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Listen to the latest audio content in Asian American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Asian American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

Pastor Ken Fong on His Daughter's Evolving Relationship to Christianity

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

11:30 listening | 17 hrs ago

Pastor Ken Fong on His Daughter's Evolving Relationship to Christianity

"Wife and I when we adopted our daughter even before we became parents. We had made it. I think mental decision to not be tiger parents and more specifically when it came to religion that although we have a preference Both of us were raised as Christians. Well my wife doesn't come rechristened family. But she was going to church ever since she was a young kid We definitely WANNA raise our children that way but with the understanding that they had to kind of come to make a decision themselves at some point In order for it to have any meaning. And when you you know understand things that way you understand that your children as they grow older aren't always going to make decisions like you hope they will so our daughter now is twenty one and she's home studying online because of this shelter in place order so we're having some unexpected family time like every day that normally having a junior in college you sitting out of state you wouldn't have so we actually were talking last night over dinner and we were sharing with her some updates about kind of what. I was talking about and last week introduction Waiting to Kinda here the decision from the board of my previous church where I retired Whether starting this coming July with a review okay for me to return to the church or nut and Our daughter just blurted something out and she said well. I think this is a good time to share with you. That this whole thing with the Church Has already kind of really messed with my understanding of what is what things should be like and I guess I grew up thinking that church was a place of no politics and quickly corrector wherever. They're people guys of what they claim to be. There's always politics but does not have to be nasty but you know she just said well you know it's it's really soured me so e even if they say he can go back I'm pretty sure I'm not going back and not sure on that interested in going to any church right now. In fact I'm I'm kind of thinking more like an atheist. Now What's interesting is that You know she chose to go to a Christian liberal arts school and it's not like Bob Jones University or Liberty University with Jerry Falwell JR senior. It's a it's a pretty. I think moderately progressive school and yet. She has so many friends who she's met there. Who are atheists agnostics? And you know I. That kind of really surprised me. Like why would atheist or agnostic. Choose to go to a Christian College in. She was explained to me that well. You know maybe the This particular school has a program and some majors that are highly regarded. And so you know you go and you just kind of turn off to out all the Christian stuff you don't go to chapel. What have you and Most of our daughters closest friends are in that camp. Our daughter did say that she She still has an affinity to some of the essentials of the Christian faith. But she's really trying to figure things out you know if this is really her faith talk about the chickens coming home to roost for years and years. I did workshops on the development of of people's faith and just like our physical buildings develop over time like if you threw a fastball at three year old and an expected here she'd have the physical coordination to catch it. That would be cruel and unusual. It'd be child abuse. If on the other hand you know the person is thirty. Years old and you throw a fastball. They should have some capacity to catch the ball. They have developed physically and the same kind of thing goes with like intellectual capacity unless some kid is a genius. You know you don't bother teaching them higher math or world geography. You know when their third graders but or even philosophy but you know when they get older that there's more of a not just a curiosity I think there's a there's a building of the brain to actually manage more complex thinking and I found over the years that the same is true for how spirituality and so Lattanzio taught you know there's four identifiable stages of our fake develops the first ages. Imitative so this is where you know. Let's say you're born into this family and it's a Christian family and you could be religion right Guy Christian family and so without knowing what it's all about without exploring it for yourself because you're little you just imitate but rebels is doing and especially when you're a baby. I mean they just put you in the armed put in the stroller and they take it to church or temple. Or what have you and you see? People Bother head so you buy your head. See PEOPLE CLASS THEIR HANDS? Either you see them do the incense. Whatever happens in that particular religion and that doesn't make it fake for that person. It makes age appropriate to be imitating you get to a stage Maybe in later. Elementary School no Middle School. Where it's adoptive and so now there's enough capacity to think to consider so you now can choose if you will to adopt the beliefs and practices that you were initially in imitating now a lot of people a lot of us if we go on these kind of spiritual journeys we kind of stalled out either. Stage one imitative or stage two adoptive and so some people. Just just keep going through the motions imitating everything. That's going around them imitating the beliefs. The stated positions. What have you without giving it much? Second thought or they just get stuck in adoptive and so they're choosing this but they've never kind of thought about what else they might choose and this leads to the third stage of spirit veldman which again paralyzed parallels Brain capacity because usually around young adult time is when the brain is most able to deal with deep Complex sort of issues and this is called Searching individual so this is when the I think you know perfectly describes were daughters at offset your questioning things that you dated without question and you adopted pretty readily but now you're saying well. That was my parents that came from my church that came from whatever my peer group but Now I'm really wondering like what do what do I believe and It's it can be very lonely time. I mean no one else can go on this journey of a real searching and I think it's scary enough that some people put their toe in that uncharted water and they run right back to adoptive. Or Imitative and this could even be pastors and priests right and and leaders And I think it really shows over time if someone who's even in a leadership position in a religious capacity has not gone on this journey because their beliefs are pretty shallow. They haven't really come to own it which then leads into the last fourth stage which is owned faith gay and It doesn't necessarily mean that when you if and when you get through the third phase of searching that you're going to land back into faith that you originally started with you did start with one you. May You may. But you may find that. You're much more enamored of. Let's Jesus then the church you see now the church will all of its Hypocrisies and and so. You're much more focused on the person in the teaching of Christ or the Buddha. You know if you will Or You come through on the other side and you're you're just a straight up atheist or agnostic or you're going to try something else altogether so what what so. I definitely commend our daughter for being so forthcoming with us. And you know a lot of ways This is how we raised our daughters so that she has this space and this personal capacity to ask the hard questions of us and her faith and everything else you know. It's too soon to predict where if anywhere she's GonNa land but I just have to say that on this Memorial Day in twenty twenty. It's just fascinating to me that something a theory of development that I've taught for years and years and years is now coming home to roost. It's it's we've got our own living breathing. Human young adult who is is wrestling with these. And I'll tell you it is. It is scary when as a parent you still. Even though I've gone through my journey and I've owned in think my wife has to you still realize that part of the authenticity in the validity of believing these stages especially the third stage is truly give this person in this case your our child the freedom and the affirmation that she needs in order to do this without thinking. She's disappointing us. You Know I. I can't imagine how that must feel for someone who's Pastor's kid to right. It's not just having Christian parents. But you know retired pastor so that's just interesting update on life. I think parents who don't understand and others imposters who don't understand kind of how this development works. They see the phase at our young adult daughters in as running away like as discarding disbanding. And I think that's a mistake and clearly what she share with us. She's really wrestling with with some of the things that are still holding onto her but she wants to make it hearse and you know as her dad and pressure. My wife would agree if that's her goal is to land somewhere or she's not just going through the motions where she's not just mouthing things that she's been raised hearing all the time that's worth that's worth the struggle and we're going to walk with their way with her.

Christian College Church Elementary School No Middle Sc Jerry Falwell Bob Jones University Lattanzio Liberty University
HarperCollins Acquires Rights to Yo-Yo Ma Book 'Playing at the Border'

Books and Boba

1:18 listening | 22 hrs ago

HarperCollins Acquires Rights to Yo-Yo Ma Book 'Playing at the Border'

"Harpercollins. Acquired world rights to playing at the border. A story of Yo. Yo Ma by Joanna Jojo illustrated by Teresa Martinez the picture books centers cellist. Yo-yo Ma using his music to build bridges instead of walls a testament to music humanity and what unites us. Publication is set for fall. Twenty twenty one most probably the first person I ever saw like on TV. Asian person you know like he's like one figures you know like like that's really unexpected. I mean back in the day like there weren't that many on on Connie Chung Michael Chang annual ma since my family like half half of my mom's side of the family are musicians are classical music musicians. Like I've heard of Yo Mamma but like to me it was like. Oh there's so many Asian classical musicians so I I didn't really see the big deal Around Yoyo Ma until much later when I got into new American community you know. Heard about the impact of your Moss. Work so yeah picture book. That's great

Yo-Yo Ma Yoyo Ma Connie Chung Michael Chang Twenty Twenty Joanna Jojo Teresa Martinez Harpercollins.
Victoria Chang: Love, Love

Bookworm

8:48 listening | 5 d ago

Victoria Chang: Love, Love

"What is the age group of this Book Victoria? I think it's around maybe eight years old to thirteen years old so it's middle grade but they called middle grade yes. The book is called Love Love and of course. I was excited because it's a novel written entirely in Poetic Lines and at the same time again. The fear of poetry that might enter is completely abolished by the clarity and directness with which it's written now. You had written a picture book before this. That was times. Notable Book of the Year Victoria. This is new for you. Yes yes yes yeah. I two children and there's thirteen eleven now and as they've grown I've had to sort of read books or learn more about what books available to children in because I write adult poetry and Emma writer occasionally. I'll have these ideas where I wanna try that too. And and so these books. The children's books are result of love. Lov excited me particularly as I read to learn that it's title has as much to do with the opening score of tennis as it does to do with the Gulf between two sisters they have been drawn apart by an experienced. One sister at first seems to be getting more attention than the other at school. The other one is shy overweight but then the first the preferred sister her hair starts. Falling out. Is the way it's presented. One can find her hair between the pages of her books. In particular at the exciting sections of the Nancy drew books that both sisters love to read and the younger sister Francis practically has to steal from her older sister and read it night with flashlight because her older sister is not a sharer is not generous. In that way. In fact that is the subject of this book. What will get these children to share? How will they share their inner worlds with one another now? You're a poet and people are used to poets being. What would you say profound and matic difficult? And you've written a hoke entirely in poetry and for children for children to understand directly. What was that like? It was incredibly fun because so much of Howard is about really sometimes difficult metaphor which is really a leap. A metaphor is is a big jump. Even similarities are a jump And so I think that writing children's was just another challenged or writing to children or for children and really thinking about the things that they can understand and then trying to figure out how to write them and challenge them in images stick poetic literary ways emotional ways philosophical ways but yet still make it easy enough and legible enough so that they can have a really good experience and not be too stuck and so finding that balance was really hard but I. I really thought it was a fun experience for me because I had never written a verse novel before and Written For Children in this age group and so the challenge was what appealed to me move. The book is dedicated to my human children tenny and Winnie and to my wiener dog children mustard and catch up and you Tell in this dedication to all the bullied kids in the world. I see you to all the kids who suffer icy you and the important thing is to be seen. It's a rarity it's a very rich experience. Hell did your children respond to the book. They haven't read it and I know now they don't they don't really. I don't know I think that they just I hear them talk. Sometimes they talk to their friends and once in a while like just last night. I heard them heard one of them. Say Oh yes. She's she's an author she. She's a poet. She writes books so I think they talk about me but I'm not sure they know exactly what it is that that I do so I'll give you know my children. Copies of my books and sign them even and they. I know they don't read them and I'll ask them why sometimes and they say oh it's they they don't have a good explanation but they'll say oh. I think it'll be too sad or they try and say something that would make me feel better when in reality I just don't think they're interested I imagined that maybe reading them when I when I'm dead to be morbid like a it can be that they'll then they'll be more interested in kind of everything about my mind and how it works in how I saw the world in the same way that I miss I i. I'm curious about how my mother thought about things you know who Who passed in two thousand fifteen so I do think that that my hope is. I'll leave things for them and they can read them or not. You know when they're ready. I discovered your work recently. But it seems as if you've led many lives and in particular you seem to have been involved in hedge funds and stocks and the Business World Song. Oh Yeah I do have a an MBA from Stanford. And so I did get a business degree and I have an investment bank at a management consulting firm. I worked at lots of different places And Yeah I I. I was just sort of doing what other people were doing. If that makes sense I followed a group of people that I had met at Harvard where I was for graduate school and they just told me. Oh you should do this or do that so you know I was. I think more impressionable when I was younger in. Just because you're good at something doesn't mean you should do it So I think it's just sort of finding your own. Voice is the process in my life that I'm still finding trying to find and and now I'm more comfortable sort of figuring out what is exactly. Do you like to do versus. What can you do Where are you capable of and so I think that time of my life was more about just not knowing what I was really interested in or not really understanding that you could be a writer because my parents weren't born here so it's not like they knew there was such a thing you know and so? I didn't really know there is such a thing so took me a wild to to figure out that you could be a writer in some ways And use any ladders also have other jobs and things but they're still a possibility that one could lead a very rich creative inner worlds The writing and pushing it out word through books and things like that that I just really didn't know existed. You know we didn't have a lot of books in our house. They were books. There were like encyclopedias or Chinese books and Our Library to started to accumulate as children based on the books that we read not the books that my parents read because you know they spoke Chinese at home so those are all sorts of things that I had to figure out more. Maybe more gradually than someone who might have had a you know parents that were born in this

Writer Gulf Stanford Tennis Hoke Emma Francis Howard Harvard
Sung Kang on Han and the “Fast & Furious” franchise

