Asian American

Listen to the latest audio content in Asian American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Asian American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

A highlight from ICYMI Encore Episode of The History of the Asian Pirate Shih Yang

Asian American History 101

05:18 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from ICYMI Encore Episode of The History of the Asian Pirate Shih Yang

"You're listening to Asian American history one O one, a podcast about Asian American history from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school, where your hosts, Jen and Ted, the daughter and father team. Welcome to episode 49. So we don't watch much tennis, but this year's U.S. open was so exciting. I mean, the women's singles final match featured two unseated teenagers, Emma roto Kano from Britain and Layla Fernández of Canada. Emma rata is half Chinese and Layla Fernández is half Filipino. It was the battle of Asian ethnicity and Emma won with a straight sets victory on Saturday. She was actually ranked 150th in the world and barely known to most viewers. She made history as the first player to win a Grand Slam title after surviving the qualifying tournament and she's the first woman from Britain to win a Grand Slam singles title since Virginia wade won Wimbledon in 1977. Actually didn't lose a set in ten matches. So she was on a 20 set streak when she won on Saturday. I mean, both of them played an amazing match and it's so exciting to see more accomplished Asian athletes and tennis. And now, for a quick transition to today's topic, Asian pirates. Whoo. You may be wondering why we're talking about pirates. And there's great reason. It's because international talk like a pirate day was on Sunday, the 19th. And international opens the door to the whole world, which includes Asia. And that's why we're talking about Asian pirates. Make sense yet? It does to us. I will say that it's interesting how much modern media glorifies pirates, because really they were criminals. I mean, for a lot of women, there's a fascination with both the dress and also how I feel like piracy for women back then sort of meant freedom and autonomy. And an escape from societal rules. And I think that most pirates sort of represent that in some way. And so I wonder if that might have something to do with the international interest in pirates, the fight against the government in some ways. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And that's kind of led to so many different movies and such. Yeah. Pirates did sort of represent this rebellion from those governments. And while we shouldn't glorify their methods necessarily, they did create a space that was more accepting. Yeah, I mean, definitely more accepting in some ways. I mean, short research will show you that gay and bisexual men could find solace and safety and pirate cruise. But of course, like all history, there are a ton of facets and pirates like most things aren't all bad and aren't all good. So let's get into the story. Like most westerners, when I think of pirates, I think of men like blackbeard or sir Francis Drake living in pretty filthy ships drinking heavily and writing boats and villages. And while some of that may be true, there's a whole world of piracy that most people never learn about, and while we don't condone piracy, there is one pretty iconic Asian pirate. Of course, there's a ton of history about Asian pirates and pirating in Southeast Asia, East Asia and South Asia, but we don't have time to get into all of the most infamous pirates and cruise from those areas. So today, let's talk about the world of East Asian pirating and more specifically, the most notorious East Asian pirate. But first, let's discuss pirating and the pirate code. Of course, the textbook definition of a pirate is a person who attacks and robs ships at sea. Pirated generally existed since trade on the sea's first started occurring, and the earliest documentation of piracy occurred around the 14th century BC in the Aegean and Mediterranean Sea. So let's do a quick rundown of the pirate code. While pirating seems lawless in some ways, most crews followed a pirate code of conduct, and certain pirate rules. There had to be, since pirating, which once was a single crew on a single ship, started expanding during the golden age of pirating, and in general became a highly organized profession. Often, even sponsored by a government or monarchy. Hundreds upon thousands started seeking wealth and glory between 1650 and 1720. Once this happened, merchants actually started drafting something known as handshake deals with pirates. It was fairly common to see merchant ships offer a portion of whatever wealth was made during the merchant trip. These pirate codes were crucial in keeping pirate crews organized and operational. The pirate code was actually a document cruise would have to sign. Some would refuse, some would write a marking instead of a name, and those who didn't sign their name had a better chance of escaping punishment if caught by authorities. Codes varied from crew to crew. Some people were forced into piracy. There aren't a ton of surviving private codes since most were generally burned or tossed overboard when pirates felt threatened by authorities. In fact, there are only four surviving sets of codes today from the golden age of piracy.

Layla Fernández Emma Roto Emma Rata Tennis Britain Kano JEN TED Emma Wade Sir Francis Drake Virginia Canada U.S. Asia South Asia East Asia Southeast Asia Aegean Mediterranean Sea
A highlight from Ep 400: Ronald W. Wong on "The Race Epidemic" Documentary

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

01:55 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Ep 400: Ronald W. Wong on "The Race Epidemic" Documentary

"Being everyone and welcome to Asian America the Ken fong podcast. Where my mission has always been to spotlight Asian American culture makers and shapers by having them share their remarkable journeys and stories with us. As of 2022, I've proudly partnered with UCLA's Asian American study center, which will eventually archive all of my episodes so that future listeners will be able to access them. And of course, as always, I'm your host, Ken thong. Welcome to episode 400. It's taken about 8 and a half years and a total investment of more than 4000 hours, but my weekly show has finally reached this incredible milestone. For the first 5 years, the shows were the fruit of the collaboration between creator and director Christopher Wong and me. For the next year in change, Alison Chang volunteered to edit and upload the episodes. After that, I've been wearing all the hats. If you would have told me at the start that I would one day be doing everything myself, I would have put you in the asylum. I'm so very grateful to Christopher and Alison, who generously did all the technical stuff so that I can focus on finding amazing guests and doing all the interviews. While I might never reach their skill levels, I've really come to enjoy that side of creating this show. This podcast has just exceeded 645,000 total downloads, and it's been reaching a global audience for some time. So thank you for listening and keep spreading the word about Asian America. You know, I can't think of a more perfect guest for this 400 episode than Ronald Wang. Ron is the president and CEO of imprinted communications group incorporated in award winning public affairs campaign and ethnic marketing firm based here in Southern California.

Asian America Ken Fong Asian American Study Center Ken Thong Christopher Wong Alison Chang Ucla Alison Christopher Ronald Wang Imprinted Communications Group RON Southern California
A highlight from 180: They Call Us Thankful 2022

They Call Us Bruce

05:36 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 180: They Call Us Thankful 2022

