Arts

Listen to the latest news, interviews and analysis from the world of visual and performing arts. Sourced from leading podcasts and talk radio shows.

A highlight from 524: Today, When I Could Do Nothing

The Slowdown

04:08 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 524: Today, When I Could Do Nothing

"It doesn't seem that human beings are built to do nothing. It feels like we are built to build things to work to make products to consume products to send emails to make art to attend to social media to scroll and scroll to binge watch to binge eat to worry obsess and to make improvements in our lives to make forward momentum. My dog in contrast, she seems like she's built for doing nothing. She does nothing like it's her job. She naps with a focused concentration that's enviable. She stares at the trees that line the backyard, like they're all there is. But even when I claim to be wasting time, I'm usually doing something reading, watching, worrying. During the early days of the pandemic, many of us had to rethink what doing nothing looked like. If we weren't essential workers, we had to remember what it was to feel no longer useful, no longer needed. We had to come to terms with the fact that the best thing we could do was nothing. To stay home to walk the block to avoid the mall, the movie theater, the grocery store, we had to avoid each other, even our loved ones. Doing nothing felt like a hard job for some. I for one, like being useful, I like feeling useful. But my job was to stay home. In today's poem, we see how a luminous poet can turn the act of doing nothing into an act of connection. How doing nothing can actually translate into close attention to the life that's all around us. What do we miss when we always are in a rush to the next thing? What do we miss when we are always doing doing doing? Sometimes what we miss is a small act of tenderness, a simple act of care for another living thing a moment of stillness. This poem seems to tell us that doing nothing can mean changing what we value and how we honor our lives. Today, when I could do nothing by Jane hirschfield today, when I could do nothing, I saved an aunt. It must have come in with the morning paper, still being delivered to those who shelter in place. A morning paper is still an essential service. I am not an essential service. I have coffee and books, time, a garden, silence enough to fill cisterns. It must have first walked the morning paper as if loosened ink, taking the shape of an ant. Then across the laptop computer, warm, then onto the back of a cushion. Small, black and, alone, crossing a navy, cushion, moving steadily because that is what it could do. Set outside in the sun, it could not have found again its nest. What then did I save? It did not move as if it was frightened. Even while walking my hand which moved it through swiftness and air and alone without companions whose aunt heart I could not fathom, how is your life? I wanted to ask. I lifted it, took it outside. The first day, when I could do nothing, contribute nothing.

Jane Hirschfield Navy
A highlight from Rothkos late paintings, galleries respond to the climate crisis and Nicolas Poussin

The Art Newspaper Weekly

07:50 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Rothkos late paintings, galleries respond to the climate crisis and Nicolas Poussin

"I'm standing in regent's park in London, not far from the freeze London tent. As a show of works on paper by Mark Rothko opens at pacey's new gallery in London's West End, I talk to Christopher Rothko about the show and about his father's love for the art of JMW Turner, among much else. Later, Louisa buck talks to heath lounge at the gallery climate coalition about galleries attempts to address the climate crisis, and in this week's work of the week as a beautiful new show of the work of Poussin opens at the National Gallery here in London. I talked to Francesca Whitman Cooper, the curator of the exhibition about the French artist's obsession with the borghese dancers, an ancient Roman best relief now in the Louvre and on loan to that exhibition and how he used it in his painting. Before all that, why not subscribe to the art newspaper, you can currently make a big saving on the quarterly price of our complete subscription. That's the printed newspaper delivered to your door and full access to the digital content on the website and our apps for iOS and Android. Subscribe today to get the offer of 22 pounds or 29.25 per quarter. Go to the art newspaper dot com and click on the subscribe link at the top left of the page for this and our full range of subscriptions. Now, the pace gallery opened a new space in mayfair in London last week. And in its opening program is an exhibition dedicated to a group of works on paper made by Mark Rothko in 1968. The first exhibition in the UK to focus solely on Rothko's paintings on paper. I went to pace and spoke to Rothko's son Christopher about the show, the situation in his father's life at the time, and the artist's remarkable gift of 9 of his secret murals to the Tate gallery, which was being negotiated at the time. Those works are now on display at Tate Britain. Christopher, the first thing that hit me when I walked into this exhibition was that the works are on a scale, which is smaller than perhaps many of us are used to with your father's work in the sense that they tend to be of an enveloping scale. These are almost like easel scale. So tell us about these pictures. How do they differ from those larger works? So these paintings are, they're the result of necessity becoming a virtue. My father had a very serious illness very serious heart condition, starting in 1968 and he was forced for a while to paint only on paper and on a very small scale. And he proceeded rather than letting this pull him down. He proceeded to produce more work in the next two years, and he did it any other point in his life. Had three easel boards where he would work on three paintings at once. And the smallest scale works allowed him to create works that were meaningful and impactful to be viewed, I think, a little bit closer range and still be enveloping emotionally, even if they could not fill your whole field of vision. And then as time went on, he increased the scale, and eventually started painting to some degree on canvas again, but always kept with paper through the end of his life. One of the things that's so interesting about your father's work is that he definitely had ideas of how he wanted the viewer to behave in front of the works in terms of the distance from the work in terms of the way that the lighting was set, all that kind of thing. He was very clear about the conditions we're seeing that wasn't he? Extremely clear and passionate about it above all things he wanted to make sure that his paintings didn't become simply decorative. They did not become wallpaper, very easy for a Rothko to become wallpaper. So he was always encouraging the viewer to spend more time to look more deeply, as part of the reason for the dark tone of the last 13 or so years of his career. He no longer was so concerned to get every viewer to stop. Instead he wanted to make sure whoever who did stop had a longer more slowly engaging type of relationship really a long conversation. And so those colors starting with actually the seagram works the works that we know so well from the Tate gallery with those works where he knew you were going to be sitting with him for a long time. He starts painting in a color toned color palette that will allow the works to slowly envelop you slowly get into your system and for you to have a more extended conversation. One of the things about the color that's often, there's almost a myth around your father's use of color towards the end of his career, right? So it progresses into ever greater monochrome and to darkness and that somehow is symptomatic of the mental illness that ultimately led to his death. That's one of the things that I notice about this show is an absolute counterpoint. There's so much bright color as well as darkness in these paintings. Yes, it is a myth that my father just descends into darkness and then takes his own life. There's no question that he was battling a depression terrible depression the last few years of his life and terrible illness. Would have killed him actually quite shortly afterwards. And yet it doesn't stop him, as I said, these last couple of years, he's painting passionately and incredibly actively and rather than succumbing to this. He paints his way through it. But indeed, there are very bright colored paintings and there are paintings that are very dark at first appearance, and then there's always some lightness that creeps through. And I think all through his career, he's acknowledging that we are never simply happy or sad, that sadness is much more poignant because of all the wonderful joyous things that we remember that we gave up. And that joy is always has an admixture of sadness. All the difficulty we came through to get to that joy's point. And in fact, how much more dramatic the joy is, in fact, because you've had to suffer to get there. And in fact, didn't he actually say that for all the darkness there had to be a glimmer of hope in every work, and since it's essentially even if he was painting the most tumultuous elements of the human drama, there had to be a light that fundamentally was omitted from the work. Absolutely. And you'll see that in paintings here that are 90% black and there's just a little stripe of color and somehow it's not a dark painting. There's always that admixture. I love this characterization that your father gave to the work, which is that they were novels rather than the dramas that were the bigger pictures. Can you say what you think he might have meant by that? Yes, he read Nietzsche very closely both the tragedy that was a huge influence for him. And he looked at the Greeks very carefully and painting the renaissance and he was always interested in the dramatic element of painting and how drama sort of recreated that elemental aspect of life. And he always wanted to engage his viewers in that sense of drama in his paintings. With these works, which he recognized could not be on the same scale, this initially to what people were used to with his work. He understood that you could no longer be in the drama in the same way. And yet he could still engage you as a very active reader. He could make something that would unfold and be rich in multi layered. And you could be in it, maybe not quite the same level of participation and yet in my mind about this is you have to be an active reader in order to get something from these works. And that's always true with Rothko. Absolutely. One of the things I'm always curious about is to what extent he was looking to the art of the past right to the end. So these are some of the final paintings he made last two years of his life essentially. To what extent was he also always looking back because he was a master in his own right by that stage, but was he continually engaging with art history at that time? He maintained to the end that he was not a revolutionary that he saw his work as sort of a natural evolution in the history of art and rather than feeling like he had made a break. He was very proud to be someone who was stepped forward from painters of the right of science from Rembrandt, who he worshiped and who, of course, could find so much lightness, just a little glimmer in the eye and otherwise black and brown painting. Or through Matisse who, again, we think of him with very bright colors, and yet there's sorrow mixed in with the beauty of Matisse. Yes, so he continues to look at great art from the past through his life. My first trip that I remember is in 1966, we spent the entire summer in Rome. And I promise you, he spent every day

London Rothko Mark Rothko Regent's Park Pacey's New Gallery Christopher Rothko Jmw Turner Louisa Buck Heath Lounge Gallery Climate Coalition Francesca Whitman Cooper Tate Gallery Christopher Poussin National Gallery Louvre Mayfair Depression Terrible Depression Seagram
A highlight from 523: Our Valley

The Slowdown

03:53 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 523: Our Valley

"I grew up about an hour away from the Pacific Ocean in a place that sounds made up. The valley where I grew up is actually called the valley of the moon. We had long dry summers, summers that are now plagued with wildfires, and mild green winters. Winters were so green, that I was confused when I moved east and everything turned dead and Brown as soon as the day's shrank to nothing. That valley will always be home for me. No matter where I live, no matter where I travel to. I like to call it my valley, though nothing belongs to me. I have no ownership over the land. The valley of the moon is situated between two low mountain ranges. The Maya commons mountains and the cinema mountains. In the mornings we get the coastal fog that hangs thick over the vineyards and it feels like the actual breath of the ocean. Even if you don't see it, even if you don't look at it each day, you get a sense that the large pulsing body of water is out there, massive and unknowable. Today's poem captures what it's like to feel the sea and sense its presence, even when you are somehow in the middle of a landlocked valley. Written by Philip Levine, who was, in fact, my very first cherished poetry professor in graduate school, this poem reminds us of the importance of awe. A feeling that makes us know we are small. A feeling that is both full of wonder and terror. This poem makes it clear that no matter how much we worship the natural world, want it to be ours, love it, write about it, it still doesn't belong to us. Like human life itself, the natural landscape will always remain something too mysterious to comprehend. And for me, that's the gift. Our valley. By Philip Levine. We don't see the ocean. Not ever. But in July and August, when the worst heat seems to rise from the hard clay of this valley, you could be walking through a fig Orchard when suddenly the wind cools and for a moment you get a whiff of salt. And in that moment, you can almost believe something is waiting beyond the Pacheco pass, something massive, irrational, and so powerful even the mountains that rise east of here have no word for it. You probably think I'm nuts, saying the mountains have no word for ocean. But if you live here, you begin to believe they know everything. They maintain that huge silence we think of as divine. A silence that grows in autumn when snow falls slowly between the pines and the wind dies to less than a whisper, and you can barely catch your breath because you're thrilled and terrified. You have to remember this isn't your land. It belongs to no one. Like the sea, you once lived beside and thought was yours. Remember the small boats that bobbed out as the waves rode in, and the men who carved a living from it only to find themselves carved down to nothing.

Philip Levine Cinema Mountains Pacific Ocean Winters Brown
A highlight from 522: Across the Border

The Slowdown

04:24 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from 522: Across the Border

"Up in a gray parka. She was in that phase of constant questioning. She pointed to a pigeon and asked her father what sort of bird it was. Her father, holding her hand, answered as if all he had done for his entire life was answer questions. A pigeon, he said, she pointed at another bird and asked again, and again, he said, pigeon, and it went on and on like this all the way from second avenue to Park Avenue until she grew exhausted, defeated and shouted when am I ever going to get to see a real bird? I laughed then. But I know how she feels. The pigeon is a real bird, of course, but it's not the colorful parrot of South America or even the teal crested Kingfisher, one might glimpse by the river. It's just a pigeon, an ordinary gray, winged thing, making its way through the streets, like any other animal trying to get by. Ever since that day, I try to remember to praise the pigeon. The daily bird don't get me wrong. I too want to see something spectacular. I'm ready for the world to open and all the magical forbidden delights to return. During this year, in particular, I have felt the strong tug of fantasy, escapism, the wish to live outside of this all too real reality. Today's poem speaks to that desire to live beyond our human concerns to where everything is alive with magic and glow. Who doesn't want to lift the gray veil and witness a bright and vibrant world? And still I am reminded that even then I'd want to come back here to this world, with all its flaws, and praise the real bird. I crossed the border, by Sophie juet. I have read somewhere that the birds of fairyland are white is snow. WB Yates where all the trees bear golden flowers, and all the birds are white, where fairy folk in dancing hours burn stars for candlelight. Where every wind and leaf can talk, but no man understand. Save one whose child feet chanced to walk, green paths of fairyland. I followed two swift silver wings. I stalked a roving song. I startled shining silent things. I wandered all day long. But when it seemed the shadowy hours, whispered of soft foot night, I crept home to sweet, common flowers, brown birds, and candlelight. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the poetry foundation. To get a poem delivered to you daily, go to slow down, show dot org, and sign up for our newsletter. Follow the slowdown on Instagram and Twitter at slow down show. Celebrate contemporary poets in living lineage with one another at the 2021 Pegasus awards ceremony, on October 21st the poetry foundation honors 7 outstanding poets, and you are invited. The honorees include Patricia Smith, recipient of the Ruth Lilly poetry prize for lifetime achievement, Susan Bryant, winner of the Pegasus award for poetry criticism, and the 2021 cohort of the Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg poetry fellows.