Asian Enough

5:26 listening | Last week

Sung Kang on Han and the “Fast & Furious” franchise

"That kind of explains the origins of Han because your character and better luck tomorrow was also named Tonj in so. There's this really fun tongue in cheek bridge between select. Mara which he did with Justin and Jason Tobin another member of the fast and furious universe and took drift but as the French has got bigger and bigger and bigger. Han was like just a part of the family. Which is beautiful this huge multicultural. Multibillion dollar franchise you've got crazier and crazier action it. It it evolved into something so much more than you know. Just two hander. Very Brohi muscular to hinder that the first movie was and then six happened in which we said goodbye to seven and eight happened in further developments involving the introduction of Jason Stephens character as a character named Shaw who is then explained retroactively as person responsible for Hans stuff happened which kind of led in turn to something that nobody could have expected. Which is the Hashtag justice for Han Movement of fans who were kind of upset with how Hans Legacy was treated and I wonder if you can speak to what that was like for you that part of your relationship with this character or like I was saying earlier you know the love difficult relationship with the Han characters that the love part is that it did give such great opportunity and and perspective and open window into really what this business is the Hollywood business but then the difficult part is that GonNa look? We live in America. It comes down to data numbers right. I thought that after film like this maybe there would be more opportunities opening up Tokyo after Tokyo. Because you know obviously premier there's interviews. You see your picture online and stuff like that people are asking for Pictures. You Go from obscurity to all of a sudden the guy you know Asian Guy. They don't know your name but Jackie Chan but your guide and people start connecting with you. So you know. That's the difficult thing with fame. Is that all of a sudden. You know your normal life is not normal in this idea of fame or celebrity starts to feed expectations and then builds an ego right and ego is hard to define but it's deadly especially. I think as an artist and as a man that's growing into looking for his identity or purpose and then when the industry doesn't really support that it feels like. Oh this was all like illusion you know is like well. What's this and I thought we were actually doing something I thought at the end of it it was supposed to leads the more opportunity and I did not feel it on a personal level and so then you start blaming yourself and that's where I think a lot of artists are so insecure and I see the first one to admit that's probably why become actor but it starts the manifest and you go. Maybe I'm not good enough. Maybe I'm too Asian or I'm too tall too short Dr. Not all of it sedan. That starts to stunt your growth because then go into dish in. You're scared nervous. Because this is all you got. It's that one line and some episodic and you know you don't want to have ten jobs right and like. I was still working at a restaurant when I did Tokyo drift. So that's the reality now like you're in a fast and furious movie and all of a sudden you live in fast and furiously after the premier it's it's Cinderella. It turns back into a Pumpkin. And your back and all of a sudden. You really look like that guy from Tokyo. Not sure if right and that's tortured by your own success and so you go. Well how do I do this? Like how do I exist in this world without my ego coming in and going wait? I think I'm a slavery but it's actually a waiter. The opportunities were not there and all of your appetite gets bigger because I thought the world was accepted me but just because the audience or the fans except you does not mean to business exception. Because it's about money it's it's the old system can't take your personal. They're used to the way they do things. And you're not friends. It's a business your product crazy. Rich Asians wouldn't come on for like a dozen year year. Yeah you know I. I realized we'd better like tumor. That journey was like a lot of Asian American kids. College students and high school kids finally had something decalogue anecdote. That's me one of those characters they could identify with. Or ASPIRE. Or they just see their face nickel. That's me and after took your drift those like. Oh there's great possibility here to be a leading man to other opportunity and the problem was that I think the audience is like we just didn't have writers and other directors out there and you have to have studio executives and executives and you have to have other genres. You can't just have one film. You have to have crazy revisions then. You GotTa have searching. You've got to have them all. You have to young filmmakers like just gone coming in you know and redefining what? Asian American cinema is right so everybody needs to get together but when you're hungry you're starving and you're fighting for scraps to help each other. It's very hard like almost like like a Lobsterman. Talia crabs the fight over each other crabs in a barrel exactly. But it's so good that the you know that it's the industry not moving fast enough that it wasn't your work you know. That wasn't good

HAN Tokyo Jason Tobin Jackie Chan Mara Hans Legacy Tonj Jason Stephens America Justin Talia Lobsterman Shaw Hollywood
How Writer Karla Cornejo Villavicencio Maintains Control of Her Narrative

Latina to Latina

7:58 listening | Last week

How Writer Karla Cornejo Villavicencio Maintains Control of Her Narrative

"This book was a longtime coming. Why right now? Well it wasn't a long time coming because it didn't WANNA write it. It was like a My parents came to this country to for me to have a better life Not to dwell in the migrants of my life like I wouldn't have been an immigration lawyer. You know that's that didn't feel like the proper repayment for my parents sacrifices. It was in far enough away from their migration and I felt like a proper repayment. And that's how I thought of my life that's why I still think of my life for their migration was something so far enough from their migration that it would make gum them not remember the trauma and so writing about immigration was not it and so just wrote about music for a long time and I wanted to be the guy in high fidelity in I was like this is me. I started writing this book in Two Thousand Sixteen because because trump happened and I thought I was the best person to do it. Because I didn't have someone like me to guide me as a teenager when I was undocumented in college I knew stuff was going to get really bad. I had no idea how bad it was. Get but I just was troubled by the idea that there is just. This was all going to go down and there was nobody like me who is going to say like the things that. I ended up saying my book because there was a lot of writing about immigrants would. We were expected to be patriotic. And we were were expected to be apologetic and we were expected to prove that we were good citizens and where we were expected to be grateful and that made me sick and I was like we are not like I'm not GonNa let the stand you right in the introduction to the undocumented Americans that you wanna give the reader permission to be punk. When was the first time you gave yourself permission to be punk? I've always been punk. I never accepted the have never accepted the title of a dreamer even when before Daca existed even before I could be like. I just don't feel comfortable with you. Know the way villain is as my parents and discharge transacts in like a narrative of innocence. I was just like Mike. I don't actually like Thought it was cheesy. I'M NOT GONNA call myself at people would invite me to things like where I would have to show a cap and gown and I was like I'm not GonNa fucking do that like Kurt. Cobaine with not to unlike bunk and a lot of ways but the way I define like being punked myself. Is that you understand that your accomplishments are not just your accomplishments. You understand that you belong to a community you understand that the world is a system you understand that the food on your table came from somewhere and you can envision the last hands that touched the food before they enter the package that you just open and that it's kind of like your haunted like you're haunted by your relationship to all of the people in this In this world and You Act accordingly and it also means like not giving shit about what people expect you to act like in order to fulfill a political or corporate goal or something so one thing that like has always kind of disturbed me has been like the Portmanteau that has the prefix undock you like undocumented. Roy or like on you something because that seems like branding and I just want like undocumented kids suggest like just be individuals like understand that they can be a part of a community but understanding. They also don't need to perform anything for anybody that they don't need to be consumed and at the same time you say. The dreamers have taken up a disproportionate amount of space in the immigration discourse. Well that's the media's fault that's not the dreamers felt talk to me about that well the media has been obsessed with them like I understand that that like I'm not bill nizing anyone but any specific person or anything but like you know of course it makes sense that you know kids doing sins in caps and gowns and showing their diplomas showing their grades. And that's for her sympathy for White Middle America when I was undocumented and I was a kid I remember being in like Eighth Grade A. Medallion bit was was like the Dream Act is going to pass. He was so sure of it. Now is thirteen years old. I'm thirty now. And the reason why he told me. The Dream Act was going to pass is because Americans love children and Americans love academically achieving minorities and I remember in two thousand sixteen when we had those marches for comprehensive immigration reform. My Dad and I walked with all those immigrants and people didn't go to work. People were risks. They're losing their jobs. And we all in white because we thought that would make us look not menacing. That's just branded in my brain. Just all of us marching down like just down lower Manhattan like all of these crowds and we were not afraid and people had like Mexican flags and then there were like. Don't your Mexican flags because people are going to be think that you like? You're not patriotic. My Dad made these t shirts that he had bought in bulk in Chinatown that had like the American flag on them. In the back he wrote we are the American Drina distributed them to his his undocumented co workers at the restaurant where he worked at and we wore those t shirts. And it's like we are not the american dream because it doesn't exist and i feel like the media's enraptured with dreamers because dreamers suggest that the american dream does exist that come here. You assimilate he go to college. You join the military and you know the American dream happens. But the camera doesn't stop filming. You know like after that. It's like well what happens. That guy is a temporary solution even if there was a dream. Act like what would happen. Is that these kids. We have to take care of our parents. We have to take care of her elderly who are sick who have been doing manual labor. Many cases for decades with absolutely zero safety net even though they've been paying taxes And we have to pay for them out of pocket and you know this idea that lake the possibility of inherited wealth which really is the American dream is unattainable for us because we have to take care of our

Kurt Daca Manhattan Mike ROY Chinatown
Dante Basco Discussed Landing the Role of Rufio

Asian Enough

5:10 listening | 2 weeks ago

Dante Basco Discussed Landing the Role of Rufio

"You work asked. How did how did that come about like you had started out as a dancer one of your first credits is in moon-walker. Yeah yeah me. And my little brother Dion. We're in Walker. I was actually his understudy in moon-walker and we did the bad video but we did the kid. Bad video friends would allow those kids today. I mean mercer tantrums in the video. She's like the executive producer showrunner of of fails to share. We've known each other since we were like twelve. The way dancing works. You have the casting you have to have a cast like exact behind them because people get hurt all the time when you dance so we did that. We Young. We're gases when he came to L. A. But when I did hook the pretty remarkable thing about hook is so my little brother. Dion hadn't auditioned for another character in the movie. And I remember calling my managers when he got the addition. Because we're like you gotta give me an audition for this movie because you know the one thing we knew is it's Robin Williams playing grownup Peter Pan. And you're like that had captured the imagination of the world like. Oh my God like Robin Williams is Peter Pan. That's who he is. And so we were all excited about the movie and Spielberg and and whatnot. And so I ended up getting audition for other character. Rubio we know in these characters are and then my other brother. Dr Ian got an audition for Rubio too so we both went in together. This the thing about being brothers L. A. And Act against all audition and continue against each other and to this day and it's like was the TV show like last season where they're like. Oh it's between you and your brother during both on the board like whatever like was going to get it so good like but we've all trained together and go of the process understand that you're not really in competition with each other you know but we've been through a lot as brothers and different these days almost be really close. Yeah I mean it's hard to be Asian actor in. It's hard to be an actress. La I always say it's hard to be an actor in La. Probably want hard jobs in the world as far as to work and then on top of that it's hard to be an ethnic actually and within the ethnic spectrum it's hard to be Asian ethnic spectrum and even within the Asian spectrum to be Filipino. That particular Asian is super strange. The people because they're like are you. What kind of Asian Asians that? We wrote this role for you like a brown skin kind of are you. So why are you so ten and then even within that little like Filipino? It's like it's you know I'm one of four brothers that are like very close in age like you're the boss brothers like at our performance that our performance that we're all here in the audition so it. I've lived a very unique experience except where I've brothers that lived with me. Oh we are definitely going to ask you about one of the few experiences. You had playing a specific Filipino. American character in the great debut debut But I I want to ask you lower living in this hook. Moment your audition you said before that in a way your upbringing in paramount helped you in. Yeah House. The unique thing about that particular project is I went in on me and my brother both went in. We put the auditions on tape with the with the Catcher in Jefferson. There's a picture of that day too. We both dressed up like how he thought loss was addressed up. I remember like bracelets on this. Weird like floral shirt and so We had the addition and then I got a call back like the eight my managing like. Oh so Steven Spielberg wants to meet you. So I went to Amblin which is on the universal lot in the whole lot. All great but there's like this one sections like Spanish villas like that stevensville offices. We went there and this is like before. Ps Ten does like here. Like a mall arcade in his office which is crazy and so we're they're playing video games and he brings me in and then he doesn't even me again we talk. We talk about a lot of stuff you talk about rats so Rizzo and talked about Dustin Hoffman. Because I know his playing hook at that time and we talked about films we talk about other things I did and then do you want me to read. He's like no no. You're good I just wanted to meet you and I was like what I walked out. My mom had to go. I don't think I got it like I read. You know and then a few days later they offer me the part which wild so read the part one time. When I was on the set I remember sitting on the pirate ship and I was like. Hey Steven like never auditioned like read the roll one time and someone offered me the job. How did that happen and Steven was like Yeah Dante. Like at of all the kids we. You're the only kid that scared me. And but you know when I think about it now inside. I'm living in paramount right. And this is ninety one. You know kids were getting shot in my school. Like my best friend. Like one of our friends got killed his girlfriend. There was like guns everywhere drugs. We you know there's like life and death situations going on every day. There was like a big race war blacks breast of Mexicans. Where where what side are you on? Oh we need to get out of here at lunch or like you know it's going down and when you're dealing with like that kind of environment to degree the lost boys gang. I just the leader of the gang and so I think some of that was you know brought to the surface when doing the character and I think that kind of resonated with Stephen. I think that Kinda helped my the whole thing so

Steven Spielberg Dion Moon-Walker Robin Williams Rubio LA Mercer Peter Pan Walker Executive Producer Stephen Dr Ian Amblin L. A. Stevensville Jefferson Dustin Hoffman Rizzo
Filmmaker Renee Tajima-Peña talks 'Asian Americans'

They Call Us Bruce

4:33 listening | 2 weeks ago

Filmmaker Renee Tajima-Peña talks 'Asian Americans'

"Teach Asian American studies at UCLA. And it's embarrassing. How little I knew. I'm being when I went back. I mean don't tell anybody with my colleagues because Dr Ahead filmaker would you expect but I mean you know. People are worried now about naturalization and I kept on thinking well that's a new thing but in fact South Asians back in the nineteen twenties were who had citizenship here were denaturalized. I mean they were because of the got sing tin case by God sing. Tin Was an immigrant from India and he was actually a World War One veteran I mean he fought he served for the US military in World War One so he was given citizenship for. Maybe four days or something like that. But then they reversed it because he was Indian Dan so he also went to the US Supreme Court and the only thing he can argue back then was while. I'm I'm white because I'm Caucasian because I guess that's the region or whatever and the Supreme Court decided. Yeah you're Caucasian but you're not white but you sure ain't white not white so no no no. You can't have citizenship. So he was naturalized. And then all the South Asians with citizenship were then de-naturalize and when you're denaturalized. You don't only lose the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Like your property you lost your property. I mean it was. Just you know as heartbreaking the case of cutting thin is it's so interesting because it's like it confirms very like on the Supreme Court level. Whiteness is like why disease it's racist such a construct in that in the in the most sort of You know those like constitutional way that they've like defined it. You know what I mean like. You're definitely not white. We need to confirm that like you're not the common man's definition of white. Yes I think what's What's also a deeper structure aspect of? This is that speaks to the uncomfortable role that as I have played throughout history And especially in the present day right that we have been seen in some ways as a kind of like The stopgap other right uh-huh our yeah the wedge or the fill in or you know the standings for various things I I'm thinking here of the earliest immigrants. The United States as a Chinese United States specifically and Japanese as well it were brought here in part because there was a need for labor after After black slaves were free right so there was this sudden. Shortfall of people to do heartbreaking work at very low pay and they decided that it was cheaper instead of to hire black people to actually import people from across oceans right and that instantly set up a narrative for us to be seen as kind of the replacement minority and overtime. We've we've had this kind of pushing pull in terms of where we belong. How adjacent perhaps to whiteness and blackness. We belong or whether we belong here at all right because that's as we began this conversation. Talking about a cyclic thing where it seems like American decides. We don't belong so I you know one of the things I think about. This documentary series is how well that that subtext kind of plays out in in the way that the narrative has been framed. And when you're trying to do one hundred and fifty years of history you have to actually will. You can't tell all of it. It's really not in real time. So how did you decide what to include and whatnot? They're just so much right. You've got yeah you've got five episodes. And then the and the whole of Asian America. Yes so so. What do you do and as you know? Country Music got thirteen hours. Five hours hundred Fifty Years American history. How many how many hours did baseball in the civil war? I well Vietnam workout seventeen or something like that. But I mean that's that's fine a deserved it. But you know countries excessive.