"Another edition of they call us Bruce, an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm Phil U and I'm Jeff Yang. And it is just about Thanksgiving, at least by the time you hear this, it actually probably will be Thanksgiving and afterwards. So in honor of that, we are having our annual special Thanksgiving episode of, they call us Bruce. And this year we decided to celebrate it by having something like a friendsgiving, bringing over some of our fellow podcasts from the public podcast network. To join us just to kind of jam a little bit about the year that was, talk a little bit about the things we're thankful for, less thankful for and still puzzling over. And we would just love to do a roll call of our guests for this very special episode. So just everybody just give your name, the podcast you do, and a little bit about yourself, I guess. Okay, my name is Ada Singh. I am the co host of the podcast Saturday school, which is in the potluck podcast collective family. My co host is Brian who we basically talk about. Asian American films and we tried to direct people back to past films. And each season we have a different topic and we've recently completed our last season, which was on Asian American sci-fi films. And I'm also on the utility journalism team at the LA times, which last time I was here, we made fun of me a lot about. We kind of did. We kind of made fun of literally once journalism. Gave you a little bit of a hard time. That was funny. I didn't come up with the name, so I thought it was funny. But it's basically like service journalism, news you can use. It's really useful. Or karaoke. Karaoke tips. It's a broad spectrum. Well, we love it. And we love you, and thank you for joining us. Kim, how about yourself? Hi, I'm so excited. That you guys asked me to be here because I love they call us Bruce. So I'm honored. This is a big moment for me. I'm Kim Cooper. I am an actor and writer and improviser, and I co host to potluck podcast podcast. I co host Asians in baseball with Scott, who's also on today and our other co host Naomi koh, where we talk about Asian Asian native Hawaiian Pacific islanders in Major League Baseball and then I also co host Korean drama podcast with Steve Lim and Kathy Yamamoto, where the second generation of Korean drama podcasts we took over from Phil will and Joanna's legacy there. So they set us up really well for success over there. And you guys are great. Oh, thank you. I paid Bill to say that. Yeah, talking about nepo babies. That's us, you know? We love it. And we love Asians and baseball and Scott. Thank you for also joining your co host. One of your co hosts, I guess. I hear. But tell us a little about yourself too. Yeah, hey, really happy to be here. I'm Scott okamoto. And with Kim and Naomi, I do the Asians in baseball. I'm sort of the old man of the group. I pull out stats and history because I lived through most of the history and we have a good time because Kim and Naomi are kind of newer to baseball in the last like 5 years. And so they turned to me as the old guy who lived the oracle of baseball. Well, from like the 70s on. So yeah, I'm a writer too, and I have a book coming out next year called oh, you guys get the scoop. We just finalized the title of my book today. And it's called Asian American apostate. Oh. Nice. About me deciding I didn't believe in God anymore while I was teaching at a really crappy evangelical school. And how I found my way from that into this community. And in Asian American identity that didn't need religion. And I have a podcast outside of this network called chapel probation. So yeah, happy to be here. Damn, that's deep. Congratulations. Yeah, well, welcome. Congratulations and welcome both welcome everybody. As podcasters as friends, we thank all of you guys for joining us. And again, because this is like free form, I am drinking wine. I just had a very large meal somewhere. Did you bring enough for everyone? I would gladly share with you if I could pour it through the mic into your directly into your limitations. Your mouth holes. As it is. You know, we figured that this would be a great opportunity for us to just, you know, talk a little bit about what we do and share a little more of the sort of podcast love with the world. Because the stuff, the podcast you do are both unique and interesting and I think really complimentary actually with what we do on what they call us Bruce. But the lives you leave are also very interesting as well. And you know, I think each of you is doing something that feel in particular was like, let's get them on and talk about this thing. I believe

Asian America Phil U Jeff Yang Bruce Baseball Ada Singh Kim Cooper Naomi Koh Hawaiian Pacific Islanders Steve Lim Kathy Yamamoto KIM Scott Okamoto La Times Naomi Scott Brian Major League Joanna Phil
A highlight from ICYMI Encore Episode of The Bamboo Ceiling and Sticky Floor

Asian American History 101

02:01 min | Last week

A highlight from ICYMI Encore Episode of The Bamboo Ceiling and Sticky Floor

"You're listening to Asian American history one O one. A podcast about Asian American history from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school, where your hosts, Jen and Ted, the daughter and father team. Welcome to episode 43. Whoo. It's been a while since we started an episode like this. So how are you? I'm pretty good. I'm pretty good. How are you? I'm doing well. Yeah, busy. Yeah. But I guess that doesn't tell you about how I am physically or mentally. Right, right. Yeah. I am still excited about the Olympics. So that's a good thing. Yeah. Excited about the different wins. I'm actually really looking forward to the Winter Olympics. Me too. Oh man, I just really want to see some skeleton and luge sled. I wonder if there are any Asian Americans and skeleton lose your bobsled. Yeah, we'll have to check. We'll have to see. Gonna have to do some research. Yeah. I don't even think that there are any Asian Americans on the hockey team. Yeah. Unless, unless Jason Robertson happens to make it, which, you know, being a rookie last year, I don't think he'd be selected, but he's a worthy candidate. Someone to look out for probably in the next four years. Yeah. Well, hopefully, one day, at the Olympics, ice hockey. Yeah, we definitely know there are plenty of Asian Americans and figure skating though. Yeah. Which is super exciting. Yeah. I'm excited to see I think Nathan Chen will probably make it onto the Olympic team. I'm excited to maybe see him at the Olympics, which would be really cool. Yeah, and hopefully getting a gold medal this time. Yep. Yep. I mean, he's had a world championship win, I think. I'm pretty sure he has, but you know, use your hand you, the Japanese male figure skater, is really good. And so a lot of the time he'll end up he wins gold. And then I've seen a couple times Nathan Chen will get silver, which is amazing. Yeah. But yeah. Yeah, silver's good. Silver's great. Yeah.

Olympics Jason Robertson JEN Luge TED Winter Olympics Nathan Chen Hockey Olympic Silver
A highlight from Ep 399: Anu Bhatt on Reclaiming Agency

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:26 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep 399: Anu Bhatt on Reclaiming Agency

"Greetings are V one and welcome to Asian America the Ken fong podcast, where my mission has always been to spotlight Asian American culture makers and shapers by having them share the remarkable journeys and stories with us. As of 2022, I've proudly partnered with UCLA's Asian American study center, which will eventually archive all of my episodes so that future listeners will be able to access them. And of course, as always, I'm your host Ken fong. Welcome to episode 399. Actor and writer a new butt recently circled back to my podcast both to talk about her debut short film autocorrect, which she wrote and starred in and to talk about why reclaiming agency over her personal life and career as a female actor of color is proving to be a new source of mental health, creativity, and self advocacy. Much of her and her character's journeys to learn to stand up for themselves, revolves around asking non South Asian persons to pronounce their non western names correctly. To some, this might seem nitpicky, but as you listen to a new, explain why this really matters, I hope you'll come to see that while this might not be a huge deal, it's still a big deal. I've inserted a famous key and Peele comedy sketch at the end of this intro to underscore this point. I was personally inspired to reclaim agency over a part of my life that has been in limbo for quite some time, mainly because I'd allowed a group of people to strongly request that I submit to their wishes. One could certainly think that in submitting to their requirements, I in fact had exercised agency. In other words, I chose not to make waves, and went along with what they were asking of me. Now, even if that's true to some extent, I find myself today wanting to take back what I surrendered. I won't go into specifics here, but as I told anew a few days after our session, I was inspired by her to begin a process that will restore to me a sense of agency over myself. Asserting one's self can be risky, as many of us know too well, and it can sometimes cost a certain relationships or opportunities. But if you or I find ourselves at a crossroads, staking a renewed claim to our sense of agency,

Ken Fong Asian America Asian American Study Center Ucla Peele
A highlight from 179: They Call Us Bad Axe

