better. They're getting worse. And the concept of normalization of deviance is. Maybe you're getting away with things. Maybe the Kobe Brian Pilot had done this fifteen twenty times when the conditions were slightly better and it worked. You know you can kind of falsely. Prove to yourself that what you're doing is safe. So that's when I started thinking about the scared straight program and you know that's the one where they take the problem youth and they put him in jail for the night and they get scared straight in quotes and that led to a very interesting conversation with Greg Patch. All My name is Greg Paddle. I'm the Chief Flight Instructor Gateway Technical College and Kenosha Wisconsin. I think the biggest issue is getting pilots to realize their their own weaknesses or overconfidence. And the the only way to really do that is to put them in a position where they become overconfident or overlook some of their weaknesses and actually make a mistake. And it's trying to find a safe way to do that and there in lies one of the issues. You know the reason. We don't do spins in training anymore because two thirds the accidents. The fatal accidents were happening in training. So how can you safely do this? How can you safely make pilots aware of their vulnerability? Greg uses simulators and actual NTSB accident reports to recreate events that have proven fatal in the real world One of the scenarios we use as a a maintenance flight for an aircraft where it had some work done. Everything's supposed to be good and you know you're flying this airplane back to your home base. what we usually do is We we give the students the scenario. We don't tell them you know what the accident is. What happened we say? Plan the flight you know you might have. Passengers might not how much fuel you bring in. So the first thing they do is they ready. One page Risk Assessment papers and Kinda lay out what they see as possible risk for the flight and what their negation strategies or reduction strategies are for those perceived risks and they may or may not hit the nail on the head with the flight. Sometimes it's something that's completely outside the realm of something they could check on a simulator flight like a maintenance issue Then they will Submit a flight plan and plan for him so we know what their route is. We know what fuel they WANNA take and they may or may not get that out just like an eye for flight plan you might get throughout you file or not. The scenario happens in the simulator. The instructor kind of drive that Whether it'd be an engine failure or Seafood type of scenario where there's controlled flight into terrain and the actual excellent report And depending on how. The students either plan the flight or respond to that. That stressor in this scenario is Is the learning experience so sometimes the flight was off without a hitch minutes because they saw that risk upfront and they were able to apply you know appropriate negation strategies and move through that. And say I'll come and they they get to the end of the scenario and they're like well you know nothing really happened. Well Great. That means you. You had good skills going into that flight. For that scenario that doesn't happen with every scenario One of the scenarios I use is a A flight within Inner Fire and I actually bought a small smoke generator from party city and use that in the simulator to to add that realism. And it's about an hour and a half into the flight so I mean you're in the simulator in an enclosed simulator for an hour and a half after a while. It feels like you're fine an airplane and all of a sudden starts pouring. I had students panic a little bit in the simulator. You know and it. Kinda sounds funny but you know after you're in there for a while you really think that's happening so as realistic as you can. So that it applies to something they'd see in real life to trying to teach them to be more diligent about looking at the day to day flying and and what south or that could be a danger. There is so much good stuff in there and Greg is definitely a man after my own heart. You know I am the guy in the simulator with all the lights off and forcing my student to hold a Red Light. You know and Turning the volume the hominy engine up as loud as I can. And putting on headsets and making fake air traffic control calls mean anything we can do to make it more like the real world and Greg's right after a while that the illusion really does start to get some depth and you start to feel like you're in an airplane even though it's not moving and there's no you know perception emotion. Another amazing thing that they are doing there is having a risk assessment For the flight that they're about to taken. I'm not sure if it was greg with. Somebody got me on instagram and said that that was something their school did as well just to build it in from day. One on any given flight even if I'm going out to the practice area with a student there's a certain amount of risk associated with it and I have certain risk mitigation strategies for me assuming. No one makes any obvious mistakes. I consider the three big risks fire failure and collision on and you know for fire and failure. Outside of structural failure. You practice you know you. Practice communication failure you practice engine failure you practice fire procedures emergency to sense all sorts of stuff like that and for collision. I feel a lot better now. In today's world that were inside of what used to be the mode c ring but now requires a DSP out transponders. So I definitely take advantage of that. I've got the century Receiver always up. I've got four flat on my phone buzzing traffic in my pocket. I've got four fight on my IPAD showing traffic and now we really do have good visibility. So you have a risk mitigation strategy. Even if it's just I'm GONNA look out the window and I think the process of walking through it is what's important and what we want to pass

Kobe Bryant Greg Chief Flight Instructor Gatewa Kobe Brian Pilot IMC Air Nautical Knowledge Greg Paddle Greg Patch David Dow Ntsb Instructor Kenosha Wisconsin
Invulnerable to Danger - Part 1

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

8:14 listening | 4 months ago

Invulnerable to Danger - Part 1

"Welcome back to the points But you know I'll be honest with you guys. It was a heavy week for me. Somebody pointed out to me that I was recording literally last Sunday. When I said it was a rainy Sunday? I'm recording. The podcast lost in space. Ace about spatial disorientation. When the Kobe crash happened that Kobe crash got to me? And I think it got not just because it's such a tragedy raggedy that all of those people died and I for sure you know have felt the sad feelings for Kobe's family and and for everybody that was on the helicopter her all of his friends and spend time thinking about his daughter in their final moments. And all this stuff very very tragic but I think what really kind of broke my heart was it made me feel as though my job was is futile. It made me feel like trying to make a difference for pilots. Honestly like I sat there thinking. Gosh am I just preaching to the choir you know as every single angle person listening to the finer points not the people that actually need to hear the information not just led me down that path of thinking about the fact that an eight thousand two hundred hour our pilot died and took those people with them doing something that kills more people than all other weather phenomena combined and I know that accident. You know the information's not back yet. We don't know exactly what happened and all of that sort of stuff but I think we know enough that we can say it's not auto mechanics. Failure wasn't like the tail separated or anything. I mean all the wreckage came down in one spot and the bottom line is the pilot was operating via far and inadvertently advertently flew into IMC that is called Vr into IMC and it kills more people than all other weather phenomena combined icing thunderstorms Lightening Wins Wind. Shear you name it via far I MC is by far the biggest killer so the thing that got me was. There's there's no way that Kobe's pilot didn't know that eight thousand two hundred. Our helicopter copter. Pilot didn't know that. Of course he knew that the problem says he didn't feel vulnerable to it and that's really the beginning of the work we have to do. That's the real work. We have to do look safety matters to everybody. It really really does if you don't know it We've been here before in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s if you go back and look at the airmen certification statistics for about nineteen eighty or nineteen eighty one. We're back in the early eighties. We had just under under a million pilots. I can't remember the exact number but it's just under a million pilots. That's that's almost four times as many three and a half times as many pilots pilots. We have flying today right. What happened was they were crashing like crazy? The training wasn't good. The procedures weren't good people were crashing and people bulwer suing each other and suing. The manufacturer is not just of the airplanes but everything the radios the the propellers met a guy in one of my fight instructor renewal. We'll classes that was brought into a lawsuit because his student his former student had purchased a baron and ended up committing suicide in the baron and and it was about one hundred million dollar lawsuit. Everybody everybody who made anything that went into the plane got sued and this. CFI's telling me he got roped into the lawsuit because he did not specifically enter a training record for specifically teaching this guy how to not kill himself honest to God this is why he was brought into the suit so he tells me. This is the kind of shenanigans that shut the whole industry down. Sassen said we're out everyone said we're out. And why would you stay right so Cessna. What was the year eighty? Eighty eight eighty nine eighty seven. Something they stopped making airplanes. They said we're done. We can't handle this liability. And you know what happened. Those million pilots just shrunk down to about two hundred hundred thousand pilots just took the head right off the industry because of safety. Mind you this isn't you can argue all you want about frivolous lawsuits and this. That the the other thing and that's a whole different podcast. But the bottom line is if people aren't crashing. People aren't getting sued so until in nineteen ninety four senator from Kansas got the Clinton administration to the past the General Aviation Revitalization Act which limited the liability of aircraft manufacturers and Lo and behold nineteen ninety. Seven says the stars making plans again. I'm that is the beginning of our of our modern story in my opinion Over the last thirty whatever years twenty five years. We've been working to repair repair the damage that has been done and we have been growing and we're finally starting to see pilot numbers growing over the last three to four years. You know more student pilot certificates being being issued more people coming into the industry. I can even see it literally. When I'm out and mid morning on a Thursday I looked down at at my ads? Traffic and I can see how many planes are out there practicing acting approaches. And doing other things you know in the middle of the week so I can see how many people are flying. The only thing that will prevent us from reaching a new you golden age and aviation reaching a million pilots again is if we continue to crash airplanes so it was heartbreaking to see somebody experienced somebody who knew better and somebody who so high profile die doing something that kills so many pilots. How do we affect that person? How can we change the safety mindset of somebody who feels invulnerable to danger and I'm saying it a bit like a rhetorical question because I do consider consider this my mission in my career? If there's one thing I can do I don't mean I wanna be a great CEO. Fine I want to provide training materials for everybody A Pin that that I definitely want on my vast is I helped develop ways to influence people that might not have seen the danger for themselves right that might be a little cavalier. That there's an old saying in flying. You can't teach judgment. I defy that I want to buy that. So let's talk about it a little bit This is where I mean. This is what my book is all about. The professionals have done this better than anybody. They've developed black and white personal minimums right. We've you've heard me talk about that. That is certainly one strategy writing those minimums down And committing to them as something that I'm currently trying to work on. I do understand that that is. We're we're the evolution of this process is headed for me. Another thing is helping pilots be aware of what's going on out there and nobody does a better job than the Air Safety Institute with accident accident recap videos and those are so accessible now on youtube if you're A CF. I make sure your students are watching a good healthy dose of those throughout training. Make sure they're burning into their memory Marie. Some of these accidents stories that are in your opinion anyway critical. There are so many stories in my mind that every now and again I find myself in a flying flying situation and I think oh Jeez this is a little bit like that story from an I can break the accident chain right then and there on the other thing is if you're a CF. I make sure you're teaching the hazardous sir attitudes as not like individual people Initiative just blown them off either. You're you're teaching. Your students that hazardous attitudes exist in all of us and this pilot who was out there flying with Kobe was exhibiting invulnerability is the specific hazardous attitude attitude. That he was he felt invulnerable obviously And if we learn to recognize them you know it's not like he was a horrible pilot. Maybe he didn't even find that way all the time. Maybe he got into a conversation with them at lunch. Would you know let you into his thinking. And you think Oh this guy's wise and he make smart decisions or whatever but at the at the end of the day. He's involved in an operation where his invulnerability killed. Everybody is feeling of unknown on vulnerability did but so make sure. You're teaching your students to watch out for those hazardous attitudes because I think if we externalize them and think of them as all that Macho guy from the flying club. I'm not going to be like him right if we if if we put it off onto somebody else then we won't notice it when it starts to appear in our in US right so those hazardous attitudes are quite critical bill.