Sophie Juet Wb Yates Poetry Foundation South America Ruth Lilly Instagram Patricia Smith Susan Bryant Twitter Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg
A highlight from 521: Invocation

The Slowdown

03:47 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 521: Invocation

"I like. The idea of belonging how can call the world closer to us. I believe in the connectedness of living things and rituals in the power of language. Those small ways. I can help ground myself when i feel like. I'm spinning off into the chaos of the world. I like candles for friends or family. Who are sick or a need. I grow and braid sweet grass and give braids to friends. I think it's important to make eye contact when you're toasting someone and like my friend. Fernando taught me. I say ojos ojos if someone tries to drink before looking me in the eyes. I talked to my house plants. I believe plants can get lonely in an empty room even with the right amount of light or water. I say hello to the three crows on my morning walk. I don't think we're friends yet. But they seem to put up with me and the dog part of my belief in these moments of what some might call superstitions or rituals is that. I want to be sure that. I'm acknowledging the world around me not just staring at my phone or dooms grueling or worrying about what's next staying closer to home these days. I'm always noticing the trees and birds and grasses that surround me. I learned their names to its way of feeling like i'm not alone. I know we live in cane. Run watershed for example. I know the names of the trees on my morning walk speaking to the natural world witnessing it noticing the way it changes and shifts makes me feel like i'm a part of something now that i travel less. See my family less. I need to feel a part of something. We get to see how that connection to. The natural world is also passed on through generations. How deeply watching or speaking to the world around us in fuses who. We are as children as parents as humans. This poem makes it clear that legacy isn't just about the human family and identity doesn't always have to do with a country how we love. Our natural world is how we know where. We belong in vocation. By w todd kanako remember me. My father sings to the forest. His mouth wide is looking back into darkness like he can see every creature on the island field mouse. Stray dog and house cat white tailed deer. That waitress at the chinese restaurant once asked his name then fed him every night for the rest of his life without ever showing him menu some nights. The sky speaks to me of so many things. I will not forget to be glad for the horizons swift departure against the porch light. A fluster of bats over power lines and across the park that taciturn music made by the winds hollow breath outside while my son kicks off his blankets. The sound a flag makes

Fernando Todd Kanako
A highlight from (Episode 257) "The Karate Kid" (You're the best) Singer: Joe Esposito.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

08:41 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from (Episode 257) "The Karate Kid" (You're the best) Singer: Joe Esposito.

"Today traveler. Joe i'm looking at your hat. I live in massachusetts. I'm thinking red sox yankees watch yet. I mean boston one that win. Gay in the backyard. i'm not a real yankee. We all come of brooklyn dodger. My team guys so said so much stuff but Yeah yeah you know. And i gotta tell you i look at the red sox fan base and i live in massachusetts in its most of them are not the best in sports rates. They're kind of a little bit obnoxious little bit. You know but. I love boston as a talented love. The i love everything about it. But i just love. I love the rivalry itself. I love the red sox yankees. It's it's one of the things in tampa as a game with the red sox today a tonight and they haven't even sold out two hours before game time. that would never have. Yeah that would never happen in new york and boston. I don't think no i was. Yeah but you. You mentioned your brooklyn who trivialize my son claimed. My son was impression basil part of When he day or a shield and seeming underneath kinsley and doesn't enjoy. Wow wow. i didn't know that we'll send you why i had questions about your son. Because those eras state and the fact that he played for the rock dogs. You gotta do. I don't know. I'm glad you said because you led me there arm. No they had he pitched wanna say early. Two thousands your son for the rockies and then with the arizona state now did you. Did you see him. Pinochet arizona's games you. I wait a second national. Actually he select number that they were using your pass when they will come down to walk. Because that's wrong. When i came out for the karate kid wasn't that big of a deal it was mostly the banana. Rabbits coup crude summa from that twenty years later my son fighting arizona state by a started taxable and it became the slight cold soundtracks and the actions. Now twenty years is is that. Do you feel like you're your son's perspective. You change when he told his teammates. You know who was. Dad was what his dad did. You feel like that. Earned him some credit within within the team whether it's arizona state or whether it was at you know in colorado everybody everybody now gets. That's big time baseball. Arizona state eagles from right from d. One you must have been super proud. I mean the chances of that happening percentage wise are almost off the chart. Right in your son. I mean that's i mean. Usb so proud of both of our. i don't know if you mentioned your daughter off here but you know you must be so proud of your kids. Four beautiful kids session the as he has yet. Yeah that's fantastic and you mentioned earlier for those listening. You're you're brooklyn. Raised your bronx born on your clearly. A new york guy You really hold. Schutte routes but musically. It's all about elvis for you show right. I feel like it's that's where everything starts. Your admiration for elvis really young k. Heard else it's just him. And then of course come out and change everything and i think of like again until eleanor reading. I realize all is losing imitated. The black hawse renan mold tat like in the sixty hours. I was done. Temptation small rods off engaged. He won the all. That was really my those are the guys at the and it almost sounds like you. You're going up like Your appreciation love for music. Joe increases rapidly throughout the years. Right you're open to the new music you hear. These new sounds in as a musician at heart vocalist at heart. You must've been aesthetic with all these wonderful artist in. You're listening to right. I mean those are all everyone that you just mentioned. All of them game changers yes. Absolute and to sing with a me content shows and hang out in engaged. Bit dated rosen. Another one. I really hang our gusty recording. The first album trades the went came to studio studio it out. So been around this people. On the periphery of the late seventies early eighties. She's the queen. Great time and i i started on us should. Do you think that the this the the younger kids are this generation on a settlement. I don't wanna sound out of place where you feel like they appreciate the marvin gaye of the world. The you know what elvis truly was the beatles. truly were. You know toss throwback yes except you know with with the new little twist on it. They inox with the introduce on and scrapes off Also being shed shera guess yes some run. Get this online office out the room. Five great a diving. Just be very the rhapsody. Get it because it's not a fan. you know. The next generation ruined appreciate you know. I always liked to see. I whose kids got killed I'll get it to get. Yeah the young yet. Fear very very talented guys that you're naming and you know and i know you've talked you've been asked these questions a million times. I'm gonna try to put a different spill. Yeah so you end up in la. And i want to say and and i'm probably skipping a lot of steps here two of the first people you mean. I want to say in a roundabout way one is ringo starr and it's eventually paul mccartney and i can't even imagine i mean you could fill in the gaps if you'd like that so i don't wanna make you first of all. I'm doing an album. Dream pod zero. He roll elvis presley scout. There's an old guy but he's also at for the rinus he wrote and produced by. Kiss kiss enroll. You may feel against. We will say four five decades. So i haven't read was him years renovatable new york city sitting around. He goes to california's a mini ice. I seek tunes. Listen i think in california. I so when they. He calls me uncle his any. What are you doing business. Goes you wanna sing on on a on record on again. It doesn't tell me over. This call was saying we're gonna studio as saw at four for a legendary last respect for the fire could you signing half which i mean Bg's he gave the neck dario army thing before they were all that source of and then caught constant unannounced helpful. Leaving on scene. i was in who the beatles. Nineteen seventy seven. i'm

Red Sox Arizona Brooklyn Dodger Boston Yankees Massachusetts Arizona State Eagles Elvis Brooklyn Kinsley JOE New York Rockies Tampa Schutte Eleanor Colorado Baseball Rosen Marvin Gaye
A highlight from 520: I Worry My Mother Will Die and I Will Know Nothing

The Slowdown

03:53 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 520: I Worry My Mother Will Die and I Will Know Nothing

"Spend a lot of time thinking about hunger. Too much time really. I'm from a family. Who starts planning their next meal while they are sitting down to their first meal. I have read books on hunger how to feel full how to know when you're hungry or just bored or maybe sad but hunger is also something else isn't it. It's not just the physical need to eat but sometimes it is the want to be made satisfied to feel for once like we have enough. I love watching children. Push away a plate. When they've discovered fullness it is a gift to be full and to know it but me. I'm greedy with food. I love it. I over order from restaurants and cook too much food at home. I want to feel not just full but fixed in some way as if each meal will be my last. And i must take it in like the world all at once. Today's palm centers on these ideas of hunger and fullness it asks what can satisfy us in a world that is often telling us we are not enough and we'll never have enough. I worry my mother will die. And i will know nothing by acer drake. Sometimes history is too beautiful to be believed until dinnertime. My grandmother sold gardenias wrapped in banana. Leaves then she found better ways to earn a living years later at an american restaurant. I'm mistaken for a waitress wearing all my silk. An accident i knew in my body like the pride i felt when my adult mother said i have narrow feet mother warns me. Nothing will change. I'm alive and you don't know anything. It was winter when my mother spoke apples rolling in the back seat. The fragrance shifting offsite under the great deterrent of rain it still winter with a brown leaf staining my work slacks. I smell the t. olives working up spring or the luxury of that kind of thinking in january. When i explained to another that my lunch wasn't useful all my life. I've wanted to lay with my stomach to the grass. I've wanted to eat from community gardens. I wrote ally all admit. Now i didn't eat the municipal fruit. I bought the cosmic crisp over the honey crisp for a dollar surcharge. Because i wanted extra shelf life the last day of the week. I split it to decide if it's for sharing or eating whole it's a luxury to have your hunger. I'm sure i don't need to go back. But can we go back to the restaurant. I am laughing with the woman at the table next to mine about the woman who would have me serve. While i celebrate. She was going to eat one dish. And i've ordered five. You know. I'll still leave hungry. Because i don't tell you what i eat. See the phoenix with its mouth and feet grasping for two servings. I n where i come from.

Acer Drake Phoenix
A highlight from 30. Brendan Jennings "Appreciate Your Success"

Before the Break

01:18 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 30. Brendan Jennings "Appreciate Your Success"

"Atom good to see you to see you. It's been a busy week. Yes you've been in and out of festivals. All over god's country civiles auditions work on work on work it's recording. It's been a crazy week. It's nice to be busy though. Man yes but i would love a fucking vacation. We're going to carmel by the sea. This weekend. Pretty luxurious firearm. Shay overstaying in a ramada. I'm kidding well listen. We've got a great show today. I'm particularly excited. I know i'm always excited. But i'm particularly excited about today. He's an improvisor writer and actor who got his start at the second city stage in chicago he has appeared on numerous shows including recurring roles in superstore and ap bio for which he also writes but perhaps one of the greatest things he is known for is absolutely drop dead. Funny what. I call genius improv. And that is the cook county. Social club please. Welcome to the show. The always wonderful brandon jennings. Oh thank you for having me. Thanks brendan yeah to meet you know i should have known. You'd have mets garr behind you.

