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African American

Listen to the latest audio content in African American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features African American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

Skimm'd from The Couch

2:42 listening | 6 d ago

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

"I WanNa talk about the concept of mentor ship because it sounds like from your story and from what you've said in the past you didn't necessarily have it earlier in your career or you've talked about the lack of being able to see people and be like. Oh that's someone that looks like me or has the same background as me. How do you think about that? Now that you are in a position to obviously be a mentor. What do you think about the importance of it? I feel like when I learned about mentorship. It was like okay. They're going to take you out to lunch and then you're GonNa do this. And it was a very strict idea and euro idea. I think of what I thought it was going to be but I think over time now I realize it. It really is a two way street in has to be more of a relationship with somebody that really feels like they're also getting something out of it can't just be you asking this person for help recommendations all of those things even though that is very valid. I think it really has to be more of a two way street of that person. Feeling like okay. I'm investing in this for these reasons or this person really adds value. Or you know all those things I think it just it has to make sense and I think they I've been blessed to have really good bosses and those people have become mentors to me because I think the over time in working for them and understanding them them getting understanding of me. We were able to come to a place of okay. I can reach out to this person but I think it's hard like I wouldn't have had that relationship with them from blind emailing them or just damning them like there were reasons and there was a method to Hauer relationships. Developed over time. You obviously work for someone. That's a legend. Now in the business that you worked for Sela be before that you've worked for women that have had huge impacts in careers. You also talk about. How what you. WanNa do requires pushing boundaries? Change there's a certain sense of fearlessness. Just hearing you speak. Would you describe yourself that way? Everyone says that but I don't think of it that way. I just think that if I'm not doing this no one else will do if I don't do this work. Honestly I've looked and searched for other people in it's just not really insight and I think they a lot of people can get to positions like this and just be grateful and super comfortable and not push into see like I got the job or I got access to this network or I was able to make this amount of money. So I'm just GonNa sit here and enjoy it because I've worked hard but that's just not the way that my parents raised me. It's time to work even harder and so I don't really think is fearlessness. I think it's just the way it is

Sela Hauer
Cyntoia Brown I am Free

Toure Show

7:54 listening | Last week

Cyntoia Brown I am Free

"Sin? Toya Brown long has lived an insane life throughout her early teens. She was repeatedly. Jailed repeatedly raped prostituted. Everything it seems like every man. She came in contact with did her wrong when she was fifteen a pimp. She was in love with center out with his gun and she shot and killed a man she was a teenager who'd been victimized by the world but she was convicted and sentenced to in prison but she never lost hope that God would somehow save her enduring her fifteen years in prison. A groundswell of support and sympathy began to grow until the governor of Tennessee. Commuted her life sentence she was released from prison in August of two thousand nineteen just two months ago. She's now free and starting over and she's the author of an incredible memoir called freese into area. It's the incredible sin Toy Brown long on. Toray show you have been through an unbelievable journey in your life to get to this point how are you? I'm good. I'm blessed. I mean you must feel the most amazing weight off of your shoulders in your heart. And just how is it? I mean it's good and it you know. Of course there is a weight like it's been lifted but to be honest with you until I can see like the other women that I left behind so I could see some change happening for them to. I won't really feel like that. You Know Big Sigh of relief But it was definitely like you know I have my own finally Though I mean just even the pictures in the book the the end photos and the sense of relief that we can see is like wow like. She's so lifted. How did you make it through all of this? This this hell that you've lived through. It was literally nobody but God that got me through. It was rough and you know there was times it should. I shouldn't even have survived and I didn't realize the time just how close I was. But you know he was watching out for me. He definitely had angels around me protecting me. I mean this story. The hell of your life starts from early teenage years. And there's really there's really nobody around who's good to you everybody's trying to take from you and us you and I mean I wonder you know just at a young age when you start seeing that happening all the time you lose faith in humanity. Do you not. Yeah so that started you know. Once I left home the little cocoon and my mother's house it was like that it was always someone that wanted something. Always you know some kind of drama happening and just a lot of trauma that I was taking in and for a while you know I did struggle with you. Know filling certain ways about men in general just about people you kinda come to expect the worst from people But you have to realize that just because you experience that with one person to person a few people that doesn't mean it's reflective of everyone and so that several years for me to to get to that place for understood that but before you even meet cutthroat. Who's this sort of central figure in the story? What did you think of yourself? Because there's just not much no no not much you know. I had come to a place where I really didn't feel like I belonged anywhere. I really didn't feel like I was accepted for who I was didn't really know who I was. You know I was just so desperate to to be accepted like the people around me anything that they said that I needed to be how I needed to be behaving. What was acceptable. I was just taking it all in like a pay this is. This is how I'm supposed to be and you know I was just lost like way before I even met him. I mean your I mean your child you were child but you were being treated like an adult quite often and you're dealing with rape dealing with crack using WANNA All see mean just I. I can't imagine what it needs. You think of yourself nathen. I've been much myself at all and I really didn't think much of the things that I was involved with. Either colleges blindly walking into situations and just figuring out how to survive from there. And when you I mean when you meet a man. They've cut throat. One would think one thing that would mean your Davis Right. Yeah Yeah you'd think so but I guess you just you're not really process and what's going on you put in an adult position but you don't have the capacity of adult you're not really thinking and so yeah that was Read right away your leg. He was cute. I wanted to get his number wanted him to have my number. I mean what was that immediate whole that La- because that's would start to lead you down the real hell you went into. I think like he was just really good about and now I can see it like you know we would have conversations. It was about me like up until that point I had learned how to present myself to men in order to get what I wanted from them. So you know I would usually just listen to them. Listen to certain key words and then just say every now and then something but with him. It was me being able to talk about you. Know my innermost desires my thoughts and and things like that and I was like oh well. He's interested in me and you know that that's all I had been looking for someone who saw me someone who was interested in me. Someone who accepted me and all he really did was just sit there and be quiet and let me talk but get the first man who's listening to me and it's so powerful and you feel like affirmed in seen right for the first time right. Yeah that kind of starts to suck you in. Oh yeah quickly. Like very quickly within his face days like all of a sudden it was like you know. I didn't want to see him for an hour. It was like on the second day. Let's spend the whole day together you now but it quickly becomes very treacherous. Because he's you know his friend is using you and then he doesn't believe you. He believes his friend is almost rapidly. He starts sort of pimping you you sleep with him. You say I mean why did you? I mean I guess you accept that because you don't think anything of yourself and like the crazy thing is like you know he was saying all these things and I'm like well no I'm not I'm not a sled like whatever saw really didn't like constantly like accepted as truth and whenever you know it would be like. I was doing what I was doing. It was like a whore. I'm not I'm not doing this. I'm prostituting like this is not what I'm doing. I'm just you know going out and getting some money from a guy like you just kinda rationalize things in a way were like later. You're looking back and it's like what was what was that. And Yeah like that was definitely the turning point. The I can't remember what I call them in the book but I'll just say with his friend Yeah that was definitely the turning point when things just turned ugly and I almost think like now like you know they plan that or something like was that just the excuse. Randy's openly start acting that way with me But I don't know so. I guess maybe readers they can attempt for themselves. Tell me what they

Toya Brown Freese Tennessee LA Rape Randy Davis WAN
Can Issa & Molly Recover?

Therapy for Black Girls

7:35 listening | Last week

Can Issa & Molly Recover?