They Call Us Bruce

04:30 min | Last week

A highlight from 179: They Call Us Bad Axe

"Wait. Potluck. Holy crap, you went through that? Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce, an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm Phil you. And I'm Jeff Yang, particularly unfiltered today. On the road in less than ideal conditions, but still delighted to welcome our guest to this episode. A filmmaker, a documentarian, a guy who has spent a lot of time with his family. We're delighted to have with us today the director of the soon to be released, documentary bad axe, David sieve. David, thank you so much for joining us. Welcome. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you, Phil. Thank you for having me on the show today. It's so great. We love the documentary. It's going to be out in theaters and VOD very soon. People should watch it, but I feel like after watching it, I've spent some time a lot of time with your family. I feel like a lot of ways you invite viewers to be a part of this family, very intimately in some highs and lows of one of the darkest moments that we've all really experienced collectively. So it's an interesting way to kind of introduce people to your family and interject yourself into this situation. I mean, one of the things that really comes across in the beginning is that you started rolling the camera, maybe not necessarily because you're trying to make a movie, but because you knew that this was kind of a unique moment. And so you wanted to capture that. Am I right in that respect? No, that's a 100% right. I mean, you know, I think you get a sense in the film, like my role in the family is sort of being this documentary. And I've always loved photographing and filming my family and really bottling them up into these memories. And when I moved home during the pandemic, I had so much free time in the world, just like so many other people did. And, you know, this time in history was no different because it felt very interesting and here we all are living under one roof again and you know, as uncertain as it was, it was something I wanted to bottle up and capture and have these memories to hold on to of all of us being together, living together once again for the first time in quite some time. And that's you really how the project started, but even having said that, though, before the pandemic and moving home, I actually always knew I wanted to share my family's story. I mean, you know, if you look at what my parents did, a Mexican American woman, a Cambodian refugee who came here with just a shirt on his back and 1979 after surviving a genocide. I mean, these were two individuals against all odds decide to settle in this town called bad axe, Michigan, open up a business, and overcome so much adversity to turn that business not only into a success, but a center of what the community bad acts is. So that American Dream story was one I always wanted to share. I just didn't realize when I was picking up the camera and filming in 2020 that that story was unfolded itself in front of me in a ways I just never expected. I feel like we are almost in like a golden era of Southeast Asian self searching documentary. You know, I think of the donut king, I think of origin story. And I think of this film as almost like a trifecta that are circling around these traumatic incidents that occurred to another generation, but that we inherit that this generation inherits, often in the middle of its own trauma, right? And I love this film so much, but I also recognize that there's something very interesting about how meta it is, right? You are the documentarian. You are the document to a certain extent as well.

Asian America Jeff Yang David Sieve Phil Bruce Jeff David Michigan
Interview With Model, Actress, Dancer, Activist, Leyna Bloom

Asian Enough

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Model, Actress, Dancer, Activist, Leyna Bloom

"So you're a dancer. A model an actor an activist. You were the cover model on. The sports illustrated swimsuit cover It's a famous pop cultural institution. But it's one that's historically been seen. I think in the mainstream through a straight male gaze and in this year's edition there was like an intentional effort to celebrate an inclusive spectrum of women. And i think i understand you shot it before you learn. You made the cover along with tennis player. Naomi osaka and rapper meghan stallion. But what were your hopes going into the shoot and what did you want to convey images. Well anything that i do sense. Being in these spaces of representation is fairly new to argos system. All around the world. I think for me. It has to be some type of cultural shift. Has the part of something that is not just based around vanity orc gluttony. It has to be something that has a message in yes. I have beaten suit on. Yes i'm in. My muslim informed bites what i stand for. And why i was chosen to be part of the issue and then be on the cover was because of what i wanna do with everything i do in the bible being In the past a lot of the models are beautiful. Yes what is a story what is fighting for. What are they really rooted and makes them who they are. And the reason why. I've gotten up to this. Point is not because meek just being beautiful. It's me fighting the system it's me. I'm being blacklisted. It's me saying no. I don't wanna do. This is saying it's not what you say. Yes you is what you say no to that builds character. So what we doing. And what i do with this issue is to invite people who think differently. And that's why i was session for a moment winning a transient on the cover. Because are every single. Day being brutalized murdered sexualize. Harass already has been thirty three on some of cases of trans women especially of color being murdered in america so when that is happening society is imperative in his responsibilities to have moments like

Naomi Osaka Meghan Stallion Tennis America
More Than 9,000 Anti-Asian Incidents Occurred in US Since Pandemic Began

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

More Than 9,000 Anti-Asian Incidents Occurred in US Since Pandemic Began

"Despite months of out reach it appears that thousands of attacks against Asian Americans keep occurring in the U. S. the national groups stop A. A. P. I. hate says there've been more than nine thousand incidents from taunts to physical attacks in the U. S. since the pandemic began with people of Asian and Pacific Islander descent in some cases being treated as scapegoats for a virus first reported in China there have been countless social media campaigns training sessions and public rallies to try to counter the trend and president Biden signed the covert nineteen hate crimes act to expedite justice department reviews of anti Asian hate crimes still about forty five hundred incidents were reported last year and about the same number this year I am Jackie Quinn

A. A. P. I. Hate U. China Biden Justice Department Jackie Quinn
Coping With the Latest "Normal" With Steve Lim Aka Steebu

First of All

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Coping With the Latest "Normal" With Steve Lim Aka Steebu

"Thanks oprah. Now they're attacked by a rug and screamed in my ear and now we are here. I apologize i apologize. it's just You know just you got to pivot every half second these guys. It's all about the pivot. Pivot pivot pivot title of this episode. I think we have it now. Pivot pivot pivot I'm doing a little dance. I wish you could see it. But it's not worth watching okay. We'll boomerang it later. And then i'll use the ross me from oca- friends all right. You are hino. Sure you have the hair now too anyway back. How are you doing okay. I mean we're both dislike hunker down again kind of where we're just for time reference because every time we have these check ins and we're talking about this new normal that we're trying to figure out right now and it's been a hell of eighteen months. We're recording this end of july beginning of august of twenty twenty one. Well here's a here's what for me. I feel like The lesson is is that there's no such thing is normal. Yeah that was just the concept that we think we understood but the reality is normal is just the fabrication. It's an ideal welcome to first of all everyone where we go right out. The gate knows that. If you've been listening to this podcast y'all know so anyway but yeah love it new neural. What's your fabric. What okay first of all. Let's start off with like we. We tried recording this and it was really funny because we recorded this. I think in may and we both been vaccinated cetera. So we can kind of regroup on that. Because i don't know what happened. I'm trying to remember and memory is like a nice little luxury. That i don't have any more. You don't remember that probably means you got cova you've got the brain fog memory loss long. Cove it right there in your drops was losing my taste man because food is like the one thing that like gives the most joy and i was like. You can't take that away from me so there's literally going to lose my taste. I know some people who probably got cova but it wasn't like in december or january with before you know it was more widely known And they just felt they described having just like everything tastes like metal. So you can imagine that it's like that's not fun.