Us Supreme Court DAN United States Ucla TIN Baseball Vietnam Country Music Asian America India
Fighting Fires with Lt. Sarinya Srisakul, FDNY'S First Asian Woman Firefighter

$6.99 Per Pound

9:05 listening | 2 months ago

Fighting Fires with Lt. Sarinya Srisakul, FDNY'S First Asian Woman Firefighter

"We're GONNA introduce guest richest guest. You WanNa take it away. Sure thanks this. We have another righteous guest up. She is the first ever Asian American female firefighter for the New York City. Fire departments and now the first Asian women lieutenant in the near New York City Fire Department. Please welcome Serena's Russa cool so perhaps we usually start off with asking our guests like describe what you do right because sometimes stylised or they're in entrepreneur and you have a title where it's like a firefighter. It's pretty planetary on the surface. But I don't think most people know like what really means. Fighter could you kind of simply due in Lieutenant House? Oh yeah so. I'll talk a little bit about finger. Firefighters I and Lieutenant so as a firefighter besides qualifiers you also do a medical calls for accidents stuck elevators electrical water utility emergencies Water main breaks Anything that doesn't neatly fit in the category of like what? Police officer does usually. It's the Fire Department. See something say something. We show up to that Any weird random rescues anyway that that's the fire department and sounds like is like better better to be safe than sorry kind of situations where you show up fully geared up with the big as like trump and and it's like a cigarette. Yeah our code for when they're smoking weed is it. Smells like incense. It smells like wink. Wink City colitis incense situation. So before you get into the lieutenant part what you were saying you do you guys cover pretty much everything that the police department wouldn't cover a lot with them to you. Yeah so they show up Even medical calls US ambulances and them show up so you obviously had your tenure in that space. So y'all can you describe what that sure basically? I'm just the supervisor so boss the boss there is. You're saying firetruck. There was a fire truck. There's a fire engine. The engine was the difference. Engine has hosing them back. So it's like the shorter rig And so out of fire. Engines stretch the hose line and put the fire out right and it's heavy unwieldy hose so you need a team and they're the ones that need the hydrant right the truck. They have the ladders in the back. So they're the ones that do the ventilation and they do the searches so there have the ladders for the people who are trapped inside. Yeah so and with the I guess. The utility emergencies the engines go to medical emergencies and the trucks go to the stock elevators and water leaks. So that's how we divide up tasks. Yeah so when you look at a rid great Either in an engine or truck. The person who's driving is called a chauffeur and the person next to the show for the officer. And it's either a lieutenant or a captain so in every fire company there's three lieutenants and one captain so I'm a brand new lieutenant so I don't have a permanent station right now. So I'm kind of like a substitute teacher. So whenever any officers sick or on vacation I cover their spot for when they're gone. I'm in North Queens. Which is where I'm assigned So as an officer. I'm a supervisor. Supervise the crew. I'm working with for the day and I do the paperwork for like their how they get paid. People were As a crew during the day. Let's say it's a car accident at the work on that. Cpr Do paperwork on that anything like that. That's the job of the officer to do the paperwork for whatever emergency does and make the decisions Of the best things to do in a fire situation the officers go in with the insight team of the truck and You know you help locate the fire if you're in the truck if you're in the engine then you like hall for whatever needs to happen for the crew to bring in to help fight the fire. Okay got you. I mean thousand foes. Luggage very thorough. There's so many different layers to it. A military base allow paramilitary organization. So we want to rewind a little bit about your beginnings in his career like as Joe mentioned early on the First Asian woman firefighter and ESPN. Y Yes I mean. The FDA wide probably existed for what three four Hundred Years Ono sixty three hundred gifts more than a century. Yes obviously in. Women firefighter in its history. Yes I was the only for a long time. I recently told us a little bit about that. Like what like. What made you decide to do that? I like if you could just kind of explain to us what's What was that like? Yeah it is a good question because it is very different and unique for someone like me to go into this world but I was recruited by my friend who really wanted to be be. A firefighter actually went to school. Down THE STREET FROM HERE. I went to Parsons School of design studying illustration that yeah yeah. It was kind of more Typical route even though. It's atypical or school. But there are other Asian women who are and My Friend Really WanNa be a firefighter was living in San Francisco. Came back to New York When New York was hiring Just want to put a note in New York. Only hires once every four years just crazy? Yeah and you have to be seventeen and a half two older than twenty nine. So he can't be older than twenty years old to take the test so I happen to be twenty one at the time and my friend was like just kind of thought. I was a great job and I never really was exposed to any civil service jobs like my mom was a nurse and my dad like worked at a lake at an office. You know For Asian Shipping Company. And so I didn't really was exposed firefighters cops or anything like that and so I got dragged to this orientation that the fire department was having was first time. I met women firefighters and they showed. It was a really corny presentation They showed us like they. Call us. Sizzle reel fire like Microsoft word. Who SO QUIRKY EVENT CALENDARS NO? Hell no hell no it. Was you know honestly it was looking at the other women and seeing how diverse they were me like? They were like short women's hall when they were League. Normal looking. Women are different than them. If they can do it. You know Addis predisposition thought of what that person looked like right as like a normal person would like firefighter. Thousand Two right after nine eleven. It was right after nine. Eleven and everything in the media was not just a man but a white man And how brave they were and this and that and you know. I guess it was more a fear of like. I don't WanNa die like going to work. It was three hundred forty. Three people died that day and it was like this horrible thing that happened. Everyone's like Kinda shellshocked But then you know they addressed it at Orientation. They said like the trainings really good. You get to help people I went to art school after that. I was in communion organizing worked in the nonprofit world for awhile and you know at the end of the day just wanted to help people The nonprofit world doesn't pay very much and I saw how much firefighters were making union job all the retirement. You Know My pension it's twenty years and retire and I'll say oh I can retire my forties. This is great. You know I was really like bought into a and being the first Asian woman I knew at the time I would have been the first one so that really was appealing to me to to break that barrier so I just like went

Officer Fire Department New York City Lieutenant House Supervisor City Fire Department United States Serena Wink City Asian Shipping Company Parsons School Of Design North Queens San Francisco Addis JOE FDA ONO League
Being a Women of Color in the Workplace

$6.99 Per Pound

7:25 listening | 2 months ago

Being a Women of Color in the Workplace

"Going to talk about what we usually talk about outsider podcasts reporting which is our workplace and being a person of color of a female of women of Color in the workplace. And how we navigate microaggressions unconscious bias. Balancing all of that with professionalism and has been saying and we just wanted to open it up to the floor and made them can go around and talk about what our individual workplace flake and looks like literally like you know what what does that look like and maybe like the industry that we're ends. Do you WANNA start. Let's see yeah. Sure I currently work at a sales agency and a fashion multi line. Show Room so Pretty much do is just Where in wholesale and the wholesale industry so I work with European designers and After fashion week happens we kind of just like get the collections and we prep it and we see buyers from like Nordstrom burke door of two in the independent Boutiques so our job is pretty much just saw the designers collection during a certain amount of time But I've been in the industry for a while for maybe like three four years professionally before that I was like freelancing and doing other things to buy. The wholesale industry is interesting because in the fashion side. It's not very diverse. It's I been through a lot of trade shows and doing you know market week in Paris but often times. The women selling the clothing are always wait. Do and it's so interesting because the men's industry is buried divers. Wow that's surprising Why do you think that is? I just think men like to work together. True true true. Yes I think so I think women I think naturally were just very Kind of I don't want to say like cliquey but we just kind of you know ten to a little sore already. Yeah I think so and you know when you have a show room with a lot of white women. It's usually. They got to tend to only hire white women green. Yeah what about you Angie? You're in fashion too. So I work for Steve Madden. I do marketing and social media so like comments. Dmz on working with influencers doing behind the scenes now for like our photo shoots and our campaigns and things like that. It's it's different. I've been doing this for since April and before that I was still st man. But I was doing the wholesale side but I've been in the fashion and I've only ever worked in fast. Yeah Higher Being St Man and I've only ever worked retail and like briefly out of showroom. Yeah and with that workplace look like and what does it look like now? Okay so when it comes to retail retail can be very diverse by. Yeah when you start looking at the people that are being promoted Israeli. Never the people like you. It's usually like white women. Yeah Or is usually like white women are one is our want to say like women are people that are like white passing and honestly the same thing for corporate. Yeah I'm in my personal opinion That's really like all you see. They're the ones that make the decisions whether you can relate to them or not And that's it's tough. Yeah no I think I and I'm in a similar boat as well so I work at Cnn's great story and it is a media company kind of like a startup be summation before that out that MTV and it's interesting when I was an MTV it was. I didn't appreciate did. They versity as much because it was actually very diverse. But as Andy said it gets less diverse as you go further up to the top. It's usually like the hustling coordinators or laying. Junior managers are like people of Color. And they're actually doing the creative work and executing and but then sometimes like the people who are getting the credit or approving budgets or have making the thought leadership decisions. Aren't the people who are on the ground and it? It was diverse but as you said it was not ever so the top. I'm in a situation now where I think it's even less diverse and especially in the creative editorial side. Yeah there's only one black producer no one now. We have one Asian producer. And it's interesting too because I think being Asian American. There's like spaces where it might be diverse but it's still underrepresented in terms of like the Asian perspective whereas like in finance or accounting. Maybe there's an overrepresentation of Asian Americans and like less reputation. Everywhere else I think in media it can kind of toss up depending on where you work And Yeah it's pretty dismal. There's can be such big improvement and I don't know if you guys experienced this but especially when you're making content bat is for a diverse community or your featuring a character or even a models or like maybe they wanna work with an influence or who's like not white then it's all for the purpose of of like selling something or trying to use diversity as a coin like a badge on their shoulder to be like. Hey like we'll call diverse. We are like our workplaces multiverse right so that is kind of like the the liberal daily things that I struggle with of. Sometimes they're like. Oh we know we have a long way to go in terms of diversity but the stories we tell her David or some just like is not problematic. Right Right Yeah. I think even for me just from what I've noticed is like I think it it truly bothers me even when I look at like certain photo shoots or campaigns not even from like necessarily where I work but just from like other companies and it's like they have like that one token blogger or like that one token Spanish girl. Ah just to exactly just to say that you had them in there like Oh Nolan. Little more diverse. It's like it's kind of like that. Like white person in caterer but I have a black Friday morning God. No that's not totally like this is so different and I think it's like this is what I say Especially when it comes to companies. It's like you have the most diverse. Like when you look at the demographics of who is buying your product More often than not they are people of Color. Yeah but your campaigns never show that And that is the biggest thing that I struggle with. And then for me. It's also like well. Why am I gonNA WANNA follow you? Social Media Yeah because like now. I'm in that social media realm so like now like I I really like pay its engines and things like that so I I you know. I love this brand. Their campaigns don't really represent me. Yeah I don't really know how I feel about this because then now I'm looking at it like okay. Well who are the top executives that are in? You know that are a part of your company like who's making these decisions. Why do they think that this that? I'm supposed to really to this person that you're showing you know for

Producer Nordstrom Burke Paris MTV Steve Madden Angie CNN Andy David
Lia Park and the Missing Jewel by Jenna Yoon

Books and Boba

4:43 listening | 2 months ago

Lia Park and the Missing Jewel by Jenna Yoon

"Aladdin acquired debut middle great author Jenner Unions Korea. Methology inspired novel Leah Park and the missing jewel pitched as Harriet. The spy meets race to the Sun. This contemporary finally follows a twelve year old. Who was a part of a magical spy organization and must use her skills as she chases clues with your best friend to rescue her parents from an evil diviners spirit. Publication is scheduled for summer. Twenty twenty two re-re. Do you know which career mythology this is inspired by. Not a clear. Nothing with joy. I think we've mentioned as like multiple times on those podcasts. My my knowledge for Korean mythology and folklore almost non-existent ninety two. And that's about maybe it's a social world where it's like you have like the Fox spirits and the what do you guys call Goblins in the whole k. Drama Potter Right. Yeah took maybe yeah. Yeah but but the English title is Goblin Magical spy organization. I mean there were spy networks In like quote Unquote Futile Korea. So it might just be like a spin on that. I don't know sorry. I'm like a very uneducated person when it comes to Korean mythology. Yeah I have nothing to contribute. One of our listeners can witness or we can talk to one of these days. Yeah so next up little. Be Yellow Jacket. Bought North American rights to writer food long and illustrator and Rica's graphic novel black blood in a world where magic is outlawed a young age versus the Kingdom of Aliyah to rescue his sister. Publication is set for fall. Twenty twenty one a lot of magic. I love it. We need it. We need a desperately time coming out until two thousand twenty one okay. That's for though next. Inky wordpress acquired debut author Kylie Baker's the keeper of the night and it sequel set in nineteenth century Japan that is haunted by the goddess of death. The novel stars a half reaper. Have Sheena Gami copy between her two worlds and belonging to neither as she fights monsters and struggles for acceptance. Publication is set for fall. Twenty twenty one way so half reaper. Have Schnitt gummy. So like is that like some sort of hopper situation where you're half lake the Western death and half the the eastern gotTA death. I'm not sure it wasn't really clear. If like half the half Chigney Gami part was just like Explaining what should he got me was a three per half. She got me but like I am not sure that is probably what it is because there is a common in between the two so. I totally read that wrong. I thought it was going to be a battle between death. And he's a nominee the Japanese of death and this this percents pick sides. This is still cool. I guess not. Yeah I mean like there's a lot of cool stuff out there. That's based on like shinnied. Gummy Lor like. That's always call like bleach and like you. Hawker show which bleach ripped off their soul eater. There's lot there's also death node obviously lots of good stuff to pull from. But if you think about it are we always haunted by? The God of death is in a constant state of being. Just think about well in these times against so so deep Marvin next up MC Eldery Books Bought Twenty Twenty Morris Award Finalist Nafisa Assads. Why a novel? The wild ones a broken anthem for a girl nation. The novel is a multi perspective feminist narrative about a fierce band of magic wielding girls. The wild ones who have survived unspeakable things and are determined to save other girls from the cruelties and tragedies they have had to endure. Publication is set for summer. Twenty twenty one. I feel like there are a lot of these stories coming on now involving like a is which organizations like I think I think like May Matt like Magic Organization has always been part of literature. It used you're seeing an uptick for the next year or two years. Judging by like the book deals that people have been