Kobe People Initiative Cessna Sassen United States CFI Kansas Instructor LO Youtube CEO Air Safety Institute Senator Marie Clinton
Zero-Zero Landings

Uncontrolled Airspace: General Aviation Podcast

8:05 listening | Last month

Zero-Zero Landings

"You see this video? So this video of zero zero landing holy Moly so it says a twitter video on twitter out the front window of presumably an airliner or some sort doesn't make three twenty. Thank you because I didn't read it. I just looked at the pretty pictures and I was actually somewhat riveted by these pictures. Because it's like a fifty five second video. The I forty five seconds of which just shows you clouds Alexandra visibility out the front window of the airliner and then like last ten or fifteen seconds. You suddenly see the runway and I mean they're they're basically on basically in the flare when you can. I see the runway out the out the front window and and to their credit they're totally on the centerline. Good job I guess but It's all automation I. It's it's all something because they I'm watching this thing. If I'm I'm the pilot in this airplane and I suppose if I was the pilot airplane I'd have a lot more experience than I do now but if I was in the pilot of the airplane the experience I have now. I'd be staring out the window looking for trees. Holy Crap this going to peer. I don't know what's going on here. runway okay. They really do this. Apparently you guys know. I mean I can't tell from here. What kind of a cert? Yeah that is it. It could well be kept three. I don't know okay. I've heard that term before. I don't exactly know what cat three zero zero cats to is. I think fifty feet hundred feet something like that cat. Three cat three or whatever it's called is zero zero Now is I understand it. all Airbuses at all Boeing's manufactured recently and I'm putting recently and finger quotes have the capability to do that presuming. Everything is is present and working There's I'm sure there's a minimum equipment list for for these operations but you also have to be trained crew has to be trained and has to be current in the operation reform. All this I hope yeah I hope so. There's probably some other restrictions about which I know nothing now I mean. Does this happen very often happens more often than you think. Well okay so let me let me be. I would notice this if I was on one of the airliners. I was traveling on. And as people know I've fair. More than average travel on a lot of airliners and when we're doing our our arrival through the clouds I'm looking out the window looking for the ground. All right I mean. Forget straight ahead. I'm just looking straight down. Which is a different kind of visibility? I admit but I'm looking to when we break out of the clouds and I'm not a real comfortable camper so to speak comfortable airline passenger Until I can see the ground out my out my window and I would it so the point of this story being I would have noticed if we landed on that kind of a circumstance because it would have freaked me out. I I'm trying to think and I am not as many as you jack but I you know I've been on a few airliners in the last couple of years I don't recall are certainly recall. Some some approaches in some classes. But I don't recall anything like this. Yeah that's I mean just to give give listeners. A context here when they can actually see the runway surface. Even even after they've touchdown and you can kind of sense from from the I actually didn't listen to the audio very carefully if there even is audio but you can kinda sense from the motion of the video. When the gear touches down you can kind of say okay touchdown so the rolling out there rolling out and they still can only see like a stripe and a half ahead on the runway and those strikes are standardized distances right. Yeah Okay so you can see a stripe and then half the gap between stripe but even if you can see the neck to head to the extreme. That's four hundred feet visibility. I mean it's like yeah I mean Holy. Moly the other thing too is. You're only looking at the windshield very very narrow view We don't know what they could see by looking out to decide okay true. It's possible down. Not that that matters because in my airplane for example it's one and I have to see something of the runway environment before I could land out of that approach With these kinds of of approaches the three as whatever You don't need to see that you only need The working equipment and the certifications cat cat to is again either fifty or one hundred feet and you still need. I think to see something other runway environment before you can land Yeah David what's your take on this whole thing? Well I been in a jump seat when we did a cat to level landing Years Ago I think it was a hundred feet was what we had. And it's for me. It was a new thing and it made me tense The flight crew and they were everyday business with them You know just another aisle less except they could go down to one hundred feet two hundred feet of which point they head to see the runway environment or go around and I've heard stories of people in Lighting G. A. Aircraft Part. Twenty-three stuff that we fly out on ninety one flight. That is not for hire who have a landed in well whether it was zero. Zero or fifty. Eight of a mile was the subject of very boisterous argument with the people on the ground. But I watched this guy come in when everybody else had gone missed and gone to a different airport i. I'm not sure that I'm not sure that you're GONNA get my Kahane's down that level may maybe with a little more experience with the L. P. V. Approaches because I've noticed in having both an an IRA less active at the same time that the is far more stable and easy to use and the IRS. Which would have a little zig zag and a little up and down depending on the terrain as you're leading into the runway expand that acronym for me l. p. l. what'd you say. L. P. Young. That's sorry trick question. Well lateral lateral precision with vertical guidance and that. Lbj got it okay yeah just OPB. And that's the WAAS. Gps equivalent to an irs and some l. p. v. approaches in fact have the same minimum. I

Twitter IRS Airbuses LBJ L. P. Young Jack Boeing Kahane David
Why Was Embraer Left at the Altar?

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

6:28 listening | 3 weeks ago

Why Was Embraer Left at the Altar?

"The collapse of Boeing's four point two billion dollar deal to acquire an eighty percent state in Embraer's commercial aviation operations has sent a jolt through an already grilling industry here to talk about it. Our Aviation Week Editors Jens float out and Michael Bruno Aviation. Week guest columnist. Richard Offiah of the Children Mike. Let's start with you. Of what the heck happened. Boeing kept saying this deal is on on on Sundays off. Yeah and that remains the four point. Two billion dollar question is what exactly happened. we can all surmise as to what might happen but You know to give their you. GotTa review the chronology of events so Let me take you back to December. Twenty Seventeen When word leaks out through the press certain with Wall Street Journal that Boeing might be looking at buying embryonic or at least some part of it. We really were quite sure at the time. But there was big news. Leaking rumors going around and that was not necessarily to be unexpected. Since Airbus did Secured Lombardi the series from Bombarded and so You know it was Slightly expected them. At least the two sides were exploring this. By the summer of two thousand eighteen they reach him memorandum of Understanding over the terms of the agreement that was originally going to be more. Expensive deal for Boeing. Perhaps as much as four point six billion dollars but the price eventually get ratcheted down to four point two by the end of twenty eighteen and then they were among the formal path of trying to get this acquisition approved by everybody. When I say everybody I mean just about everybody had to approve this deal one way or another whether it was regulators in the United States in Europe in Brazil. Of course you might imagine that There was a lot of resistance to giving over the crown jewel of the aerospace industrial marketplace in in Brazil to a foreign owner particularly in the United States and so that had to go on political lines of judicial lines. There were a lot of lawsuits than etiquette resolved. Finally we're getting to the point where it was Pretty much just a matter of when not if this was going to happen. And then all of a sudden the EU regulators Decided to push back their approval of the steel and that sturdy to open up questions as to whether this deal would actually take place and even as that was happening through the latter half of last year both sides on the industrial point. Emberg Boeing. Were saying that they were pretty sure. This thing was gonna get approved any day now by the EU the last regulators to approve it and that basically they were ready to sign the paper and call it quits and move on as a single company and then. Kobe nineteen happened. Of course amd we can go off on a tangent of of how the sense. Some pretty much collapsed. The air traffic industry as we know in bringing down the manufacturers to a related degree but luxury short four point. Two billion dollars that Boeing doesn't spend is really for point two billion dollars naked really really us better somewhere else and while we don't know exactly what the terms were. That couldn't be agreed to in the end just last weekend. On April twenty fifth Boeing announced that it was walking away from the deal embry ourselves. That was a mistake in that they were going to pursue alternatives to try to perhaps force bowing to Back to the deal or try to pay some kind of compensation for it and that's where we are. Now there's there's no deal there's only m recriminations and accusations and we'll see what happens next Richard. I'd love to hear what you think about what might have happened and also wrote in your column about winners and losers from the deals collapsed. You WanNa tell us what you wrote. Yeah you know. I think there are four principles involved here and obviously what's Embraer's lost as Airbus's gain and to a lesser extent Mitsubishi? But basically the name of the game see get. Embraer's costs down in line with the larger. Oem's and the way to do that. Of course is what the kind of aggressive by Jane Management? That only a big company like Boeing. Or Airbus can do. That's what made the series a success as the twenty in Airbus's ends. That's what I think would have really helped each series. Allot in billings hands. Embraer doesn't get that benefit and they're up against somebody Airbus that does have that benefit so there's a pretty clear loser a pretty clear winner sort of tangential winners Mitsubishi. That I think really did not relish the thought of having to compete at the regional level with Boeing backed product. That would have been really painful. And now it's going to be more of appeared. Appear to small air framers going head to head sort of situation So the big question is is Boeing. A winner or a loser. I'm the one level exactly as Michael said you know. This is four point. One billion or so that's been added to their rather beleaguered balance sheet. That's not a bad thing And there's also a little bit of additional political risk in Brazil these days that they're avoiding Whatever management challenges associated with bringing this unit online? That's avoided too but on the loss level you know. They're kind of being boxed in by Airbus on the single-aisle front the 737 Max aid is doing fine. When it comes back to service but against the eighty three twenty one neo at the top of that single market. They're losing very badly and now they have exactly nothing to respond to the bottom of the single end morale market to at the twenty level so basically boy is fast becoming a niche company in the single market arena. That's not a good thing and of course the idea of joint venture with the Casey's re ninety might have had some promise in terms of selling into the US dod market depending upon. Who you believe that joint venture to might be at risk because of the fallout acrimony associated with the end of the jetliner. Jv So it's kind of a mixed bag One you know significant loser. That hopefully can recover two winners. Airbus and Mitsubishi and expect for Boeing.