Hino Oprah Cova
They Call Us Seoul Sausage

They Call Us Bruce

02:23 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Seoul Sausage

"Hello and welcome to another edition of call us bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia. America i'm phil you and i'm jeff yang and we are here with some very special guests fresh from reality television and maybe a window serving delicious food near you. We're talking here to ted. Kim yong kim and on one of seoul sausage who competed just now in the great food truck race all-stars season and we'll talk a little bit about that finale which just happened What it was like being on on the all stars of this competition whereas like winning season three of that competition and just in general what. It's like to be trying to sell sausage or things other than sausage in a pretty rough environment for selling any kind of stuff right now. Welcome to the show guys It's so good to have you guys here as you guys know. I've been a fan and a supporter of sociologist Since before day one. I think yeah i knew guys before you guys didn't started in was a huge fan of season three and everything you've done of course have been a big consumer of your your wears a since then fan of your sausages know. I was wondering maybe we could start by. Maybe talking about 'cause 'cause when you guys compete in season three this season that you won you guys had never actually run as a food truck before and i'm kind of wondering like and we still don't know how to do can't jump into that like i i. I do starting this venture even before the food truck race. But what was the impetus to get started. Where you up the short story version or the long version cast on the show and you know We want a food. Truck aussies three so. It was never part of our plans. But here we are. You know We open our store and we have a truck and a and a store at the same time. So yeah that's how we started

Jeff Yang Kim Yong Kim Bruce Phil TED Asia America
Author Chat with Emiko Jean

Books and Boba

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Author Chat with Emiko Jean

"And we are here with emiko gene. The author of will never be apart impressive. All seasons and most recently tokyo ever after emiko so nice to have you on the podcast. Thank you for taking the time to speak with us. Thank you for having me today. Yeah congratulations on your recent book. Launch of my girlfriend has already re-regular. She read your book before. I even had a chance to receive your book. I think she's very excited. I'm talking to you right now. So we usually like to ask our authors like if they were always a writer if it's a passion that came later in life. I know that like i was looking at your bio earlier and it seems like you've juggled a lot of things in your past in your past life. You were an entomologist. You were a candle maker. You were a teacher. So how did you become a writer. Yeah so my road to writing and publication was really windy and long always been a really voracious reader. Remember getting stacks and stacks of books from the library on my mama. Take me there like every weekend. And i would get you back then. I think libraries have limited to now. But back then you. It was as much as you could carry over like rain. Myself down with books But i never really saw myself in any of the books that i read. I looking back now as i am. Kind of examining my adolescents. I i had never read a book. By japanese american author or even an asian american author. Add never read a book as a young person that featured in asian american protagonist And so i think that was really formative The clothes that pathway. So although i loved reading i never thought that i could be a writer

Emiko Gene Emiko Tokyo
Interview With Actor, John Cho

Asian Enough

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Actor, John Cho

"How's it going. thanks for. thanks for coming down. Thanks for doing this. Yeah john we were thrilled when you said yes. What was it about our podcast that made you wanna come on l. a. times. It's my hometown paper. Secondly i listened a lot of podcasts. I just become really interested in the medium. And then thirdly i was Few months ago. I was listening to divvy chang's podcast and he had I can't remember the guests now. But he's had a few asian americans on and when they got into culture was so unique. Or i realized it was very foreign to hear asian speaking to one another in media and i realized also called a buddy of mine and we who had the same reaction he was so excited to hear it and it wasn't anything explicit. It was just like the tone was different. I realized also at that moment. I've been talking about being asian my whole career to white people and i thought oh i have to make a concerted effort to talk about these things that come up To asian americans. And i i would like asian americans to hear that conversation. Well we're going to start out by talking about. I guess your childhood your life. Well so your family came to the us in the seventies you grew up in a bunch of places including like monterey park and went to school in glendale what was that. Like which component of that Growing up in monterey park. I did i was there very briefly as born in seoul was there till i was six years old and then came to houston texas went to elementary school in houston then the roaming started we went to. I think seattle daly city san jose monterey park We settled in glendale so the year. You kinda went off to college was was nineteen. Ninety-two right. ninety

Chang Monterey Park John Glendale Houston Seoul Seattle Daly City San Jose Mon United States Elementary School Texas
Interview With Writer, Nicole Chung

Asian Enough

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Writer, Nicole Chung

"Thank you so much for joining us to call. Thank you tracy john. It's good to be here. Let's are at the beginning. You were born to korean immigrant parents. But you're adopted. As an infant into a white catholic family in a mostly white rural town in oregon. So how did you first start developing your own sense of identity. Sure sure so. I will say i lose the only korean that i really knew until i left home and it was formative and ways and at the same time. That's really hard to see when you're growing up there when you're in the midst of it when whiteness is just kind of the default around you as it was for me and did grow up in a very white area and it wasn't just like my family. It was my neighborhood. It was my school every school. I went to pretty much. you know. It was definitely the church we went to. It was one of those things where i definitely noticed from a young age. I noticed i didn't look like everyone and also like it was pointed out to me and like many different ways by different people. I will say that i. I don't think. I began really noticing a lot or feeling self conscious about it until i was old enough to go to school so my early years and how many of us has that many memories of our early childhood right but the memories i do have. It's like well of course. I knew that i was adopted. I don't remember being told so. I must have been told like around the time i was two or three. Is my gas like when i was actually verbal and i remember a few discussions like my. My main memory is asking my adopted mother. My mom likes to tell me the story of my adoption. And i would ask for this over and over when i was a kid and i remember like sitting in her lap and hearing the story and it never changed but growing up for me it was so impossible and honestly still isn't possible to separate like my asian my korean identity from my adoptee item. They are so bound together.

Tracy John Oregon
Author Chat With David Yoon

Books and Boba

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Author Chat With David Yoon

"Hey we're hearing with david author and guess now publisher dvd. I'll stick thanks for joining us on books and boba. Thanks for hopping looking forward to this. Yeah we are here to talk about what we're talking to david about all his great accomplishments but also about his newest book version zero But before he gets that we always like to start because this is a book club about asian american authors. We always like to hear how did you. How did you end up becoming an author like what was your journey as a writer was always something that was part of your life or something that you discovered later on. It's definitely it's. I mean i love this question. 'cause for me. It's definitely been something i've always wanted to do Ever since i was in third grade. I wrote a story in the class and they loved it. They're cracking up. And i was feeling and then a another story interested in it was crickets. Okay okay good feedback gonna try them better. And since then. My favorite classes have been english. I major was in english. I went to grad school for fiction. That's where i met Nikola wife Yeah and yeah and we learned about writing but we didn't learn about the publishing industry so we spent a lot of years just working our day jobs because they paid really well and writing in the mornings or at night and Really the are grad school contacts for members in college was the way we got to be agents and people like that was that was mainly networking. And the the more you write the more you can make your own luck. So when the agent when you friendly do need an agent now i will assume your stuff budgets to sean

David Nikola Sean
Interview With Author, Jesse Q. Sutanto

Books and Boba

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Author, Jesse Q. Sutanto

"And we're here with jesse. Qc who tanto the author of dial a for aunties as well as the obsession. Welcome jesse were so excited to have you here on the show. I thank you so much for having me your full disclosure. We've been trying to make this interview happen for months. I feel like to who calling in from. Are you in singapore. No or carter. Indonesia jakarta so time zones are thing. Yeah well So just starting off. Jesse can you tell us a little bit about when you wanted to become a writer like was writing always something that was part of your life. i heard that it took you like eight manuscripts to get published like it was very long journey for you so if you could expand a little bit on that on my never ending saga yeah i mean i i. I've always loved and bucks. And i think it was around like ten years ago now actually longer than that I was like okay. I'm gonna get a master's in creative righty and my parents were like. Oh you should go to business school and outright ending yet right But they supported me anyway that they're wonderful and and so i did that and then it's a heck of a long time After graduating to even get like one book published so that was that was a really long and twist the during with lots and lots of rejections and for the longest time. I was kinda trying to find my voice. And i think around At that time we didn't really have like that diverse You know push for more diverse city. And so i was writing. I didn't think that you know publishing. Would once stories from people like me. And so for the longest time i was just kinda writing occasion characters and stuff like that. So i'm very grateful for all the authors who you-know-who kind of paved. The way for us