"And for those of you who haven't been introduced a doctor. Oreo will let me tell you a little bit about here. Dr Oreo is an author. International Speaker and certified sex and relationship therapist in the Washington. Dc Metro area. She's the owner of a nod right and specializes in working with black women on issues related to color ISM and texture ISM and its impact on mental and Sexual Hill. She's the author of cocoa butter and hair grease a self love journey through hair and skin. She and I chatted about the continuing tension. In Malia Niece's relationship steps you can try to be less defensive when someone calls you out are in questions to ask yourself about the health of your friendships and our thoughts about where Molly Isa go from this point on. We definitely want you to weigh in with your thoughts as well so be sure to share them with us on social media using the Hashtag T. BG in session. Here's our conversation so they definitely gave us a lot who it was a lot this week. Oh Yeah I was like Whoa. Whoa WHOA WHOA. What will be Matha Prasad? I won't so I definitely was taken by surprise also so I think what happened is well first of all like very early in the episode. We realized that the conversation that we saw in the beginning of the season happened even before the blew up. Yes I'll be honest. I was actually relieved because I was like okay. This confident of the season. So that's what you yes yes right. Maybe hoping that would have been a horrible season day. Molly no more like what is. You're not coming back next. Season was right. So we see that she's having this conversation with Nathan Presumably you know after a was there molly. Has You know said. She's not going to help her. Try to find a new headliner for the block party. So we don't know necessarily how she and Nathan started talking again although we did see last episode that he called and said. Hey I heard is coming along. Congratulations and yeah. So we knew he was. Kinda eeking back into the picture but didn't necessarily know that he was gonNA show up again in such a central figure APP. It was like the original ghost shows that after the other chick go sit by condone and this guy in the same day yes so now that you have broken dollah into the conversation. What do we think about it? Honestly what was the purpose of common? Come into the block party. Yeah okay. So she's here but she Watch her do anything. It's not that she needs to have like some real conversation. As a matter of fact I'm just like okay. So did you really just come here? It'd be like yeah me and Lawrence broke up. Well I feel like a part of her coming was to try to make sure that she was salvaging. Her professional relationships right so it sounds like she was the one who brought spotify onboard. And maybe some other people and so it feels like maybe she was doing some damage control. Make sure you know like hey I was the one who signed you up for this and give me show my face right and given that she doesn't know how e- so you know fared after she dropped her she probably was coming to see like okay. Is Everything going to be good so that I can maintain these professional relationships shrew true? I mean it was. It happened so fast I was like you know what almost the yeah. Yeah so she just POPs back up after ghosting Easter. Yes like you said. He kind of a continuation of the goes man. This kind of goes back to our previous conversation from a few episodes ago just about the importance of having difficult conversations. Even if you don't WanNa have them so yes so now. We've seen that ISA has had to try to manage in scramble to replace her head liner into Kinda. Get all of this stuff. Taken care of after condolences drops out on her and boy. What a scrabble it was. Just I like the whole thing. I mean it really. Does this whole season for me. You know communication but my partner jazz just looking at some of those season. One season two seasons three cats. 'cause the let me refresh some things. Coletta thing for Congress on the Internet but I simply do not agree with I was just like Oh my goodness like season one. Isa Confronted Molly about some foolishness. What does she confront her? He should've watched the recap confront her. Because I definitely have been seeing conversations around like well hasn't been that great of a friend either and so I've been trying to remember like what would has done. That has kind of painted her as not a great France. Oh did you see some of that in the recaps? Not Okay actually. Not What I saw. And you know the memories that sparked fires but I watched for the other. Three seasons was mostly that both of them have foolishness with one another. Both of them had expectations. That were unstated for one. Another and that at times that ended up getting in the way of how they wanted to do their friendship at the end of season. I can't even last. It was at the end but in season I think it was one or two ballots. Went with when Easter was still at. We got y'all She confronted Molly. Like what's up with you you you talking a while. Two people I work with. I mean you trip. Was She act? Sir? I'm not avoiding actually wanting to have a conversation and then just how that whole conversation was so left because molly was hurt that he said maybe you could benefit from therapy. That's when we saw that conversation You know and it's reminded reminder like you know you. The common denominator inaugural messed up relationships as you this one. Is this too thirsty to one? After this will not educated the way you need him to be educated like the common denominator is useless. What are you GONNA do about? Even then that conversation really only came up. Because Molly was you know deflecting Become fronted on her poor behavior by ESA and instead took it as an opportunity of well. What about what you do? I'm just that type of stuff that we do. We do that very often when we are not ready to be confronted we WANNA throw it back to something else. That happened and I was just like well. All of these things. They call less like looking back from season one. It makes sense exactly why they're here where they are in season four.

Molly Isa Dr Oreo Malia Niece ISM Washington Nathan Sexual Hill International Speaker Matha Prasad Spotify ISA Lawrence France Partner Congress ESA
I Live In A Slaveocracy

Toure Show

6:52 listening | 2 weeks ago

I Live In A Slaveocracy

"Nicole Hannah Jones is a certified genius a spiritual warrior and a journalist. Who's trying to change America? She's the spirit behind the sixteen nineteen project at the New York Times which was a takeover of the New York Times magazine as well as an incredible podcast series as well as an upcoming series of books and Articles. All of which are meant to help us further. Understand the way that slavery and it's a long lingering effects have shaped so many aspects of America so widely so deeply that she calls America a slave. Crecy Nicole's also done extraordinary work exploring education and racism. She's an intellectual bad ass. Who's got a MacArthur genius? Grant and a job at the New York Times and a mind full of brilliant ideas. I mean I listened to her and she just blows me away. She's awesome and I'm so honored to have had her on the show. It's the Great Nicole. Hannah Jones on tour ACO when the sixteen nineteen printed project came out. There was this thrill among black people like walking around like caring and cling to it holding onto it and like is like so important. Did you feel that excitement when like people were finally getting their hands on it? And like this is so great. Yeah it was like most amazing thing my life really. I I mean I. I hope we were making something powerful. I knew it was important. But as you know that doesn't mean that people will respond to it in that way and The response far exceeded exceeded any expectation. We we had. What was the pitch that I made to the Times this because this came from you not somebody saying. Hey imagine something but you said No. Let's do something no I I I've been thinking about sixty nine thousand four very long time and I'd been on booklet for about a year and a half and The first thing I pitch when I got back from book leave in January. It was the project and The pitch was very simple We have I I I talked to my editor about it. And then we have a weekly ideas meeting For the magazine and I just brought it up at the meeting and I said that This August will mark the four hundred aniversary of the first enslaved Africans being sold into Virginia and that most Americans have never heard of that date and that I wanted to dedicate an entire issue the magazine to assess as the ongoing legacy whole issue. It's not an article now the whole thing because what I said was that the argument of the magazine would be that you can look across all of these aspects of American life capitalism democracy. Why would only western industrialized country without universal health? Care our culture our legal system that almost nothing has been left untouched by the legacy and I wanted the magazine to look at a modern modern phenomenon across America life and then trace it back to the legacy of slavery and that we were going to be able to make these connections in a way that they hadn't been made and really Do a project place slavery. Actually at the center of the American story and immediately Jake Silverstein. The editor in Chief of the magazine was Ike. Let's do it. That was it and I mean that has been took off from there. I mean what this specific project but it has been part of your genius at getting major media institutions to say yes. Let's do a major project on a very specific deep issue of racism. Right I I came to know your work with you to two major pieces of segregation for this American Life. Yeah and now this major multimedia project for the New York Times just for those of us who are in those spaces or entering those bases. How do we get a room? Full of white folks say yes. We will dedicate a ton of space to segregation or a ton of space to the Slovak crecy of America. When they know a lot of the audience will be like. This makes me uncomfortable. Yeah I think to be clear. It wasn't that big organizations always wanted to say. Yes sir working on these issues for almost twenty years and There were certainly times in my career. Where with a struggle to get my news organization to allow me to do. The work wanted to do. But I think what What I has the benefit of. I've been studying this for twenty five years. I'm obsessed with it. I read widely on the history of raise on the sociology of raise. I have always treated it as an investigative story. And Not Simply. Let me show you how black people are at the bottom of this indicator. Let me show you this Segregation exists because that's not interesting. People know that anything you measure black people suffer the most from it but I always make them. I'm GONNA show you the architecture of it. I'm GONNA show you the intention of it and it's going to be investigative and it's GonNa be surprising to people and I think that's what once you have success doing that. Of course it becomes easier to convince people to let you do it but I think what? My work is always surprising to. People like people are not surprised segregation exist but when? I show them actually. There was a thirty year decision by the Federal Government. Not Enforce Fair housing laws. You know when I can say actually. We don't have universal healthcare because we have fought back against social programs because we thought black people would benefit them for more than one hundred and fifty years. I think it's that of surprise but also really the rigor of the scholarship Racist one of those things because everybody has a race that everybody thinks they know dislike covering education. Everybody thinks they understand how public education should work. Because they've gone to school and when you can approach them With the argument that they never thought they never knew is shocking to them surprising to them. I've been able to to sell those arguments and then you also have to actually be able to deliver compelling narrative rigors scholarship Get people to talk to you. All of those kind of normal reporting things as well.