Boeing Airbus Embraer Mitsubishi EU United States Brazil Richard Offiah Michael Bruno Aviation Wall Street Journal Jens AMD Europe Kobe Casey Jane Management OEM
Fleet retirements spreading far and wide

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

10:07 listening | 2 weeks ago

Fleet retirements spreading far and wide

"Some things are happening a lot of great things. Unfortunately we continue with the theme such as it is in our corn teen state so phase. One of all of this was figuring out what the hell was going on that lasted. I think I WANNA say early. To mid March into April. It was back when we still had a chance of tracking what the Hell is going right. And then April turned into service reductions or finalizing service reductions making them more less ad hoc hall say and figuring out how airlines. We're going to operate in this new environment and then dealing with how to do. We continue to operate these cities. Do we continue to operate these aircraft and things like that and now that airlines have had some time near on two months to SESA situation a lot of airlines have started saying aircraft that where on the way out that we were considering possibly not having flypast date are gone? And the latest. Today is the Virgin. Atlantic fleet is shrinking measurably as the seven. Four seven are gone. They will not fly again. They're parked and they will not be returning and actually that is a bit more than just a seven four Sevens Virgin Atlantic is in dire straits at this point and they have withdrawn from London Gatwick Airport entirely at this point. It will keep the thoughts in hope that when demand picks back up it will resume flights at Gatwick. But who knows when that is? It may or May Not Happen Virgin Atlantic may or may not be airline in a year. I hope it is but we shall see but for now any of those fights that still operate will be operated out of Heathrow instead of Gatwick and don't be a I believe the other day is also said they're axing service from Gatwick so Gatwick not looking too good right now. Is it no? It's not an version saying they'll keep the slots is dependent on whether or not they're allowed to keep those slots so I think that'll be something interesting to watch whether or not that puts be a in a position to maybe get a better deal out of it or if anyone else wants to met jet blue once upon a time would have paid a princely sum for those thoughts but M- assuming those transatlantic desires are no more but we will see in at the same time virgin reaffirmed that it will be retiring. It's eight hundred thirty two hundred that I believe it acquired from the demise of Air Berlin in twenty twenty two as planned. So that's what a ten eleven aircraft headed out. Sizeable Chunk never small fleet and seven immediately. So that's pretty a pretty big drop off and then there's what happened at American. Were pretty much. If it was an older aircraft is grounded indefinitely and permanently retired. Gone are the seven. Six Sevens gone are the seven five seven. Jason I are actually looking into purchasing one. Beer can go on exactly gone. Are the nineties and gone are the CR J two hundreds operated by PSA? So that's another sizable chunk. Yeah none of. This is particularly surprising. The seven six seven fives and Iwo Ninety S. We're all slated to be retired sooner rather than later within the next year or two. Actually I believe we're missing the eighth HR thirty three hundred from this lists. Yes let's see. I wanted to be missing one and we'd get yelled at if we forgot it. So it's seven seven seven five seventy one ninety eighth three thirty three hundred not the two hundred and the CR J two hundred so those were all especially the ninety s and eighty three threes. Those were rumored for years now to be retired but now we finally know for sure those will be parked and almost certainly will not fly again as passenger aircraft. I would say the very good chance. Seven six get a new lease on life as freighters the seven. Fives have no idea. The nineties are interesting. They weren't that but American. Just had no place in. Its fleet for them. So what might happen to though? I do not know some. You went ninety S. The nineties are far too young to join the Pech mortar fleet. I mean we don't really look at anything beyond debates at this point. I look forward to the introduction of this seven to seventy or fleet one day one day. We'll get there. Were still a four engined for all as I like to say interesting so yeah American also recently last year. If you listened to the podcast you know that they retired the the mad dog the eighties with a huge amount of fanfare out in. Roswell these aircraft will not be getting such a party or celebratory retirement. Unfortunately the the tone this year is a bit different Disney it. It's a single line in a press release is what it is and maybe that's okay these days. I don't know there will be no party. Just a somber press release. Meanwhile north of the border up in Canada Eric Cannata will be retiring. Seventy nine aircraft including the seven six seven eight three nine thousand nine hundred and the e one ninety all of which are out. Oh no fleet immediately. Love No love for the ninety. Well no I don't know if the seven six seven in the eighth nineteen out in Malibu just ninety out immediately yours is unclear to me is being reduced anyway and yeah but this is particularly interesting because the seven six seven is rouges. Only wide-body aircraft rouges Air Canada's low costs unit so this affects rouge pretty hard. The bulk of its fleet is eight hundred. Nine thousand nine hundred seven six seven. They also have some three thousand three twenty ones but this will leave. Air Canada without a wide body fleet to operates mid haul and long haul flights especially transatlantic. So I don't know what happens to rouge in the future. Does it limit to just North American flights and the Caribbean? Or what? Well I think two things one. I'm not sure that the seven six seven hundred nineteen phase out effects rouge entirely. Oh it does that. It's that literally. Okay if you add the numbers up it is every facet. Every three nineteen equals Air Canada. Plus ruse got it so in that case. Here's what I say to you. Air Canada said that they're going into hibernation mode for three years. I mean they've been not terribly optimistic. Run off with. I mean but I think it's going to serve him. Well I really do. I think it's going to serve them. Well they're coming out with their. I forget what they branded it but cleaning promise and how they're sanitizing the yeah. Yeah and so. I think that in these times perhaps pessimism is warranted. If not only because it's probably a more accurate sentiment but I think that it sets you up for being pleasantly so I would much rather be pleasantly surprised that I have to bring more planes back from the desert than I didn't put enough planes into the desert and now I'm a very curious position. Yeah we'll see what happens. Nobody knows every crystal ball is pretty fuzzy at this point. I mean I think at this point that have all been taken smashed on the floor. I think they're parked out in the bone yard parked at crystal balls out in the desert. A boy anyway in the rundown fleet retirements sustained north. Yeah this is not a huge surprise. Alaska Airlines has decided it will not bring back the eight nine teens. It acquired from Virgin America which it never really wanted in the first place. They never refurbish those aircraft. They were actually still sporting the Virgin America Interior. Those are parked and will not be fine under the brand ever again. Hopefully somebody picks those up one day someone will perhaps explain to me and we can do this on the podcast. Or if anyone just wants to write an email to podcasts two four dot com I will spring for a meal or something if anyone can convincingly explain to me why Alaska Bought Virgin to screw jet blue route network. I mean that just enough reason. It was a fleet. It didn't want interior product. It did not want employees did not want really just wanted to make sure jet blue did not get all of the above guy. Yes so yeah. That's the three hundred are gone but that was probably going to happen regardless and then last but not least I think gun laws. Were missing anything right now. In the last two weeks Qantas Seven. Four seven will not be returning to the skies nor will some of the eight hundred eighty s probably. Maybe they've stopped the refurbishment process on the a three eighty. So there were six done and six to go. They've parked a few the a three eighty S. And so how many of those come back and when nobody knows nope but the seven four seven are in fact done for. That was rumored to be happening when they did there. I think the fly by on their last commercial flight with it that actually had passengers but it will not be coming back so and those were the special seven four seven. Four hundred ers were unique to Qantas. Yeah I mean. None of this is surprising. No but that also means that's the end of an aircraft type. Yeah worlds ahead and thought about it. Take that so. That's the first. It's not just Qantas grounding the seven four seven four hundred. Er they were the only airline that ever had that. So unless some other airline that Baltia maybe picks up four hundred Er. That's it that Avatar Avatar hats right. So I'M GONNA go.