Shay Chicago Cook County Social Club Brandon Jennings Brendan
A highlight from 519: Missing Cat

The Slowdown

03:43 min | Last week

A highlight from 519: Missing Cat

"In. May she turned ten a fawn pug with a benevolent dictatorship irish personality. Who wins over everyone. She meets though according to her. I haven't gone on long enough. She is my heart. Once many years ago she went missing for about fifteen minutes. That might not sound like a long time but when your dog is very small and very much at your heels at all times it is terrifying. At the time we lived on a very treacherous corner of an old country road cars would fly by on the hairpin curve and there was no shoulder to speak of my husband who was my boyfriend then had gone out for ron before dinner and i was terrified she had somehow gotten out and followed him because the story is dramatic. There was a light rain falling. I ran through the house screaming her name iran outside in the rain screaming her name. I cried. I called my husband who came running back and helped me frantically search for her. We couldn't for the life of us. Imagine where she had gone but suddenly out of desperation. I open the cabinet under the sink where we kept the garbage can and there. She was just sitting there. Tiny and wide eyed wondering why. Everyone was screaming her name. I don't think we ever hugged her harder in today's poem. We see a missing cat. Come back but it is the cat of the mind the idea of the cat the idea of getting a second chance at loving someone when you think they might be gone forever it is such a rare feeling to think you have lost someone for good and buy some miraculous happens dance. Have them return. We know life is fleeting but sometimes that just makes us want to hold on tighter missing cat by frisia mckee in a few hours all score my loss and blessings lying in bed like the cats. We count when we walk the dog. When i was a small kid. Spring was palm franz shaking hands in church in the pew i closed my eyes the green backdrop behind the cat miss. You hides under the bench in this city. I'm supposed to be a teacher. Miss pronounced a student's name for weeks. Would we say something again. If we knew the other person would change my assumption as me. Masseuse tail wraps around my wrist. I think of eating lunch once when we got a phone call. A friend had died. We thought we knew who. I stopped chewing. I remember the carrots in my mouth. The hunched shoulders the shudder before a second phone call a miracle from the person we thought was gone. It rained so hard when we drove here. A wet accident at the end of our block could have been her or us the cat running past rubbing his soft head against my calves misuse back.

Frisia Mckee Palm Franz RON Iran Cabinet
A highlight from Jasper Johns: the retrospective in depth. Plus, Venice's tourism problem and Finnish artist Outi Heiskanen

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:32 min | Last week

A highlight from Jasper Johns: the retrospective in depth. Plus, Venice's tourism problem and Finnish artist Outi Heiskanen

"We conversations with more than twenty five artists from michael armitage to testing now. Jasper johns even if they were organized by multiple museums major perspectives of artists. Work tend to begin in one venue and then travelled to others of course but in an unprecedented collaboration between t- museums the latest survey of jones's work which opened last week the first in the united states since the mid one thousand nine hundred and containing what made across seven decades by the now ninety one year. Old artist has been organized. Jointly by scott. Rothkopf at the whitney museum of american art and carlos although at the philadelphia museum of art and has just opened simultaneously at both venues. It's mind mirror. And the principal theme the show is the doubling repetition that carries through jones's career from his earliest work. He's a real artist artist. He's influences now. Stretched across several generations of followers. One of them is sarah z. Who i spoke to assist the podcast. A brush with. He's what she said about john's work after a visit to the whitney show. I just saw the jasper johns show. Which is phenomenal. I think a lot of people relate my work to rauschenberg which i love. But i also think john's if not as much or more as someone i learned a lot from think about And this cross between sculpture and painting now even from the most basic idea of having the kind of playfulness with the black slow at jar. That has the you know the face on the side. Simple thing of saying. I'm an image image. You're making me into an object. I'm not an object and then to to paint objects to paint a flag to paint a A target to paint a can of brushes. And say you know that paint is immaterial that we can build a sculpture out of paint. Think one of the things. That's interesting to see the shows. I think he almost has a pilot of marks. That and i feel like this myself powder marks and that mark can being silenced. That mark can be a big mark can be a color of paint. That you like But we know this is repetitive. Very intimate and you know they have this kind of urgency. That you don't know they are there like the young boy or the criss cross marks or as. I explained that you know the vase that comes out of two profiles but they have kind of urgency to him. That somehow comes through. I love that about our. I feel like when there's an urgency in the making of the work or there's a serendipity something coming together that is actually conveyed somehow through inanimate materials to you the viewer and so there's this kind of real intimacy that surprising in his work because he doesn't necessarily give you the reason why it's intimate but the mark is so lovingly so tenderly applied with such precision. You can hear the rest of brush with sarah z. Wherever you're listening now. So here's the conversation with the curator of the johns retrospective carlos buswell dough and scott. Rothkopf call us. I'd like to begin with you because in the catalog you make very interesting points about exhibition making being a relatively conservative form. Can you expand on that a bit. Sure if you know for most people i mean. The common understanding is that exhibition is sort of neutral medium. And what matters is what you put the inside really and for many people. It doesn't really matter how you put it inside. That's sort of denial of the actual experience of the viewer. Because our experience is what informs us and our experiences an embody experience. We perceive things through senses really. And so how we move in an exhibition how we traverse city and how we experience to work in terms of our own bodies is it matters. Tremendously so i've always been keen on trying to develop a form of the exhibition in which the form itself is active so the form itself is corresponds response to the content. And tells you something about what these being on this plate and this show is no no exception to that. I mean one one thing that it was interesting to me that ideally would have an exhibition. Were whose formed really resembles intimately that would use on display. If as possible. You know.

Rothkopf Sarah Z Jasper Johns Michael Armitage Jones Whitney Museum Of American Art Philadelphia Museum Of Art Rauschenberg Scott John Carlos Carlos Buswell Dough United States
A highlight from 518: Metamorphosis: The Female Into

The Slowdown

04:23 min | Last week

A highlight from 518: Metamorphosis: The Female Into

"And big life events our whole lives are spent in transition and yet i know i will feel more at peace in fixed or controlled state. I want things to be known to be planned to be smooth. I remember being in a meditation class at the tibet house in new york city many years ago and the teacher talking about how we either live in the past or the future and never in the present moment. of course i'd heard it before but it had never landed on me that night on the subway home i had realized that the majority of my life was either spent deeply remembering or aggressively planning or even catastrophes thing i tried to just be on the subway with its bodies and smells and humanity. It's funny to say it now but that moment changed my life. Today's poem talks about what it is to always be in a body that is being transformed into something else or to be in a body that has asked to be something else. Beginning with the myth of daphne turning into a laurel tree this poem expands on what it is to be in a body. Only seen as a symbol. For something else metamorphosis the female into by maggie queenie laurel tree limbs bent entwined into crown. Heffer bank of marsh reads handful lashed into pipes song. In another breath a clutch of conifers. Weeping amber black bear worry constellation white crow black crow grass cropping mayor flames voice repeating the last darkened mulberry fragrant incense seeping out of the ground. Violet like flower. Tracing the sun's path rock darkness seeking bats sea goddess rock rock rock rock rock seabirds serpent apprise a bride monster crowned and snakes offer weapon black and white magpies arguing in near language water flowing fountain half alive half dead flock of tuneful maiden faced birds. One of a pair of mountains crane stork ash-grey spider weaving her traps in the corners of the ceiling. Corpse corpse corpse corpse corpse corpse corpse spring weeping into the summit's anorexic air nightingale swallow trader mother castoff ex wife which weaver of the poisoned robe deadly gift. Fila side a natural marble figure corpse. Patricide exile herron died him in the sky. Guinea hens five aisles. A further island linden tree slave than fisherman than mayor than bird than cow than deer weasel. Lotus that bleeds when plucked lotus spring flowing from a shrub oak tree mail twice dead shade. Rock horse shane burning their bodies. Read into rock. Mur lioness grove of oaks halcion male barking bitch snapping her jaws snow white doves deadly. Were a pull. Virgin faced hounds snarling between her thighs water than nothing. A statue of a woman a star inside. Her husband constellation corpse living female fountain of chilled water.

Tibet House Maggie Queenie Laurel Heffer Bank Of Marsh New York City Fila Herron Guinea Virgin
A highlight from 517: They'll Ask You Where it Hurts the Most

The Slowdown

03:26 min | Last week

A highlight from 517: They'll Ask You Where it Hurts the Most

"Important story. I remember in graduate school trying to write the heaviest poems. I could because that's what i saw being praised and after graduate school. I remember someone asking me to write a poem for their magazine about my border story. They wanted to know about my suffering when i crossed the border. They did not seem to care that despite my heritage i was born in northern california. I have no personal border story to speak of. They also didn't seem to care that. I would have much rather written about trees. I worry about the commodification of suffering. I can't tell you how many things i've turned down because they'd rather focus on my pain rather than my resilience or my generational trauma rather than my generational magic. I wanna write about trees. I want to write about joy and praise and the interconnectedness of the world. I wanna write about those things. Because i wanna feel those things. Today's poem allows us to see that pain can transform into a beautiful defiance. And that sometimes when we are asked to show are suffering what we need to show. Is that unstoppable light in us that part of us that like all things wants to flourish. They'll ask you where it hurts. The most by kwami a- poku duku blessed be the bitterness at your core that quiet light growing quieter. Still let the dull mon. That escapes your lips. While you dream they'll ask you child what you know of suffering. They'll ask you where it hurts the most when the pain changes like wavelengths of light in the evening sky when the cries that the ancestors ring out to you from the ocean when their words vibrate in your diaphragm like a listless queen lewis hive. You may forever child feel a type of way but you must get up every morning and watch the sunrise from the ocean. Remember to love your lover remember the goodness and righteousness of deep red against her skin. The color of the ocean on her toenails remember the ancestors who praised the gods at the site of land. One day child. You will join them on a beach in accra or you will pour out libations for those who've yet to come until then stand with your arms stretched toward the sky and though termites might each you from within prey to grow into a wise old tree for the dignity to praise alone the sun and raines prey to become a garden to distinguish what nourishes us from what is keeping us

Northern California Accra Raines
A highlight from (Episode 256) "Midnight Mass" Actor: Crystal Balint.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:47 min | Last week

A highlight from (Episode 256) "Midnight Mass" Actor: Crystal Balint.

"Currently find crystal balint as dolly scarborough on netflixing. Mike flynn midnight mass crystal. Welcome to the podcast today. Thanks derrick appears to be here. Thanks for having me so trying to connect some dots here right so raised in a small town in the rocky mountains. We're specifically crystal on. The canadian side is a career. I am canadian. And i grew up in a little tiny community called cab morale berta which is not so tiny anymore but it was quite small when i was growing up. I don't wanna see. I read crystal where you're one of the very few people of color in that area in that where the town you grew up in but i moved around a lot and i wanna touch upon that do i i i i have that correct. If i don't then it's pretty embarrassing. No you absolutely do as a kid. I grew up in a like. i said. It was primarily caucasian community including my own family. I'm the only person in my family. So there were no other people like me and my community until until i got into grade school or later almost into middle school which i guess there's different in different places but it would have been great six or seven i think Then it started to change just a little bit but for most of my childhood i was the only person of a visible minority community. How is that. I mean obviously if the feelings are too personal you don't have to share. What was that. Like because i feel i went to a high school where you know. White was the only color i saw for. It seemed like until i got to college. I kind of hold myself responsible. Also my my highschool responsible because diversity seemingly was just not there it was just like not even learning what other cultures it was. Just it was just kind of embarrassing. But what did you go through personally growing up. Did you find that did you. Did you feel alone. Did you feel like it was like gosh. It'd be really nice if there are other. How i i. I don't think. I felt loneliness at the time. But i think it's an interesting thing to go back and look back on your childhood because there's an adult obviously you gain different perspective and you you know some of us do the therapy or you unpack things so that you it's easy to project. What you know is an adult back onto the person that you were as a child. But if i think if i'm being honest with myself i don't remember ever feeling loneliness You know the community grew up in was fairly liberal for the most part And it was comprised of people from all different cultures but primarily caucasian. I did have a couple of friends growing up who were also mixed race. Not black and white like myself but some were like japanese and swiss or different sort of mixed couples in kids that i grew up with so there was diversity in the larger sense as far as outwards concerned and my friend group was really fairly inclusive. I mean no one. I don't i don't remember ever being seen as an other as the kid. I don't ever really being Remember being isolated in that sense and in some ways at the good thing. Because i grew up feeling very included and very welcome and safe but in some ways that also creates problems later on and as i experience in my young adulthood and even into my thirties there. Was this really interesting thing. That i had to sort of identify with who i actually am and it didn't because i wasn't identified as an other growing up and i didn't have anyone to identify with as another. I didn't quite know who i was later on. When it came to my ethnicity i had to really try and find that out for myself so it has its pitfalls but overall i never really felt a sense of isolation loneliness or or. I never felt outcast or any of those things. I was very fortunate in that regard Good i have to say canadian. Kindness is a real thing. I've interviewed people from canada. I have never had canadian guests kind in one way or another feel like people from canada have a different probably sounds terrible but i do feel this way. They have a different mindset. I mean there was nobody. Is this kind of indescribable kindness. Crystal that people. That guest from canada withers toronto. Or wherever i always feel like it's it's kind of an unspoken kindness. Yeah i think. I think we really pride ourselves on that as a culture here in canada. I mean it's not again. It's not without its bad apples. And we certainly have our own history to look at as far as exclusion an You know racism it division in terms of our. You know our history. And we're seeing that now with current events with indigenous affairs and things like that so we're not a perfect or not perfect but i think by and large canadians do tend to move forward in the world with a sense of Love and Just really kind of honoring. Those golden rule elements like treating others as we want to be treated. So and i feel that way about my my dealings with other people and a lot of people i surround myself with the same so. I'm not surprised that you're encountering that in this the last question i have about your childhood such teenagers was that a couple of actors that have gone through this too. I it's different people have to say about this. Is that the fact that you move ten times in three years. Does that affect you at all. I mean that's not an easy transition. I have to believe crystal. No i mean again. It's a. It's an interesting thing. Because i moved like ten times in buydell community of like less than six thousand people so and so when i moved. It wasn't like i was moving can you. I wasn't moving. I mean i was still going to the same school.