America New York Times Nicole Hannah Jones Crecy Nicole The New York Times Magazine Great Nicole Hannah Jones Jake Silverstein Virginia Macarthur Editor Grant Editor In Chief ACO Federal Government IKE
When Friendships Change

Therapy for Black Girls

4:20 listening | 2 weeks ago

When Friendships Change

"Hey y'all thanks so much for joining me for session. One fifty four of the therapy for black girls podcast today. You WanNA spend some time chatting about what to do when we find ourselves in friendships. That are changing. When we're young and life is less complicated. Friendships are maintained by things. Like play dates sitting together at lunch and late night. Gav sessions until someone falls asleep as we get older and they're more demands on our time and energy friendships become a little more difficult to maintain we move get partnered. Become parents. Life continues to happen. I think that the thing that's most important to remember about the life cycle of a friendship is that it's normal for things to shift as we change so do the relationships where a part of but often when we send things changing instead of it alerting us that we need to shift with it. It results in US feeling like something is irreparably damaged and should be discarded. You heard Dr Oriole Woah. I discussed the importance of having difficult conversations on session. One fifty one of the podcast a couple of weeks ago and that's often the first step that needs to happen when we noticed a change in our friendships many times the changes in our friendships are ones. We can foresee things like moving becoming apparent etc. I'll give you a little bit of headway. So you know they're coming and you know that things are likely going to change if this is the case. It's a good idea to acknowledge that things will be different and to allow space for both of you to grief. I'd encourage you to have an honest conversation about your worries as you're both moving into this new phase of life carve out some time to just actually talk through your fears. That doesn't have to be a plan for alleviating them just yet. It's okay to just acknowledge that the exist at some point after the conversation has happened. Consider making a plan for how you'll be intentional about creating new experiences for your friendship. Now the time distance and other things will be different. What kinds of things can you do to make an effort to stay connected just like we schedule? Date nights for romantic relationships date nights for friendships are also really important. Consider building in your friend. Time around certain activities. You know. You're likely to participate in. So maybe you do something like scheduling a thirty minute chat on Thursday nights after you watch how to get away with murder or maybe you have a group me where you're popping in regularly about every day Monday in kinds of things the gestures that you make to stay connected don't have to be gray into effective but it's helpful if they're consistent and finally. I want you to get comfortable with asking specifically what you can do to support your friend in this new phase of life and be open to how this might change if they're moving for Grad school. Can you help them? Virtually search for places to live if they're becoming apparent perhaps you can help by organizing a baby shower. Sometimes it's easier to show up for others if we know exactly how we can be helpful in the moment so be sure to ask now. Please don't hear me say that. The brunt of maintaining their friendship is on the person not experiencing life change. That's not what I'm saying at all. It's absolutely also important for the fringe experiencing. The life changed to be sure that they are checking in and making efforts to connect as well. When we don't take these tips or at least make an effort we can see a real breakdown in the friendship in ways that might have been able to be avoided. It's also important to note however that even with the best of intentions sometimes friendships just in the doesn't have to be anyone at fault. There may not have been a big blow up. Sometimes they just in. And that's definitely a topic will exploring in another episode of the podcast soon to navigate when a friendship ends

United States Dr Oriole Woah Grad School Murder
Monique Morris: Why Are Black Girls More Likely To Be Punished In School? - Part 2

In Black America

6:02 listening | 4 months ago

Monique Morris: Why Are Black Girls More Likely To Be Punished In School? - Part 2

"That Jamal she talk about discipline in the schools but obviously is having an adverse works affect on how these young women are. matriculating through educational system is not working. Yeah no the removal of students and from the classroom impacts learning time it impacts Whether they feel they belong in school. And you know there are those situations nations. Where young person has you know? Sort of reached a level where they you know. There are some times when a young person has reached a level where she might have to be asked to to leave but but that should be a last resort and it should be done in the context of of healing and an opportunity to come back in In singer Rhythm Danza Blues. I I actually offer a strong critique of exclusionary discipline and The idea that when we push kids away that the system gets better immediately. I think that's the sort of misrepresentation of discipline should look like in our schools. Is that if we just take this kid out then. Suddenly the school system is better without considering that part of our work in education is to ensure that we are building out an institution that is responsive to all our children and nat even then that means that we should be concerned about those kids who are not in the classroom as much as we're concerned about those kids who are in the classroom. I offer several examples. What situates Singer them dance the blues differently From the other texts is that I spend time on the road exploring this issue with different communities and happened upon programs and strategies that have figured out ways of doing things differently and one of the programs that I- profile is the Columbus city. Prep School for Girls. Where the principal at a community meeting stood up and said that she would no longer punish girls for having a bad attitude? Which of course caught my attention immediately lately but then following up with her and having a chance to visit the school I saw that she had not only just declared that she was not going to do this anymore but that she had really situated needed her staff and faculty in a very strong way to be able to say you know to be able to build an infrastructure and I said a practices pisses that would hold them accountable to that so you know they instantly read to you? Know design their classrooms a specific way. They assigned young the people to adults to have stronger relationships. They have regular meetings where they discuss student measurable progress where they're able to really have conversations Sion's that are specific to the student about what she needs. In order to thrive and all of this is doable. You know having a set of restorative practices and and opportunities for young people to engage in healing is. It shouldn't be that radical. I you know we really should be in a space where we understand that. If our are young people are asking for their schools to be sanctuaries and really critiquing the fact that they feel like prisons that that requires us to do something different and so seeing a rhythm dance the blues as evidence that there are schools that are reconsidering this that are doing things differently and that is showing positive outcomes that school in Columbus had a a reduction in their truancy rates. They had a reduction in their bullying rates. They had a reduction in their fighting and in their cases that are have been assigned to insubordination so across the board award the fact that they built out relationships with young people and respond to young people in crisis rather than pushing them away. I think you know is showing positive academic outcomes uh-huh as well as positive disciplinary outcomes. You also talk about in the book when these young women are in the classroom. They're not learning. So there's here's a double edged swords going. I being punished for whatever behavior problems that they have but also they're not receiving an education. That's right you know the loss some instruction time is a big deal and so you know again we should be trying to figure out ways to keep young people in classes rather than figuring out new creative ways to get them out and and so you know and push out you know the conversations that I had with girls about their push out experience. I I talked to them about what they would do when they were out of school. And for the most part you know they would describe preparing for fights or they would describe sitting around doing nothing. They would describe not having access to their academic material because they felt the school with Matt them or a teacher didn't like them and didn't give them the material. What the Columbus City Prep School? You know to give an example again from that same institution does is if if a student is having a disruption then they are placed in the classroom. They don't even they don't call it in school suspension but I think in in some ways it functions that way but they provide no child loses in instruction time so there is somebody working with them in this space always to make sure that they're doing their work and the principal herself checks checks all the work before a student can be Sent back to class and release back the class and so there's never a loss of emphasis on the fact that young people are there to learn and that our girls can have an opportunity to re-engage Another example that I talk about in the book is from Oakland The African American female. Excellence where you know curl had a disruption. She cursed at a teacher. It was seen as a violation of a set agreements in the classroom but that she was able to apologize and come back in and one of the things that sat with me that I share in the book that I think is really important. Is that the head of the program at the time and Zingo to Gus. Then you know that it's important for us to recognize that we have to this. Work is about forgiveness right like it's about a young people understanding that they can be forgiven if they make a mistake that this is not a disruption that should sever their relationship with school but that they should learn from on how to actually behave and being community with each other. And that's what we're seeking seeking to do is build out schools that emphasize community and relationships not that are seen as locations for punishment.