Air Canada Gatwick London Gatwick Airport Qantas Virgin America PSA Alaska Airlines Canada Virgin America Interior Air Berlin Disney Alaska Caribbean Jason Roswell Malibu Eric Cannata
International Fighter Competitions

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

6:37 listening | 2 weeks ago

International Fighter Competitions

"We're here to talk about. International fighter competitions and went to a presentation by till group analysts. Richard Lafia way back in January. Seems like another time but he talked about how this year in particular when it comes to aviation across all sectors. The fighter market is the hottest one going Tony. You recently wrote in Aviation Week of how the German fighter competition which is extraordinarily interesting right now and getting complicated by the industrial base implosion caused by Kovin. Why don't you tee up? The situation. What Germany has seemingly decided where that might be headed hodge of high listeners? I Yeah No. It's really a intriguing situation. So the whole German watch procurement has been complicated by its continuing interest in providing deterrence capability. Tonight so couple of years ago Jim. Nfl's chief said we won't buy the F. Eddie five the French came on and said if you pursue a thirty five by we're going to kick you out the future Combat Air System so the Germans are sort of panicked. They got rid of the thirty five out the shortlist and then basically cut their list down to Eurofighter and the F eighteen Super Hornet and then last week the German Defence Minister. A K K issues known announced that she was proposing a by. All of Typhoon Eurofighters call him in Germany and the Super Hornet and several growlers principle being that the Super Hornets provide that jewell capable aircraft. That would drop the Nuke Eurofighters would do the rest of the work to replace the Tornado. Tornado is currently the only European aircraft a European built aircraft. That can drop the be sixty one this the jewel weapon that's in several NATO bases across Europe so Jimmy wants to replace the Tornado. We've both the Super Hornet and the Eurofighter. But it's created a political storm. There's now talk about Germany's future as a nuclear deterrent nation. And this is sort of push to try and make this decision will push this decision making for this at back into tour. Twenty twenty two twenty twenty three. So it's a it's a bit of a mess for Jimmy. Which way do you think it's going to go? Do you think they'll stay on their current track or will the German government be swayed by Airbus's argument that its industrial base will be irreparably harmed by the purchase of American fighters of US would not particularly impressed? They call this a compromise to fall on it. Would irreparably damage the gym. Defense Industry Knife propose a compromise deal where all the typhoons would be contracted this year. The only way they feel that they can go on I think given how controversial the Super Hornet buyers and ongoing participation in the NATO deterrent. I think it's going to be a real difficult issue for the next election. I think it'd be a real discussion point for Germany country. That doesn't really like spending on. New Equipment is hard see. Also the Super Hornet being a effective deterrents carrying platform in the twenties thirties and forties. When when it will be in service I think a lot of nations will be questioning. Germany's judy to this mission. In the coming is Steve. Did you have something to add to that? While it just like. Tony said a couple years ago that move by France and Airbus really to exclude the F. Thirty five from this competition. I mean that's that's really where this comes in. Because the F thirty five is being primed as the US and European dual-capable capable aircraft in the US has started the integration process for the B. Sixty one Dash twelve the latest version with the improved tail kit with improve navigation and guidance for this nuclear bomb that should be delivered in the end service. Data's in twenty twenty five a got several of the European forces that are participating in that mission are using that aircraft For that purpose. Obviously it's got some of the Elo characteristics and strike characteristics that you that you'd want for delivering nuclear ordinance in if that ever comes to be an even as a deterrent. It's it's very effective so I mean that that is the the big issue now of course neither a typhoon or the Super Hornet or qualified today to carry the B. Sixty one you know so that would be required for there. Be An integration required. A process from car for both of them. Of course Boeing can point to the fact that the original F. Eighteen Hornet was qualified to carry the B sixty one. Fatf is you know a substantial modification of their aircraft. But they're familiar with the process that it would be something you'd have to add completely new to the typhoon platform. I wanted to swing over to Finland. Tony you've been tracking the Finnish fighter competition. They spent the early part of this year testing the various contenders for that. How long is that competition going to take to unfold? And which way do they seem to be leaning at this point if only it was as predictable as trying to figure out way they were leaning. Finland's processes quite different to the every other fighter competition. I've seen covered in the last few years since have been aviation week when he's gone is is a process where there's no comparisons are made between the aircraft. They test them. Although then simulate the aspects that they have been able to evaluate verify and then they'll put that into a war game at the end of this year and that will be the deciding factor in which platform. They will go ahead and choose and that decision will come in. In twenty twenty one so got the five main Western fighter jet to Typhoon Griffin Rafael Super Hornet and the thirty five. Thirty five is probably likely to be the one to be after all. It has virtually been successful in every fighter contest. It's taking part in with the exception of Germany as we just talked about the challenge. Here is that. Finland is a non-aligned country. Radio it's not a NATO country the tiny laundry with the European Union and it has very different needs very different needs and maybe some of the aspects of the F thirty five such systems alias warehousing of parts true wider distribution system that would be more. Nato designed rather than for a neutral country may not fit some of those needs plus it has very expensive infrastructure and so on so yet. The next few months could be very interesting. You point out in January and February. They tested all five craft in the country. It's going to be a very interesting

Germany Hornets Finland Tony Nato United States Airbus Jimmy Typhoon Eurofighters Eurofighter F. Thirty Richard Lafia European Union Fatf Europe Boeing JIM NFL F. Eddie
Tough Airports with Pilot to Pilot

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

6:11 listening | 3 weeks ago

Tough Airports with Pilot to Pilot

"I'm GonNa Bring Justin. See here he comes. Hey there's my man has then. Are you actually looking up at four flight up with my computer? And I was looking up bested when you're talking about it because I know seen it before in my mind is not like I don't even know if I WANNA fly. They're like Oh yeah. You know it's funny. Some sometimes that stuff's really intimidating but the rules you have to follow making for example. If you're coming down through Elgin and Valparaiso there I think it looks. I mean obviously be having to talk to their tower Roy. Once you're talking to their tower than your you know everything's Kinda worked out for you with the floor capabilities. File Easier that's funny. I was going to ask you about that because you're flying into so many different types of sorts. That's pretty much what you guys do. All the time right. It's just file a far. Yeah we will most are flights Are we can't take off the far far up in the air but we like to keep it many times. It's awesome just because it does help the have. Atc talking to you. We're GONNA get a busy airports. I never even expected to be really busy. There's one in Minnesota really crazy student training area. And there's like six or one seventy two pattern at a time mixing via far in just the Afar general. It can be a lot safer going I- Afar when you have the opportunity to do so. Yeah I totally see that Aspen. Airport there any over. It's like that that you guys going to where your company says we're GonNa have to do extra work with you guys or you have to fly in their inexperienced captain. I or something like that. We do similar trading on ask than we have a whole like Aspen lesson where we have to to land at Aspen. Show that we can do that. Another one's called Ocean research is a private airport down in Florida. And it's a really skinny and kind of severi interesting airport which we have to get checked out in the simulator. I I think we have to do it. Every every couple of years just to get retrained because our wings actually hangover the hedges when we go into land so it's very interesting but it's a very popular destination. While can you say just briefly? What's so challenging about aspirin? I that's SORTA aspirins just very interesting place. I mean if you even just look up the approach tar and you can see the glide. Slope like seven degrees. Maybe maybe it will literally feeling like you're going straight down at catch it. The site pictures just so messed up and then you have like a mountain right here. Airports a little bit farther forward. You can't get the glide slope warning fear when you come here I. It's hard for me to really explain it unless you're going. There are other chart in front of me. But it's there's a lot going on at Aston you gotTa be under your pointed down so far that you're speaking to come even if you have the Steve Breaks out so it's a very interesting airport for sure. Yeah that's wild. I mean we flew in there all the time in one. Eighty Two's mountain checkouts in Eagle Aspen than through loveland. Pass out toward lead though and all that now one eighty two. It's not a huge big deal. It's totally different. When you've got a jet can handle up pretty well so it's not too big of a deal but it definitely interesting. We don't take it down to the purchase so that we have the the airport site at a certain fixed remember. Stop ahead now. But we have special charts going in there and then. There's some other mountain airports where we don't need to be checked out in but we have a special area in our. Aol were read up about it before released before we go so we know the challenges that airport could cost. That's interesting I think. The last accident I remember at Aspen was a challenger from that mistake and landed with a tail rent. That's yeah that's very commonly. I WANNA say they landed on the taxiway almost other grass remember astronaut now or another airport. Another airport was. They didn't know that the runway was just pay. They thought the runway was covered in snow so they saw a freshly paved runway but their mind. They thought that it was supposed to be snow-covered sir. Lynden to the right or to the left of the runway landed on grass. Wow that's so fascinating that you just said that because somebody else I think it was. Brian Shift pigmy the other day he was doing lecture for Nasty. Just wanted to know if I thought about something. He was calling expectation bias in training right and I didn't really know any man I was like. What do you mean by expectation bias? And then he told me a little more it was basically what you just described. It's like how do you deal with when your mind is set on seeing one thing? That's what you're expecting. And then something different is happening and to be honest. I don't see it very much in training but what you just described was perfect. Exactly what the talk about do you guys talk about that at all in your training that specific conflict We'll make a big deal about going over all the threats that could be going on so as soon as we brief all the threats. We kinda talk about all the threats. This threat might be kind of one that comes up on the fly. But if there's ever a moment where you feel any kind of confusion or you feel any dow it's like immediately go around this. Go take off. We'll talk about last hour. The runways taped or not paved or regain rebrith. We WanNA do. We can go somewhere else. We can talk about some things especially to ask them because the weather changes so often. We have a very strict kaylynn limit were. Some operators may be part ninety one. Maybe they don't relate abide by that but we do not go in there with a win more than two not talented. So if we're coming down on finally tell us that the tailwinds do high will do out and go around and go somewhere else. So it's definitely safety. And you always going to err on the side of safety so one person was real comfortable. You go out now. That's awesome and there's two things that you just said that I always hammer on my students about so I just have to act on. One wasn't aboard point where you're talking about having a certain way point if you're not on glide path through or whatever then it's just an automatic and the other is that a superior if it's eleven knots. Tailwind you're out you don't think about it. It's not ten anymore. It's eleven soared on once really good. That's good stuff. I feel like so many of those things that we can cement those for GE pilots. You know there was a guy that flew into Palo. Alto in a mean. I don't know if you've ever flown a Moonie but it's like doesn't want to stop flying. I mean not only. Is the wing like six inches off the ground at slamming her flow. It won't quit and twice in my career I've seen people come in and Mooney's and just go around late in one case and hit the trees on in this last case Palo Alto literally just floated till he went right off the end of the runway and that was a fatal accident. You know people say like what would happen. How could he avoid it? I mean abort point in any airplane is a great idea right. No absolutely and it's something that like you said when you drill down and generally aviation to create that kind of mindset. You always think that it's not going to happen to you but it can happen to you. You're gonNA find yourself in this situation. You don't feel comfortable. Then you gotta go around just like no if saying like you can't succumb to that mindset