Crystal Balint Dolly Scarborough Mike Flynn Rocky Mountains Derrick Canada White Toronto
A highlight from 516: In Response to Feeling Alone

The Slowdown

04:07 min | Last week

A highlight from 516: In Response to Feeling Alone

"And the cat sleeping in the upstairs bathroom would also beg to differ. Still many of my days are spent in my office or on the back porch or at the kitchen table alone with my thoughts. I am comfortable alone. I am not lonely. But sometimes i do find that. I've been talking to myself or writing letters in my head or suddenly unsure of who it is. I'm speaking to in my own mind. Just yesterday i was getting ready to complete a creative project and found myself getting anxious and said out loud. Don't spiral and. I smiled delighted knowing that i was treating myself like one of my beloved animals. Sit high five. Don't spiral what i like. Most about being alone is that it comes with. Its own strange music. Today's palm even though it is in the form of a letter feels like a tribute to that rich music of aloneness the sense of the brain moving fast to make bright unusual connections and then slowing down again to breathe. It feels like a secret note from a secret. World slipped under the door begging to be opened in response to feeling alone by thi lien. Doubtless our lives are solitary but also the inverse jenny cher. Everything's been known before us. Okay the clouds disappear the sky sometimes or they become it when we stood on semenyuk beach like a pair exclamation points we heard the same offing tone heard when someone went back to look for their father's corpse in nineteen sixty five. Didn't we please. Don't make me explain this after the fact a siren see-saws by my open window passing on the street of voice in a phone says no. I'm alone now. So it's possible ghosts also vacation from what's to come. How many people can you name who want to be loved without enthusiastically loving back. The common cause of disappearances cost us. We live in the after math in other words. If one more person tells me the country of my father's birth is cheap. I will lose it in other words. This is the only language. I speak to my slightest disappointment. I'm just writing to say hello. No need to write back. Don't get me wrong. Waiting is passive. But what if they never found him spoiler alert. You already know. They didn't or they found him a thousand times a thousand times. The story i was told was cooked on a soaking wet. Skewer piercing the meat of it through and through in other words and implication not to change the subject. But if you think. An apocalypse will eliminate the wealth gap. Let's hold together the premonition. It will not admiration turned me into a housefly. Repeating my body against a window trying to get out. I lied low about having let particular men touch me but don't leave me alone now. Before i recover their spines turned in on the shelves. Reveal thick wads of time. I spent in omission gentle paper.

Thi Lien Jenny Cher Semenyuk Beach
A highlight from 515: Matte

The Slowdown

03:12 min | Last week

A highlight from 515: Matte

"My last year of high school. Long hair ripped jeans and a tight black leotard top. It's hard not to study. The face of who i was then. Smiling for the camera are posing like what i imagined. A model might do the thing that also marks most of my pictures from fifteen to twenty one is the presence of my boyfriend. We'll call him. Classic classic was so intertwined with who. I was those many years that it's hard to find a photo of me. That doesn't have him in it except for the few times that he was behind the camera. It's me and classic at a campsite near the beach me and classic outside my dorm room in college always me and classic staring right at the camera. This is when pictures of you by the cure plays and we all sway a little sadly in the rain for a long time. I couldn't look at those photos without feeling a little paying of hurt. How much of our youth was tied to each other and how we finally had to let each other go in order to actually grow up still. I think there's something to be honored in that past. I see myself there. The girl who wore the same cutoffs every weekend for a whole season who always wore tight black tops and colored lipstick and thought she was tough. And i wanna give her a high five and i wanna give classic a high five. Look we did it. We loved and survived matt by. Elizabeth mcmahon tanko one night. You told some girl you'd met that you had loved me for five years. And she said well. Why are you talking to me then and i got mad. We weren't a love thing i said later. You can't make this into that. I were halter tops from walmart and matt powder on my face in all the pictures i have left. I am a ghost. Who was that girl made out of things left outside parties old blue sweat shirts and those cutoff shorts. That never fit me right. Who did she love now. My face is a white mask filling with air. I'm putting pictures into bottles at the beach. Feeding tides like starving lambs. Hear me in my college dorm room and then here you outside vegas with the wind filling your shirt here. A last one are blurred faces halfway outside of the shot and the world a vague dark blur spreading between us.

Elizabeth Mcmahon Tanko Matt Powder Matt Walmart Vegas
A highlight from 29. Ronald Conner "You Have To Keep Showing Up"

Before the Break

04:22 min | Last week

A highlight from 29. Ronald Conner "You Have To Keep Showing Up"

"I got coffee this morning at the train station. And for whatever reason it got misconstrued. I just said i want black coffee. And they gave me this coffee and i was. I've never had coffee with sugar in it. You just wanted black coffee. You was gonna pick milkin it okay and i was like what is it. Tastes like syrup. This is disgusting. And i turned in it said black with three sugars. I've never had coffee with sugar in it and i was like. Oh it's the equivalent of like some pioneer on the frontier. Having having sugar for the first time like their first experience but review. You didn't like it at all it. It was pumped an syrup. it was. It's not real. It's not real. And if i say sugar-free syrup it's even more not real. Oh i hate it. I was like you have to get rid of this please. I need just black coffee. Put milk in it. She was like okay. I don't need sugar either. I don't need together. I don't know why. I think it's because my grandfather took me into those old irish cafes in cleveland and made me drink coffee like as an eight year old and also made me drive there but an immigrant. All right guys. We have got a great show today for over fifteen years grace our screens in stages he's known for recurring roles on hbo southside nbc chicago pd and the shy on showtime as well as appearances on empire chicago med sirens a two-time black theatre. Lions word win. Please welcome to the show chicago native ronald kahn ronald. I'm actually a saint. Louis natives just british chicago for forever right. You were born in saint. Louis you came to share to after a fuck. They'd start this again. This actor his grace star screens at us. I've been here long enough to be considered a cicak. So i guess i i guess i say native whenever i like. I'm doing something in chicago for production really. I see chicago native. Because i was there for five years. It's like you have places to stay. You have places to go native. I guess it's just where you're where you can stay. I don't know maybe that's your local higher right right. Yeah yeah yeah so saint louis you were born and raised there and you obviously moved to chicago but before that move. How're things going for little ronnie. did we did. We have dreams of this of a life in the in theater as an actor that was. That's why it's always important to me too because that's where it started. I've been performing. Since i was three school. Play stuff like that But you know in my family play sports and so you can't anymore played all three which played baseball football basketball and all the while. Those are sports adam. Go ahead this three for him like lacrosse tennis and golf. I wish i wish. I play golf. But yeah and so the whole time grandmothers taking me to the theater. Saint louis black repertory company and so and then she took me a broadway. When i was ten. I saw digital washington was he was playing called checkmate's and i i didn't really know what was going on. It was just a lot of cussing. And i was with my grandparents. Going crazy over. Wash parts be honest and amid entire audience was was just laughing and like the the energy in the room. I was like this. This is something. And then i i saw saw jack. Nicholson play the joker in that man in the by the time i got to high school and realized that i didn't really have the heart to play football Didn't have the patience basketball baseball. Nor the height for basketball I continued to do school place and delusional hope of an actor tonight. I had just good shot of making the major league of the mlb. Become an actor. But i saw good old. Leonardo leonardo dicaprio the basketball diaries.

Chicago Ronald Kahn Ronald HBO Cleveland NBC Lions Louis Ronnie Golf Basketball MLB Saint Louis Football Adam Tennis Washington Nicholson Jack Leonardo Leonardo Dicaprio
A highlight from Episode 178: 5 Ways To Optimize Your Home Page

Advance Your Bellydance Podcast

02:30 min | 12 hrs ago

A highlight from Episode 178: 5 Ways To Optimize Your Home Page

"Three. Don't forget your newsletter ogden. Even if you're not a web designer most website templates offered this and no email. Marketing is not dead. I know social media wants to think that but that's not the case. I harp on this all the time and in fact when facebook and instagram or shutdown ahead dancers told me they thought of me because i do nothing but tell you the importance of not relying on social media as their sole marketing strategy. So and thanks to those of you. Who told me that that really made my ki cart. Very happy And also always helps to know that. I'm not screaming into the void by myself but you can add your newsletter often at the very end of your homepage. Even on your footer. Which is just the bottom of your website. That usually stays the same. On every page this way when people are scrolling down and haven't clicked on your offers that are usually right up up top on your homepage or maybe after your mission statement after your little about me section that we can get their ema just for your freebie optin and still stay in touch with them for when you have something to sell which leads me to number four. Go easy on the pop ups. Even the inventor of the papa regrets invention. So i urge you to really use it sparingly. I know it's common to use a pop up to grab emails for your newsletter. The you see this on almost every website you go to. But i'm a fan of not doing things that you don't like so if you don't like something then don't do it if you do use it because you you're okay with ed or you see great results. Make sure the settings are set so that it only happens once so when some of his not every single time they visit or every single page. And if you're in squarespace you can adjust this. There's a setting in there and that it doesn't pop up when someone is viewing a website on their phone which is the majority of people. And that's just because the pop up will take up the entire screen on someone's phone and it's really annoying to try to click out of if you do use it. Make sure the settings are set so that it only happens once and the never again for that one person or that. It's also just not showing on the phone and number five. Don't be afraid to add your personality. This is your website for your business and yes it's all about your ideal client for sure and how you can help them. But you are the key to that. Don't forget to show people. What makes you their go to person. And don't be afraid to add some of your own razzle-dazzle to your website. This can be in your design on your copy or you tell people a little bit about yourself and who they'll be working with you can have this little about me section just to give a little glimpse of who you are and what you're all about remember. People wanna work with people they like and no. You're not going to be everything for everybody. But that's amazing. Use that to your

Ogden Instagram Facebook ED
A highlight from Rip It Up: Welcome To The World of Special FX ft. Rodd Matsui

"Diary of an Unemployed Actor"

02:59 min | 23 hrs ago

A highlight from Rip It Up: Welcome To The World of Special FX ft. Rodd Matsui

"Milo denison non khumbu and this is rip tonight. We have got with those run. Matsui we're talking about all things to do with s. x. probably more than this. I'm sure you've got like plenty of lake fantastic stories looking at some of the stuff you've worked on you know from what's considered the best batman movie of all time. I'm sure one well. Of course that's that's a matter of jinyan but yeah. I think i think what we're what what i'm try what we're trying to get at is maybe if anything if it's if it's about special effects the role of special effects in jason and storytelling civilization building through engage asian the nuts and bolts of. It might be the glue and screws and wires. They put it together. But if you know you're you're participating in some some form of communication. Ideally or maybe you're not right like you're using the special effects but not communicating ideas in which let's actually what's going on today. We're we're it's all it's all pyrotechnics and very little story. If any at all can be found and what you can find doesn't make any sense because they don't care i mean her part of it is way one of the easiest cheap ways out i've noticed his is something. They will moral moral ambiguity. That's where you have like everybody time a little bit the bad guy so even the good guys are a little like not good right and can just have kidney 'cause it's crammed in real life. It's a cycle way out of storytelling. We'll just lamb everybody fight or there'll be a lot of loud noise it'll be done well. Yeah student storytelling. as it's been devolved. My i mean special effects themselves in terms of visual effects. Animation involve troops so tremendously right over. You know some thirty forty years or actually over the entire course of film if you want to go back to your back back to you know. Eighteen ninety five eighteen six is it's just been continuous process evolution right back across the history of film. Well we want to know that today is one yourself. And you'll you'll background jerry. A background myself. It probably really starts with halloween. Tiny

Milo Denison Jinyan Matsui Jason Jerry
A highlight from Episode 484: Joe Ollmann

RiYL

04:51 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Episode 484: Joe Ollmann