Jesse Jakarta Carter Indonesia Singapore
Interview With Musician, Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Asian Enough

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Musician, Thenmozhi Soundararajan

"We wanted to start by looking at your own journey. Navigating discrimination as an indian american woman. Your parents were delegates from a village in rural india. But you grew up in southern california after your family immigrated to the united states. Can you talk a bit about what your family's experience in india was like and why they chose to come here. I think that you know both of my parents really struggled with tremendous discrimination. My dad was one of the first people educated in his generation that was able to leave to the united states but to imagine the kind of terror that he went through like his village was constantly tortured by dominant caste people who in order to kind of keep the wages low would often come with machetes to make sure that people never got quite settled. The threat of violence was always Looming kind of crisis. That that just kept people kind of contained and when my dad went to medical school people were always trying to find out what is cast was and you know. He tried to keep quiet where he could and so he hid and so he just learned to create and perfect. You know how to be the invisible belet you know excel but never be present and be able to kind of like crack a joke that could disarm people but always keep up the shield to that people would never get to know you you know. My dad went by his initials his whole life so he went by t s s rogen. And i was like this is so embarrassing. You just like tell people what your real name is. And he was afraid because his real name would actually have revealed his cast background

India United States California
The Silence of Bones by June Hur

Books and Boba

02:04 min | 1 year ago

The Silence of Bones by June Hur

"Eighteen hundred chosen korea homesick and sixteen year olds. Whole is living out the ancient curse. May you live in interesting times indentured to the police bureau. She's been tasked with assisting a well. Respected young inspector with the investigation into the politically charged. Murder of a noblewoman. As they delve deeper into the dead woman's secrets whole forms an unlikely bond of friendship with the inspector but her loyalty is tested when he becomes the prime suspect in may be the only one capable of discovering. What truly happened on the night of the murder. I will say before we get started. I'm going to do my best with the korean pronunciations. I i do not have native tongue rear this so i apologize in advance totally fine. 'cause like The thing. I don't know if you have the same trouble marvin but when you use the correct pronunciation with like an english sentence sometimes your tongue. Kind of does like gymnast. Ix and it's very hard to be consistent with the pronunciation because stiffer and it's also just proof of how globalization and colonization has like screwed with our mind. I know when i meet someone. Who's last name's lou. That lame extra khalil. But i still say lou because it's easier in my mind and it's just where we're we are living interesting times like I was thinking about this In terms of the legacy of colonization and howard like mess the world up and like we're all just dealing with the repercussions figuring how to how to best move forward right before we were recording. We were talking about romanisation complaining to marvin. Saying romanisation makes absolutely no sense when it comes to Phonetically spelling korean into english because english is best up and the pronunciation guide is. It's just ridiculous like half the time. I'm like this yawn or is this yoon when it's spelled. Y u n

Korea Marvin Khalil LOU Howard
Interview With Writer and Sociologist, Anthony Ocampo

Asian Enough

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Writer and Sociologist, Anthony Ocampo

"Thanks for joining us. Anthony thank you for having me. We just kind of want to start out by asking you a little bit about your background. There's been this kind of gap in filipino academic research. And and i think you're part of the sort of growing number of scholars that is focusing on the lived experiences of filipino. Americans can you tell us a little bit about your own childhood. And what motivated you to focus on filipino. Americans in your work. So i'm a son of immigrants. My parents migrated from the philippines in one thousand nine hundred eighty and then i was born shortly. Thereafter nineteen eighty-one and i grew up in a very robust filipino. American community so i i grew up most of my life in eagle rock which folks Me no has a significant number of filipino. American residents And i also like many filipinos in this country grew up with a very very large extended family that i spend a lot of time with it so most weekends were spent at like filipino. Social gatherings My parents house was the place where when new relatives were migrating from the philippines and getting settled in the us. They'd often stay with my parents for a number of weeks number of years in. So i just had a plethora of filipino reference points and then of course lake because of where i live the school that i went to also had a large number of filipinos in so i guess i've always had the opportunity to just observe how being filipino. American culture is in my everyday life from the food to the inner general dynamics to visits to the home country And that's that's i guess we're all interest started.

Philippines Anthony Eagle Rock United States
Interview With Author, Payal Doshi

Books and Boba

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Author, Payal Doshi

"And we are here with pile. Doshi the author of ria and the blood of the nectar. We are so excited to have her on the show. Her her book is a middle grade fantasy adventure. And i'm pretty sure are indian american readers out. There are going to be very excited for this book. It's coming out on june fifteenth pale than so much for being with us today. Hi thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Yeah congratulations on the launch of your book. How's it been like i. I saw on instagram stories. Your first unboxing of your the first like print feeling. Oh my gosh So surreal feel like this mixture of relief. Happiness disbelief I've lived with this book or about danielle's took me daniels to write this book. And then to me about two years to sell this book and then this whole last year has been you know a lot of everything just the general situation in the world and then at the same time it was all of these you know highs of book news like your cover coming out and seeing that for the first time and then you know get in your arc out people to read and then getting those are so many of those like insanely surreal moments but i nothing beats holding it in your hands. I feel like that's a before and after before bio and like the oft the book is it my hand. It was incredible. I was so nervous. You have all these imaginations and expectations. About what your would be like and then you hold it. I smell that we all do that. It's like the new book and like i. That's the quality of the paper and had a lovely like oh creamy yellow color. And like i was like all of those Bangle my own book so it was. It was awesome and even more excited for the launch in june. Because i know that it's you know it's a really good-looking book as well. That rita's will have and hold and hopefully love the story as well so it's very exciting. Very very exciting.