Aspen Afar Elgin Eagle Aspen Moonie Valparaiso Lynden Aspirin Palo Alto Minnesota Ocean Research Aston Mooney Brian Shift AOL Palo Florida Steve Loveland
Maj. John Rain Waters: F16 Deployed & Demo Pilot, USAF Instructor, and 777 Pilot

AviatorCast: Flight Training

5:41 listening | Last month

Maj. John Rain Waters: F16 Deployed & Demo Pilot, USAF Instructor, and 777 Pilot

"Give us a little bit of background just like a quick elevator. Pitch on John. What what have you been known for? What are you doing now? Yeah so I started flying in high school. Got The bug hooked and I wanted to go sir. By countries so best of both worlds is able to go fly in the Air Force has been twelve years flying air force mix from being a t six instructor pilot flying that sixteen and eventually the being. F16 DEMO pilot edges recently transitioned into airlines flying. A triple seven right now. Right on very cool. So let's start at the beginning then so you started flying in highschool tells about where you got the bug and how that love for aviation started. I Group A community. That was just full of aviation a lot of Delta pilots. Round where I live in all our ex air force next navy guys and my neighbor actually took me flying in a piper cub but a day it was like seventy degrees as absolutely beautiful door open when cruising around. I think that was the first Hook I had put in me for aviation. My Dad was a big influence. He wasn't a pilot but he saw it as a great career. Opportunity to kind of push me in that direction and so I was fortunate to have someone who wanted to teach of a friend of mine. Fly His son. He wants you to send out a fly but he wanted to teach them to fly with someone so I was fortunate to be able to be that other person and me and my friend were taught how to fly. My I fly was on September tenth. Two thousand one. So the next day I was is a big moment for so many across the world little in America so when September eleventh happened that really solidified my desire to WanNa go serve and if I go serve while flying two birds with one stone and was fortunate. That's where I put all my effort in high school was to get an ROTC scholarship. Go in and get a pilot slot and then flying air force now. That's amazing I think for me. No connection to nine eleven. I think I took my first flight less than a year after that. So yeah September Eleventh. Two thousand two so wild and crazy now coming up with me. It's almost two decades ago right so there's so many people that you know in op. See Our age no it lifted everyone holderness no it and lived it but you know being the demo pilot going out and talking to kids. Now there's just we now have the first generation of Americans serving in the military who were born after September eleventh. Yeah so is just. It's such a such a big event moment in history for so many people and it's crazy to hear the different stories and then you go dig up my logbook and take a picture of an shared or something because it is kind of wild. I remember another friend of mine that has a similar store to you is working the financial sector nine eleven happened and then he became. He became an air force pilot as well. He ended up in the rapture. But you know he. He felt the call as well so Can you walk us through? What the process for you as like say in high school to get to that point where you're qualifying to be a fighter pilot. I don't know if that's like an acceptable her. But you're obviously shooting for something there. So what's that process like to actually get in a position to be able to do that so for me? I think most people the average is a very long process. They're opposites exceptions to someone who monitoring have their degree in apply saucer training school which is a shorter condensed program and they go off and become a pilot but on average most people commission become officers in the Air Force which you had to offer to be a pilot most people commission through the Air Force Academy which is a four year college military school out in Colorado Springs or through ROTC which is at most universities across the nation. So I did ROTC Georgia Tech. But you start queuing yourself up in high school because you have to be competitive in order to get into. Rotc or get into Air Force Academy so mine started really like eighth ninth grade looking to see whether requirements were in order to get a ROTC scholarship or get into the Air Force Academy which is good. Gpa's good sat be well rounded so be involved in sports or working but they also want to see in those processes of work or your club or sports that over the course of three or four years you go from. Yeah the guy who just joined the group to being the club president or being the team captain. Because they're looking for leadership ability so it really cute up early on and it was a long path just to get ROTC and get into college and then once you get into ROTC or college Air Force Academy. The process kind of starts all over again. Because you're competing with everyone who's shown up at the end of school your junior year. That's really when most people find out what they're going to do in the Air Force. Three years to develop as a leader develop as an officer. Show that you had that potential to serve at a higher level and function at a higher level and then you apply for pilot slot or navigator slaughter intelligence officer. Whatever might be but you've been racked and stacked against your peers. There's a number one. There's a number two. There's a number ten and they all comes down to the needs of the air force so if we need ten pilots great news for that group of ten people but if there's only need to pilots than the top two people get that that's a very broad brush gail but in the end it's a really long process typically in order to get to that point and it's a big investment to write without being guaranteed that you're actually. GonNa get that slot you're putting in years and years of work before you ever know that you're GonNa get pilot

Air Force Air Force Academy Rotc Officer John Instructor Georgia Tech Delta America Wanna Colorado Springs GPA Gail President Trump
Aviation Aftermarket and COVID-19

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

2:27 listening | Last month

Aviation Aftermarket and COVID-19

"Robert I wanNA turn to you. Because there are certainly some major effects happening from Kovic nineteen across the aerospace and Defense Sector. But it's impacting the aerospace and defense world in different ways depending on what niche. What corner. You're in. I WANNA start with aftermarket because that seems to be where the biggest hit is happening immediately. Can you tell us about what's happening with aftermarket? And why are they getting hit? So hard as we've seen in previous done tons the oath to mock it is always the to the industry that gets hit. I and typically drops about one and a half times as much as airlines cut capacity so airlines reduce. Asem's or case by about ten percent we would expect to see the often market dropped by fifteen percent this time Ryan with iota full costing a sixty five percent year on year dropping capacity in quarter to the old correlations. Don't apply because the optimistic can't go down below zero but we have seen typical aftermarket effects of old aircraft being grounded which means that any maintenance which is flight. Our flight cycle driven doesn't need to get done. We've seen heavy checks not being performed and we've seen any form of discretionary maintenance being postponed whether that's embodiment of service bulletins for performance or interiors work. Just not taking place for supplies. It gets worse in that old aircraft typically getting broken up for spares to create US serviceable material. Those are typically older aircraft. But we've also heard stories of some newly delivered aircraft being robbed for us and those allow us going into serviceable aircraft so even newly aircrafts newly delivered aircraft seemed to be at some risk of being converted at least partially into you serviceable material effect. Repulse supplies is an MRI shops. Become very cash constrained and consume existing inventory. I and that destocking effect means that they didn't put orders on parts suppliers which is a second impact for the pulse supplies so the pulse supplies feel they need the US effect but also that postponement of orders for new spare parts and say since many supplies make most of their money through saying space. That's a doubly bad effect from that

United States Defense Sector Kovic Robert I Asem Ryan
Kanfit - Makers of unique composite and metal parts