Columbus Principal Prep School For Girls Columbus City Prep School Jamal Zingo Sion Matt Oakland
Neil DeGrasse Tyson: I Am More Than Science

Toure Show

8:26 listening | 3 months ago

Neil DeGrasse Tyson: I Am More Than Science

"Neil degrasse Tyson. It's one of the most brilliant people alive but when we finally got together for an interview I WanNa talk to him about science. I WanNa talk about almost anything else. So we get into who he is a deep about. How race has impacted his life. The book concludes with Attribute Kim say to your father your sorry Eulogy Yes yes and You Know I lost my dad last year Owen did. Your Dad passed three years ago. Three years ago and You honor him beautifully. Can you tell us about him? And how he leads into you sort of the way you sort of take from him to become who you are. Yeah So my parents were married. Sixty sixty four years until his death to the end right now and We had a stable household. My mother was a housewife homemaker. Today I guess we call that Until were empty nest and she went back to school. That was by agreement by the way so the agreement was my father would continue working and then my mother would raise the children at home. There were three of you. Yes and the middle earth and raise the children and then when we were mostly empty nest enough she will go back to school and pick up her career which is exactly what happened. And she went back to College. She got a degree in Gerontology. Became a German got her masters Gerontology. The study of the needs that afflict old people. Okay Okay and how to resolve Geriatric Okay. Yes correct to gerontology geriatrics the same route And she ended up working for the FEDS. Allocating moneys to retirement communities Old Age centers nursing homes this sort of thing so my father was studied sociology and got his Masters at Teachers College Columbia and was always his entire life. Maximally concerned with the plight of the under served and in New York City in the nineteen sixties. It was then known as the ghetto. He got noticed by the city. He got pointed to be a commissioner of human resources by Mayor Lindsay in the nineteen sixties during the most turbulent years of the civil rights movement in the big cities he. He worked long hours. We'd see me come at eight something like that. But he was home on the weekends and we would Cook Breakfast and dinner on the weekend so he participated household when he could but during the week it was mostly my mother who was raising us. And what reference in my eulogy are things that he said and did that contain called deep levels of wisdom. You know what is wisdom? It's it's ideas. It's wisdom our thoughts that you have that are the distilled essence of your life experience after you've discarded or forgotten the details that's actually a necessary part of wisdom that allows wisdom to come out in the form of sentences. No one's GonNa hand you a five hundred page book and say here's my wisdom. That's that's that's not wisdom wisdom almost fi construct has to be so simple and so deep that you just pause and reflect on it without getting mired details so one of them was. It's not good enough to be right. You also have to be effective. You can say I'm right therefore it should be this way. You know we don't have time for you. Have you navigated a pass to make this happen? Have you bought for example? The you know the water hoses and the in the south during the during the protests. Okay why do we have perfect video and photographs of it? Beacause the organizers made sure the press was there knowing they'd be able to capture those conflicts. This was even done even go back as far as Gandhi This was portrayed in the film Gandhi where he's ready to have a protest. It is not useful if no one knows about it if you get your head whipped by the local police and there isn't a photograph of it. You are in the right but you're not effective so you invite the press. The sympathetic press so that for me was very important in getting things done in navigating the terrain on which you're trying to implement social justice and the press doesn't write about events that don't happen why would they well in the late nineteen sixties watts burned. Detroit burned Washington burned. You're newark burned. New York City did not burn. The most populous ghetto in the country was basically quiet in the wake of the Martin Luther King assassination. Yes there was some minor skirmishes compared to what was going on elsewhere. No does anyone write a story no riots in New York The story is written. My father was active in the human resources administer. He's the commissioner a city commissioner. Making sure that there were opportunities available to people who needed opportunities for jobs to feed their family. What is a riot if it's not the very last act of desperation of the mouthpiece of the voiceless it is the it it not only voiceless people who are also hopeless Once you've run out of hope you have no options. You can have no voice but still hope you're not gonNA rock it. You gotta be voiceless and hopeless in it. Yeah so people in New York. The inner city of New York didn't was not without hope without some confidence that maybe there are opportunities just on the other side of the hill. I'm just saying these are things that my father was engaged in that I will not ever forget. I'm their son the astrophysicist but I stayed grounded in what matters for any kind of progressive change in this world and for me progressive. Change IS THE INEVITABLE. Consequence of rational thought applied to challenges. So no I'm not hitting people over the head saying you should be more progressive. Because then we've learned that some people dig their heels and more strongly to impose you especially in modern times where conflict has fomented on social media. But you just get people to think a little differently about things in the face of evidence. I've found that can have potency of its own and as an educator and as a scientist this is what I've done an in the book. Essentially every reply to people have written to me is an attempt to layer onto them some degree of measured rational thinking still some emotion there. You can't just be cold about it. But you want to empower people to be able to sink in new ways so that they can say. I now know how to analyze this information in ways I did not previously. Thank you for this bit of scientific insight. That allows me to do that. And that's what this book is about

New York City Commissioner Neil Degrasse Tyson KIM Gandhi Owen Martin Luther King Mayor Lindsay Feds Newark Teachers College Columbia Detroit Scientist Washington
Monique Greenwood transformed Brooklyn 'haunted mansion' into world-class B

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

1:07 listening | 3 months ago

Monique Greenwood transformed Brooklyn 'haunted mansion' into world-class B

"Three tents and win celebrates black history month she began her life of love of life she beginning to start that again she began her line of luxury bed and breakfast inns with the transformation of the haunted mansion meet Monique Greenwood it's a first on ten ten wins black history month a trailblazer who has three eyes I do that third is the ability to see the possibility any change maker has to have the third she's Monique Greenwood from bed Stuy and the vision taking an old run down eighteen sixties villa and turning it into one of the country's premier bed and hot spots it was dilapidated yeah because no one was ever there well they are here now be a quantum mansion attracts tourists from all over the world that's guys probably when the bass is gentrifying communities ever Brooklyn had no major hotels twenty four years ago when a quavo opened Greenwood at her husband Glenn pope changed all that I enjoy staying at bed and breakfast at the hotel and I realize that everything about it tied into my personal passion the couple is opened at least four other locations in cities across America for black history month Larry Mullins ten ten wins

Monique Greenwood Stuy Brooklyn Glenn Pope America Larry Mullins
Ida B Wells: The Unsung Heroine of the Civil Rights Movement