Twenty Twenty Twenty Twenty Morris Japan Chigney Gami Sheena Gami Korea Methology Magic Organization Leah Park Aladdin Jenner Harriet Kylie Baker Hawker TA Writer Rica Nafisa Assads Marvin
Novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen on Cultural Authenticity

Asian Enough

8:33 listening | 2 months ago

Novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen on Cultural Authenticity

"You grew up in San Jose California. Your parents open a grocery store tells about that experience. What was that like in? What was their journey like what what brought them here. Why did they come to California? My family fled the Vietnam War. But I'm thirty thousand other Vietnamese refugees because we were on the losing side and my parents in particular. Were were hardcore Catholics and Hardcourt Catholics Communists. And so they fled from the communist twice in nineteen fifty four when the country was divided and they were in the north to the south and then they fled again in nineteen seventy five so the refugees twice and then they came resettled in Harrisburg Pennsylvania For few years And there you have to realize my parents have been very successful. In Vietnam. They'd been born. Peasants work their way up and became wealthy and then lost a lot of that coming to the United States arrived here as refugees and their American sponsors expected them to be poor refugees. Who would be satisfied with class or even menial jobs and that's what they did in Harrisburg for a few years. But they'd obviously we're not satisfied with that and a good friend in San Jose who said this is a promised. Land and weather's good. There are a lot of Asians out here and I just opened up a grocery store so they came out and worked with her at probably the first Vietnamese grocery store in San Jose in nineteen seventy eight and then opened the second Vietnamese grocery store right down the street for some reason. I don't have their friends all about that. But you know we live the Classic Refugee or immigrant American Success Story. Which meant you know? My parents climb the ladder yet again. Rebuilt their wealth and that exacted huge physical and emotional toll on them and emotional toll on me. I'm thankful they didn't make me work in the store because they didn't want me to do that. They wanted my brother to get an education but what I saw growing up. Was My parents working twelve to fourteen hour days almost every day of the year and working in a very dangerous environment you know there was shot in their store. We were robbed at gunpoint at home. My parents were always very paranoid about these kinds of issues. And I'm saying we had this class classic immigrant refugee story because they spent all their time working in order to support my brother and me and and and give a good life but of course what that meant. Is there no time to spend with us? So that's just the classic immigrant or refugee double bind and that's part of what it meant to be having this lonely traumatized childhood for me. Which in the positive sense gave me the requisite emotional damage necessarily become a writer thankful for that inherited trauma you mentioned earlier. And it's something that's really hard to explain to the everyday reader because it sounds a little bit academic you know but like when it comes down to is basically like what your parents went through and how it affected you. I don't know if you could kind of talk about the specifics of that any sort of characteristics that your parents might have passed down well. My parents were devout Catholics and Catholics. Like to suffer so in a sense we were very well equipped to deal with being refugees and immigrants because my parents suffered a lot Both in terms of just having to work really really hard and and also of course they. They survived thirty years of war in Vietnam from Nineteen forty-five to nineteen seventy five which which killed millions of people. So I have no what they had to go through to become the people that the Rx conceptual way. That's the consequences of that. Just in terms of their refugee shopkeeper lifestyle and even though they became very successful financially in the inheritor of that I also grew up feeling that we were poor made a lot of money but they were not spending it on anything and I think that watching them suffer in watching them work as much as they did. Made me not want to do what they did? But ironically I've turned into someone almost exactly like them in the sense that I work constantly now working very nice job being a professor and being writer but I'm always working and I suffer in my own way. Not Getting not in the grinding way that shopkeepers have to go through. But writing has kind of a a suffering for internal suffering journal suffering right but if you ask any writer will most writers. They're tormented by the struggle being a writer and as elite of a lifestyle as at as it is Nevertheless I think I've I've been quipped to deal with that. Based on what? I saw my parents go through and just absorbing the workaholic Catholics lifestyle. I think in my life own family. Like the way that my mom is very sort of pathological about saving money and maximizing it and that's because she grew up very poor now. I find myself thirty two earning enough money to buy a pair of shoes. The costs more than twenty dollars. Now that make you feel free. Can't do you really can't you know and and somebody told me that? I had the shoes of a restaurant worker a couple years ago now. I need to fix this and even my dad. You know when you go back home and they do your laundry for you. Here's looking at my clothes. You know it was like you need new clothes. Why don't you buy some new things you know so these things will leave a mark guy off of that what year work is in the kinds of writing that you do require so much self-knowledge as well you grew up in the bay area which is a diverse place. I also grew up in East Bay. Your south by East Bay But for me being Asian American as a kid in a very diverse place was great in some ways because it's diverse and I didn't stand out in the ways that frank for example in Tennessee has talked about very different but by the same token there are things that you've written about your experience growing up. I really relate to in that I was so intensely aware of the otherness other people perceived when they looked at me and it gave me a chip on my shoulder head a lot of like anger and resentment about the and it was really hard to know what to do with that for a long time so then to become a writer who writes about these things. You know. You're not running like fairy tales or SCI FI movies. You're you're writing is very close to these experiences in. I wonder how did you process what enabled you to get to that point? And and what was your experience like growing up. Well it's kind of interesting they'll give hearing about both of your life experiences because you could see where Franks experience would mean that. He would obviously feel like a complete other yet. We grew up in the multicultural bay area and I grew up in Vietnamese and Mexican neighborhood and so on but I still felt that that sense of otherness. And I think that's because even if we did live in a multicultural environment Dominant American culture is still was and still is dominated by white people inside like to say. I didn't really experienced that many direct episodes of racism experts if you've small ones but nevertheless I felt like we were all irradiated by racism. Just out there on the airwaves you know from. Tv Movies Radio Shock. Jocks this kind of stupid stuff that was going on. And so I felt that on absorbing that another hand also receiving support from the Vietnamese community and from an implicit Asian American community. So I went to this all white high school mostly. What High School Bunch of us? Who were of Asian descent? We knew we were different. We just didn't know how so. We've gathered a corner of the campus every day for lunch and we call ourselves. The Asian invasion reclaimed didn't have the language we knew her Asian. But we most of those guys never became political like I became political. So what happened. I think it was a combination of this Catholicism that I was raised with the suffering and the sense of sacrifice willing sacrifice I'm going to be a martyr and then I went to Berkeley and I was already an atheist. I couldn't be a Catholic martyr. Became an Asian American martyr. You know at Berkeley became immediately radicalized there and that was partly through political activism on the campus but also wanting to be writer in the context of the traditions of Asian American African American literature but also American literature I did a PhD in American literature. And I thought I'd I'm not going to refuse being Vietnamese or Asian American but I'm also at the same time going to claim my Americanised as well. I'm gonNA write stuff that goes in both directions. I did have big chip on my shoulder. Still do around about people just aren't angry enough. I came out of a Berkeley tradition. Where anger was good. Being radical was good. And then you look out at the landscape of Vietnamese and Asian literature. Sometimes you think well it's well written but maybe there's enough anger that's not enough politics in there. There has been in the past so I wanted to be someone who would incorporate both the politics of the Asian American tradition with what I imagined to be the highest levels of aesthetics and literature. That was my

Writer Vietnam San Jose California Franks California San Jose Harrisburg Pennsylvania Berkeley East Bay United States Harrisburg Americanised Sci Fi Professor Tennessee
Racism in the Time of Coronavirus With Phil Yu of 'Angry Asian Man'

Long Distance

8:25 listening | 2 months ago

Racism in the Time of Coronavirus With Phil Yu of 'Angry Asian Man'

"I've been following your posts on twitter and I know you're tracking a lot of what's going on in terms of Anti Asian racism xenophobia and hate crimes related to cove in nineteen. I myself as you know. Experience something very recently As angry Asian man. What are you noticing in terms of the things that are happening? Asian-americans what are the stories that are sticking with you? I mean this is coming for a little while no actually. It was a slow trickle but us we started hearing about people giving people funny. Looks Giving Asians Weird looks and interacting weird handshakes and things like that are non handshakes. It's just as escalated now. Now that covert is in the news. Twenty four seven people. Want someone to blame you know what I mean and it just feels like it's really come to head now and it's. It's actually almost halfway acceptable. I think everybody knows that. This is a major concern. And so I feel like Asians are kind of the face of this in a way and And that's that's frightening scary and when you say it's been a slow trickle like when did you start kind of hearing about racist incidents or or seeing it in the news it started about a month back maybe and I it was just jokes right? It was just like people making fun of others. Like if you're Asian and you're sneezing or coughing in public like people would like give you a funny look or even say something you know and like a kids with other Asian kids on the playground Corona Virus. It started escalate. Maybe two weeks back. We started hearing about more verbal harassment or people being on edge and then the last week really is when it blew up. I mean look. Historically Asians is always been kind of seen as. There's always been this stereotype of Asians as dirty as as as foreign and creating brain disease this country right. It's it's sort of this. The stereotype has been used to drum up xenophobia and Anti Asian. Hate in this country. This goes back you know since the beginning of this country and so the viruses origins and China. That's a ripe ready. Excuse for people to use that to direct their hate at Asians once again. You know it's part of the whole yellow peril complex that this country seems to be mired in I through its history. I'm glad you brought up history because just off the top of my head. I think about like Japanese Americans during World War Two and how they faced. You know incarceration in concentration camps at that time. They were being blamed in their japanese-american right. Can you think of other or can you can share other times in history? That kind of stick out. That are maybe similar to what we're experiencing right now. I mean around the time with the sort of the Anti Asian sentiment that resulted in the Chinese exclusion act. I mean there. There're people rounding up Asians in towns and driving them out and lynching them you know it's always when people feel threatened economically there's economic anxiety around sort of the threat of Asian labor force or even in the eighties win. The Japanese auto industry was kind of a threatening the American auto industry right. I mean you saw like a deep anti-japanese segment during that time which resulted in the death of it's enchanting exactly. I'm glad you brought that up. Because I was honestly thinking about him because he was Chinese American and he was beat up. Asians are all the same right so these guys are just placed their anger on this one person and it led to his death. I mean I couldn't I I write about sort of hate crimes and and racism and stereotypes and a lot of anti-asian stuff over the years And I've always felt relatively like it's always grim and it's hard to hear but I've always felt relatively safe and privilege from where I stood. You know what I mean. You know when trump tweeted and called it the China virus for the first time publicly. That was the first time I actually felt like could endanger you. Know really like an illegitimate way. You know I just thought about like how I run errands and in the evenings you know go get gas or groceries or something like that and I don't know for the first time I was like I don't know if I feel totally one hundred percent safe going out alone you know in this climate and I'm korean-american you know but people see my face they're not gonNA give a shit about that right. You brought up being afraid or feeling uncertain by going out. I mean I after what I experienced. You know that was in Eagle Rock. Which is pretty Filipino neighborhood? So I thought I was in a safe environment right but you know this can't be the first time in your life you felt. Like someone's accosted you for being Asian though right now but it's the first time for a related to like pandemic I've never lived there pandemic. Yeah right but I feel like this sentiment has always been kind of simmering below the surface. You know what I mean like your you know. We talk a lot about the model minority myth you know. And that was that's sort of this weird characterization of Asians as being able to assimilate very well you know be successful and stuff like that. It's deeply problematic. But you know that whole thing shatters actually would never were faced with something like this right where you know. Guess what you're never really going to assimilate ever you're never that welcome here. You have this face that makes you stick out you know. It's it's that perpetual foreigner. Our communities always characterized by you know and so guess what it just take this moment here to give people the green light to express that you know and how quickly things can turn right. Yeah I mean you. You've been covering this for almost twenty years right. How do you compare this moment to other things you've covered in the past? I mean ever seen anything like this before what's happening in terms of racism and xenophobia. No I've never seen anything like this. I've read about it right. We have these historical examples where it was very much the case with like this kind of sentiment and violence was very real and very out in the open but this is the first time in my lifetime where it feels like this is. Oh this is like one of those moments history. And I don't like I don't like the feeling of living through it honestly Yeah no this is. This is nothing really like this. I mean a global pandemic is. It's a nightmare scenario. Now it's real and then the stuff that comes along with that with regard to my identity my community. I had never really wanted to let myself think about that. But it's here you know. Yeah I mean. What do you think's GonNa Happen? What's your outlook on this in the coming weeks or months or even years and do you see anything positive or any changes had. I think it's GonNa get it's GonNa get worse you know what I mean It's going to get worse before it gets better. I hate to paint a bad brush in be alarmist but I'm I am truly like Kinda frightened by this in concerned this sentiment this anti-asian feeling across the United States is on the open. You know and people are mad and confused and scared and they want someone to blame in so you know I think it might get worse and then it'll get better. I you know the other part of that is that were more equipped to fight back or more equipped to raise this as an issue. I would hope that we have more allies to recognize this as well. Honestly it is hard to combat when you have the person in charge being totally okay with it you know. Is there anything? Asian Americans should be doing. You think or something we can do in this moment. You just mentioned like bringing this up calling it out when we can but are there other kind of tangible things you think about not to give us more work in the time of global pandemic let you. I think it's a good time to reflect recognized that this is our moment where we're going through a great deal of hardship but this is also the story of America in the ser- marginalized people throughout this country's history. You know it's been bad for everybody particularly bad at different points in history. This unfortunately is another part or story. Right and so Maybe recognizing that this kind of hardship or suffering it goes across all groups goes across all the all the folks who try to make it in trying to get by. I don't know man I I yeah. I hope we can all get together. We're going to get through this as a