STRUCK: A Lightning Protection Podcast

2:26 listening | Last month

Kanfit - Makers of unique composite and metal parts

"One company that is pretty interesting stuff out of Israel Canvas so they on their website a bunch of the day doing a lot of research for the show and yeah it seems like they have a unique niche where they can make really high quality metal parts. They can also make high quality composite parts. Yes also seems like their specialties. That they can also make really high quality metal and composite parts whereas other For other I guess suppliers you might have to go to composites person. Anna metal person kind of combine them like it's true them together but they can kinda threw it all in house and get a unique part so tell us a little more about about can fit. Well can't fit is based in Israel and Forget how long did around? But they're well established company and they they're involved in a variety of different aerospace markets From making parts for aircraft to Making drones they make Ray Tomes So they're they're involved in a lot of different areas but there it's one of those unique businesses in places where they have basically skilled aerospace workers. They can do the gamut and that's unique today. I'll give you the example In the states in the United States tend to be either you make composite parts because your hip and cool or make metal parts because it makes money and so rarely do the two shall meet So it's a different skill set clearly. It's a different skill set so you you have to have a pretty highly educated workforce to do that composite parts take a lot of Layer layers of material. You're putting on your dealing with the policies resin systems. It's complicated you. Have you have an autoclave in there. checking temperatures and that kind of stuff. The metalwork I think is just as important though even though we just because we've we've done it for a number of years now making metal parts has gotten easier and a sense but to no less critical so having a company that can actually make both ends of that is in today's world really unique And I I don't know if it's just a fact that that they're in a smaller country and they just need to be very versatile and that's what drives it also could drive just because of the The skilled labor labor forced to go ahead and do that But we've been working with them for a for a number of years and The things we see come from there are exceptional. They really are

Israel Canvas Ray Tomes Israel United States
Dragon Lady Heading Into the Future After Six Decades

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

7:41 listening | Last month

Dragon Lady Heading Into the Future After Six Decades

"You give us a quick run through the the story about the upgrade yes Yeah Hi basically Lockheed Martin skunkworks as begun work on this Avionics Tech Refresh Program. They call it. It's a fifty million dollar. Usa Force investment in the Dragon Lady and as you mentioned sort of kind of almost hasn't really come out of nowhere but it ever see is part of an ongoing Refresh of the aircraft but mocks very dramatic new stage in that process and fundamentally. It's it's focused on improvements to the cockpit itself the avionics upfront the some Enhanced on board mission processing as well Emission computer and basically sort of getting to the guts of the aircraft both from systems and cockpit display. Perspective hasn't been touched in a long time. So it's quite intriguing because it's it kind of opens a new chapter for the airplane at a time when you know. It's obviously an old airplane but now there's a new breadth of life been breathed into it so stay. It's really only been a couple of years. Maybe only a few months since the air force was talking about getting rid of the U. Two. I mean I'm a bit confused what's happened here. Well as probably some of the people listening to this podcast with you to The longevity of the Youtube has been questioned for for years and years air force. I think going back to two thousand eight or two thousand nine Basically started a you know a campaign Internally to retire the U2 and shift You know high altitude. Isr Intelligence Surveillance and reconnaissance mission to the argue for the unmanned argue for which is another high altitude aircraft. Not Quite as big or as High altitude is you to but does the same mission Congress push back on the Air Force for several years And prevented the air force from from retiring the U2 and carrying out that plan and then In two thousand seventeen the air force finally came out and said okay. We're going to keep the U2 and we're going to keep the argue for we're GONNA fly both of them for the foreseeable future. There was no Inundate put on either of those fleets for the first time in a couple in several years at that point and and then things got a little murky in the in the most recent budget cycle. You know we started hearing over in the fall that the air force was looking at really deep cuts. Because at at you know. They're in this process where they're trying to generate savings out of what they've got right now and take that money by retiring aircraft and take that money and paying for next generation capabilities that they want to have in the force and in twenty thirty Am What we heard. Was that meant. They were going to retire the force and they were going to retire at least some of the youtube views within this five year planning cycle Strangely when the when the budget came out. That's actually what it said. That the Arche four-block Thirties Would be retired or the the block. Forty which is slightly different mission Would the Arche four block forty would would still continue to operate than it also said that I quote currently the Air Force plans to divest the Youtube in fiscal year. Two Thousand Twenty five that appeared in budget documents twice In the budget documents that came out back in February and it turned out When when presented with this information the Air Force said oops we goofed mistake. That's a Typo some of those type of appeared twice but They said in fact. The Youtube is still in the budget and fully funded through fiscal year. Two thousand five Now they didn't say anything about fiscal year. Twenty six So we don't know what happens after that But we do know that When the Air Force presented its fleets retirement. Plan to the combatant commanders. That they got a big pushback. We reported that back in January. That the combatant commanders said. That's way too much. We still need some of these aircraft. It wasn't just a youtube or argue for his other Platforms that were in the mix and they. They successfully lobbied. The Secretary of Defense is office to force the Air Force to put those aircraft back into the budget and it. It's possible. The Youtube was part of that. Based on what we saw in Texas documents themselves so guy so this upgrade I mean. It's it's fifty million to a lot of money but this is really the backbone of the airplane. They're refreshing isn't it? I mean this is the the whole. It's not just the company it's the whole data management data handling putting this open mission system wrapper around everything. So they can plug lots of things in with make it much easier to plug thing and they've already demonstrate some of that capability and exercises things. So what what's going on here? I mean are we seeing a shift in the role of the airplane away from its traditional sort of peering over borders to doing something a bit more. Ya think exactly the point. The point about the this is really like you laying the track really for the other foundations for a new capability which is obviously tied in with the fundamental. Sr Role of the Youtube to start with but takes advantage of the fact that it's a high flying aerial platform with With persistence and not ability to be high in the Sky Upright like a a node in in the in the battlespace management of the future in the the advanced battle management system that the force. This idea it's really playing to that so it's important to remember also that this Tech refresh is part of a bigger skunkworks program for the Youtube which we've found out about which Lockheed described It's cold the dragon star at stars. Akron an acronym for Senses Technology and Avionics fresh. But it's part of this. Pathway and the key elements is this new open mission systems standard which the new processor At least part of which is Lockheed's Einstein box this enterprise mission computer to the second standard That's going to be an open missions. open mission system stunted Processor from the start and in fact The U to upgrade the initial one. It's going to be flight tested next year. And by the end of next year the basically Lockheed saying it will be the first The first of a compliant fleets of OMS aircraft in the air force inventory. It'll be the first of the open mission systems complying aircraft in the Thai fleet. So they kind of like saying. This is not only a pathway gateway really to a new future but obviously also a a testbed. You know this. The Youtube with this open mission system will be able to explore all of the kind of new processes and systems and intelligence assets. The which will Abm Ashville requires part of this open systems. Ox Agent

Air Force Youtube Usa Force Lockheed Martin Skunkworks Lockheed Isr Intelligence Surveillance Abm Ashville Texas Senses Technology And Avionics Secretary Congress OMS Akron
Gabrielle Palmas: Surviving a Midair Collision

There I Was...