"Happening world. Well at the same time so yeah. It's kind of unmotivated and i don't know i just finished a book too so there's not and i was finishing at the beginning of this so i'm not sure but i've started writing again now. I'm i'm actually doing short little pieces maybe to do it just for no reason. I've been doing like to page strips and one page jobs for fun. Like which is something i never do. I always work on my next book. It's kinda feels like a kid again. Just doing things for no reason which is kind of fun. Sounds like a positive. You're actually like making art for the pure enjoyment of making art exactly. Yeah which is is kind of. I don't know yeah it's kind of different turn to. Your youth is nice when otherwise in in a normal year. Are you basically just kind of tied to schedule. Is it went when you sit down and work on something. It's because it's clear that you've got some sort of long form piece on horizon usually. Yeah usually i finish a book. And then i'll sit down and i'll do a couple of months of just reading and just debriefing kind of and then and then it usually it's i've already formulated. Kind of what my next thing might be. And then after a couple of months of just goofing off. I start to get down to work and i don't know if it's like my old factory worker instincts but i like i have a bit of a workaholic and So i just like when. I'm not at my outside job. We're doing freelance stuff. I i just work like from when the kids go to school. I'd sit down at eight thirty and work till you know. The kid came home and make dinner. Hang out with the family and by nine thirty on back down there in the basement working till eleven thirty twelve at night. And that's a regular normal thing for me and i like it because i enjoy it but it's probably too much it's bad it's like i started in screwed up shoulder because of like sitting so much i went to an osteopath there. They were like so. How do you do. Anything repetitive I'm on you do that now. It's well fourteen hours a day. And then knowing how do you sit. And i was like kinda like like this one hundred dollar in there like you're doing everything wrong so they gave me some exercises in light just to tell you to take breaks like it's changed a lot Like just just not continually doing it and just hunkering down listening to audio books. When i'm drawing and just getting lost for hours and hours have you read that create a book that she put out about Yeah i i haven't and i've looked through by like unhealthy person. I'd i'd i read that. And i should follow it because like like she's obviously really studied this in as concrete ways to improve your health. Your artists so Ads on the shelf. I i give coffee two weeks ago. Because i was just like at a point rose drinking six cups a day which is too much i just quit cold turkey and i'm definitely somebody who operates in the extremes when it comes to things like that. I've noticed that this book deals with alcoholism to some degree in your past books if dealt with alcoholism. I've heard you describe this in an interview. Where when it comes to that you you're kind of an all or nothing kind of person. My my wife is an all or nothing. Everything and i'm a bit of a So yeah when. I was drinking. I drank a lot all the time and probably dangerously so and i always shied away from everything you know that i was an alcoholic. But i'm pretty sure that i was technically i was yes so i i And eased off things. I i never drank when i was younger. I was like a moderate my whole life and then my first marriage fell apart like after fourteen years and i literally. It was like a switch turning. I became a drunk and For years and so and you know part of your identity when that's what people know you as like you're the guy that drinks the most than He's i was that an and then i eased off. I still drink. One guy would work at night. And i'm have have you know either single malter bourbon there and i just. I did my little special glass and all night. I'm slipping and sipping you know Much less than when i was in my header stage by It was too much. They'll so i i. There was when new years. I just said i'm to try trying quit for year. And it was as radical thing to do. And then i realized after i got through the hard part of that which is the first couple months

A highlight from Audio newsletter: October 2021 (playlist: Geoengineering the Climate)

Podcast Brunch Club

01:59 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Audio newsletter: October 2021 (playlist: Geoengineering the Climate)

"Club dot com slash geoengineering. We included 5 episodes, one from future perfect, which looks at whether we can take the concept of a volcano, which sprays particles into the atmosphere that cool the planet for a bit and modify it to help us fight global warming. An episode from the Jordan harbinger show, which is an interview with Thomas costigan, a New York Times bestselling author and journalist, who discusses his latest book, hacking Planet Earth, how geoengineering can help us reimagine the future. In episode from the interchange that explores the possibility of stripping carbon from the atmosphere, another from outside in that gives an overview of the field of geoengineering and discusses the ethics involved. And finally, an episode from the Ezra Klein show, which is a conversation with Elizabeth Colbert, about some of the difficult tradeoffs and suboptimal options that were left with. They talk about things like dimming the sun, whether carbon capture technology could scale up to the levels needed to make a dent in emissions levels. The ethics of using gene editing technologies to make endangered species more resistant to climate change, the governance mechanisms needed to prevent these technologies from getting out of hand and how the pandemic altered carbon emissions and more. We also included bonus episodes from brave new planet, TIL climate, should this exist, 99% invisible. Imaginary worlds flash forward and vox conversations. So you can join in on the conversation at one of our in person local chapters. We have them all over the world, our latest edition is Asheville North Carolina. You can also start one if we don't have one near you. Or you can join our global virtual chapter to join in on the discussion. We have a few global virtual meetings coming up.

Jordan Harbinger Thomas Costigan Elizabeth Colbert Ezra Klein New York Times Asheville North Carolina
A highlight from Nothing Being Wasted With Masa Sasaki | Ep 65

Brain Fuzz

07:44 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Nothing Being Wasted With Masa Sasaki | Ep 65

"I've seen you referred to yourself as a ceramicist. So what are you. You would say a ceramicist. I guess i would say that. I must ceramicist or harder either way. Ceramicist sound a little archie. Okay okay well. That was actually the next little note that i made here. Was you know those terms get used. Just interchanged pottery ceramics. what what. What are the differences. While i'm not really sure about the to me. Pottery seems more functional. Like you know down to kind of feel to it. But then ceramicist probably include more sculptural. Maybe was more experimental Clay walks to as well as functional. Pc's to so he seems ceramicist seems marlboro. There are they are there. Are there any differences in the tools and process that. We're talking about here between these. Not that i'm aware of but if you like Primarily making sculpture out of clay. And then if you're ceramicist. I guess you would use Different to will from factual Big tonight picked up on. Some era state name is like functionality and utility right which is great dr the materials different in terms of if there's something that's going to be functional needs to be durable because you talk about the longevity. You want all. Yeah our yeah you're objects versus if you're maybe making some highfalutin artistic sculpture that that doesn't necessarily have to you know it's not going to be handled. Yeah while my idea is this. Okay let's Let's see there's archaeologists digging the and then some piece of powdery surfaces from thousands of years ago right and whereas watercolor painting you will not survive that length of time. I don't think so. That is what. I mean by durability. Yes oh there's another thing that i had jotted down. He gets to that. Very point is there's kind of utilitarian nature versus art for our sake and i. You know i've got so. I've got actually some of your. I'm reminded of your work. Daily masa because it is part of my daily routine and i see it and i think about it briefly for that moment. But then i'll pick up There's a salt and pepper shaker and another item but the salt and pepper shaker. You know i will use that. There's a utilitarian nature to this item. But then i also look at it and briefly for that millisecond admire the form of it so putting something on wall or putting something in a in a plexiglass. Vitrine is different than sitting on the kitchen counter. You mean like i'm making it. Try melody for people to use or yet. Yeah do you approach it. Is i think the functionality is very important to me Specically mating key pop or something. Then it better porch e. instead of not coming out of that lid like i keep that i ever made it was beautifully formed. Cool design by wall street. That he cheated didn't come out of the spout but he came from the lead. Then i hated that people saw because it doesn't do what it's supposed to be doing. So in that sense the functionalities very very important to me. And then i do think about that when i make things and tried to serve on to over time. How does that process work. Okay some sometimes. I sketch things i. I used to be primarily interesting painting drawing and things like that first. And then i it playing with clay on the immediately failing love with it saw. I consider clay to be almost like a three d canvas for me to explore the surface these possibilities. It's a. Let's say in the teapot example. Say the comes out of the top versus spout. is that something that you figure out in the sketch phase in the actual process of making it or in the trial and error the user testing trial testing try on era. Probably we start with sketch first and then you make the actual thing close to that original sketch and then you make you immediately realize the mistake when you actually use it and then you have to change the whole thing and then it. Does you know that shape gets improved according to the requirements of the function. And then after that. You've just go to sketch anymore. You just improve the shape of the pops on top of previously. What i thought he was supposed to be doing such series of improvements and series of being aware like each time. You make something you'd gets better because he will. You know you know what i what you did wrong previously. So i had the opportunity to see the setup there at your studio and kinda refresh my memory and and share. How many pieces will you have at one point in this process or this part of the process and then how many pieces are over here in another part of the process. You're it's about four hundred square feet or something like that. It's not a very big place at all but Fly him baking cop. Mike chilling probably fire up to sixty cups at a time. Yeah but to make us sixty cups i. It's gonna take me a like a month. So i'll be making some other things to go with that so i can pack the killin. I'm probably have several different going on the same time. And then one day i'll choose to paint the surface of the pots and one day. I'm just throwing the potter's wheel and maybe one just trimming the pots on the potter's wheel to and they won the answer. Glazing the whole bisquick so it all depends a one day from gallery. Needs this many things. So i tried to come up with that as a priority. So it's easy varies very much. So the steps walk through the steps for for those of us that are the first thing is you go through the claim by your clay bag. Okay bring it back to the studio Cut the client. Pc's so that you know you need like a pound of clay for a cup

Mike
A highlight from Ep51 Monalicious

Art Unknown Podcast

03:28 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Ep51 Monalicious

"This week on the podcast very excited to talk to this musician singer songwriter. Who has a great resume and is my very first. Non binary person that. I'm talking to Their name is mona. mona delicious. Is the name you go by. And i'm so excited to talk to you about bet but also just to give you guys a little of background on mona. They've been part of many different bands. Twin medicine flowers of mass production. A couple of bands. Now all of their music is made under the name malicious. But how i came across this person was that they're going to be at tech's this fall and so i'm excited to talk about the tax and how that came about mona. Welcome to the podcast. Hey so happy to be here. Thank you for having a yeah absolutely absolutely tied to talk about music exerted. Talk about your life in your story. But before we begin. I would love to hear an inspiration. I always start off asking the artists that i talked to you about something that inspires them and it can be anything. It'd be a quote. It can be music movie person just something that you carry with you that inspires you throughout your day will in general as an artist or as someone who creates in the world. I'm constantly assimilating and disseminating inspiration and like taking things in and it could be the smallest thing on a walk or it could be you know going to a big event but right now something. That is super inspiring. Me is dance. I've most recently gotten into a dance style called brazilian zouk and i am just like so inspired by not only dancing it but also watching people It's just like such a inspiration to me to watch two people sync up and to like play as they both are interpreting music and it's just a huge huge inspiration in my life right now. Brazilian zouk fraud is that i'm not american. I've never heard of that. Said brazilian zoo cuts later. But is it anything. Like is it What's the word about the interpretive or freestyle dance. Or how does it. So it is a partner dance and so similar to salsa but less like fire and like high energy although the it can be very high energy but in the section i would say it's like more yummy and gooey. People do in body rolls together but it is very much like a formal dance Similar dances are the cia. he's nba lombarda which you again may not have heard of but the batas yes similar. Okay cool how'd you get. How'd you get turned onto that my partner. Their name is dea. she is super. She's a phenomenal dancer and Yeah i she opened the doors. And it's been really really lovely journey ever since and i've gotten into it like five months ago. Okay it's always cool to hear you talk to. You'd said mentioned the about outside on a walk. Or what have you and i get.