China Twitter Harassment Eagle Rock America United States
A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

Asian Enough

5:42 listening | Last month

A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

"The story that works. You know I've had thousands of people over the years reach out. It's not just me not saying we read this book or we listen to this. We Watch this. And we didn't even realize some of the assumptions we held or the prejudices. We had about Muslims until we heard your story and was like Oh my God. You're just you're just like any of us and and you know it made it much more self aware I think storytelling is one of the most powerful aspects. Storytelling is what changes people's hearts and minds really. Nothing else works. What were some of the stories that I made you feel that like even growing up. You're always like a writer at heart. What were the stories that I took hold in you? Where did you get them? You know the stories growing up as an American Muslim when before nine eleven honestly a lot of people had no or maybe before the Iran hostage crisis. I'm trying to think of what international event made me realize that I'm a Muslim probably the first the first Gulf War. I remember the Gulf War. I was in middle school and the war began in the middle of the day and teacher came over to me and said hey tell your uncle Saddam Hussein to back off or something and I said who is it. Almost saying I'm not era. I don't even know what's happening and I was a kid. But you know a lot of the stories really just came from like my parents handing down stories like stories out of our religious traditions cultural tradition as an adult. I realize what's problematic with a lot of the stories? They're wonderful stories of very heroic stories but they also set up this false like idealism. That didn't allow us to feel like if you're a Muslim you can also have false. You can make mistakes. You can screw up because all the stories were told. Were about people who are just incredibly honorable. Did the most amazing things. And that's what you aspire to And that's what you're supposed to be What's an example? Gosh I mean one example is like my name so I'm named after medieval century like Muslim female saint one of the only Muslim female saints I best known I think she lived in the twelfth century. I don't even know Rubio other. We and you know the story I was told about her growing up. Was that you know she was incredibly right. Just and pious and she spent her days worshiping God in the evening she would go out and teach people and she had so much faith in God that she she just kind of stayed cloistered in this little space that she told people. Don't bring me any food. Because will deliver me. Sustenance and food would appear out of nowhere so for a little kid to be like okay I got like visas does incredible role model and And she says she was an amazing saint from what we know. But of course over the years you don't know what's been added to the tradition and it was just kind of this this really high expectation of piety and religious righteousness. That is really almost impossible to meet. Because you tell us a little bit about where you grew up your born in Pakistan and ended up in Maryland right. Yeah so I thought this was only like six or seven I was. I was under one when my parents came over here. Fundraising United States and my dad worked for the US Department of Agriculture. He was a veterinarian. And a lot of people don't know there's like this huge Boccassini veterinary like a whole gang of them in the US Department of Agriculture. They all came over in the seventies what we grew up in very small agricultural towns because of that. Because my dad had to work where you know where there was agricultural business oh Kansas Delaware Lancaster County Pennsylvania just very remote places where we were often the only people of color not just the only Muslim but really there were there. Were places where there were no other black people know. They're black families so very small town America. Then when I got about high school is when we kind of moved to a slightly bigger town with with diversity in it so but most of my formative years in adult life. I've grown up around the beltway. Northern Virginia or Maryland. And that's where I am. Now you've written on your blog that your parents know how to be quote critical of where we've been and where we are without throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Yeah I guess I just wanted to know how your parents raised you and how that shaped you my parents you know. They left boxes on one thousand nine hundred seventy nine hundred seventy s block. Assad never left them so as time moved on their idea of what's culturally appropriate for us was forever one thousand nine hundred seventy something bucks on. Meaning you know my dad would be like. Why don't you have your hair? Your hair should be in two braids and it should be well oiled and dress a certain way and you should at home. We always wore a boxing enclosing home. You know we only eight bucks any food at home but the funny thing is we would visit Baucus on like in the eighty s and ninety s people over there would be like all the women have their care cut and permed and look really cute and they'd be like what is wrong with you people. Why do you look like like? You're from a blast from the past. But you know my my parents are. My Dad is a very spiritual person. He's not like a a religious person. Like ritualistic my mom is much more religious. My mom raised us with some really strong values. And look the one thing that we heard and over and over again is the whole purpose of your life is how you're going to serve other people like what are you. GonNa do with all the education. The time the health the wealth the youth everything you have is basically like a test like we're being tested for. What are you GonNa do with it? That's the whole point of being here and so you know I. I always appreciate that because I think that's the one thing that's driven me to always feel like there's more there's more to do. There's a lot more to do.

Us Department Of Agriculture United States Maryland Saddam Hussein Iran Writer Pakistan Kansas Delaware Lancaster Coun Rubio Assad Baucus Boccassini Virginia
Being a International Student During the Virus with Zeyi Yang

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6:29 listening | Last month

Being a International Student During the Virus with Zeyi Yang

"So did we miss anything? Is there anything else? The listeners should know blow introduction took. It's your fault because you made it long because you're involved in so many things So that's I mean it's so crazy. It's like a full circle because I think when we were researching on on what questions. We should ask her and everything when we first started the project by the way listeners. If you guys have been caught up check that episode out. You wrote that article and you know you interview these people who are from John who are getting ahead and thinking about. How do we rebuild this place? Could you tell us like the story behind that article how you pitched it Your involvement Sure I'll so I pitched it because of course I am. One always have a lot of connections. They're always looking at wore. My people are doing this and I know there are non loud but some will have people here in United States or vary warrior. Just like me and I try to do something for home. Even if we're just we're like miles away from so I connected to I v because I talk to a New York based organization. They're like comprised fully off Wuhan People Or It's a name. It's called Yellow Crank Club. I believe so. They were all like people from John or have connections to Wuhan der here. They're professionals and they tell me. Oh I these organizing this report project. It he she'll be the best person that you can talk to mark to know her. Howard to know her and also besides hurt because I went to school in John onto onto college so I have a lot of friends or like like school. Connections also here. I also talked to them of a hot. What they have done for the city and those are pretty much one made up Was in the article for self strain of morning. Post. That's crazy. So how long did it take for you to Pitch Shit and then for you to write the whole thing up where people really enthusiastic about helping you out? Yeah I think so. I pitched to the editor actually is through Nodar Hon. Journalists also here in New York also So that probably approved that a very soon like after one or two days because He saw veteran. And then I did an interview in like one week I think I can I can. I said I have a lot of school school friends from Wuhan. So it's really easy to connect to people from and there were I think was actually the last person I talked to. The article Easier to got to off today. I feel like okay. I got everything I use. Probably not a week to ride article and then shaky S. journalists to journalists. You know you have any questions for Zee on I mean I yeah so I think a quick question that I wanted to ask you know A little bit about South China Morning Post If you'RE A ASIAN-AMERICAN I'm not saying all Asian Americans speak Chinese but I mean especially if you are of Chinese American background south China morning poses kind of like the most relevant newspaper that covers Chinese American Chinese issues around the world can dumb. Can you kind of explain to the listeners? Like what is like a like. What is the American counterpart for like the South China Morning Post in like how relevant it is India and the Chinese community right? Well that's a big question I will say it is probably one of my most trusted publication that reports a lot about China though is English newspaper based in Hong Kong. So Iri but he really looks a lot of different regions like not just Hong Kong Bar. They have a lot of stuff in mainland China. They have a loan stuff in other Asian countries. They're looking at like the whole that. I guess Asian Pacific region so and also I feel like I do like to resuscitate him more money because they usually presented a very balanced views. A NAS saying they don't have like a Pro China China views. They do but then you kind of see a balance of all different. They're all diverse views injured. So that's why I usually have a US my go-to new sources for like English articles about China. I see I see so like I mean I think I think when when when lot of Americans when they think of Chinese media they have a sense of a skewed perception or I wouldn't set. Well maybe skewed isn't the right word but they have a preconceived notion that you know a mainstream media in China to be Control you know what I'm saying by the government to to to a massive degree I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with that point but Would you say like you know I just go off on what you just said earlier? Like you know if you are like a American of somebody who was not Chinese were living in China. Would you recommend like with south China morning? Post like the go-to newspaper that you would recommend for a Americans to Kinda get informed about Chinese issues. I think it's is a pretty hard question to answer. A first of all to is true. That most of the media based in China are heavily censored is that I didn't say a man I asked him to go back your hand. James Right yeah. Because it's true that Because Autumn Media Inge based in China are subject to kind of like the administration regulations about it slow either administering Goto Demonstrate Unique article. They have to comply with that sadly the truth but endure a lot of nuances in there is like it's not every single be censored in China

China South China Morning Post Pro China China Wuhan New York John United States Yellow Crank Club Hong Kong Bar James Right Hong Kong Nodar Hon Editor Howard Pacific India ZEE
Chef Niki Nakayama's First Food Memory

Asian Enough

7:00 listening | Last month

Chef Niki Nakayama's First Food Memory

"We want to know what was your first food memory. My first food memory. One of my favorite things to eat is I just love rice and then not just rice but I love eggs in races so lake any kind of eggs generally. When I was growing up in Japanese food you can eat raw eggs but in the cat so we have to like a pan fry are boil it. But it's the idea of mixing that with the rice important slice sauce on it if there's nothing to eat eggs and rice was that you making that for yourself or is it somebody else making it for you. That was my grandma and my mom making for me and then when I got to do things at home because at cravings I got very creative creative with like found ingredients. Yes let one of my best things that I felt that I created when I was young so I was craving pizza. But we don't have pizza at home and it's not like you can make pizza. So I just got like the USA dumpling. Skin and I put regular spaghetti sauce on it. Cut The craft slices of Cheddar cheese and some ham and a toasted and I was like. Oh my God. It's pizza aided and then I gave it to my sister. She's like that's bad shirts pizza. Now you're like see it was cuisine. Yes see those creative. Your Mom's food like we ain't a lot of like Japanese style American food for example like Omelette race or rice. We eat a lot of Tom. Cut Su Eight Curry rise we just had a lot of things like that but we also eight really cleanly to eat a lot of like you know Japanese. They say oh she. It's just like boiled vegetables. Soya sauce or just very simply my parents. They started as seafood market and then they would always have fish and seafood at home and I remember growing up thinking. I hate seafood. Engages won't meet. Can we just have meat in there? Like no secret is good for you. Is that household like where you can get a lot of things. But you're like I just want something else. Yeah I definitely grew up eating all Chinese food right and then I grew up in the south and so I wanted to try crystal and white castle like what was that food that you couldn't get you wanted to get McDonald's back in the days. When I was growing up that was what was nearby. It was like I looked to the left. It's McDonald's I looked at the Rights Burger King Well I wanted to ask you basically about kiosque and your experiences going to Japan and learning to cook that as a southern California born and raised japanese-american but I How would you describe Kaseke. I have to tell people when it comes to Seki that. It's the most formal way of dining in Japanese cuisine. Because it's a very completely thought out meal. It's not just you know where you randomly pick things and put it together. It's a formalized meal where you really have to think up a thing greedy and you also have to think about the cooking methods that really highlights ingredient and it's about seasonality about representing the area that you're in what. I always say that the thing that I love most about is that it's really about showing gratitude toward nature like this feeling of really appreciating what nature has to give you and then giving back by doing the best things that you can do to ingredients to highlight them and make him shine like honoring essence. Yes I didn't realize how. How much of an outsider? I was until I actually went to live in Japan because I remember going up here and thinking. Oh you know one day when I I remember like around the age of twelve hours. I think I want to go to Japan to study. I WanNa live there and Experienced that kind of life just to what it's like so different from what would've known and I thought that would would be an amazing experience for me to do it and I always had planned it in my mind. That was going to go after high school and just sort of experience the lifestyle and there was only when I actually went there. Did I realize like Oh my gosh? I think I'm so much more American than I recognized when I lived in America. Because there's just so many things that are so different from our lifestyles and there's so many cultural nuances that if you're not familiar with you could come off as being offensive to people. I felt like I had a really good education about those nuances. But it's only when I went there that I realized oh I can't walk around and eat at the same time because that's not what you do and your pen like and then. I can't sit in the subway with my legs spread out because I'm so tired like I just have to sit there properly and behave yet and I think one of the most hardest things when it comes to trying to get into what I wanted to do with cooking was finding the right place to sort of accept what I wanted to do. Luckily I had relatives there that were willing to take me in and give me that training and things like that but I felt that there are a lot of differences but at the heart of things I always feel like I can relate so it's very difficult I think at one time I really wanted to be a part of the society but then after as I got to know it a little bit more deeply I just felt like I think the best thing is just be who you are and you came home. Yeah well what was it actually like growing up here? I think one of the things that was different growing up here is unlike how it is. Maybe now there weren't as many Asian people when I was growing up and I felt like I had one Japanese class main ahead. Maybe like three Korean classmates may be there to Chinese consummates but it just felt very on some level isolating at one point. I hadn't really thought about it. Wasn't like a big deal wasn't like. I felt the need sort of not belonging that I noticed that there are differences. Thought about being as an I guess or being seeing how different you're from everyone else. Yeah you know what I didn't really think about being Asian until I actually moved to this end. Gabriel valley and that was really an unique experience because the high school I went to had. Maybe it was probably seventy percent Asian. The thing that struck me was like this is not how imagine highschool leg where all the cheerleaders and jocks that you see going on. Tv's and my high school does not look like this and That was the thing that blew my mom. I'm from Tennessee. So that was the thing that blew my mind. The most of California's there's a majority Asian highschools I was like one of you know two or three and my high school Tennessee. You know coming out here like I'm like oh I'm Asian and then there's all these other Asian people it's like I need

Japan California Tennessee USA Mcdonald Gabriel Valley America Kaseke
They Call Us Andrew Ahn