Doshi Danielle Daniels Rita
What AAPI Heritage Month Means to Ben's Chili Bowl's Sage Ali

Weekend All Things Considered

01:36 min | 1 year ago

What AAPI Heritage Month Means to Ben's Chili Bowl's Sage Ali

"May is Asian, American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, and we've been celebrating by checking in with recent guests about what this month means to them. This week, we caught up with Sage Ali, co owner of the iconic Washington D. C restaurant, Ben's Chili Bowl. Ali's father. The restaurant's namesake was from Trinidad and of Indian descent, and that was a big part of his identity. Growing up. We were raised Muslim My dad is, you know Muslims, so he's from India, Muslim, and so we even living in D C. We went to the mosque and the mosque was a largely Indian community. In fact, at one point do we went from the Islamic Center in Washington, D. C. To a Caribbean base mosque that was probably 90% Indian. So we were raised with I mean, we loved, you know, Roti and Curry and all of the Indian foods and The music and the culture in general, you know, and in fact, Vida my wife. She's also from Trinidad from the same community. Ali says it being black and Asian American gave him a rich cultural background to draw from it felt to me like Was a little bit lucky because I had a bigger world than most of my friends. Doesn't mean it's not like I just had a little bit more to draw from. You know when we went to Trinidad for a month, and there's my grandmother, and she's teaching us how to do the curry and the roadies and stuff every day and teaching us songs and or doing stuff. You was just a nice addition because it just added something. That's something included Indian films, which Ali says we're a big part of how his father connected to

Sage Ali Trinidad Islamic Center ALI Washington BEN Roti Caribbean Curry India
Getting Ghosted and Rejected

First of All

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Getting Ghosted and Rejected

"Talk about rejection because it's been my observation from a lot of different personal conversations. I've been privileged to have From my friends who trust me with their deepest darkest secrets to complete strangers. Who for some reason. Open up their deepest darkest secrets to me. Like in an uber driver or in a i know meeting just getting to know somebody. I've been really lucky And sometimes really overwhelmed and not knowing what to do with it but Been very at the end of day. I think really honored and and Fortunate for people to be so frank with me be very vulnerable with me and i know how much these encounters these everything from like your deepest truest love to like a one night stand to like just attempting to talk to somebody else and getting rejected like how much of a scar. That can leave or how much that can like. Change your entire outlook on life for yourself and it can be really tough to talk about publicly or even to just even like your friend or a person to say out loud. It's really personal. And so i thought that in light of it being asian pacific american heritage month and it also being mental health awareness month which i cared deeply passionately about that share some a in my opinion a pretty funny story at this point to reflect on all those elements combined so here we go garrity for one of my most embarassing moment. I still don't understand why. Keep this story. Keep kept creeping on me and i literally have had conversations like do i really need to share this on a podcast and it keeps coming up. So i'm aligning with my higher calling and gaden myself and here. We go so As i mentioned my first crush was bryant housing kindergarten. He was beautiful brown eyed sandy brown hair. He dressed up dracula in kindergarten for halloween. I was strawberry shortcake. It was adorable and he sat diagonal to me kindergarten glass and i remember he liked candy corn and i thought it was kinda gross and tasted like wax but i ate it because brian haas liked it so i wanted to have a connecting point of interest with him so i to eight candy corn.

Frank Gaden Garrity Sandy Brown Bryant Brian Haas
Interview With Novelist, Min Jin Lee

Asian Enough

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Novelist, Min Jin Lee

"Thank you so much for joining us mention out. It's a pleasure to be here. Tracy and jen and Yes i do have a lotta side hustles. I don't know he do it. And the pandemic even very like on your hustle and very productive seems. Well i'm fifty two. And i'm the sole provider for my family so in a way. I think that i have my priorities. And also i'm a writer. The which means that i'm a freelancer. That's what it is so you kind of have to keep your game on. Well i think for me. This is the biggest question for all writers but why novels i feel like that's one of the hardest storytelling ways that is out there. It started out with a corporate lawyer. Just wine apples while. I'm a big reader so that is really the reason why i wanted to write a novel and has really for me very very difficult. I've only produced two in about thirty years. So i've had to have all these side hustles to basically pay for these things. Because i never wrote a book before on contract and that's really important to share because a lot of people think that you have an idea you contact the publisher and say hey. I want to write a book and it just doesn't work that way. So i wrote it on spec and of course in the film industry guys no i wrote the entire thing and i presented it to somebody and said hey can i get one representation. I'd even have an agent. When i wrote my first book and it took me about eleven years of this kind of beating my head against the wall. Why did i choose novels. Because i think novels can create an incredible world. That's really difficult to do any other media. So that's why i did it but for me. It was a very long struggle. I've met young very talented writers who can just pop out. And i think that's awesome. That was not me.

JEN Tracy
Interview With Rapper, Ruby Ibarra

Asian Enough

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Rapper, Ruby Ibarra

"Thanks so much for joining us. Ruby johanna hi jan. Thank you so much for having me. it really is an honor for me to be in this conversation especially with asian american pacific islander heritage month coming up. I'm pretty sure you know the conversation that we're about to have is is gonna be relevant to what's been going on in this country. Yeah definitely. we're really excited to have you here. speaking of being asian american. You know you're known around the world as rapper rubio barra you know ruby bar in the belleek. Byron's that's the name of your band and so much of your music is centered on not just your philippine identity but this concept of being a and for listeners. Who don't know what that is. It's it's basically generally speaking of a filipino. Ex pat but there is this sort of larger obligation to feeling the need to give back to your home country or your family because you've left the country and sought out you know better economic opportunities and things like that but you came here when you were really young. At what point did you decide that this was something that you wanted to focus your music gone. And and what is being a buy into you. Those are really great questions to start for conversation to. I answer how. I got to the point in my artistry where i knew that i wanted to discuss or focus on you. Know my background and my heritage. My culture honestly. I don't think that really became a thought until my cirque ninety one album i think prior to that when i was making music a lot of it really involved just me trying to find my voice when we think about identity a lot of it really gets muddled and these thoughts of who am i and how. How do i belong in the space. That i'm in these her constant thoughts that i had in my head even as a young child. I never really felt that. I belonged in the us and at the same time. I never really felt that i belonged in the philippines because i grew up over here and so i think my journey in finding my voice. It's really started in college. I attended uc davis. And even though i majored in biochemistry i took it on myself to take classes that were outside of the scientists and one of them being asian american studies.

Ruby Johanna Hi Jan Rubio Barra Ex Pat Philippines Byron Uc Davis United States
Interview With Mommy Legislator, State Senator Stephanie Chang

Model Majority Podcast

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Mommy Legislator, State Senator Stephanie Chang

"Senator stephanie chain wall come to the model majority podcast today. thanks so much for having me. I'm excited to be here absolutely. We are very excited. Heavy on our show as well. We've been tracking your career for quite some time. You're serving as the state senator in michigan right now but i want to begin by starting from the very beginning. If we may to get you know a little about your personal background and even maybe find some clues as to why you are serving in public office today. So i love to hear about. Where did you grow up. How did you grow up and anything from that. Upbringing might have even triggered or contributed to you entering public service today. So i am the daughter of taiwanese-american immigrants who came to this country like so many others looking for better educational opportunity in my parents matches school. They met at the university of notre dame and moved to michigan when my dad found a job in the auto industry which is has is the thing that has brought most families to michigan and I grew up in canton. Which is about a half hour outside of detroit me and my sister mom and dad and we grew up one of the public schools there. I remember feeling very much like there. Were not a ton of asian americans. At the time. I remember going up there. I have think that was the only asian american girl in my class during pretty much almost all elementary school and then it really wasn't until high school that i started to learn more about asian american history through an asian american student group that was there and really had a strong mentor. Who was a teacher out. Who really sort of started to pull me into different leadership positions and encouraged me to learn more about my identity as a nation american and so I definitely think that growing up as daughter of immigrants and growing up in canton and getting that type of experience has certainly shaped to i. Am i definitely think that nobody of the values that my parents came to america believing in you know opportunity Is is something that as legislator that i try to fight for Constantly trying to stand up for our values

Senator Stephanie Chain Michigan University Of Notre Canton Detroit America
Analyzing the Latest Data on Anti-Asian Hate Crimes