Mona Mona Delicious CIA NBA DEA
A highlight from Listener Favorites: Alberto Savoia | Why So Many Ideas Fail and How to Make Sure Yours Succeeds

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

07:52 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Listener Favorites: Alberto Savoia | Why So Many Ideas Fail and How to Make Sure Yours Succeeds

"Most failures happen. Not because people don't work hard now because they're not passionate enough because they don't execute well but because the they're building the wrong product as saying that book. Make sure you're building the right it before you want. Failures are cannot be attributed to incompetence of lack of desire. Just people pick the wrong idea. And i saw my father in my experienced as an entrepreneur. I get seeing that many many times. In fact i would say that eighty percent of engineers and product managers. Whatever titles you have in most companies are working with products that launched will fail. Of course. I don't like that training because our most valuable resource right to solve all the problems in the world are entrpreneurs. Innovators inventors right They're the ones that are going to come up with a new solution and yet would you take this most valuable resource and eighty percent of the time. They're going to fail so that really doesn't sit well with me. And that's why i wrote the book and you know the book is just the outcome of ten years of research and making sure that what i teach and what i discussed actually works. So that's my mission to to to beat failure sereni row and this is the unmistakable creative podcast where you get a window into the stories and insights of the most innovative and creative minds who started movements built driving businesses written bestselling books and created insanely interesting art for more check out our five hundred episode archive and unmistakable. Creative dot com. Welcome to the staple chris. Thanks for taking the time to join us. Thank you for having me. I'm looking forward to it. Yeah it is my pleasure to have your so as we were saying before we hit record here i came across your book the right at why so many ideas on how to make sure your succeed and the title grabbed me immediately. Because i'd seen so many failures in my own life with a lot of my own online projects But then i dug into it and as somebody who likes everything to backed by research data it really really struck a chord with me. So i emailed you right away and we're finally doing this. But before we get into the content of the book This is something i wanted to ask you based on your last and now obviously exit. Where in the world were you Were you born and raised. And how did that end up. Impacting choices that you've made with your life. Yes so yeah. I love this personal question. I was born in rome. Italy and just like pizza. I came to america to for to become bigger. And better and and i landed in silicon valley Actually my parents divorced. I came here with my father in all to start the new and you life and i landed in silicon valley. And i thought well. I want to be an entrepreneur. It's in it's in the air and so that also. That's how i came who come up with experiences that i discussed in the book. How how learn about failure and how to overcome it So in part of growing up. I think in every culture is that culture instill certain values certain belief systems. Your certain programming. And i wonder what aspects of the italian culture do you think played a role in you ending up doing what you're doing. And what aspects do you think. You actually rejected as a to be able to do what you do. Yeah great question. So i would say you know. Romance are pretty famous. Philosophers and the engineers are very empirical right. They were able to build aqueduct. That weren't hundreds of miles without really knowing the physics behind it. So if you look at like roman philosophy and greek philosophy. The greeks have played on the world. The deal with the work of idea and the The allegory of the cave. And the come up with all theoretical concepts whereas the room and philosophers and engineers are much more practical They tinker the build. That tried to learn things for sand. And i'm a big believer in doing that. So i would say i've i've taken the actual attitude in my life just tinker and i guess they parts of rejected is that in italy and i'll say in most of europe and not just europe. I know pretty much anywhere outside. Silicon valley there is. This fear of failure is a huge stigma attached with failure. there are countries in europe. Or if you have a bankruptcy are not allowed to start a company for ten years so just like you into Tail and so. Yeah i i much more comfortable with With failure having said that. I do not like to fail and i think failure would be handled. And that's why. I decided to write this book based on my experiences with great as at google and some of my start ups but also we want failure. That really beat me and hurt me. And i said okay. You beat me. I'm going to bite back. And the result is the work of my last ten years. Okay so we'll come back to the failure. That bit you in and google and all of this but of the thing i wonder is in the italian culture. What do parents teach their kids about risk tolerance about pursuits. That where you know. The outcomes and guaranteed is it similar to sort of the indian or asian culture where you're constantly encouraged to be doctors. Engineers do something stable than if you don't do that. They're like well then. How the hell do you plan to get paid or do they encourage you know a variety of pursuits. You say it's it's neither. I don't think this pressure to be a doctor or a lawyer as in some other culture but there is this tendency to stick close to your knitting so if your father was a butcher in rome. Maybe you're likely to be the son of a butcher in rome being which i guess it's a good thing so they don't want to too many too many risks but i cannot say that there is just like the reason some other culture. This generalize uniform a push to have your children to be or do anything specific. I have observed that a lot of friends and colleagues of course as you can imagine from from india and i can notice the difference in their cultural. How important for them. It is to achieve to succeed to get the title. I would say that we're a bit more nonchalant right and if the result of the talent economy's not exactly booming rival. We tend to take things a little bit easier more relaxed so he thought he's acute vacation. While i i hope that by combining my italian attitude with this kind of silicon valley drive. It's a it's a good combination with funny. You say that. Because i as you were saying that i remember you may have seen it. Michael moore did a documentary called where to invade next where he goes around to different countries in europe to look at various social policies and he goes to italy. I he looks at bay. Oh eight weeks of paid vacation. These people look like they're having sex all the time and you know it turns out that that was actually true what they said But the way that the the culture there in terms of work really operates was so different. When i saw that documentary. How old were you when you came here. I was a seventeen high school in the united states which was quite a shock crackles. My level of english is imagine if you started out on a spanish or some other language in highschool much english as you learn if you take two hours a week in high school through junior yours but Fortunately i learned. I'm pretty good with languages. Humor languages and computer languages so it it talk about friends lee transition. Actually i liked it. You know when. I when i landed in silicon valley in california.

Silicon Valley Rome Europe Chris Italy Google United States Michael Moore India LEE California
A highlight from Return to Reflection with Emma

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

05:25 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Return to Reflection with Emma

"With you. Mfa a your back again. My special deaths that's correct and we just moldova. How those titles didn't wages give you an inside perspective into the magic of Podcast creation So yeah you got the introduction for me and now it's more of me talking about Some of the things that i have been doing again for my doctorate for my professional doctorates that. I've completed the first model for her as he welded. You are not going to talk about my progressive during this time. Which is a sign. I'm expecting my life to be a bit easier today. Well i will try my best to be coherent and we have just had a summer break so have no excuses for not being able to string a sentence together take a while to get back up to full speed. Doesn't it does. There is such a thing as holiday head. So i am going to. I did do the thing. I'm going to talk about stay just for context. I had to do a presentation reflective presentation. And i did it in august during the holiday periods so i i returned from part of my holiday to do this assessment which i passed and just to give you some details on it this component off my first module that the professional doctorate was asking me to reflect on what i learned from the module but part of the criteria was to present some of the literature and reflection and to deci eat and to justify might decisions up for my decision on a reflective model to us so we thought that this might be a useful thing to talk about in an episode on our podcast because for those avid listeners. You'll know we had professor brendan crop on last season to talk more. Generally and i'm with with detail in there about reflection reflection for teachers. He comes from a sporting background who talked about reflection from that context a so. We thought we'd take a deeper dive now and i would talk to you about my reflections on reflection. Gosh like inception. Isn't it for these. You've seen that film layers. And i'm going to talk to you about one of the reflective models the i decided to us because i think it raises some interesting points about the purpose of reflection and also the reflective stance that we adopted teachers. Yeah and as we said when we talked to Professor brands and a little while ago and that was a cracking episode. And we got into some quite naughty things but as we said at the time. It's very easy to talk about being reflective. I'm even back in the dark ages when i did my. Pg everyone was saying you needed to be reflective practitioner and you know in these sort of performance space things like sports. They talk about a lot but actually doing is is quite a difficult thing and we present a number of mortals to our students so there are pieces of research out there that try to lay out the the step by step process of how you get through reflection and kind of out the other side with something that you can use. And what's really interesting is that there are several different ones. And i didn't think i'd kind of entirely realize this until i dived into it as part of my work here and we give a choice of four. I mean they have features in common. Don't they but then sometimes they're a little bit different number of steps you know the way they go around it so i mean what. What would we say with a kind of common features of reflective models that they tend to share well. There's usually some kind of descriptive phase. Which i suppose is the if we if we were doing this on bloom's taxonomy or thinking about how taxing that part of the process is you know we'd say that's probably the easiest. As will you just kind of getting all out. And it makes me think about something that judith nin was on previous podcast episode mentioned. I think she gave you something to try. Which was to if you having problem with having to write it down so the first stage of trying to make sense of something that happened in the classroom would be to just describe it. This usually some kind of comparative phase where you are comparing you perceived that incident or whatever a code that you're reflecting on with maybe the perspective of someone else such as a mental. He might be helping you to make sense of it. So there's sort of that sort of critique phase where you're may be evaluating or analyzing and impacting that description and that comparative faces. Well might be where you're comparing it with what you found in the literature about something that you're reflecting on. So let's say for instance the incident in question that you're reflecting on was to do with behavior management or behavior learning and. You might do some reading to help make sense of what happened and why it happened. So that is the comparative as and then there's another phase which is the critical phase and here. I'm referring to some of the work that i find in the literature this is for missiles by jay. Johnston two thousand and two that was sliced in duffy twenty fifteen. I'm getting all technical.

Brendan Crop Moldova MFA Judith Nin Bloom Johnston JAY Duffy
A highlight from Actor Video Review

Casting Actors Cast

01:54 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Actor Video Review

"Called conversation pieces out of the studio. The voice over workshop for professional actors additionally on that same by filling out that form that says dive into the talent pool. All you need to do is just fill that out. And by the way i've said this many times i really mean it. I don't do anything with that. Additional information you share with me. i don't spam you with all kinds of nonsense. I might on occasion talk about some upcoming event or something like that. But it is on a very sparing basis. I don't want to subject you to more. I don't know stuff that you're getting right. We're all just so inundated with stuff. That's not my intention but my intention is to perhaps continue to grow a like minded community of actors who are connecting with each other getting together learning and growing. So we can make this a better place for everybody. That's my only purpose in doing all of this. So going to the website casting actors cast one word dot com. And that's going to get you access to a another video for example called casting director secrets. What they don't want you to know and so it's a twenty minute free video but it's a private video that you only get access to that video by going to that site now. Also i wanna share. This is kind of cool. That if you want your self tape to be evaluated the email address couldn't be easier. It's casting actress cast at g mail dot com. How simple is that. And i think that kind of covers everything also. I'm going to take a moment here to put my Sponsorship shot out and this is to those folks who have really made casting. Actress cast popular by pudding and promoting the podcast on their websites so we have cross promotional sponsorship

A highlight from David Skal -231

On Mic Podcast

05:49 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from David Skal -231

"Hello and welcome. This is on mike with jordan rich. When i was a kid. I loved monsters particularly the universal movie. Monsters frankenstein dracula the wolfman the mummy. Oh i couldn't get enough. So when i had the chance to talk with david skull credited as one of the true experts on all things monsters nonfiction books right up my alley and maybe yours books. Like hollywood gothic. The tangled web of dracula from novel to stage to screen the monster. Show a cultural history of horror dark carnival. The secret world of tod browning and so much more david as a walking encyclopedia of all things spooky in erie in the movies and he's a great cultural historian so as we present this podcast during the month of halloween in twenty twenty one. I am psyched and pump to talk with david about monsters and more as we go on mike right now with david skull. I like you. Emma monster kit. A what's your definition of a monster kid dave. Well you know one. When you see one. I i'm i you. I'm i think i'm bit older than you. But i'm part of as a The first generation that grew up with the classic monster movies when they were being released to television for the first time in the fifties and nineteen sixties and It was really a rather tribal thing. There were All across the country fan clubs kind of erupted and there were these monster magazines at every Fan clubs and every town had its own television horror movie host mine. was google already in cleveland. Ohio but There were many many others xactly than pyro happened a bit a bit before. She was the trailblazer. But they're still going on. I was just on creature features the other night Great and they're they're on their third round of hosts over thirty years but It's an enduring kind of kind of phenomenon. I think it was because we we Connected with these monsters for all kinds of reasons of but the films themselves were pretty damn inaccessible. There was no mo video. It was no streaming on demand. And the only way you to wait for a you know a television station to show something or For some art cinema to do a rare theatrical revival and that was me with the cleveland had kind of a blackout on the universal monsters. All through the nineteen sixties. Which was when. I was getting a hot heavy. With dracula and frankenstein. Others and i couldn't see the films i couldn't read about a good look at the pictures i could. I collected movie. Stokes is started sending away to To a place in new york called movie star news that would sell you Actual original negative prints from these classic films for fifty cents and They're white they're worth quite a bit more now. When were you a an aurora model kid as well. Because i had all the monster models i had frankenstein dracula wolfman mummy i. all. It's not within reaching distance. But i still have my frankenstein data and my mother did preserve him somehow up in the attic and i reunited with him Few decades ago but the but he's one of my most treasured treasure the points of reference to that whole. Well you make you made a career as a cultural historian and as an expert in this area. Because you'll love it too much in looking at not just the characters in the films but but the story behind them and some of the Actual on an academic level some of the actual goings on in society that that prompted the kind of entertainment that we see. And i'd love to get into that with you a bit because read some of your stuff and you you accurately point out that what was going on in the world was pretty horrific. I'm talking about world. War one the gas attack the maiming and killing of so many hundreds of thousands millions of soldiers and then world war two and the atomic age. Talk a little bit with me in our audience here david about the very close connection between the entertainment that we saw and see. And what's going on in the world. Well first of all back in the early part of the twentieth century in in in europe Horror movies had their roots in german expressionism. Which was a art movement Actually very diverse and wide ranging but in in in the cinema. It was directly related to the great war that had had just passed and had a to some people's minds Really destroyed europe or drained. Its life away like a vampire. And that's exactly what the makers of the german expressionist film nas for onto intended. It wasn't it wasn't academics coming. You know years later Putting two cents worth in it was part of the publicity for the film it wasn't escapist entertainment. It was considered serious art. At least in europe and america found ways to commercialize these same conventions and tropes and and and characters.