They Call Us Bruce

6:58 listening | 2 weeks ago

They Call Us Andrew Ahn

"We talk a little bit about what I heard that? Your Dad said in response to you coming out. Which was as I understand it. Something along the lines of okay. We get it but keep an open mind. Yeah it's it's a thing you know like I have to say like my dad has really My Dad's really Like grown and you know he said that which you know again like I kind of as as good as I could have hoped for but You know now. Like he's he's he's really you know like proud of me and happy for me and my career you know. I will say that like I wonder what this would have been like had. I not gotten into Sundance. You know with that film like know if the film sucks you know. Maybe like this wouldn't have gone over as well But you know it's they I think they were just kind of Shocked and I think they were also just like shocked by like how I did it. You know that I didn't just say like I'm gay like that. I made this fill like you know at one point during that conversation my mom said like. Did you make this film just to like do this to say that you're gay and I said Yeah. And my mom was like she just shook her head and she said. You really didn't have to do that. And you know I think Yeah I I just I think they were kind of just so in shock that it. It took them a a moment. But I will say like now like You know it's been a little bit up and down but You know I really feel their support and their excitement for me In my career the other story I really like is Is You explaining to Your Jeff? You'll appreciate this. The the explain to your dad. The how the odds of getting into Sundance. How like like a big deal. It was. Yeah so I I called my parents like immediately after I found out that I got into Sundance and And like my dad had kind of heard about it but he didn't really know what met in the way that like. I know what like what that meant for me in my career And so I. I told my parents I was like It's easier to get into Harvard than it is to get into sundance and suddenly they're like. Oh my God like like. My mom had reached out to the Korean newspaper. You know it's it's things like that Yeah you know it's so funny it's like Like I think they were probably still a little bit like worried about like me coming out in you know being so public about my sexuality but You know the fact that it was like an achievement. You know like like a good grade like getting into a good school like that. I think that made it a little bit easier. Which is terrible but like I'll take it like you know I I needed. I needed that win at that time in my life. It's like basically like getting into Super Harvard. It's movie Harvard. Exactly that's that's the only way they could get you know so that was your your first short and kind of your first taste of People being aware of you as a filmmaker and then from there did you. Did you immediately do spun? I was it? Was it the the next big project you did or was there was something between that. Yeah I mean you know after I I graduated from From Film School You know and a couple months later like played my thesis film at Sundance It really took me You know a couple years to to get a feature going to get spun it going and You know in the in the meantime I was a you. Know a applying to labs and workshops and you know fellowships things like that But I had a day job. You know like I was working as an admissions counselor for college You know I I ended up Like working at a Like a private Like Sat Academy in San Gabriel Like torturing these high school students you know like with the same torture that I had in high school and so I just you know you do have credentials of getting into the Harvard filibuster. It was just like you know it. Was this time in my life. Where I you know it's like I. I had to to pay the bills and films weren't going to do that and so You know I I had a day job. Had A desk job and and doing that was you. Know like actually like really Helpful for me and I feel like I learned a lot about myself about you. Know my just kind of my interpersonal skills. but You know I wanted to make films. I wanted to be a filmmaker and so I I had my i. You know On on the prize the all time and and Made Spun I. Finally you know four years after graduating from film school and then I just was like I gotta get this thing into the best film festival that I can you know. Let's let's go for the Harvard to film. Schools are a of Peissel's again and see if I can get into Sundance and you know we we. We got in and And I quit my job because I felt like if there were ever a moment to to do this. You know to really commit to being a filmmaker who's going to be now I. I often think about spun night because It was I remember I was at the premiere at Sundance. It was such a moving experience It really hit close to home in a lot of ways as a korean-american is the son of Immigrants Green immigrants but I also I also think about what a minor miracle it was. That film even exists on every level in terms of like it being like almost entirely in Korean. It's it's an American story but like it you know it's it's also coming of age gay drama and then also it's about like these sort of illicit hookups in you know in these Korean spas and you're like okay. The marketing for this is going to be very very delicate.

Sundance Like Sat Academy Harvard From Film School Jeff Peissel San Gabriel
They Call Us Alice Wu

They Call Us Bruce

5:48 listening | 3 weeks ago

They Call Us Alice Wu

"Saving face still feels to me like a genre of one in so many different ways. And that's not really a great thing in that you would think that after saving face the world will be filled with Asian American Lesbian Ron. Calm but the fact is the way that you the way that you actually told that story still to me is unique and has been until. I watched your second film. Thank you so. I'm glad you see a similar DNA. Because I think they're quite different films in that. I'm always worried that people who are like I love saving face are going to be deeply disappointed by this one because this is not saving face to. It's actually genre wise. It's actually quite different but I also very I've been told I've a very specific voice and so it's possible that that voice just comes through and both it's it's not just the voice I think but it's also things tangling with in this this larger notion which I think. We'll talk in more depth about of the layers intersectional layers. I think of what it means to be Asian American to be a woman to be not just heterosexual right. These are things which I think are pop. Culture hasn't done a great job of converging right and telling stories that are appealing to to a mass audience and I think he really successfully did that and saving face. I think you've done that here. It is very different but I think those are what make so necessarily that. You've told another story if you will how well thank you? I mean to be totally by though I thank you so much for what both of you just said. And you've obviously been definitely top. Three of the people who've helped keep this film alive hunting in between like took Jeff's articles loosen between Phil bringing it back for the ten year anniversary. And so I. I really appreciate that like you have no idea how much it's meant to me I it's funny because I I mean I knew. There's like a small very very rabid fan base for saving face but I always assumed it was really small like it's like all right me my friends. Everyone Dave dated. Maybe everyone those people have dated. And that's probably and then like that's ninety five percent of it and then like five percent or like creeper white guys you know and that's probably like the band base but the I do feel like one thing that was shocking to me is when as film got announced. It just seemed like a crazy number. People came out of the work to be like that. You know I've been waiting for another Mike. You have like what I didn't even know this this and And I probably honestly is probably better for me. I didn't know that because I think it would have freaked me out. I think it's the Best I. I'm a big fan of low expectations. I think the lower I can keep people's expectations the better for me but I think that You Know I. It's just interesting because I I mean I don't know if that's just an artifact of the way I tell stories to like when you talk about the intersection -ality I wonder if it's because Obviously McQueen filmmaker. I'm an Asian American filmmaker. And you know I spoke. English is my second language like there's all sorts of things but because they're just part of my life. I think my treatment things is that I don't I don't treat it so previously like it's going bleed like I'm a big fan of subtlety and nuance and so I kind of love it. When like you know like I I try to write characters specifically as I can because I wanna make them feel human But when I wake up in the morning I don't think Oh. Gosh another day to combat homophobia or another day to like deal. Although these days if I go on twitter I do think conversation hike but like left wound vices like I wake up. I'm just like okay. I have to get up. What are the things I have to do? Which is like pretty much like everybody else right and I think that is a little bit of the philosophy that I right behind. Is that the textures of a character. Argh going to come out especially in the directing. Because I'm the way I cost him the way I choose to frame them like there's all sorts of stuff that goes into that but my goal is to in a weird way. Make people that. Maybe you don't normally see or you don't have in your own life but make them feel incredibly human and accessible to To you and so I don't know I that might just be A. I wonder if that's what your your reacting to. I think I think it is. I mean I think that there's something that comes from authenticity right and as it appears on screen that even in telling stories that might feel familiar otherwise I feel very different. To some people. Right like to your point there are you know kind of a creeper white dudes. We're probably watching it saying okay. Wait for them to kiss. Whatever I can't imagine that anybody who watches wouldn't wouldn't ultimately be absorbed and taken somewhere different from where they began. I I mean I remember the first time I saw it I didn't know what to expect. And after seeing it I I just knew that it was It was a film that I think would change. People change

Mike Mcqueen Dave Jeff Phil
John C. Yang's Journey to Asian American Justice

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4:34 listening | Last month

John C. Yang's Journey to Asian American Justice

"Please welcome John Thanks. Show thank you so much for being here and talking with US and chatting with US. I have to say we were all looking at your bio and resume and it pretty much belongs to an Asian mother's dream. It's very very intimidating. You are irrational lawyer. You worked under Obama. The president the only president that parents probably know about you. Yourself are president of insert prestigious Asian American organization. Here you have so many accomplishments so on the surface it's again quite intimidating but I'm sure it wasn't You know rainbows and it wasn't an easy path to getting to where you are. Sure to. A lot of hard work and determination just reading the articles that you were involved in your son of immigrants who experience a lot of the same challenges that may be somewhere listeners or people who are represented country also experience. So could you walk us through your personal journey and how you got to? Ajc sure we have to do. I thank you very much for having me on the show. It's a pleasure to be here and you're right. It's interesting because a one level if you look at my quotable resume I'm not a doctor so I don't have that going for the Asia gene so to speak but I've been very privileged to have a lot of professional successes but one thing that I don't have on my bio but that I actually do talk about bit is the fact that I was undocumented immigrants so my background is very much like all of our background with respect to being coming from an immigrant family and at one point when we were growing up. I was still a child volley out of status. My parents came here on a work visa and that work visa expired and they had to make the decision of whether to go back to China or stay in the United States until by I always reflect back on the courage that my parents had in decided to stay here because at that time I was nine years old my brother might have been ten years old and they knew that for us to go back to China when we had raised here made no and so that does carry with me in terms of the work that I do now and always remembering. Why won't do the work that I do? Not As amazing. Um I mean you just like I I you know I went out. I came into this country. You know I didn't have paperwork for myself either and through various hardships Many years going to the social security office in a winter time to renew social security and get a new a worker's permit like a family was able to get a green card before My parents my brother and I had to go to college. So we were able to benefit from student aid but So I totally understand like the struggles of The uncertainty that you kind of have to go through to being essentially a second class citizen in a country. So that's you know I applaud you for that But with that said like you know I'm assuming like the sense of Being an other in a country and really a persevering through all of that kind of drew you into working at a legal realm but is there anything else that kind of like Made you want to work in Asian American justice. Well it started because I grew up in the mid west and what I grew up in the Midwest at that time there were few Asian Americans literally account a my hand. The number of asian-americans in my graduating class graduated class of five hundred. Sixty some kids and that always stuck with me and let's let's be real right growing up. I had my fair number of occasions where salute will call me. Chink or someone would call me a racial slur and when your kid you don't really know how to deal with it you you you get into fights arguments at always lived with me and then obviously the immigration experienced lives with me and so when. I was thinking about what I wanted to do. A idea of a legal background not necessarily becoming a lawyer but just having illegal background seemed to make sense because it felt like it would open up opportunities and to allow me to help others. I know that sounds grand but it did go through my mind as a find a way to help

President Trump United States John China Midwest Asia
Mia Ives-Rublee: Talk to us, not at us.

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

4:03 listening | Last month

Mia Ives-Rublee: Talk to us, not at us.

"What was the moment when you decided that activism. What's for you? You know count. I wouldn't say there's a specific moment. I got to see sort of how. My parents really advocated for me when I was A and public schools and you know unfortunately when I was in public school that was right around when the Americans with disabilities act came online and was signed and schools sort of scrambling to you know. Update things Even though the idea had been out there the Rehab Act All of those were out there but you know schools were still sort of scrambling to meet the needs and they're still scrambling to meet the needs of disabled students across the country. And you know I got to see sort of how. My parents spent a lot of time. Just advocating for my needs and then eventually When I was in high school seeing them advocate for other folks needs and I think that helped show me the importance of finding your voice and being very aware of how systems work and how to use systems to gain access to gain equality across the board. And so you know. I really started to use that when I was in college because I suddenly found out that you know the idea doesn't cover you in college and you become the student without a lot of rights and a lot of without a lot of the combinations that you sort of presumptively thought that you had one year in and secondary school and so you know. I think that was sort of a time that is starting to find my voice and went to the University of Illinois and You know began working on immigration issues around. Lgbtq issues around campus rape In sexual soul issues and specifically around A mascot that I believed was racist Chief Lineup Wick Spent some time. advocating As a student activists there And we were eventually able to get rid of it so you know. I think there are different points in time that I really began finding my voice and you know I worked as a vocational rehabilitation counselor here in Chapel Hill Carbonaro and got to really know a lot of the details on how systems can function and then not function for for people on the ground and you know got really frustrated there and decided to leave that job because I was getting burnt out and I'm seeing a lot of my clients coming back. You know without jobs without a lot of hope and just really struggling day-to-day to try and find a job and maintain job. And so you know. Each part of my life had have really given me a lot of understanding of of systems and helped me learn to empathize with a lot of different issues. And you know eventually you know it. All seemed to come to a head win. This current administration came into power. And you know gotten sort of dovan headlong into the women's March and by that point I was like you know. I've been to protest before been to these events where they don't think of disabled people they don't think of women color they don't think of a lot of things and that tends to lead us out and leave us vulnerable. And that's why really decided to to just like in you know headlong and to activism after that. Oh I love your Surrey. That's so

Chapel Hill Carbonaro Surrey University Of Illinois Rape
Jet Tila: Thai Food in America