The Electorette Podcast

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Analyzing the Latest Data on Anti-Asian Hate Crimes

"You so much for having me. So we'll talk about the rise in anti-asian hate crimes and incidents. We've seen the recent data that i've seen shows that during the year of pandemic i think this was. The data was taken between march of last year. In february of this year. There have been nearly four thousand incidents of hate crimes at least reported hate crimes in comparison to the previous year. Were there are twenty six hundred for the entire year. I don't know if those numbers are correct but that seems like a significant rise. Yeah since the start of the pandemic we have definitely seen from different sources that there has been an increase in reported incidents with Racial bias against asian americans. But there's also a difference in in gender right in the way that women experienced these hate crimes and incidents versus the way that men are experiencing them. And i want you to parse you some of that data for me because one of the things that i had read in this appropriately wrong and i think there's why there's gulf in how the media is reporting the incident with the data actually says but is it not true that women are experiencing or at least a reporting more incidents than men can parsi data. Sure yeah this. Is i think an important point in the current moment of how we understand both race and gender and the violence that is associated with both so we know that the atlanta shootings in march that that was a white gunman who opened fire on a on an asian owned spa and or asian on spas and that violence was for sure a function of both race of the women's national origin and gender. Those women were in that position because of their gender you know occupations and they were also economically vulnerable. What we're seeing in the

Atlanta
Interview With Elise Go, Singer, Songwriter

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Elise Go, Singer, Songwriter

"This episode is least go. She's in la based singer. Songwriter and i would also say fantastic producer. You the triple threat girl. I always prepare every guest by reading their books listening to their music waiting through their poetry. And sometimes it's not my thing. But i do it because i want to be prepared. I have been marinating in a least goes music this week. As i've been editing photos for hours and hours. And i want to say at least you really bring all these amazing gifts together and i can't wait for our audience to sample some of your wear. So welcome to the five cast. I can think you so much for having me hello listeners. What's up well you are not from. La in fact. I watched a little bit of your youtube video. Twenty eighteen when you and your mom your piled into the previous for the free is right to make that journey so tell us a little bit about your back story so we can kind of appreciate how you've landed in l. a. as this amazing berkley. School of music graduate talent were awesome So when i was little. I started pointing seattle when i was four. So music has always been in my life and me and my mom are very very close race by single mom so that comes with its own hardships. But she always found time to you know she. I i see now as an adult looking back ever since i was younger. She always made sure. I had all the opportunities that i could to explore extracurriculars to see what i was passionate about to help. Find that passion. So i started playing piano on os for the classical music for really long time and then progressed to really liking to sing. And i always bring up the lizzie mcguire movie. I watched that with my daughter. That's too cute. Dreams are yes that is exactly thong on ironically. Got me into pop music.

School Of Music Graduate LA Berkley Youtube Seattle Lizzie Mcguire
How to Pronounce Knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa

Books and Boba

02:02 min | 1 year ago

How to Pronounce Knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa

"Stories that make up how to pronounce focus on character struggling to find their bearings in unfamiliar territory or shuttling between idioms cultures and values a failed boxer discovers what it truly means to be a champion when he starts painting nails at his sister salon. A young woman tries to discern the invisible immutable. Social hierarchies at a chicken processing plant. A mother coaches her daughter in the challenging art of worm harvesting in todd. Visceral pro style. That establishes her as one of the most striking and assured voices of her generation. Tonka interrogates what it means to make a living to work and to create meaning so at the top like this is a story. A collection of stories about the lao refugee diaspora and laos is a country is adjacent to vietnam. But it's southeast asian like block. That wasn't solved the the vietnam war and because of that were the source of a lot of refugees along with vietnam. Cambodia that came from that area in the seventy s sixty seventies. Yeah it was like The sixties and seventies laos is the only landlocked country in southeast asia. Like you said it. Borders vietnam also borders thailand and is also the most heavily bombed country in all of history in terms of country size and population and most of that is from americans and a lot of the bombs that were dropped. Not all of them have detonated so every year. There is a lot of casualties from these from these bombs. So yeah western colonization and meddling has definitely you. I don't know what else to say.

Vietnam Laos Tonka Todd Diaspora Cambodia Asia Thailand
Outgrowing People Pleasing With Kevyn Fong

First of All

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Outgrowing People Pleasing With Kevyn Fong

"Guys. Oh my god jim so. I don't think there's anybody more excited than i am. Because i freaking love you let me just say right. I loved you the most i love you. So how are you doing today. Pretty good actually got to workouts in been very very focused on work and despite the weather being what it is right now. I'm very blessed and happy to stop took. I took a walk. And i'm like good girl. I walk to the fridge. And then i was saying i mean your workouts have been very inspiring which is why i'm so excited to talk to you because we're talking about transformation here right. Oh you better stop. I'm still in the middle we're ongoing. We're we're ongoing work in progress monitoring very excited about it. Well okay so to get situated. It's been really fun having so many awesome guests on first of all and because not everybody tuning in may of heard your incredible episode with me earlier which was like another lifetime ago or he talked about your coming out story right and just everything that made you who you are. How would you. How'd you do your little elevator. Pitch of like what's kevin long story and like a may life story treat tiktok tiktok on animate tiktok. I know. I guess. I am a military brat. Half chinese half filipino. Filmmaker turned digital content creator that focuses a lot on talent management. And that's where i've been. I've been in la for the last ten years. And i think now. I'm like really learning to just help others so i can also help myself.

JIM Tiktok Tiktok Kevin LA
Biracial Identity With Actress Jade Ma

Model Majority Podcast

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Biracial Identity With Actress Jade Ma

"Jade ma welcome to the model majority podcast today. Thanks for having me here all right so we have a lot to talk about. Get into your current acting projects and also talk about some current affairs. If you will. But i want to start with your personal background a little bit so people know. Get to know a little bit about you as a person love to hear. Where did you grow up in of. How did you grow up. So i was born and raised in hong kong to british father and chinese mall and Yeah i lived there for seventeen years until i moved to the uk for university there for five years and then moved out to canada. Okay and a what was it like growing up by racially but also a hopping around different places in the world. You know growing up in a very different societies and cultures was really interesting so growing up in hong kong. I found myself in this place. Where because i was mixed. I wasn't quite enough of either to be considered part of either community. So i in asian enough for the local chinese community. But i wasn't wide enough to be part of the white exit community. Luckily for me there is a fairly large community of mixed people in hong kong. Do just like international nature of the city. So i still like grew up around quite a few people who were like me Moving to the uk. That was immediately like berry different. I was immediately viewed as chinese rather than as mix just. Because i know present quite chinese to most people Especially if they haven't been around many biracial like chinese mixed people right So when i moved k. That became quite a big part of my identity to other people

Jade Ma Hong Kong UK Canada Berry
Interview With Mia P. Manansala, Author

Books and Boba

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Mia P. Manansala, Author

"And we are here with author. Mia p monot sala the author of arsenic adobo. She is also the winner of the twenty eighteen. Hugh colton award and the two thousand eighteen. Eleanor taylor bland. Crime fiction writers of color award. Welcome thanks for having me. It's always great to bring award winning for unpublished. But yes good. I mean it still counts. Still mary impressive award winning author. I mean like those awards are for my now soon to debut novel. So i guess you're right accounts it can cam nine like in publishing. You need to celebrate every little thing. So you're right you're right so how are you doing. How's how's covert publishing life going for you. What my book cut like as of this recording my book comes out in three weeks. So it's that weird thing of like. I've been waiting over a year for this to happen and now that it's starting to happen. I'm like oh no what like like people are going to be reading my words and and having opinions and oh you know. It's a weird super exciting and super scary time right now. Your your book is a book of the month choice. And that's like that's a pretty big deal too so congratulations. i think. I think that's also was kind of adding to this weird like inbetween feeling because i see my book like on instagram. People are tagging me and photos but it hasn't officially released. So i'm like is this real like. Is this actually happening. It's called marking. It's called marketing. Not a lot of authors. Get it but you're very lucky. Your book definitely deserves it. Because i had so much fun reading it.