David Skull Jordan Rich Emma Monster Tod Browning Mike David Cleveland Frankenstein Dracula Erie Hollywood Dave Stokes Ohio Google New York Europe America
A highlight from 150: Get in the writing groove with novelist Heather Bell Adams

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

08:06 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 150: Get in the writing groove with novelist Heather Bell Adams

"I'm excited to bring you a delightful and practical conversation with novelist heather bell atoms before we get to that conversation. However i'd like to send out a quick but heartfelt thank you to the listeners who have supported our audio fundraiser. We are in the final days of raising money for the nine episode original series. Jesus pancake if you are able to contribute. Please don't delay and hop over to our indigo campaign right. Now see the links in the show notes for more information all right. Let's get to it in this episode. You'll hear heather bell. Atoms discussed her approach to historical research. When writing fiction tips for making time to write ways to get back into the writing groove and more heather also shares to excerpts from her novel the good luck stone published by haywire book in twenty twenty heather bell. Atoms is the author of the road which one the hippie gold medal for the southeast and good luck stone which one best historical and the next generation of awards. Heather is a recipient of the rose post creative nonfiction award. Carry mcclay literary award and james still fiction prize. Heather's work appears in still the journal. Atticus review the thomas wolfe review the pettigrew review and elsewhere. She lives in raleigh where she works as a lawyer. If you'd like to get back into your writing grew with heather bell atoms. She will be leaving that workshop. At the north carolina writers network one hundred twenty one fall conference november nineteen twenty in durham north carolina. And guessed. it. You can see the links in the show all right. Enjoy this episode. Hello heather thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me today. Thank you for having me. I'm just so thrilled to be here with you. We have lots of interesting things to talk about. But i wonder if you would like to start us off by reading something of your own. I would love to thank you. I have picked out a brief selection from my second novel which is called the good luck stone. This is a dual timelines story set in twenty ten savannah georgia and in nineteen forty. One forty two the philippines and i often read The beginning of chapter one which is twenty ten seen sentence savannah. I thought today for something a little different. I would read the beginning of chapter to so that our listeners get introduction to the world war two storyline so our main character is a woman named audrey thorpe and she's a nurse in the philippines and so i will just share the selection which introduces us to audrey during that time period in her life. So this is chapter the beginning of chapter two from the ship. The islands of the philippines looked like stepping stones of impenetrable jungle and jagged cliffs. Barely passed her twenty first birthday and fresh out of nursing school. Audrey stared out at the pacific with no way to know what was in store. She could only worry that she'd made a mistake. The biggest of her life. Maybe she would have been better off staying home and kentucky. They'd had layovers in hawaii and guam. The destination of manila bay ever present in. Everyone's mind between her nerves and seasickness she'd spent most of the trip curled on the bottom bunk. Leaving her with little sense of how many days had passed now. That land was incite. The humidity clung like an unwanted blanket. She tried to steady herself with both feet planted on the deck. As the wind picked up she picked a hangnail until she drew blood. Her mother would have been appalled at lack of decorum. But here on the other side of the world audrey was finally free of her. Mother's unwavering scrutiny. Her father's cigar sent it size of disapproval. Her younger sister had married the wedding ceremony at st john's a cocktail reception at the country club and settled down. Although audrey didn't want to disappoint her family she envisioned something different for herself. The expansive horizon stretched out in front of her seemed a good start. She was surrounded by other nurses some as young as herbert most with a year. More of experience. Name's audrey had only heard in passing and couldn't remember women from saint louis. Omaha jackson richmond all over the country. They're chatter grew louder once they drew closer to the coast. Were gently sloped. Volcanoes cloaked in green and rin clouds appeared in the midst. The wind gathered strength until it whipped audrey hair from its pins that just gives a little introduction a little picture of our main character in the good lex stone as she is arriving in manila where she will serve as a nurse. Thank you so much for sharing that. I was lucky enough to read the deluxe stone over the weekend. I enjoyed it so much and it reads out loud really well. Is there an audio book in the future. For this. I would love that. Yeah thank you for saying that. That's so nice of you. Yes we don't have an audio version out. Currently but i would love for that to happen sometime in the future. I know a lot of people are are big fans of audiobooks and that would be great to be able to reach more readers in that manner. Oh i can't wait for that. That's really exciting. So i'm gonna go out of order a little bit here because since you just read that selection. I have a question for an of that and that question has to do with research. This is a fiction novel. But obviously you had to do a lot of research in order to write it or i suspect you did. So can you talk a little bit about how research worked for this outage. You actually manage all of the detail. Do you use an excel sheet. Sure this is such a fun topic actually did an online seminar a few months ago on creating your stories world and we talked a lot about research for historical projects. And and that sort of thing. Because i do think it's important. It's a way that you draw the reader in and you really show them the world of the story so he this particular story line the world war two aspect. You know i. I wanted to do a dual time line. I think they're really fun stories. And i'm kind of interested in with respect to this character. Audrey thorpe the idea of legacy and this older woman looking back over her life right and thinking about the secret that she's had in the past she is society woman around savannah and everybody thinks they know her. But they don't know the real audrey thorpe because they don't know this momentous decision that she made during world war two. That's kind of how the good luck stone started for me is with this character and so when i had the world war two storyline. I very much wanted to do at story set in the pacific. Because i feel like we have so many wonderful world war two stories that are set in the european theater and i just feel it's time to have since the pacific and of course there are some but i think maybe that will be the next wave of world war two fiction. Who knows. I started kind of broadly with my research. And what i mean by that. Is i read a lot of books about what was happening in the pacific so even when i had said okay i want to do the pacific as opposed to your app. I didn't really know what year what country what was going on. Definitely no expert in military history or geography or anything like that. I started off. Broadly and i read about japan and tahiti in the philippines and just all the different military maneuvers. What nurses would offend doing in these different countries and different points along the world war. Two time. Line when i say you know i read several bucks. I mean i don't know may have been ten twelve. You know it was

Heather Bell Audrey Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Audrey Thorpe Philippines Hello Heather Heather North Carolina Thomas Wolfe Omaha Jackson Savannah Manila Bay Raleigh Durham Guam James Georgia St John
A highlight from Jessica Martin - Family, Spitting Image and Drawing Life

The Plastic Podcasts

02:30 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Jessica Martin - Family, Spitting Image and Drawing Life

"She taught me how to yodel. But this voice is nothing by comparison with today's guest. Jessica martin impressionist singer actor writer and illustrator. She was one of the voices. On the original spitting image was a punk werewolf for sylvester mccoy's doctor. Who spent two years in the west end with me and my girl and has late written and illustrated life drawing a charming and honest account of her showbiz trials and triumphs. She describes herself as an old fashioned girl. So let's start the interview in an old fashioned way by asking how you doing madan. I can hand out in a slight nate irish accident remember. That was what people would see when i go on holiday. Editing county samana. It's probably terrible. Terrible accident accent queen but no in short the odds your question how am i how am i doing. I'm doing really well. Thank you doug oh good. Good accidents who we think particularly close to family. Yes yes It's one of those things that i was constantly doing accents from the age dot and i blame my irish mob for that because she could never tell story of how today had been without investing herself in all these currents dicken saga in a day at the league losses. You get to experience everybody. It'll their focal colors. And of course nowadays. I'm doing. I'm doing that since telling a story like kids. Mom mom you call that. You've been casually racist. You gonna get canceled. You call possibly do that so i didn't. Maybe this lost i lost. I think that my initial intention. If there was any intentional tool in doing accent was to assimilate and ingratiate myself by you know. It's like mirroring. Isn't it in a very conscious business technique. But i think there must be something metro. Do next the try. And i want to feel comfortable. Say i'm gonna talk in the vernacular just continuing on on the accident there. Because it's something talked with Other interviewees about certain characteristics given out certain accents and also this country wet. Somebody pointed out in the united states. You can travel for one hundred miles and still be in the same state in this country. You travel fifty. The accents changed twice. And there's a different way for bunn. True absolutely true says snack sense as well all move friendly than other accents and

Jessica Martin Nate Irish Sylvester Mccoy Madan Samana Dicken Doug United States Bunn
A highlight from Superstition

Fun with Bells - bell and handbell ringing interviews

03:46 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Superstition

"Episode of fun with bowels. There are a number of superstitions that have accumulated over the years around bells and in this episode. We're going to take a look at some of them. Given the church bells are steeped in mysticism and folklore. It sounds surprising that for centuries many have believed them to have magical or healing powers the custom of blessing baptizing new bells before anointing with holy oils was undertaken in order to make sure the devil would flee whenever they were sounded. The sound of church bells was set. To purify the air drive away plague cure pestilence lift curses usher a departed soul to the next world and even ease the pains of childbirth women in childbirth. Were able to pay the bills. Be wrong more swiftly to speed delivery. This obstetric intervention of bells could even draw angels to the birth to bless the child's arrival. Poor women who could not afford to pay for ringing might resort to wrapping their god'll around a church bell in order to transfer the sacred power to themselves as a sort of amulet but there are rings of bells in london which bestow an even more distinguished quality. Those who were born within the ish of bow bells are said to be true companies. The church of saint. Mary lebow is one of the largest oldest and most historic in the city and there has been a charge on that site since saxon times. It was said to have been destroyed by the london. Tornado of ten ninety-one then rebuilt a gain until it was destroyed in the great fire of sixteen sixty six with the replacement being built to the designs of christopher wren and it was again destroyed by a bomb dropped during the blitz on the tenth of may nineteen forty one with all the bells crashed to the ground the fact that being born within the audible range of it spells made someone a true londoner chose how important the bow bells are. Depending on geography and wind conditions on a typical day the sound would carry as far as stratford in the east and as far as whole but in the west according to legend in thirteen ninety. Two a penniless boy. Dick whittington heard the bells as he passed the highgate archway making him change his mind about leaving the city. Tanna gain whittington thou worthy citizen turn again whittington thrice. Lord mayor of london make a good fortune. Find a good wife. You will know happiness all through your life tanna gain. The wind must've been blowing from a southerly direction that day. And according to legend whittington use the tune of the bells as a campaign tune his reelection for the office of mayor. The clock chimes tune is known today as whittington chimes. It is far older than the more famous westminster or cambridge chimes had in the victorian period whittington chimes were used in domestic clocks during the second world war. The bbc broadcast recordings of bow bells as a symbol of hope bells and thunderstorms in medieval times. A humble succulent simple viva tech tourism. Otherwise known is jupiter's beard or house leak was believed to repel lightning strikes when it was grown on the rooftop of a house or church it was so effective that the holy roman emperor decreed that each house should have at least one blunted however in the case of churches. Even the planting of house leaks was not totally infallible as the highest point for miles around spires particularly vulnerable to being struck by lightning.

Plague Cure Pestilence Church Of Saint Mary Lebow London Whittington Christopher Wren Legend Whittington Dick Whittington Office Of Mayor Tanna Stratford Lord Mayor Thirteen Westminster Cambridge BBC
A highlight from #110- Creative legacies and healthy selfishness with the Creative Dementia Collective

Creative Therapy Umbrella

05:27 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from #110- Creative legacies and healthy selfishness with the Creative Dementia Collective

"Therapy umbrella. This is a place. we talk about. All different types of creative art therapies expressive therapies. End creative approaches to my name is shannon. I'm a licensed uncle professional. Counselor all support. Certified music therapist. Your host apparently along with my cats. Cecilia could hear in the background. But she is currently at tapping my elbows that she can jump on my lap so on today's episode It will not be an interview with my cat. but it's an interview with some really really awesome women who have formed the creative dementia collective the creative dementia collective was created by aaron kaley jail and are three very very passionate women who have extensive experience in the senior care industry with their experience. They realized that there are many gaps in mead's people living with dementia and their loved ones. So they saw that need for real intangible support and unfortunately i think many of us know that's not able to be accessed through larger and more institutional organizations so they came together and created this collective and the work that they do is so powerful and incredibly impactful in today's episode. We really just touch on a few different things you know working together as a team so doing lots of collaborative work in cold treatment within different disciplines. We talk about self care a lot actually in this episode which is so fantastic. Not only for helping professionals but self care for caregivers or care team for people who are supporting people with dementia. And we also talk about you know legacy work and how beautiful storytelling to be in being able to tell your story and create your story and have that live on as a legacy and we dive into so many and i just absolutely loved the work that these three women are doing. And it was really inspirational to hear what they've created and the power that they have created to coming together as a collective and how much more able to impact their community. And it's just amazing to listen to them. So i hope that you enjoy this episode and i will talk with you on the other side all right everybody. Welcome to the lane sir. Having us of eight yes for listeners. That was three different voices that you have with us today. So i'm going to have everyone go around. And if you could introduce yourself with your names for our listeners. Know your voice and tell us a little bit about what you do within the collective. I will go ahead and start. My name is and i am in art therapists and a mental health counselor with the of dementia collective and i kind of specialize in doing like work with our clients I'm really all about using the head of creative expression to tell our story. And i believe that creativity super healing And that's what. I've studied through my undergrad and graduate work and yet the produce creative dementia collective. I'm kaley. I'm a board certified music therapists kaley allen. My work is primarily in dementia. Care though i've done a lot of different populations in my undergrad study An internship but i just fell in love with Work in memory care And i am very passionate about bringing music into the lives of people. Living with dementia and also their loved ones are touched by dementia Whether in a caregiving role supportive role and And finding ways to use that music to tell their story and to bring some some lighten love into their lives beautifully said. Aren't they cool. This is aaron My name's aaron data accor- And i'm a certified independent trainer with positive approach to care That is cheaper snows organization. So that means that. I'm a dementia where it is trainer. And that's the piece that i bring to the collective Or dementia education Working either with folks who are living with dementia or their family or care partners. Anybody really touched by Can be empowered by learning more about what it is how brain change effects The person how it presents and how we can Adjust our approach to best meet their needs I have a mostly a background in like life enrichment activities engagement So i get to work with folks on how to make activities meaningful. You know things that just happened in daily life And dementia friendly so. That's what i get a break. Wow all three