Asian Enough

5:51 listening | Last month

Jet Tila: Thai Food in America

"How do you describe the explosion of Thai Food in America and in Los Angeles? You know I think you have to trace it back to Vietnam right. Most major campaigns were flown out of Thailand right because of the Golden Triangle because our our relationship Thailand is his never been occupied or controlled by a foreign power was allies with the US so they gave Thai people visas so nineteen sixty six. The first group of Thai people came in in mass. My parents were in that group. So there's the beginning second. There's always been this romance of of this this American Romance Thailand. It's exotic that people are nights. It's so beautiful I mean and there's also the the really not so nice side of that the sexual tourism and all that but no matter what right. There's there's this halo effect. I think Thailand has on on Americans and then when we started the food all these flavor the flavor range European food is like herbs and salt and pepper and olive oil and garlic and Mir Poi and all of a sudden I got hot and sour and salty and sweet. It's so exotic. Yeah one of the things. I remember from the book though I thought was funny. Was that at first. Thai food is marketed as like a better tasting Chinese for exactly. Yeah and and it's because you know Cantonese foods little sweeter and richer or whatever and they wanted brighter flavors. Yeah but yeah like. What did people know about Thai food? And how much of that did you guys teach them? I would say pad Thai chicken Satay Dome Yum dum car guy. It was Thai food. Then you even chow main because you gotTa Games order start because again Americans new Cantonese style Chinese food for years. This was just like a departure and the image you get you know what I mean. It's like each gradually acclimate and learn. And then you start to get curious and Thailand is always has always been really aggressive about tourism right getting people to visit right right named ty culinary ambassador. How did that happen? By the way the truth. You guys want the truth right of course Jones version of very sort. Which is the the brutal truth right? You know the consul general in myself Three CONSUL-GENERALS AGO. Right because the post transitions every few years. You know we had a lot of Thai chef. That was were starting to become notable in America. We Ricker. You've got guys in Chicago then. There's so. There's a lot of mixed messages about Thai food. What is Thai food? Who SPEAKS FOR THAI food? We we sat down a room and we're like we need a position that that basically allows the government to say this person plants. The holds the torch for Thai food. So we need a culinary ambassador right. We need the guy and we need to create a fund marketing term for it. So I was like Dude. GimMe the ambassadorship. It sounds awesome. Any says a great idea. So you know we we have a we have a few program. Thais elect which is a government program that acknowledges Thai restaurants that are that are doing very well or or you know are good at certain things we have trade shows around the country around the world. Can you speak for Thai food because we also wanted someone that was in media? That was recognizable right. I was the only one at that time doing a lot of television. And so as part of your ambassador ship you're going around to different tire restaurants in really out into the field hundred percent and when I'm on television. Which is the best way to go anywhere right when Elton Brown says this? Is You know on our new shows Culinary Ambassador of Thailand like that sinks in but I just have to ask this on same. Whose idea was it to get matching tattoos and tattoos or have to my right forearm. That's is never be daunted. So Alton Brown and I did a bunch of episodes of a show called cutthroat kitchen together and over those episodes in hundreds and hundreds of hours in months and years we became very close. Friends like very very close friends. We were just sitting around one day. And he's like I haven't gotten a tattoo. I get attached to every decade. He said let's get together. Let's get hammered. Let's do it. Let's do it. So it really is a symbol of our friendship. And it's never be daunted as hemingway quote and the way that came to be was. We're sitting around the trailer I'm like okay. Let's let's get imagine to. Who's going to pick what it is? I am not A. I'm not a cerebral scholarly. Guy Like Elton. I'm like if I win this. Whatever we're going to get an octopus chef with eight utensils one each arm. Thank God he won. Thank God you want so you can actually watch the video of you. Google jetty loud. We actually wanted to put it out on social media. While we're getting Tattoos Watch we livestream did and it and it existed lives in the world now so there was this moment where like Thai food was cool and there was this moment where like no one knew anything about it. Yeah what was it like for that thing that you grew up with like all of a sudden be cool. Yeah I'm trying to think back through those years. Try to kind of like articulate. What was the tipping point? It had this phenomenally fast. Rise to UBIQUITY. Do you know what I mean. And it had to be between the eighties. Probably the nineties. Wow 'cause town was founded in two thousand right and I would say we were already firmly ubiquitous. Yeah that was the recognition right so I would say between the eighties and nineties for some reason. Thai food became

Thailand Culinary Ambassador Of Thailan America Vietnam Los Angeles Elton Brown United States Mir Poi Chicago Google Consul General Ricker Alton Brown Jones Hemingway
The Good, The Bad And The WTF With Alan Yang

They Call Us Bruce

7:52 listening | Last month

The Good, The Bad And The WTF With Alan Yang

"I think this is a good time for us to pivot to our regular segment. Our favorite segment the good the bad in the wgn. Jeff I feel good about that. Let's do that okay. So why don't you lay down the rules of engagement for Ellen? Okay all right. So the rules of engagement for this game We live in a world of rolls right now mostly related to social distance and hygiene but in this particular game. What we what we do with this segment is it's kind of a round table segment where we will ask our guest or guests s is we will join in as well to talk about a single topic three ways so you know one dish served three ways and the three ways are the good of that thing what makes us feel warm and fuzzy inside positive Joyful the ecstatic and then the the bad the negative side the darker side of that thing and then finally the W. t. s. one of the things that still to this day. Make us go right. They don't necessarily need to be either good or bad. It could be either but they still leaves a little puzzled so we thought that it would be appropriate given the amazing work you've been doing in this. I mean won't call the genre but Solitary to do the good the bad dose of telling immigrant stories. And you know we figured that this is something which we want you to share with us on your own so we'll just do that three ways with you beginning with the good if you can you know. There's so many good things about it but if there's if there's something particular that you feel is really just heartwarming about the idea that we're now in a space where we can tell these kinds of stories or even shelvin anecdote of telling immigrant stories that you WANNA share. That was particularly heartwarming. That'd be fantastic. Yeah well the good part is the easy part right. It's like the bad shitting. Immigrants Stores goofing around something but no the good part. The good part is easy. And it's it's it's multi part right one. Which is like were able to do it right now. That's that's the number one. Good thing it's like we were at a zero. These stories weren't being told at all. You know we. We were essentially zero and even in the last five years that's started to change in in you know starting from some of the stuff we did on master like that that you know covered some some some of that ground and then starting to work on. Tiger tail which is about that and then you know obviously little America is a whole show. That's about immigrant stories but Being able to be just being able to have the freedom to tell these very specific stories that that you know just were not in the cultural landscape at all when you talk about this country. It's like it just didn't exist so so that's great. Secondly you know getting to know yourself a little better getting to know your family a little better getting to Appreciate part of yourself that that you may have not been very in touch with because you wanted to fit in because you wanted to assimilate so so becoming more comfortable with who you are when you look in the mirror. That's all been part of this for me. It's been it's been really served edifying an interesting fulfilling And then a third part is and sadly this is probably more relevant than ever is is just kind of. I don't WANNA say educating people but because that sounds like homework but it's like a it's it's showing that these all of these people are three dimensional human beings as basic as that sounds I at the sounds incredibly basic and simple but if you look at the past if you look at the history of Asian American representation on screen is not human three-dimensional it is being depicted as perpetual. Foreigners is being depicted as nerd being depicted as a Guys or a you know atomic towns or sort of robotic and emotionless and you know in a movie like Tiger tail. I wanted to show that we are full of emotions and we are full of internal life and are we are living breathing emotional creatures who change over time and you have regrets and who love movies love and find it hard to talk to our kids in hardtop for parents then overcome that you know all these things of intrinsic in telling a story like that and frankly. I haven't seen it very often depicted if at all and so all these things are kind of why I'm passionate about telling me stories in There's many many more reasons. But that's that's just off the top of my head. I think it's just scratching the surface and I think there are many more stories to be told in many different genres including potentially horror action thriller. You know I gotta say given that. Actually living in a Har- inaction thriller right now There is something really meaningful about humanizing Chinese immigrants and other Asian immigrants in this era. Right you know showing showing Chinese people townies people literally without their masks is so important and bring them to. Life is something which I think has repercussions for actual life. So I'm super glad that even though it wasn't planned that that this is coming out at a time in which it's needed in that fashion. Yeah I mean. Look the totally unexpected circumstance. And it's just it's it's awful. What's going on? But you know the movie is coming out and the movie will be available for people to watch and if it if it's some small comfort and if it's you know depiction that as we said is three dimensional than of Asian people and people with Asian bases like you know I. It can't be a bad thing in my mind right so now we move on to the second round like you said. It's little more difficult. Although I'll tell you you know it doesn't have to be something bad about immigrants stories but it could be something bad about telling them right. And how the challenge of actually doing them right? So what in your impression Allen is the bad Santa tell this isn't this isn't a bad per se but it is a difficult challenge right so so when we were doing little America for instance it was a production challenge. Because you're doing eight stories that take place in eight different countries in eight different parts of the of America. So we're should and we're shooting the majority of them in New Jersey. So you're faking New Jersey for Uganda. Your New Jersey for Singapore. You're you're making new. Jersey are everywhere. So yeah talked to our production designers. Amien Diana about about the challenges of doing stories but that show went some crazy as to not only hurry doing that but then we ended up shooting Montreal for Syria and then I flew to Florida and we shot this episode. That took place on a cruise ship and we fake a Floridian cruise ship going to the Bahamas for Alaska. So at that point. I think we were just making life more difficult for ourselves on purpose because that doesn't have any big immigrant that just makes it much more difficult In the same thing happened in some ways and tiger tail. Because you're shooting in New York and you're shooting in Taiwan and interestingly enough again. This is kind of funny but just the way the days split up. We ended up having to shoot some of Taiwan Four New York in the movie. That take place in your shot in. Taiwan and I like I kind of want people to guess which ones they are. 'cause there's some scenes that they're in your. We shot in Taiwan which is so crazy and we had them put out a casting. Call for extras like we need non-taiwanese extras and all and so we got like white and black people in I wanted to be in the background.

New Jersey Taiwan America New York Ellen Jeff Bahamas Uganda Singapore Alaska Amien Diana Florida Allen Syria Montreal Santa
They Call Us Alan Yang

They Call Us Bruce

6:24 listening | Last month

They Call Us Alan Yang

"I gotta say I mean I think all of us probably have stories that our parents have either told us reluctantly or other people told us about our parents right. Which don't jibe with what we know about them today. And then there's also the kind of moment where we either open a photo album or an old wardrobe or closer store and you just get this sudden blast like full on facial blast of nostalgia for a an era and a place in a time that never existed to you. That even seem alien to your parents today and I remember for me. Was that warder moment. Because at the back of my mom's closet were a bunch of outfits that again were very clearly from her late twenties when she first came into the United States and they were kind of swinging outfits. Like you know stuff that I'd be disturbed to to of us. Now she's GonNa I'm Gonna I'm GonNa wear these one day just going to see them or no. Actually those are dad's now I mean the classic thing on like instagram whatever's man like you know old school ghouls like your parents wearing seventies or eighties clothes or whatever. Yeah I have a few of my my parents for sure and they look cool is out. It's like young and attractive and Um wearing like belva really it was before they were accidental Chinese hipsters. They're just straight up Chinese after applying. That's the that's the real deal man though. Jesus enough you said earlier. This film is definitely not a money grab. I'm wondering if there but you did you face any kind of challenges trying to get this particular story made or are we in the time. We're like we can do it all now. You know or any roadblocks. I'm the luckiest guy in the world. So just a little bit of context when I started writing his movie and and even when I completed the first draft of the script. Keep IN MIND. This is before crazy revisions before the farewell. It's before you know. Bonds eun-ha when a million Oscars They're still having been Asian. He's made a long time when I wrote this. So it was kind of a crazy leap of faith. Writing script with adjusting exclusively Asian American and Asian cast in so Yeah I don't think it was a great climate to sell that script in but I very fortunately had a relationship with net flicks and and new tents around us a little bit who we sold master of none two years and years ago and so I was extremely lucky. I had drafted the script sense. Detained and He loved it and wanted to make. And so we made the movie. And I'll tell you that is not typical of the experience in entertainment. You don't usually get a movie script. May I usually take years and years and years so I feel really fortunate in that respect and then in the interim between when I sold it when we shot it and when it came out you know we had this little resurgence of Asian Feller? Not even research. It's just a surgeons because it does but yeah and I feel really lucky because I feel like you know. I think the public is shown to be receptive of movies with Asian faces in them and even reading subtitles as parasite show it so Yeah I feel like culture came around and in the process of making this movie in that time period. I hope people are ready to to to be receptive to this movie. Can we talk a little bit about the the cast because obviously one of the things that really has distinguished? I think all of your All works you've done has been a really deep and interesting collaboration with the actual actors either putting people on screen. Who Sort of serve as Your Avatar? I think in the past you've talked about and we've we've had Kelvin you on the show How you sort of served as your onscreen standing but the performances are a lot of really brings us. The stories are telling to particular kind of nuanced life. And I. I'm curious how you decided to cast this. And to what degree do try to seek out people who mapped out to the real world counterparts. Like is time of very much like your dad. Is I guess Angela. Yea essentially you know. I tried to hugh close to the characters and of course there's some overlap between the characters and the real people but you know. There's there's some diversions too. So you know what's funny is tie in person is is is not that much like characters very social in very talkative. And he's from New York and you know it's it's like He he's very different from the character but he's an incredibly skilled actor and he's able to portray that really well he's really reserved and and sort of a quiet and he does so much with so little in the film you know he he just by little word wise workout wise. You know it's a it's a quiet performance but it's incredibly powerful and moving in. That's because of the subtleties of exacting. And that's you can see the years of experience and you can see also that he has a hint of life in his eyes in that sort of a spirit behind there because that is embodied in the past by Honky Lee who who is a demanded to be incredibly charismatic. I mean the point of the movie. Is you see the change in this man from from his youth to to his the older period in his life. And so Yeah I mean Angela loosely based on my sister although it's very different because she's happily married and that's a totally different in the movie But it really was really just working with each individual actor in figuring out what they would bring to the role and I I do try to occasionally Taylor the part to the accuracy you cast and then you rewrite the rewrite. Some of that happens as well You know of in particular. The Taiwanese actors. It's very sort of a very very different casting process there. Were you know I flew to Taiwan and met with the actors? It isn't just a you know. A sort of a A videotape process like I went in there met with them and interact with them and and red lines with them and I did that with each and every person that cast. So I'm it's very personal personal

Angela Warder United States UM Kelvin Taiwan Honky Lee New York Hugh Taylor
Mina Kimes Reporting on eSports