Encyclopedia Womannica

4:03 listening | 3 months ago

Ida B Wells: The Unsung Heroine of the Civil Rights Movement

"Born into slavery. Today's warrior became a journalist. Educator civil workers rights activists in suffer. Just she is best known as the leader of the Anti Lynching Movement her reporting on the violent injustices faced by African Americans and the work to make United States or more equitable place significantly impacted American society. Let's talk about ib well IDA. Bell Wells was born in Holly Springs Mississippi on July Sixteenth. Eighteen sixty two six months. Before the emancipation proclamation. She was the eldest of six children. When I was sixteen. Her parents died in a yellow fever. Outbreak Ida was determined that she and her siblings would not be split up so she got jobs a teacher at a rural country school in eighteen. Eighty two item move with her family to Memphis Tennessee. Two years later I was riding on a train from work when she was asked to move. She was instructed to move to the colored car which also served as a smoking area. Furious either refuse when the conductor forcibly removed from the train ida bit how she sued the Railroad Company and ultimately lost the case according to a story in me obey the injustice inspired beginning of her activism in journalism career while working as a journalist Ida wrote about ride subjects she was an outspoken reporter and weighed in on issues such as disenfranchisement and segregation rapidly. Ida became one of the most prominent black journalists have her time and was called the princess of the press in eighteen ninety two. I disclose friend and two other African Americans were murdered by Lynch mob. The killings motivated IDA to expose the reality of becoming one the first reporter city so I don't wrote articles condemning the attack and the wrongful deaths of African Americans and one article titled Lynch Law. In America I wrote the nineteenth century lynching mob cut off. Ears toes and fingers strips of flesh and distributes sugars person at the body as souvenirs among the crowd. Her Writing Ida documented the dangers that black southerner face after one particularly controversial article. That either wrote a mob stormed the office of her newspaper and destroyed the press. Fortunately I wasn't in the office when the incident occurred still the attack understandably Friday nighter and she left town. She moved to New York where she worked at the New York Age and African American newspaper. There she continued her work exposing lynching and wrote a report on the subject for the publication. Ooh In eighteen. Ninety eight IDA brought her campaign to the White House. She discuss lynchings with President. Mckinley Alami Congress for a National Anti Lynching Law in one thousand nine hundred five item to Chicago and married for an Ed Barnett with whom she had four children in Chicago. Idaho for many prominent civil rights organizations including the National Association of Color Women That Alpha suffrage club and the end ablaze c. p. she actively fought for the women's suffrage movement during one suffers parade organizers told IDA and the other black women incidents to march in the back the organizers feared that women of color would offend southern delegates but either refused standing her ground despite the enormous backlash she received. Ida's fight for. Social Justice was relentless. She continued her activism and to her death in one thousand nine hundred eighty one at the age of Sixteen Ida is best remembered for her invaluable role as a social pioneer Ida a risks her life repeatedly to fight against the score of lynching and to protect African Americans all over the country.

IDA Reporter Sixteen Ida Lynch Law New York Age United States Memphis Ed Barnett Mckinley Alami Congress Bell Wells National Association Of Color Tennessee Idaho African American Newspaper New York Chicago America
Nobody Belongs at Rikers... Not Even Harvey Weinstein

The Breakdown with Shaun King

7:42 listening | 3 months ago

Nobody Belongs at Rikers... Not Even Harvey Weinstein

"I loathe Harvey Weinstein. Not just in some generic way. The man was violent and abusive to people that have come to know over these past few years. He Literally Encouraged Hillary Clinton's twenty sixteen presidential campaign to target and harass my dear friend the late Eric Garner as she became an effective campaigner for Bernie. I saw the emails to the campaign and I talk with Erica about that in it terrified her to see this man a man in power. She was struggling at that point in her life. Just an everyday person fighting for justice for a father into see that Harvey Weinstein knew her. It was throwing her under the bus in emails to the campaign concerned. Her as of yesterday Harvey Weinstein is now a convicted sex offender now. I am nothing but glad that he's being held accountable for his abuses period. End OF STORY DOT COM. No IFS ands or buts soon. After the world realized that he was being sent to rikers. Which is the primary jail for all of New York City? As soon as people learned he was being sent there just as all convicted men in New York City are the conversation went somewhere that I just can't support and I understand it so let me just say that up front. I understand the conversation and I understand that revenge. In some ways is primal and Harvey. Weinstein has used his white privilege his wealth. His power is used those things to assault women into ruin people's lives and careers for decades and man was able to do it over and over and over again because powerful people had no intention of ever holding him accountable and so when the news got out that Harvey Weinstein was on his way to rikers. I saw people saying all over social media things that I simply refuse to say. I'll explain why in a second but people began saying they hoped Harvey Weinstein would be put in solitary confinement. They hoped he'd be beat down. They hope the guards would turn the other way. I saw people say they hope Harvey Weinstein would be raped. Get a taste of his own medicine. In four moment as the online mob against him grew the word. Rikers was literally the top trending topic in the world and it was mainly just because people are celebrating that somebody like Harvey Weinstein was finally going to experience the hell that black and Brown New Yorkers have experienced since long before I was born in again. Let me say I get the anger. The man did horrible criminal things. But let me explain why I can't join in on some of the remarks that people are saying last year after generations of just chewing people up and spitting them out. The city of New York finally voted to officially closed down rikers island correctional facility. Now it's GonNa take years for it to fully shutdown but the place is a hell hole year in and year out. Tens of thousands of New Yorkers primarily black and Brown New Yorkers primarily poor New Yorkers. They are taken there. But nobody who emerges from rikers is ever the same in. It's literally a one in a million chance that somebody like Harvey Weinstein ever has to suffer there because the people that get beaten and battered in raped and stabbed and slashed their at rikers. They're not rich white executives. In fact before Harvey Weinstein could even get to rikers before they ever took him there. They actually diverted the car and took him to a hospital instead. And so as I record this at this moment at least he's not even actually at rikers but I can tell you who is thousands of poor black and Brown. Young people people suffering through mental illness and drug addiction. But I getting the most brutal form of incarceration instead of any type of treatment. So I can't cheer Harvey going to rikers because I know it's almost never him or men like him in the systems and structures that people want to chew Harvey Weinstein up those systems and structures. They rarely chew men like that up. They'll rarely do that instead. It's going to be happening to the most marginalized men among us. Let me close with this thought. We have a great new ad from one of our sponsors that I can't wait to share with you. The same reason that I can't cheer on Harvey Weinstein going to rikers. Listen again. I'm glad that he was convicted. But I can't cheer anything about rikers in the same reason exists for why I don't cheer when White Supremacists get the death penalty. Listen in full transparency. Something awful in me. Sometimes once those men to die. I'm not. I'm not proud of it but I admit it. I don't like feeling that way but I don't have a soft spot in my heart for Dylann roof but again here's what I know it's that it's not normally white supremacists that are being executed in this country. That's bad who's going to the electric chamber. That's not who's going to the electric chair rather or the gas chamber instead it's black men. It's poor black men to be more specific. They are the single most likely group of Americans to be executed so when I cheer on the execution for Man. That's really the exception to the rule and not the rule. I'm basically cheering it on for everybody else as well. I can't cheer rikers. I can't share the death penalty and part of being a modern day. Abolitionist is having actual principles that are centered on the fact that the whole damn system of mass incarceration needs to be torn down. It does that doesn't mean there's not a way for Harvey Weinstein to get justice. But you won't hear me cheering on rikers. Never that

Harvey Weinstein Rikers Island New York City Hillary Clinton Erica Eric Garner Bernie Assault Brown Dylann
Save Nate Woods

The Breakdown with Shaun King

5:49 listening | 3 months ago

Save Nate Woods

"It is Super Tuesday. Which is the single biggest day in the entire Democratic primary and I have spent so much of the past two months doing nearly forty different events around the country in New Hampshire all over California. I've done maybe twenty plus events in California all over Texas in Houston in Dallas All over the state to fight. Not just for Bernie Sanders but to fight for Medicare for all to fight for a completely revolutionized immigration system to fight for policies that will combat climate change. That will lift wages for everyday people around the country. And as I've been fighting for all those things I've met so many wonderful beautiful people all over the country. I was at the huge rally this weekend in Los Angeles. But as we've gotten two today which is a huge huge day for our country for our campaign. I'd be lying if I said what was on my mind. Was ANYTHING OTHER THAN NATE WOODS? Your brother who scheduled to be executed on this Thursday I shudder to think even that we live in a nation that executes people to we are really one of the only developed nations in the world that continues to have the death penalty and I oppose it for hundred and one different reasons chief among them that it is used disproportionately against African American men. Poor African American men in particular and here. We are with a young man who never pulled the trigger in a case that he is now about to be executed for. You haven't heard me break it down. I did on just a few episodes ago. But we've built a new website called Save Nate Dot Com in partnership with his attorneys and his family's and others. And I want you to go there today. Even if you just stop this podcast stop this episode and go on your phone on your computer to save. Nate DOT COM. It's important and sometimes we fight for something knowing that all of the odds are stacked against US knowing that the systems of inequity and oppression were designed and built to execute nate. This justice system was never built to give him justice. To give people like him justice it was meant to oppress us and so all of a sudden we try to squeeze justice fairness equity balance out of this system for a man. Like nate. Woods is not there. There's no way to do it all the way. Back in. Two Thousand and four nate and a friend of his were in a house known to be what we call a drug house where people bought soul traded and use drugs and police had been surveilling the house for weeks and months on end bad regularly busted in there for raids and other things and two different times on this day in two thousand four bay came. They're claiming to want to arrest somebody but never did eventually. They barged into the house and when they did. They sprayed nate in his face with pepper spray. Which is very relevant in this case. And if you've ever even been in the room when pepper spray has been sprayed. It's brutal you. It's so disabling that you really cannot continue doing what you're doing. They barged into the house spray him with pepper. Spray and nate goes running through the house out through the back window of the back of the house and his friend longtime friend shoots and kills a police officer in the house. Nate had nothing to do in nate. Didn't have a gun. Didn't shoot the police officer. Nate goes out the back window across the street and literally just sits on the front porch of a home while his friend in the house. Bust out of the House and shoots and kills two more police officers. Let us in Birmingham Alabama. So you can imagine and I understand. I am deeply sympathetic to anybody who lose loses their life to gun violence. If it's a police officer anybody else and you can understand in Birmingham. They were going to have blood. They were going to hold people accountable except nate. Had nothing to do with it. They offer nate a plea deal where he would not only not get life in prison but that he would get twenty twenty five years basically which is still an incredibly long time. He could literally be out in four years. His attorneys advised him not to take the deal because they didn't think he was guilty of the crime. They put up a horrible defense and instead of getting twenty to twenty five years. They CONVICTED NATE. Which is wrong of capital murder which is premeditated deliberate murder and the penalty in Alabama for that. Is The death penalty offers twenty years? How can you then give a man? The death penalty. It's