Dementia Aaron Kaley Cecilia Shannon Mead Kaley Allen Kaley Aaron
A highlight from Photographer, Elinor Carucci (NYC, USA)

The Wise Fool

05:54 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Photographer, Elinor Carucci (NYC, USA)

"In prague correct yes. I was born and raised in washington. Dc and then. I traveled many many places in and have currently ended up in prague. For the moment my wife is check. Okay great yeah. But i lived in. Yeah i went to school in washington. Dc north carolina iowa san francisco and then taught in ohio north carolina and the united arab emirates. Now in prague. Okay yes. I try my best not to talk about the united arab emirates. Yeah i have some questions as an israeli. I mean i have two citizenships. One is not mature it can get in there. I have i have to check into it. No yeah no. Because when i was there i was not allowed to visit israel right so i can well technically we call it non loud but like they would do the separate piece of paper and stamp it and you put it in your passport while you're there and then when you leave you t the blue speiss paper out so you still can go there. But if if i was in the united arab emirates and i traveled to israel and they stamped my password with i would not be allowed back into the united arab emirates which yes. I can't imagine yeah it was. It was lovely job. I enjoyed it. And i'm happy. I got out of there without being arrested. Yeah the and as a woman with even more nervous to go to those places or maybe less who knows. I'll tell you my wife said she felt the safest she's ever felt in her life there because there was very little crime if any and and as a woman she she could do whatever she needs she didn't feel all gold didn't feel harass. She didn't feel any of that stuff on the other hand but she also didn't have many rights and other kinds of issues like this so there's a balancing right and they also she's a visitor you know doesn't have to live her life. Yes the only place she ever had to wear this shalon. Abaya was in government offices and Mosques other than that. She could wear anything she wanted. Because the western. Yeah yeah yeah yeah no. It was an interesting job. As i said i'm happy. I got out of there without being arrested. Yes a friend. A coworker of mine was arrested and was thrown in prison and deported. Because there's something. They posted on facebook while they were there. Yes without even being like a citizen of the marine just for being there were no. She was an employee wesley. Her husband was an employee at the university. Where i was teaching. She was doing part time teaching and she posted something on facebook. They arrested her through her in prison and then deported her. Thank god. I'm not going to those places. No there's enough to deal with in our lives. Anyway between the pandemic can be an israeli air. Every global warming is enough. You know you. And that's why i choose to leave. I was just saying this is too much this stuff. I shouldn't have to be worrying about on daily basis. You have other things. We have a nice list each and every one of us. Yes we do. Yeah so anyways. Let's get back a steph. So start off with an example. Which is could you please pronounce your name correctly for me schiller. My name is eleanor karachi. And you come from israel as we've already discussed and you moved to new york so they bought and things. I love to know about people sort like how they got created in the first place. So how does it create. A person was it. Your parents influence was his some schooling. Like what sort of drew you to being creative as a career. I was in the arts from a very young age. So i was playing classical piano from the age of five to eighteen and i think yeah my parents. My mom is a kind of a typical jewish mama who everything we did memory brother. She was like keyser creating stir but she was also putting pressure. Everything we did especially me. I was the first i had to be. You know do it very well. Think about the top of my field like five years old playing the piano. That was the good in. The baggage is very supportive. I got exited occasion. Even though i come from a background. Which is the jewish people who came to israel from arab and the mediterranean countries and not from europe. I grew up with a lot of this culture of my mother. Is hari was the costano. My father's from brooklyn syria a little warmth and intensity and talking about everything but you raise me in terms of the patient with a western patient classical music at then later on. When i was a teenager i studied acting in drama for two years and then around fifteen sixteen a right to photography just one day so i was already surrounded by the Already archive school. I already tasted the taste of being mediocre especially with music. I was good but not amazing. Not good enough to be fillipini's so when i discovered photography and it started by photographing my mom i got hooked and very passionate about it immediately and i was not old sixteen but i knew because acting

United Arab Emirates Prague Israel North Carolina Washington Abaya Eleanor Karachi Iowa San Francisco Ohio Facebook Wesley Schiller Keyser New York Hari Mediterranean Already Archive School Syria Brooklyn
A highlight from Taylor Rochestie | Why Your Happiness Determines Your Success

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

01:09 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Taylor Rochestie | Why Your Happiness Determines Your Success

"Didn't get enough sleep Then you check your phone and see that you got a text message at it puts you in a bad mood because it might be something. You didn't wanna see You didn't get a text message from ran and you're like hey maybe they're not thinking about me not feel good about yourself. You check the weather before you even set foot on the ground and realize it's going to be a cloudy day where you see the stocks. Oh the stocks are up today. The stocks are down today. That i'm going to have a good day or a bad day. You check your social media man. I can't believe. I only got ten lights instead of five thousand. Likes like this other person. Everything that's happening. You haven't even taken a step and the external is just playing on your mind and telling you who you are what your day's gonna be like and you need to. You need to acknowledge that you need to realize you need to wake up. I just say two words. The moment i wake up i just say thank you. I'm srini row. And this is the unmistakable creative podcast were you get a window into the stories and insights of the most innovative and creative minds who started movement built driving businesses written bestselling books and created insanely interesting for more check out our five hundred episode archive

A highlight from Andris Nelsons -230

On Mic Podcast

05:08 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Andris Nelsons -230

"Know. I don't know i'm so gratified i knew you sort of answered that way. I kind of suspected because you have this This big smile on your face whenever you're on stage and i'm sure it carries over off stage but it's a great great honor to have person of your caliber here. I am a couple of other questions for you. And i know you're very busy man. A one of them is conducting not just one major orchestra but another the pardon. My pronunciation the gone to house orchestra leipzig germany. Their language questions. I would imagine and there are personality differences and so forth and maybe musical styles it. Can you keep it. All straight is what i'm asking well. I'm really lucky. Having to absolutely amazing goal this one of course is divorced and seemingly and the other one is on august alive to cool cool great august as one you know with the great tradition. You know boston symphony is such a great tradition. Being almost old back to go almost oldest orchestra in america. Obviously there's some discussion so there was but and then to the being the one of the oldest officer of the the history and tradition in in in euro and and and What is know what is let's say normally or very often conductor has One one august as a music director and then the rest of the time. You don't do anything or you. You do get or the or you do hit when i did of getting And and getting one one you one week you or berry in london you are in humble and again in new york or so and and i enjoyed that more process of that kind of for for a while but then was an opportunity to i was offered the music their position in life to get. I thought you know it would be so great to have two homes to musical homes and consented the competences of them and the coach. Too deep with roy also to collaborate and be managed to make the alliance you know the all embracing this wonderful lines between these august and for me because it's come all the as absolutely ideal situation to amazing august is different continents which are great friends and they are are admiring each other as we have projects together and and it's it's alternative wonderful at the end of the because i'm concentrating on practical to orcas i have more time because Little bit more time as well. That's fascinating that's amazing as you talk about the bridging of the gap and people coming together. I'm reminded that it was the boston symphony and schedules our going to china. Way back in the seventies when nobody was going to china actually the music and art can can change your life and it can can do can do much much good. This happens in show business a lot when the star can't go on he or she is taken ill or has to have a flight out or something. It's the substitute who goes on. And that's happened to you and It it's an amazing thing. It life at throws a lot of curveballs at us but occasionally the stars are aligned. And i believe you filled in one. Time for james levine at the met. Am i correct about that. But he has to conduct the boston symphony in carnegie hall and he unfortunately had to had to go to withdraw and and i was in new york and so i exactly the time on the base when there was a concert I i was free and then and that was three days pretty cards in boston so i remember that the grape boston. The drive peppino legendary took me from from new york to boston. Movie rehearsed for five hours. Remember then keep coming back to new york the performance and they they We had a little up with it hustling carnegie and performed molly nine symphonies. He was also also very very unusual way of of meeting each other. But but that for me that was so so emotionally Important that i don't know. I think

Boston Leipzig Germany New York Berry America ROY China Boston Symphony London James Levine Carnegie Hall
A highlight from Opening Up Nerd Culture

Immigrantly

00:50 sec | 5 d ago

A highlight from Opening Up Nerd Culture

"What. I'm hearing conversations about diversity and inclusion. It's always sort of airing on. There's not enough you know we. We need more representation. I always think. I i see a lot of it though. We kind of shift our focus to mainstream content and we ignore the independent content. People stop when they see that they're not gaining traction and they get up and they think oh. Nobody's paying attention. And that's that's the difference between someone who chooses to do this because they're passionate about it and someone that's in it for the clicks and the revenue people are going to kind of lift you to a standard then maybe higher than what you would even expected of yourself and That can

A highlight from Gallerist, Vivienne Roberts, Aleph Contemporary (UK)

The Wise Fool

04:53 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Gallerist, Vivienne Roberts, Aleph Contemporary (UK)

"Could you please pronounce your name correctly for me and you run. A roving believes the word. You use art gallery in london correct because we have a permanent space change faces. You could call it pop. If you're night which i didn't like is that through choice though or through sort of Necessity in rats necessitate. But it's the choice because we could have had a gallery far out long time to get to but then if it paid. The rent was such a gathering in the east. Sandra the north of london. Then we wouldn't have had enough money for curation and the austrian right about the artists. Yes it is because of science because if we had enough money for everything because we would have nice gathering bang in the middle of maitha and that's a very expensive endeavor. I mean absurd the expense people. Don't even understand just how expensive that idea would be. And the reason that. I used to be in the center of town. Either may wilson james's which is near sotheby's and christie's is because people like to gary hall and they go around the galleries game to museum exhibitions in fact and they are there. They have to think. Oh my god can. I actually bothered to go to the east end of london. I take a taxi is gonna take me to get And if i take the tube will know what the chew besides especially at rush shots horrible. Good when it's an interesting dilemma. That's coming up more and more and more in conversation which is they do. We hope that people come to the gallery and put the gallery somewhere and think that we're gonna put on such great exhibitions. That people will see will naturally desire to come to us or do we try to put ourselves basically more or less like where people are in order to engage with them in a more effective manner. When i just a big galleries. It's got the golden shoes gary revert regina seizures by kings cross and which strategic place to be. Because it's near the eurostar. But he's been in the ghanaian mesa. Why because that is where everybody is. And then he can tassie them out to china's streets same as he does in paris he's got culture gallery in the center of paris but he's huge gallery is at revulsion. And you have to be invited to a hangar. This is fabulous fantastic but you have to have a point in the central town. So i just figured we'd be in the center of tom amid only other big galleries. And maybe we'd get noticed by. The big garner is actually. Because i like to think of guarantees as he. Umbrella for little galleries is a very important. They need support. Yes and sadly. There's not a lot of support for smaller galleries as in like grants and you know government supports and things like that. It's it's a pretty much doggy dog world until you prove yourself. Is it different now. Select. let's take back a step so how long so. How do you pronounce the name of the gallery. So i don't mispronounce it because aleph so h alaw gal contemporary the how long has it existed since okay but you thousands of nineteen. Wow okay so you open like right at the time when fat then we had locked down then. We came out lockdown ginger and we read to the gallery and piccadilly arcade. Same one dog. It just soho but you have a longer history in the arts like so Take take us back a step to your history. Because i know at one point you were an antiques dealer and perez and you have other credentials and stuff like this before opening up this new gallery. I ca. i feel awkward calling it our space. No a concept A passionate love it. It is a gathering because gallery paintings fair enough. yeah. I worked with antiques. Ice to find because i had an antique show when i was much younger when i was married living in oxfordshire and then moved to paris and having had french education anyway so that was easy for me in big bilingual and i started finding interior designers in london and new york. Some new find antiques cheeks. And when you

Wilson James London Gary Revert Gary Hall Ghanaian Mesa Sotheby Sandra Umbrella For Little Galleries Paris Christie Kings Cross Tassie China TOM Perez Oxfordshire New York