Asian Enough

3:50 listening | Last month

Mina Kimes Reporting on eSports

"Done a lot of long form sports journalism which I've read you know Aaron Rodgers Luca Donncha h And then you did these amazing stories about Korean e sports and Korean bad flipping the first eastport story. I wrote for ESPN. The magazine was at believe in two thousand fifteen and it was about a nineteen year old Korean kid named faker. That's his Gamertag. thrilling Who was the Best League of LEGENDS PLAYER IN THE WORLD? Then I WANNA say a couple of years later. I wrote another sports story about a girl named Gay Gurry in Korea who played overwatch plays overwatch. Who was so good. People thought she was treating the final story. Hope final but I also went to Korea And spent some time there to write about Korean baseball in particular to try to understand why Korean baseball players have such glorious and prolific backflips. Y Y Y Korean stories. When did you start doing them? Well they were total boondoggles. Because I got to go to Korea three times and see my family members on. Espn excellent stories. We're bringing them actually so it is a One of them. Yes so the first eastport story I did was in two thousand fifteen we as a company had not been covering sports before then And they by they I mean the editors Kinda came to me and they said well. We would like to do a feature about this. We're doing an issue. Can you tell us who to write about? Whatever you know. It's your choice. So that wasn't my idea to write about any sports so I spent like a week or so just re which I had the luxury to do as a features writer and I know is very luxurious to actually just kind of learned about the space and figure out what would work and video games or an at all. I didn't play a lot. You have to be like such an authority in so many different spaces within sports to add e- sports to that expertise driven it is but it's different because as a features writer it's very different from being an analyst like you're actually don't have to be an expert you just have to do the research right like in the process of doing that story. Nobody would expect me to have theories about Strategy Games Raji or you know. Be opinionated about that. They expect me to talk to people who are smart and trust them and synthesize that information anyways. I there were few American English articles about gaming couple features. Really hasn't been a lot and Every time I would read these articles they'd be about like a North American team whether it was legal legends. Which is the game ended up writing about? And then there'd always be a line in the story where the Koreans would just show up and kick their ass so I went back to ESPN. And I was like I think I should write about Koreans and then from there. I found out this one kid in particular was the best so yeah I kind of just my approach was to just write about it like we would write about a young Lebron or any other prodigy. I suppose in sports. Ns gamers name is gig ARY This is fake story before. Yeah so I learned all about the various tensions because the future's all about finding tensions and and that's what drives the story a good story but all the tensions associated with Gaming and Korea Crean Culture. I mean I was very interested. Not only okay. Who is this kid? Why so good but why are Koreans in particular so good at this? You know. You're not born with gaming gene? So I I think the socio economic and cultural reasons to me were as fascinating as anything else. So that that's how I ended up in Korea. The first time second time was about Giger US another player in that one. The detention and the piece was very obvious because she was a woman and had been through a very kind of interesting. I love that story. I thank you thank

Korea Espn United States Gay Gurry Korea Crean Culture Aaron Rodgers Features Writer Luca Donncha Lebron Analyst
Don Tamaki on Stop Repeating History

Model Majority Podcast

11:15 listening | 2 months ago

Don Tamaki on Stop Repeating History

"Is the background? And the purpose and the goal of the Stop Repeating history campaign that you are a Parv well as the listeners know in one thousand nine hundred eighty two almost one hundred twenty thousand Americans of Japanese ancestry were removed on the say so of the government alone and put in in American style concentration camps three individuals charged the challenge government in that process. Read Komatsu Gordon Arabiya. She and Menu Suey. And those cases were heard in nineteen forty three and forty four and the Supreme Court to their surprise ruled against them and those cases stood for almost thirty seven years for the proposition that without trial without evidence entire racial group. Lose your freedom. Their property and be imprisoned indefinitely by accident thirty seven years later in the nineteen eighties of secret intelligence reports from the army the navy the FBI were found. They surfaced all of which admitted japanese-americans Americans oppose no threat in he committed no wrong and Department of Justice lawyers urging their higher ups basically to tell the truth and not lied to the US Supreme Court and on that basis. We assembled hey legal team to represent all three lead against I was on the legal team representing Redcar. Matsu and based on that evidence of misconduct really abusive power lies in order to manipulate. The of those cases of Fred Karma sues a criminal conviction for Divine. The military orders were overturned and In separate actions the convictions of coordinator beyond Xinmin Yasui and the legal team basically educated the public about what happened when trump announced his travel ban in January twenty. Seventeen we reconvene these legal teams In order to to work with the quarterbacks who center in Seattle and the law firm of Aken Gump to represent the adult children of Fred. Komatsu Corden here beyond Menu. Sui Basically make brief was to remind the court that When they when the court stood down and did not ask questions and accepted the government's claim that doing this Drastic separation civil liberties made the nation safer. It was a civil liberties disaster. So we filed amicus brief Basically to urge the court to examine whether the travel ban Really made the nation safer or in fact was merely fulfillment by trump campaign. Promise that he made repeatedly on the campaign trail down the borders to Muslims and American families of entering the country. Saturday in two thousand eighteen. The court has upheld the travel ban. Five four but we had launched a public education campaign called stop repeating history in order to also inform the public. What had happened and that it ought not to be repeated so I love to hear what your thought is in your whole team. Start when you saw. The travel ban announced his clearly. You being intimately involved in the overturning of the Coronado to indicated by Ashi end the convictions node. The history in intimately well. What kind of parallels did you see that in your mind in your team's mind Signaled the fact that the travel ban against Muslims and a lot of refugees as well is literally in your organization's word repeating history. We were enormously disappointed and angered by. The court's decision was cited by five to four majority. So there was a divided and we thought it was an opportunity for the court to once and for all reverse in truth. Komatsu versus the United States. Judge Chief Justice Roberts did provide lip service have met decision basically saying the core mottes who was wrong. The day was decided but in the same breath join the majority polling the travel ban which in our mind reinforced the worst and most dangerous aspects of Karma swoop versus the United States which was when the executive branch the president invokes. National Security. Courts will stand down. They'll abdicate their traditional constitutional role of being a check and balance on the presidency. And the problem with that is when you have an executive branch which is gone rogue and would certainly happened in nineteen forty two and it's happening now. It opens the door for tremendous abuse of power in the lesson of monsoon. Is that when there is no check and balance The temptation for political leaders to Fabricate facts to misrepresent Epa evidence in order to manipulate the outcome of in this case Major Supreme Court cases that temptation becomes irresistible and the founders of this country certainly understood that every high school civics students knows that we have three branches of government. We have executive branch the Presidency the legislative branch. Which is Congress and the judiciary the cords? Each are coequal each. You're supposed to be a check and balance on the other and the genius of the system was it was really designed to thwart the rise of kings in tyrants and when those systems fail as they did for Japanese Americans. This is how dictators get started. You have in this case of President. Exercising unfettered power and the consequences are severe. You have children being separated from their parents. You have a president who targets minorities whether they be immigrants muslim-serb refugees and the latest attacks are on Asian American specifically Chinese Americans by labeling a global pandemic as a quote Chinese virus and institutions are supposed to be check and balance on that kind of abuse and we see history repeating itself all over again. I want to dive in a little bit. Into the point you made about Fabricating Facts to litigate in front of Supreme Court which is pretty mind boggling for everyday citizens to even contemplate you know we generally hold the Supreme Court to pretty high esteem is the highest core of the land is the final. I call or final decider on a lot of highly controversial disputed issues but to your point people or government in this case in particular actually lied to the Supreme Court to get their position one. And you have a lot of experience with that in the overturning of the quartermaster case. I think that is essentially. What you your team discovered that lets you even the possibility that you could overturn the Supreme Court case which again too many people's minds that is the final decision right when the Supreme Court says something whether you decide whether you agree with it or not it is done but of course they are edge cases and exceptions to that. Could you tell us about? Maybe your experience overturning. The Komatsu case will was the discovery of that. Were the lies that were discovered that. Lets you guys even being able to do this? And then of course tying to what we are experiencing right now whether it's the Muslim ban or potentially other offer things can happen in the future. While thirty seven years after the fact the Supreme Court cases decided Komatsu here she knew. Sui In nineteen forty three and forty four thirty seven years after that secret intelligence reports were discovered by accident by researchers Peter Irons and Heiko Yoshinaga hurt sick. Which really all that. The government in order to manipulate the outcome of these landmark Supreme Court cases fabricated evidence and even burn them and despite the protestations of Department of Justice official soon attorneys who urged their superiors that they ought not to be lying to the Supreme Court to clarify. We did not over earned the decision. What happened was basically Before nearby she in ministry five the orders for this bass removal. They were charged and convicted with Criminal violations and Suffered criminal penalties and we reopen these cases. A writ of error was the only device reopen these ancient cases. That would've otherwise been time. Barred by this limitation isn't criminal writ calls rhetoric quorum notice which allows litigation to reopen their case to clear their name and doesn't give them any money as and give back the years that they lost. They can remove their criminal. Convictions we won on those. The government appealed their loss and then they withdrew their appeal in our system. Only the loser can appeal not the winner and so the the withdrawal of the appeal was a very strategic. Move to keep it out of the. Us Supreme Court And only the court supreme court can reverse itself now when the trump versus quiet case came up in twenty eighteen. That was an opportunity for the court squarely. Look at the facts Komatsu because there were very similar to the travel ban and actually reverse it reverse that case and sadly the court didn't take that

Supreme Court Government Komatsu Major Supreme Court Komatsu Gordon Arabiya Department Of Justice Komatsu Corden Executive SUI President Trump FBI Judge Chief Justice Roberts Parv Fred Karma Coronado National Security Seattle
They Call Us Pandemic Parents

They Call Us Bruce

9:02 listening | 2 months ago

They Call Us Pandemic Parents

"How how does that turn into? I guess the schedule the end of actually creating for the kids We the schedule about we have Is very similar to our schedule in the summertime Because again the kids are at home and we want to emphasize that we need to get our work done before we play. And so that that's basically the principle of that struck schedule us to get all your work done in the morning so you can play in the afternoon and if you don't get all your work done in the morning then you're going to you know you're going to shorten your free time. And so the kids have been really motivated to try to get all their work done in before lunch But we have made some adjustments as we've gone on So for example in the morning I really wanted to do a check in with the kids because I think there are things that are going on in their heads they're not always voicing and so I start off by the senator dumb in the beginning but it's actually I'll just share. I think they go around the table and they share affirmations of each other and this is something that I did as volleyball coach after a game. I gathered all the kids. And you know they're having their snacks. But we're still huddled and we're just going over affirmations for each team member because I wanted them to see that. Each team member contributed to our game and the outcome of that game. And so instead of you know putting blame on somebody for not playing. Well wanted them to keep their eyes on the positive and over time they just work towards that positive and really Look forward to that time to gather at the end and really share out there. What they saw each other team members do and so I kind of wanted that idea to play out in our family In in the beginning they're kind of awkward about it but it's funny how you know in the course of our first week at home. They've really cherished what each other have said about them. And it's almost like they want it to happen again. The next and so they sort of work to build that relationship. I'm seeing slowly happen And there's a lot less bickering. I feel like Because they want to be noticed for their good good deeds of the The other thing that we added In our morning prayer is to have the kids share out their prayer which which really ends up being a way for them to voice. Their concerns their worries and One of the things. I did this with my class. Also I didn't want the kids to be carrying around burdens throughout their day and so to share it in the morning I feel like it does. Lighten their low that they're carrying around emotionally and psychologically and so two Sur Cher out thought in the very beginning of the day kind of makes the rest of the day go smoother Does something else that we added a family meeting at the very beginning of our schedule So it's it's some structure but allow for flexibility To be able to gauge. Where the kids are and to be able to adapt to what? You're feeling that they might need as I think. Essential for this to really work for the long haul. That's amazing and I might add the fact that you actually have both experience as a teacher and a coach probably gives you a little bit of a leg up on this front but I wonder actually I mean how much of how much of what you experienced learned as an educator feels like it works as a parent and I'm going to ask actually that of Stephen to relative to your wife who you said was a is a therapist right greg. Do you feel like you feel like there's kind of almost seamless transfer of of knowledge from being a professional that works with you know which people as it were in this capacity versus The kind of rough and tumble of just being a parent. Yeah I I'll show I'll jump in so I the fact that my wife is therapist Has has has. I've learned a lot from that and Continue to so for me I. There's like a lot of Greater attention to the kid's feelings and the stressors and an understanding that and being a better communicator to them in ways that on my own I wouldn't think about. I would be maybe more afraid to talk about my worries and my fears With my kids but but through my wife able to better express myself To my kids I would say that. My Wife practices a lot of what she preaches insurance of of again that communication and that openness with the kids but then at the end of the day if like if it's just really getting on her nerves you know like she's Cuban like therapist the mom it just becomes like man. This kid's so annoying. I can't deal in right now. So that professionals who could only take you so far Truth Avenue. I I do feel like when I went from the classroom into home schooling. I was expecting homeschooling to be exactly like classroom teaching and and so we even even made them wear uniforms and I had a room designated as the classroom and we put up. You know an alphabet chart and you know this is i. I try to make it. So that are home-schooling space was separate from the rest of our house and that are home-schooling time with separate from our family time but what I've learned that first time through home schooling aside it. I mean your family. Life is the highest priority. You have to kind of really assess what's going on with the family before you can even start schooling and so So yeah that was my first hard lesson in home. Schooling is that you know schooling at home is nothing like schooling in the classroom. And even now as I coached teachers. That's the number one thing I'm telling them is that you cannot expect school to be from eight to three every day because these parents were home with the kids. They're trying to get work done to and We're not sitting next door. Kids the whole time and It's not at all like the classroom. And and the whole time were were sitting in. You know watching these things on the news and trying to evaluate. What's going to happen to our families? And you know we're starting to hear how it's affecting our family is in the other countries and and so the kids are dealing with a lot more emotionally that will affect how they're going to be learning and so trying to make that clear to the school is essential also is to keep communicating with our teachers and our administrators as they try to learn the best way to go about with distance. Learning is I think he yes just to kind of build off of that. I think the There is this sort of expectation. Like Oh yeah this is. This'll be just like it. How it is in the summer or this'll be like things are normal. It's like a global pandemic is not normal this is this is incredibly incredibly stressful on. You Know Uncertain Times that we're in with the news just gets like so overwhelming and so scary an so stressful so I think that Yeah it's it's it's really everybody's thinking Oh yeah things are okay and like but but Yeah there's there's a lot that our kids are picking up on Because this is this is just a very serious global crisis I do appreciate homosexuals are trying to bring you know their normal routines into the distance learning but but at the same time as I've been saying is it's important to provide structure but at the same time to be expecting that you need to be super flexible To really be able to adapt to changing needs.

Volleyball Senator Sur Cher Stephen