11:10 listening | Last month

Gabrielle Palmas: Surviving a Midair Collision

"Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. You were in an interesting situation and you and I were Were chatting about it not too many people have survived a mid air you did. Can you tell us all about that absolutely so thankfully not many three hundred? Our pilots have experienced talking to the FAA and the NTSB but In October twenty twelve. I found myself in that exact situation to give some background. I fly out of Phoenix and a few different airports here where we have some of the best flying weather in the United States and in the world so with that comes a whole bunch of traffic air traffic. We have eight general aviation airports within thirty nautical miles of each other. And there's a lot of international students here with training academies and things tend to get busy when it's a beautiful day outside a very busy area. You've got all the airport you mentioned you. Of course got Phoenix International. And just outside of that. You've got Luke Air Force Base which is a training base for the Air Force. So it is a busy area. Everybody trying to take advantage of that beautiful Arizona weather and along with that. We have very limited approaches that we can do when it comes to training. So there's only one I alas in the area that were really allowed to navigate by and the only other two are at Phoenix Sky Harbor and over it Gateway Airport so along with that we have a lot of intense training traffic heading down south to this one particular airport. Kasa grind and their sister when were transitioning through these areas on top of that we have practice areas so it gets to be a little crazy when it comes to all of these training academy airplanes in one spot. So there I was. I was up on a training flight with my chief pilot on a stage. Check to progress to my next step of training in my instrument and as we were flying and transitioning out of the practice area and heading toward the airport for practice approach. We were in that scary spot where you're not talking to either frequency yet. You're in the process of changing your in the process of getting yourself situated for an approach. So there's a lot happening. I was under the hood at the time and my chief pilot reached out for the controls and turned to the aircraft and dove down as fast as he could and we ended up hitting something and my initial thought was. Maybe we hit an airplane. But I'm thinking birds. Birds are probably going to be the best scenario here right birds. It's fine just birds and he told me calmly. I need you to take your hood off and I need you to look around to see if you see them so there was with the thought process of. Oh my gosh. We hit another airplane with people inside of it. Wow that's another level of intensity there you're under the hood you feel an impact. The instructor says take your hood off and now you take the hood off. You're just trying to get total laissez on on now having vision. And where are you? And I can't imagine that it was a fear of looking out to the right side. I can tell you that. Why is that where you felt the thump? Come from yes okay. The impact was from the right side of the wing. We lost three feet of our wing and a Piper Warrior and had no aileron control whatsoever after that. So not only. Were we trying to see if the other party survived? We were also trying to figure out. What do we do now? Do we get this aircraft on the ground as soon as possible. Yes okay do we. Head straight toward the airport. Because at that point we were aligned directly toward the Chandler airport where we're based or do we make smaller turns to head toward an abandoned airstrip. That's on reservation. Land Not really monitored by anybody but also much closer to us and less traffic possibilities because we were also thinking okay. It's just the wing but it could also be the landing gear. It could be the engine stopping at any moment. We don't know what else has been impacted. About what altitude were you guys in terms of AG L? When the collision occurred at about four thousand feet. Okay and it's a an awkward altitude to be at because you're in the process of shooting practice approach and not yet on with approach. But your right at that altitude Should you be at the five hundreds or should you be at the thousands? What are we doing here? So that was the most difficult struggle for us to is that. It's a transition point where you're descending from one to another but with us. We had just leveled off to start the approach and start talking to traffic control so I remember a styling in. Instead of contacting approach. We contacted our local tower because we figured that the local tower might have these guys up on their radar and they have a better internal contact to get down to our flight. School emergency services in the local area Chandler versus talking to Phoenix approach which was much further away. So all of these split-second decisions were being made. We didn't want to fly over houses. Were dealing with an airstrip in the middle of nowhere versus airports but the airstrip is closer. And how do we do this? We manipulate the airplane. Just using rudder so I can tell you I am beyond grateful. I wouldn't be here today. If my chief pilot had not been the one in the airplane with me because this man flies great lakes he flies pits he flies aerobatic and knows exactly the limitations of an aircraft especially in a state like this so immediately of course he was on the controls and once we landed We couldn't use any flaps obviously coming in because the Aileron had been jammed so much into the flap system and we just took every precaution. You're sitting there thinking about going back to the basics when something like this happens. You're cracking the door open. Just like you're taught in training your hands on the fuel selector valve to make sure that you're shutting that off as soon as you touch down you just go into that mode that we all practice for over and over again in emergency training as student pilots. All the way up to professionals know at any point. Did you ever see the other airplane? We never did air. Traffic control finally told us about a minute before we land that they were able to see them squawking seventy seven hundred so at least we knew at that point that they were alive before we landed. Okay but you hear the collision you never do. See Them. You're focused on flying your own airplane. The instructors got control of the airplane. Did you guys do a controllability check talks about now? You've got this airplane. You make the decision to go into Keila River Memorial. I think you mentioned on on the reservation. Was it relatively close to you. Where you just a few miles away from the airport. At that time we were so we were just a few miles to southeast of the airport. So perfectly lined up with the chandler that we were checking back to so. It took us about fifty to ninety degree turn. I can't remember the exact amount in order to get lined up with the runways that are over at. He'll river for us. During that time it was a matter of okay. Let's take a look. See what we can actually do. The airplane okay. The rudders are fine. Ailerons can't do it okay. What about flap controls? Nope totally jammed. Can I ask you? Did you know that were ineffective? Because you tried to use them in. Couldn't or did you just look out at them and decide? We're not even going to try that. Nope we tried to move the yoke around and nothing was working. You could move the from full left to right and nothing was working. Got It so no aileron control but you do have good pitch control and good rudder control of course The engine still operating normally correct. Okay and you're at four thousand feet above the he'll river memorial. So you looking at the map here you do. What looks like probably a left hand. Turn and begin. Descending towards the river memorial is that right correct it was get on the ground as fast as you can power idle since we have zero flaps worse case scenario if we're high weaken slip it and just pray at this point though we get this thing on the ground safe and you have to do much turning or you rudder over in the direction of he'll river and you were pretty much set up on a final approach there or how did you guys do that. We were essentially on a long final at this point. Enough time to get stabilized and pay attention to how we were going to muscle this onto the ground. And how did you do that? Did you fly a pretty fast final because you were? I mean who knows what your real stall speed is now with three fear wing missing out on the right side right. How'd you handle the approach speed somewhat? I remember I remember My chief keeping it pretty straightforward and S. Just saying. You know. It doesn't matter how long it takes us to get stopped. We're going to aim toward the beginning of the runway. It's a relatively long runway because this airport at one point was used for aerial firefighting. So they still have some DC. Six's that are. They're just kind of abandoned so we knew we had a lot more room to work with and no houses on either end unlike the Chandler airport so we figured we just need to get close to the ground. We'll get it on the ground and then however long it takes us to get stopped and situated. We'll figure that out as we go. Yeah so it sounds like you keep your speed up. You came down and realize you had a long runway. The winds can get pretty strong out there in Arizona were the wind factor at all. Thankfully not because this was October so October is some of our most mild weather in Arizona. It's the transition period between when we get all of those storms coming in. The monsoon season has wrapped up for the most part and then October becomes that seventy degree weather until we reach March. Beautiful Time of year to fly out there and so That was a lucky break for you that it happened there when you're not worried about the heat or the wind or density altitude too much so you guys came down final. Kept your air speed up. You come over the runway and then just from there as normal as he could make it around out of flare and touchdown correct yet as normal as we could make it and as soon as we got on the ground immediately. Shut everything down. Fuel selector valve turned off and get out of the airplane as fast as we can just in case and I can't tell you how fast we both dropped to the ground just to make sure that both of us were okay that you know okay. We're on the ground. It's fine now. We can start thinking about everything that comes along with this.

Arizona Phoenix Chandler Instructor Air Force Phoenix Sky Harbor United States Phoenix International FAA Ntsb Keila River Memorial River Memorial S. Just DC
Practical Decision Making

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

4:24 listening | Last month

Practical Decision Making

"Today I WanNa talk to you guys about decision making as much as I can from a practical perspective. Because I think that you know. There's a light instructor renewal courses and there's when I'm talking to a room full of. Cf is we always say well. When should you start teaching? Adm and and the answer. The question is from day one right but it's really really hard thing to teach and by the way. Adm is Aaron article. Decision-making I don't take that for granted anymore. I hate when people use acronyms and I don't know what they are. Some pilots had never heard of him actually was in a room full of. Cf is some backwards like what's ADM so it's like okay. We can't take anything for granted but decision making is a really hard thing to teach and I always tell. Cf is one of the hardest. Parts of our job is on day one. We do everything and it's like a steady progressive poll out of equation and on the last day. Theoretically were doing nothing right so we're transferring this ninety one point three pilot in command decision making ability to a student in a perfect world but one of the main challenges of doing that is in training. We do what I call flying in a fishbowl. Say that very affectionately by the way. I love my fishbowl. But it's like San Francisco my little plastic castle. And this is my fishbowl. And we don't leave it very often. You know so in training can say to yourself. I make great decisions. You know like the wind is blowing strong today. How about we scrub the flight? And it's okay great. We scrubbed the flight but in reality as much as that's good stuff like teaching yourself to turn around walk away. Live the fire another day. That's all great. I'm not discouraging out on any level but you get out into the real world things become a lot more complex and we're GONNA go through some systems and some tricks that I can give. You possibly will help you make better decisions. Kinda give you for me like what? What is this sort of nightmare scenario? Not Really A NIGHTMARE SCENARIO. But a tough one. I had two students both of whom were Training California. And both who did my actually. I don't know where they did their privates but I did their instrument in California this is I don't know ten years ago and So I knew they both understood my processes of standardization and personal minimums and all that sort of stuff that I outlined in my setting standard all the stuff that I teach and I knew they knew that so they say to me one day. Hey we're going to go buy one seventy two actually. There's they weren't actually buying it somebody else's binding to one they were. GonNa go pick them up so my two guys in one plane and two other guys that they knew in the other plane they were going to go out to Virginia in the summertime and fly these airplanes all the way back to California and I joked that it's my nightmare scenario. Because that's that's a that's a long flight that's a lot of time in the airplane and for a Stra California pilot. There's a lot of weather you might encounter in the summertime between Virginia and California that maybe never seen before so the funny part of the call was. Hey can we take you out and buy launch and you can maybe give some pointers on what we should how we should think about this. So I had a lunch. I had like one hour to figure out. What am I going to say to these guys? One of my going to tell them that might make them safer. That might make a difference and the only thing I could really come up with from my own experience that I could cover in an hour that they would actually remember was. There's GonNa come a time where you guys are having a discussion like you're not sure what to do. You're not sure if you should press on to the next airport. You're not sure if you should circumnavigate a line of rain showers tipping my head Scott Online and rainshowers there. You have some decision to make and when you have to make that decision my my best advice you the thing that I could maybe give you. That will help you in one hour of lunch over. Mcdonald's or doing is land the airplane and have that discussion in the pilot's lounge and make that decision on the ground and if the right decision is to continue flying get back in the airplane and flying. That's a piece of cake but it's Q. Easy to sort of continue with the momentum of an airplane moving along at one hundred twenty nine. You're seeing all these various options and can make decision making very difficult so just getting yourself to slow down. In the decision making process can be incredibly powerful

ADM CF California Instructor Mcdonald Stra California Virginia San Francisco Scott Online
Power Off Stall Tips