Nate Woods Officer Bernie Sanders Alabama New Hampshire Los Angeles California Medicare United States Murder Birmingham Houston Dallas Texas
An Innocent Man Is About to Be Lynched in Alabama

The Breakdown with Shaun King

3:31 listening | 2 months ago

An Innocent Man Is About to Be Lynched in Alabama

"One man and one man alone is guilty for the crimes. That nate woods was later. Convicted of his name is Kerry McGuire. Spencer WanNa read a letter that carry wrote carry also on death row. This is a letter from Carey in his own words. My name is Kerry McGuire Spencer. And I'm writing in regards to the march. Fifth Twenty Twenty execution date set for Nathaniel Woods. Your Woods is one hundred percent innocent. I know this to be a fact because I'm the person that shot and killed. All three of the officers that Nathaniel was subsequently charged and convicted of murdering listen to this nathaniel. Woods doesn't even deserve to be incarcerated. Let alone executed. I've confessed to shooting all three of the officers in question. Both when I was first interrogated and also on the stand at my trial but yet instill nathaniel was charged. Tried and convicted unjustly. These continue the words of Kerry Spencer. He says I pray that my words don't fall on blind eyes deaf ears. Don't allow another innocent man to be executed if you can do something. Please put a stop to it. This is my most fervent prayer. Sincerely Carry Spencer. While we like to think that the epidemic of lynching that plagued the United States back in the early nineteen hundreds has basically ended. It hasn't hasn't ended. It's just shape shifted and take it on a new form instead of hanging black folk from trees. We are now shot by police in the streets or killed by the many different machines of mass incarceration is still lynching nonetheless. Don't be full. Nate Woods is innocent which takes me to our final action step with the hope that we can save name off right away as soon as you hear this particularly if it's on Thursday march fifth go to save Nate Dot COM. Take all of our action steps particularly. There's a letter and I want you to fill out the form. It'll send a letter directly to the governor's office don't just hit send type in your own words there. Then there's a phone number and I need you to call. That number will talk you through every step. That's there needed to call it number now and he did call it all day. We need you to post this on your instagram facebook twitter anywhere. You can post it. Share it email it. Text it wherever you can share. Save NATE DOT COM. Share our phone number to everything you can to fight back now. Listen we do all of this knowing full well that they might ignore us. But I need nate and his family and his loved ones to know that we never stop fighting until the very last minute. All right take care of about

Nathaniel Woods Kerry Mcguire Spencer Kerry Mcguire Twenty Twenty Nate Spencer Wan Nathaniel Carey United States Instagram
Malcolm Gladwell: I Am

Toure Show

4:40 listening | 2 months ago

Malcolm Gladwell: I Am

"Malcom gladwin is a stone cold genius who loves A grade sports argument. I went onto bill. Simmons podcast and I had this totally ludicrous thing that I want to talk about. Which was I was like? Could a basketball team made up of Nigerians? An all time basketball team made up of Nigerians be the greatest basketball time and then I ended it. I amended until as I said all right I have to corollaries one is. I'm going to add west Indians because almost Indians not all mostly I'm Jamaican. Where am I what am I people from? We're from originally like I'm Ibo right most Jamaicans cable so I add the Caribbean and then I said and just refund. That's also add the rest of Southern Africa and then I construct the students. Tony Ridiculous Caribbean so busy. I say out can Africa and the Caribbean put together an all time team. It's better than an african-american team a euro team at a white American team. It's the third one. Maybe not. The answer is yes. We don't have time to do this but I will convince you. I can't convince you to Africa and the Caribbean in basketball. All Time team and also your co you qualify by or Nigeria. Will I started? I start with all of ethnic did not all? I'm only adding. I added Southern Africa. 'cause I WANNA have Steve Nash and Joel Embiid on my team. Wade Steve Nash. Born in Johannesburg. He's Canadian. No my rule is that you. Are you qualify? Virtue of your parents. Place a birth. So get all of Steve. Nash Who Play Thompson. Really? He's Bamyan are are are taking. Tim. Duncan Tim Duncan Hang Hau Kim Elijah Akeem Joel Embiid Yoenis Clay Andre iggy Dow Victor Depot Drink Igwe Dolla. Where's he from Nigeria okay? He's full on your deal and Steve. Nash I got a back court of Nash and Thomson. I got a frontcourt of Dunkin embiid. Jaanus Patrick Ewing forward a okay. Right right right right from the islands. This really is in the island. This team is insane when Patrick's coming off the bench. But how just doesn't matter but Kim Jaanus and but sure but but the other team has Lebron Kobe. Japan Michael I know. Just for starters and Steph curry just restarting Potanin Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell. Just just try go ahead. That's the African American teachers. Try Playing Lebron Jordan. Notice what we doing that thing ooh together. Thomas can't come in and Magic Johnson coming in. Can I read this out rushing your your appetite? Engineer Crushes Team Sport Play. You cannot Jordan Jordan and abroad and Kobe on the court at the same time out of your mind. You have all centers you have one forward you have you have guards and a bunch of centers. You got a problem with that because the modern game nobody in the known you already. Janis on Lebron an WHO's covering Jordan who's covering stats got covering step. I got clay and Andrea Diallo. Who in their day or two of the greatest lockdown defenders of the last twenty five years in the NBA? I got a clay and national or two of the pure as shooters and I have argued with the greatest defensive front court in the history of basketball. I Have Yoenis Hekim Akeem Patrick embiid. I mean I have wilt Bill Russell Shack. It's close by. Queen is not close if I had if I was restricted to white Americans. Then maybe may point so I do it as long ludicrous. It's ludicrous ludicrous. And you're right I'm wrong but so what is it that there are people took offense. How on Earth? What is they were like? Oh you know you Kim like first of all all the things to get worked up about in two thousand eighteen in America about race. This is the thing you have said about

Steve Nash Tim Duncan Hang Hau Kim Elijah Basketball Southern Africa Nigeria Caribbean Lebron Kobe Yoenis Hekim Akeem Patrick Emb Jordan Jordan Malcom Gladwin Patrick Ewing Joel Embiid Bill Russell Shack Simmons Johannesburg Kim Jaanus Jordan Tony Ridiculous Bill Russell NBA
Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