Mia P Monot Sala Hugh Colton Eleanor Taylor Bland Mary
Interview With William Hung, Former American Idol Contestant

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Interview With William Hung, Former American Idol Contestant

"When we started this podcast in two thousand fifteen i compiled a list of what i call the white wales and these were guest that i hope to book someday. People like george decay and margaret show and sonar so forth. And we've actually had margaret and george decay on but one of the white. Whales did eluded me until this very moment is my guest. This episode william hung william. I want to welcome you to our show. Highly meet you oswal for some of our listeners. May have heard of some of these other people that i just mentioned. But maybe they're not familiar with you and and let me just briefly. Explain to the audience. Why you were on my must book on this back. When i wasn't even watching american idol. So this is i think. Season three of american idol. Early in two thousand four. You auditioned and i heard about the audition so not even watching the show. Your audition actually kind of went by role and it sets up the next seven years of your life and then even what you've kind of transition to so. Could you give our audience in idea about what led to the audition san francisco for american idol. And then what happened there. And then we'll talk about the next part sir. So i always enjoyed carry your in my life. I started singing karaoke. Gave the my parents. I was tenuous on the back in hong kong and then in college i studied at uc. Berkeley i studied zimmer engineering I wasn't doing at school. So i thought i needed to try something new then one day. I thought his poster for a school talent show. And i thought watching and studying the music videos from ricky martin's she bangs

White Wales George Decay William Hung William Margaret George San Francisco Zimmer UC Hong Kong Berkeley Ricky Martin
What's With The Rash Of Asian Hate?

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:18 min | 1 year ago

What's With The Rash Of Asian Hate?

"All right. You know this is to kansas is exciting to be back online with ya. and cash ken beached white male. Podcast asian american podcast with ken. Fog were together. I love this and you know last time we did this. Can we talked about the targeting of asian americans in this culture. And i mean it was six days after we posted that podcasts that we had this amazing shooting. Remember that podcast can. Oh yeah yeah. In fact everything was so schmooze together when you reminded me that we had recorded that less than a week before this atrocity happened. I had a double check. And i i found myself when i heard this story. I thought oh my gosh. This is terrible because this guy robert aaron long went to at least two asian massage parlors and he walked in he just started a start taking people out and these these girls in in those massage parlors are dead and i and i thought. Gosh we're talking about asians being targeted and here it is. The number was three asian owned massage. Parlours yeah and and In one of them they were not girls to them were in their seventies one was in sixties and what was in her fifties. Oh my god right so it. Just kind of blows up a lot of the horrible memes Incentivizing around asian american women that the young nubile sex workers. As i know these were. May i think hard working wage elderly eh. asian women trying to do what they could to help support their families. Yes and and so. Many issues came out of that story just about the. you know. Sexualizing as women. You know and but then it turns out that this guy tells the people that arrested him that he had a sex addiction. You know as though that was the motive in the cause of these shootings and then the police officer gets on the microphone and he says Yes the the individual committed this crime Admitted to having sex addiction and you know he had a bad day.

KEN Robert Aaron Kansas
Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan

Books and Boba

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan

"This is also your standard spoiler warning We are going to talk about. The entirety of girls have paper and wire including plot points and revelations about the climax and twists. So if you have not read the book and you do plan to. This is where you should pause our podcast and comeback after you finish the book and with that said. Let's get to it rewrite. Can you start off with the book. Jacket description each year. Eight beautiful girls chosen as paper girls to serve the king. It's the highest honor. They could hope for and the most demeaning this year. There's a ninth and instead of paper. She's made a fire in this richly. Developed fantasy lay is a member of the paper cast the lowest and most persecuted class of people in kara. She lives in a remote village with her father where the decade old trauma of watching her mother snatched by royal guards for an unknown fate. Still haunt sir. Now the guards are back and this time it's lay thereafter. The girl with the golden is rumored. Beauty has peaked. The kings interest over weeks of training in the opulent but oppressive palace. Lay an eight other. Girls learned the skills and charms that befit kings concert there. She does the unthinkable. she falls in love. Her forbidden romance becomes enmeshed with an explosive plot that threatens her world entire way of life lay still the wide eyed country girl at heart must decide how far she's willing to go for justice and revenge. So this book is an asian themed fantasy a more specifically southeast asian and chinese fantasy. It's an imperial court

Kara Kings
Living & Processing #StopAsianHate

First of All

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Living & Processing #StopAsianHate

"Hey guys welcome to first of all a real unfiltered conversation on career family relationships and culture. Ivanhoe's mingy chang. I'm an actor producer and entrepreneur. And i'm here to share inspiring stories and go through everyday life with you Right off the top. I don't know how inspiring this week's episode is going to be but it definitely is with the intention to walk through life with you because it has been a moment a really tough moment for a lot of folks at least in my universe and for myself to go through and with the full mission of what first of all was from. The very beginnings from his birth was to be space for asian american voices for female voices. And there's a lot to unpack with. What happened this past week. And what's been happening in the asian american community so to get everybody up to speed. If you're new to first of all how is first time tuning in this. Podcast has been an exploration in a place where my experience in the the friends of mine. My universe can talk a lot of different elements of who we are as people whether that's racer or sexuality or geography or whatever. We all have a really diverse background. We're all unique individuals human beings and i'm fascinated by that and i wanted the space to be a place where we can share all those things talk through some things process and things learn and This last year. There's been a huge surge in anti-asian violence This the last administration. The trump administration had been kind of setting the stage in Provoking and planting a lot of hateful hateful rhetoric a lot of hateful attitudes and discriminatory Perspectives and viewpoints. Really like empowering a lot of people that are bigoted and zena phobic and it's been really scary time But in terms of the hate crimes that have been happening. The violence That has been surging. I think we're almost like four thousand hate crimes in the last year It's been a lot for folks to deal with and with what happened in atlanta and knowing the fact that a lot of the people that tune in for first of all are a lot of asian americans asian diaspora a lot of women. Female identifying folks. i just i. My my wish was to create a space for us to to kind of grieve together and process and to learn again all the original intentions of this podcast because there is a lot to unpack here. It's not just pain but that pain is coming from a shared experience of being largely invisible being discriminated against being a being a you know attacked and mistreated and dehumanized in so many different forms. That it's something that's been cracked open in this moment.

Ivanhoe Atlanta