AviatorCast: Flight Training

3:18 listening | Last month

Power Off Stall Tips

"Start something that's a little bit little bit just technical and start to talk about that so having a hard time with my power off stall any tips so the power off stall is also known as the approach to landing stall and I've really tried to rename it myself to make sure that I connect that approach to landing to it because that will tell you everything you need to know about setting up your power off stall. So you're coming into the pattern right. You're going to be landing. You're reducing your power back as you're coming into the pattern power off. That's how we know we are doing a power off stall emulating a landing so you'll typically do this with flaps you will you can either do a straight ahead or you can do it. In a banked turn essentially this one is really easy with the flaps out and most airplanes the the airplane is more docile in the stall. You don't have the left turning. Tendencies that the power on stall we know that if you have that powerful throttle or even partial throttle that you are going to get those left turning tendencies that will pull the one way in power off stall you. Don't really have that so. The airplane is fairly docile. What I do is I get the airplane in. Approach speed Say Sixty to seventy miles per hour in a Cessna. One seventy two. And then all you do. Is you pull the nose up to the horizon? Okay you put the top of the cowling right on the horizon in a one seventy. Two's going to different other airplanes. And then you You hold it there. Until you get the stall indications with the flaps down you're going to get a fairly mild stall You'll feel buffet. You'll hear the stall warning Horn and you may get that momentary drop and as a pilot. You're the one forcing it there right. You're forcing it to that horizon. So all you need to do to recover is relaxed the pressure on the yoke reduce the angle of attack. And then you can get the wing flying again now. The recovery the entire recovery is reducing the angle of attack sue. Get Out of the critical of attack the wing flying again just by doing that. Little Bit of change in your pitch attitude and then adding power in and climbing out of that approach to land install so recently emulating that we've come in we've we've for some reason Become distracted and we got to slow. We got to a stall condition and we really do want to have that power in there to recover. You still can just put that nose right on the horizon. And that's GonNa give you a enough of a of of a climb and then you would want to reduce your flaps by one notch. If you are say at thirty thirty degrees you can even go to twenty degrees in one. Seventy two so couple of different helpful. Things THEIR POWER PITCH UP CLEANUP BASICALLY POWER UP POWER FORWARD PITCH UP CLEAN UP FAST recovery after you've reduced angle of attack and got the wing flying again and then you minimize how much altitude you lose all right. So it's all about that recovery and in there you go.

Horn
Approaching a New Aviation Normal

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

3:21 listening | Last month

Approaching a New Aviation Normal

"The rate of change seems to have slowed down at least as far as aviation concern. Yeah well when you hit rock bottom. There's only so much share not. We're not there yet. But we're getting sick yet. This is true this is true the US is most certainly not at rock-bottom vo at were we'll get there. Yeah and so I thought it would be worth it to take a quick look at what ended up happening in March as far as the numbers we were talking about. You know things down and things staying down so total. Flights in March ended down twenty one point six percent. That's it's kind of misleading statistic. I think and we did a blog post earlier last week explaining this a little bit because if you look at the first week of March nothing really was out of the ordinary. Traffic was up four and a half percent globally. Because things really hadn't gone too far outside of China in some immediate joining countries as far as traffic was concerned. Then you get to the last week in March and traffic is down fifty five percent so a huge change in really just a week. I mean the eleventh and twelfth of March are really you think the defining moments for aviation in this and it's not getting better or coming back anytime soon from everything we've seen so far. No we're we're looking at. I think at this point we're GONNA see the US market further decline in the number of flights operated. But I feel like we're closing in on. I don't even want to call it normal because it's not normal at all but a new stasis a new kind of baseline where we're seeing something around thirty thousand commercial flights a day fifty to sixty thousand total flights looking at the numbers. I mean that could change next week and we could be sitting here going. Wow Ian was really wrong but I guess it remains to be seen depending on how how carriers adapt their new and their new schedules once again because it feels like airlines are cutting a little bit or a lot day by day. Yeah at least in the. Us were seeing. Most airlines have cut their scheduled the absolute bare bones here in the US through pretty much the end of May pass June things. Get a little more optimistic and then it ramps backup. Kinda to what was once normal. July and beyond American has made some pretty dramatic cuts to its international route network. It really seemed like domestically they haven't touched anything. Have they know I mean the domestic? That still seems rather optimistic to me. Extremely optimistic the American. We're just using American. Here is an example because they published the most comprehensive and and I guess the most to date information. They chopped a lot of their international capacity. A lot of routes that we're going to launch a lot of the summer. Seasonal routes will not be launching again for twenty

United States IAN China
Josh Flowers from Aviation101: Tools to Help Avoid CFIT

AviatorCast: Flight Training

5:50 listening | Last month

Josh Flowers from Aviation101: Tools to Help Avoid CFIT

"I WanNa talk a little bit about Actually kind of bringing in a tool that you and I used I. I didn't brief you on this or anything but a tool that unite us when we flew from battles down to Nanna on our way back. 'cause we got in a situation where we got a close to see fit. I. I'm not sure I'd say close but I I wouldn't it but it started to be car alarm. Bell STARTED GO OFF. We need to get out of it. Basic right so see fit is controlled flight into terrain. We were flying around the mountains. The weather was a little bit. It wasn't even like marginal really when we went in there. But I never considered a The rain could start on top of you and just come down. Which is what happened and then as I was happening we got into an area of smoke and so we kind of got in the situation where almost instantly within two minutes everything went away We were done away. Yeah and we knew that there was rising terrain in front of us. And we're going to want to climb here soon and is like all of a sudden it just kind of faded into like Milky White Mist and it was like okay So it it. We weren't close to see fit. We had so many outs. The the the important thing is our wisdom. Our past experience is what caused us to start setting off alarm bells on our heads individually. I like okay. How do we get out? Let's get out. Let's stop this. What do we do now right? Neither of US had a warm and fuzzy anymore. It went away right and when that happens like you just gotTa go with your gut and we. We were looking at four in the terrain pages and stuff. And we yeah. We had these amazing tools in the cockpit to help us get out of it but ultimately what kept us out of that situation was our aeronautical decision making and judgment to be like this just got way worse than we thought it was going to. We know that there's lower land that way we're GonNa go that way and then sure enough. We go that way and the weather got better and we can see everything yet. Yeah Yeah I mean I. I felt like in that situation where the everything deteriorated so quickly in our alarm bells. Were going off. It was nice to be able to pivot something like four flight Rome. You did a good job in that sense because you you basically looked at the train very quickly and you could see on the terrain adviser like hazard advisor where to go so we basically did a left ninety degree turn and went to lower terrain and it was. It was kind of like river valley that led to to lower landgraf and almost immediately things improved like the rain went away but then we got in the more smoke and then we follow the Yukon River down so it was interesting to to come up against those situations. You have any advice for people. I guess that the get themselves in that situation like 'cause you've been in you've fallen a lot now so you've probably had a dozen situations where it's like okay. Something needs to change. What do we do? So what is your advice for? Someone that is getting into a situation like that right. I think I think one issue is had you get yourself in that situation to begin with but we're talking about like in the plane. They're already in the situation. Worry about debriefing. It later when you're in the plane. What tools do you have to to help you with that? Like even if you've got a garment for thirty bring that thing up to the terrain page and start looking at what you've got around you and of course I just want everybody flies with an IPAD. These days use that become. I've I've run into a lot of pilots and in fact we just had this conversation with my dad about this morning. Dan Greider right now to do this like AAC. Up Recurrent Training series in addressing fatal accident rates and stuff. And we had this long drawn out conversation about when you're going to depart in airport or you're gonNA fly around terrain or fly at night. Anything like that. There is no excuse to not bring up a terrain page of some sort like get turn on the obstacle layer on four flight or bring up the terrain terrain profile or synthetic vision that synthetic vision is awesome. You know if you've got a stratus or a century or in our case we have the garment transponder That talks to the eyepatches brings something like that. Use Your resources not only use your resources but know how to use them effectively. No every little feature And it'll you don't Wanna find out in a situation like that. It's kind of becoming critical almost like life or death critical for you to know these features and know how to access this kind of stuff. You don't want to be figuring out in that moment that you don't know how to access the terrain page or access that vision you know. Sit in sit in bed like before you fall asleep plot your eye powder pull out your phone four flight and just play with it. Learn the new features and of course four flight has all the they've got all sorts of webinars and stuff that an online videos that walk you through all those features but know how to use the tools that are in your cockpit. That's a big. It's a big deal. Yeah is interesting because when when you pull up the map view when we were in that situation I pulled it. The synthetic vision view like right away like an airplane has the ability to pull in the Harz from the airplane so I can actually see. I can't see the synthetic vision on four flight so I pulled that up. You pulled out a route and so we had like instantly a safe way to navigate in case we did go. Imc for some reason even though we were trying to avoid it and then you had an out to get out the other direction. And so exactly I. I think that's it's interesting because you talked about like knocking in the situation in the first place. You know we could rewind the clock on that in in in We could talk about that. We don't need to but it comes on the judgment. I like knowing when things are getting bad and then being willing to like knock it off and do something different right like you have to do something different to get yourself out of that and then you know utilizing tools to assist you in that

Nanna United States Bell Rome Yukon River Harz Advisor Stratus Dan Greider River Valley