In Black America

6:27 listening | 2 months ago

Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

"On this week's program historically black colleges and universities and the NFL with Doctor Derrick white in black America in their celebration of the hundred year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the for better for worse college football who celebrate the One hundred fiftieth year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries. That kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of talking about the early game when the Ivy Leagues Dominated College Football. Right you get that kind of Astaldi. Nfl is not so much right. In their part of Wigan's law says that the integration the reintegration of the. Nfl in part is done. Because you know teams WanNa move to the West Coast Right. They WanNa play in Los Angeles And that the black community the La said no in particular forced the L. A. Don's to say if you WANNA come in you. GotTa you gotTa desegregate Your Team. So woody strode gets an opportunity to play and Kenny Washington gets a chance to try out for these teams and they make these teams in the NFL so we were talking about the kind of reintegration of of professional football as the National Football League celebrated. Its first one hundred seasons unbeknownst to many sports fans the NFL didn't have any African American players for decade from Nineteen thirty four to nineteen forty-six. There was an unspoken agreement between owners to ban African American players today. They are two African American general managers for minority head coaches and one chief operating officer for the first time the crew for sue both fifty four had a record number of minority officials of the seven on the field five for African Americans the contribution of historical black colleges and universities. Acc use to the NFL has changed the game forever undrafted by an NFL team. Paul tank younger was the first African American player from grambling State University to play in the NFL when he signed with the Los Angeles Rams in nineteen forty nine the first African American drafted in the NFL draft was jaws rooks. I running back out of Morgan state in the Eleventh Round. One hundred and twenty fifth overall by the Green Bay packers in nineteen fifty one doing super bowl fifty four week in south Florida Group of area high school athletes had an opportunity to learn about the rich history of black college football and his contributions to the NFL and Black America spoke with doctor. Derrick wide associate professor at the University of Kentucky. When I was teaching a class on sports history I found that the students knew nothing about historically black college role. They were as part of their assignment. They had researched The histories of sports history at various institutions and students had cookman in Florida. And I knew that those are really successful. Athletic programs and students came back with nothing. And so I've you know I just thought chalked up. Initially students being students that they just didn't do enough but when we both begin system. I realized there was a huge gap in the scholarship. And there's a Lotta work on sports. History is a lot of work on college sports especially college football but there was very little nearly nothing on historically black colleges And so at the time I was at Florida Atlantic in so I was like Bam. You is like right up the road. Well you know eight hours away from my house but I and I knew Jay. Gator was dominant. I'd heard these stories from my uncles and I knew he was a fantastic program so I did a research trip and I went up there and they have the archivists there. And the the library's at up in Florida were amazing and they gave me these materials in there. All these letters documents and so I had budgets and letters of professional teams and I begin to understand how he organized his football program because the issue is discussed our Pamela Day. That there wasn't a lot of research money. A lot of research recruiting money not money budgets. Within Coach Gate. There was the ad coach basketball at one point. And those things. I thought those kinds of stories and that the greatness that the success that he was able to produce was Willie Gallimore Kim. Rowley Bob Hayes. I wanted to understand how that was done. I didn't WANNA chalk it up to that. These were just natural athletes that there was something being done happening on these institutions in some coaches Were better than others and so I wanted to tell that story talk about. Integration Immigration had a positive effect but it also had a devastating effect on also African Americans going to the NFL right so an integration was boom for professional football. Right then you know one of the reasons that Jake was so able to be so successful especially early on in the forties and early fifties that many of his former players gather degrees and became teachers in the high schools. All across the State of Florida and North Georgia. And so he would. They would just send him letters. Like hey coach gay. Got This really. Good kid this Willie Gallimore guys pretty good right. Like this is how he got recruiting information was from his former players but those players were talented but there was no professional football opportunities and so when those opportunities really begin to open up a specially after nineteen sixty when the AFL comes in then professional football now creates a new opportunity for black colleges in small colleges in general and so that becomes this boom and on the backside that the course the civil rights movement is happening at this exact same time right so brown. V Board of Education. This is entire push to desegregate schools Whether the high school level colleges etc and so so many ways why colleges Kinda caught between their own. Their success right. They're producing these great players in the NFL. Minium all pros as we talked about earlier. Thirty two or in the NFL Hall of fame at the same time. There are new opportunities at Florida. Miami or Georgia and that these schools especially in the deep south are slowly trying to recruit them when you look back at the history of ACC using his contribution to to the NFL. I found it amazing and the one hundred year the League. There's very little that has been articulated about a SPEC- US or the early African American players and they and their celebration of the hundredth year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the you know for better for Worse College Football who celebrated his Hundred Fiftieth Year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries that kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of documentaries talking about the early game when the Ivy League dominated college football. Right you get that kind of Nfl is not so much

National Football League Football Florida Ivy Leagues Dominated College Derrick White Espn Astaldi Los Angeles Willie Gallimore Kim Ivy League Woody Strode America United States Rowley Bob Hayes League Willie Gallimore ACC Green Bay Packers
Jessie Redmon Fauset - Editor, Journalist, Poet, Author

This Day in History Class

3:08 listening | Last month

Jessie Redmon Fauset - Editor, Journalist, Poet, Author

"Day was April twenty-seventh eighteen eighty two Ryder Jesse. Redmond FO- set was born in Camden New Jersey. Fo- set was the literary editor of the Journal the crisis and an important figure in the Harlem Renaissance Jesse was the seventh child. Born to Redmond any faux set her mother died soon after she was born her father then moved to Philadelphia and married Bella Huff who had three of her own children together. Redmond and Bella had three more children Jesse graduated with honors from Philadelphia. High School for Girls Jesse got a scholarship to Cornell University where she majored in classical languages. She graduated from the University in Nineteen O Five. Because she was blacklisted he philadelphia would not hire her to teach in the public school system so she taught at Douglass High School in Baltimore for a year then she moved to Washington. Dc to teach French Latin at a high school for fourteen years before set began to write for the NWC PS magazine the crisis in nineteen twelve the ACP or the National Association for the Advancement of colored people is a civil rights organization that was formed in nineteen o nine and nineteen ten. The crisis was founded with W E B Two boys as the editor and Co founder published several short stories poems articles and book reviews in the crisis before she became literary editor of the Journal in Nineteen Nineteen. She moved to New York to take the position. And until nineteen twenty six. She took over a lot of do voices work at the crisis during her time there. She lectured in traveled around the

Literary Editor Journal In Nineteen Philadelphia Redmond High School Bella Huff Douglass High School Cornell University Camden New Jersey Harlem ACP DC Editor New York Baltimore Washington W E B Two Co Founder
Terry McMillan: I Love My Characters

Toure Show

9:39 listening | 3 weeks ago

Terry McMillan: I Love My Characters

"Terry. Mcmillan has been a friend of mine for years and talk is just like you'd expect she's fun and vibrant and a reverend and just keeps it real and says whatever she wants. She brought all that energy to this conversation about writing where she gets really deep about her process where she surrenders to her characters and really lets them come alive on the page until her who they are and what they WANNA do. This really inspired me as a writer. Maybe think about really wanting to focus on character on a deeper level Terry writes these deep indepth character profiles before she even starting let those inform the characters. She talks all about that stuff here. Look whether or not you love. Terry's work a lot of people do and she's got a lot that she can teach you about writing. Check out her new novel. It's all downhill from here. It's in stores everywhere already. And of course this is the Patriots era of Toray. Show so if you want to hear the whole episode with knee and Terry could a patron dot com slash. Toray show and support are growing team. There you get the full Wednesday episodes and Friday patriotic exclusives already. There's episodes there with people like Malcolm. Glad well Zizi Packer Morris. Day Little Yadi Neil degrasse Tyson and more for now. It's Terry McMillan on Toray. Show how are you? I'm trying to keep hope alive for lack of a better cliche. How is corona affecting you? Are you stuck in the house? What's going on no? I'm not stuck in the house I live in a sort of a condo on the sixth floor and in Pasadena. That'S A HIGH-RISE MOM. But fortunately one side of where I live. I can see the parking lot to my really high end garage grocery store so I know when all of the stuff is being delivered and I'm friends with the guy in there so I get to get it. I get paper towels and toilet paper and all that stuff put aside but I'm just I look out the window what I see trees. I'm fortunate that I feel like I can exterior at least walk. I'm glad I'm not in New York. I feel sorry for people in New York will sorry for your in California and there's a lot going on in California. Are you scared. I'm scared not just I'm not scared for me But I did just you know. Do my hands again. I live and breathe for anti bacterial products gloves. I do my door handle if somebody wants to deliver something. Don't touch my door handle It's you know people are being very very nice to each other That's what I really really appreciate and am grateful for but am I scared hell. Yeah I'm scared we're scared of. I'm scared I don't I don't trust strangers. I know the most insidious thing we can't trust our friends. My neighbor came up as she wants to know if she can have some coffee and I said Wash your hands but she was already starting to turn the water on. And I've got antibacterial everything everything all over this house and I've gotten to the point. I wash my hands by accident thinking. It was my antibacterial stuff they were lens cleaning white sperm eyeglasses. I'm I'm concerned about the bug right. Because in New York we're looking at potentially fifty to sixty to seventy percent of the city getting it some concerned about the bug getting into you know me or one of the members of my family. My Kids my wife who you all know but yeah I am more. I am perhaps even more concerned with the mass economic impact of the iceberg. That is happening. That is coming that is going to affect a gigantic portion of us and thus have an impact on almost all of us. Do you think about that part of it all. Of course you know. I'm I'm on a list all the places you can donate to during this time. I mean I just keep thank God for pay pal. I'm just I worry about people. No I worry about people who can't feed their kids who can't pay their rent. Who aren't going to get too stupid check from Donald and senators In time I just I mean I can't even imagine what it must be like and I I can't even I can't fathom it and you know I'm just I'm really scared and I'm also very pissed off. I'm very pissed off because this really shouldn't even have been necessary if Donald Trump and done what he was supposed to do and not using his instincts which obviously is Has none not to mention brains and thing that we have called Empathy if he had something remotely close to that where he could think about something other than himself and his properties in Wall Street. Maybe we wouldn't be disposition. No we wouldn't be in this position. Will I mean yes? I think there was a constant thought. Of what do I need to do to get reelected? And if I downplay the situation and make everybody think it's no big deal nothing to see here while the House is burning down It'll go away and they believe that Shit. They still do that stuff they do. His base believed it. Wait till they get sick. I'm one waiting so you got a new book coming out trying to skip the subject. No but I mean like I'm talking to me worked up I mean no but I was WanNa talk to you about your book. I mean okay. It's kind of exciting. It's it's it's kind of an event for a lot of people knew Terry McMillan book. It's a big deal Holland say all that I mean. Don't you see that in the world that there is? There is a large class of people who are Terry McMillan fans and they get very excited when new Terry McMillan novel comes out. Well I'm grateful. I'll put it that way. I'm quite grateful. I mean there's a lot of excitement more than I imagined. I just got something today from publishers. Weekly the top six books to read. I'm like what I didn't even think they liked me. When you're writing and you're alone. Writing conceiving the book do you hear the masses? Do you feel a pressure because you know. A large class of people. Critics editors readers are going to read the book. Just because your name is on the cover of like I don't know what it would be like to the be writing knowing all these people are going to be watching. Imagine that might be sort of paralyzing. Now I'm not thinking about my audience when I'm writing a book you can Chinese know first of all they are Emma House. They aren't in. My Life Depict characters that I'm writing about. That's who I care about. That's who I mean. I surrender to these people and I'm I'm more worried about what my character is feeling and thinking how he or she is going to act as a result of something that I basically created For them to have to deal with and I don't know the answers to it I put myself in their shoes and I just I'm hypnotized. I'd I do what they would do. Not what I would want them to do but I do. I do character profile. So I sorta no my characters personalities but I don't know everything that they will do at any given moment but I'm not let me just say this but first of all if I'm on page twenty six or three hundred twenty six I am not thinking. Gee What are the folks going to think when a read this?

Terry Mcmillan Terry. Mcmillan New York Toray Neil Degrasse Tyson Donald Trump Writer California Emma House Malcolm Pasadena Holland
Was Diddy right about forcing Joe Biden to have an agenda for Black people?

The Breakdown with Shaun King

8:35 listening | 3 weeks ago

Was Diddy right about forcing Joe Biden to have an agenda for Black people?

"You never really know who's going to shine during a pandemic during a crisis but A person in a voice that I think has really stepped up in a major way has been Naomi Campbell who has done some amazing interviews and And even just had some conversations herself about the pandemic about politics and Of course I mean she is a woman who's traveled and seeing the entire world but she's just been brilliant throughout the pandemic with just deep insights and thoughts and yesterday she had a conversation with diddy and apart of that conversation was about the presidential race and did he gave his thoughts on it. And I want to play that clip for you now. Black born is now going to be for free. We're going to have to see some promises. What are we in return for? I'll quote nothing has changed for Black America and in order for us to vote for biding. We can't be taken for granted like we always because we're supposed to be Democrats off because people are afraid and trump so I was going to take him out. Community level was to make a deal. This is business at this point. You know we can't truth follow. Titians you know so. We WanNa know very clearly just like trump made it clear that he wanted to build the wall vitamins to make clear that he's GonNa Change Lives in quality of life of black and Brown people else. He can't get the boat. I will hold a vote hostage. Ivine now. I saw and heard that clip earlier this morning when my friend. Sholom in God. He posted it and he posted a loan. Caption if you go to my instagram now or Charlemagne's Instagram I reposted Charlemagne's caption where you could just go to Charlemagne's page and check it out for yourself. I agree with everything they did. He said they're like I. I would say it even stronger. I think it's it's ridiculous to say otherwise but it's a bit of a roar test Which wish if the ink blood tests where you Somebody shows you ink blots and you tell them what you see I heard what did he said. It was like Yep. That's right we need to make sure that Joe Biden actually has an agenda for us and I I heard that and I'm like yeah of course. What other scenario are we saying that we don't care if Joe Biden has an agenda for us because what did he is saying is true? Black people almost exclusively put Joe Biden in the position. He's in right now and he doesn't come close to winning. The presidential election in November without the black vote and all saying is. Hey we need to let him know. Hey if you actually in real life want us to show up and vote for you like in a major way if you want us to put you over the top talk to US clearly about your agenda show us the policies show us the plans show us the strategies instead of just saying that you're going to be different than trump or that. You're better than trump. Can WE BE PRACTICAL. Can you talk to us about your economic policies? Can you talk to us about your justice policies? Can you talk to us about your healthcare community development policies? Can You? Can you speak on these things? And I see several of my friends including Kenny Burns who? I'm doing an interview with later this afternoon saying. Hey Hey that's reckless asked my brother Isaac as the third also posting. Hey everything they did. He said right. There was completely wrong and I was shocked because everything I heard in everything charlemagne heard and and I see many of you even on my instagram debating. It right now. I agree with every bit of it. It's outrageous I mean if it's a city council person if it's a local mayor if it's if it's a state representative if somebody for Congress we should always require of them that they have an agenda that as much as we can make it is binding that they have some type of binding commitment to our concerns and other people are saying no no no. No No. Don't say that. Don't say that you just need to vote for Joe Biden no matter what. And here's the thing. Black folks are gonNA show up and vote for Joe Biden Black Folk vote almost ninety five percent for the Democratic candidate and black folk will show up. But what we know in Michigan in Wisconsin in a place like Georgia Florida North Carolina and others. Is that if you actually want to win? Black folk have to go all out and we saw that in two thousand and eight and two thousand twelve of course with Barack Obama but black folk while black folks showed up to vote in huge numbers for Hillary Clinton in any place where the turn out was depressed even a little bit in in Milwaukee in Wisconsin or in Michigan. She lost. And it's okay for us to say to Democratic candidates to democratic nominees. And let's be real as I record this. It's still April. Were still in the primary. It's okay in April to say. Hey Joe Biden I wanna make sure you actually have an agenda for US okay. Like that's not an let's be real did he is not making threat. He is saying that we all deserve to have a presidential candidate. That has an agenda that actually represents our needs. Our concerns are our biggest issues and that they have to have a plan. And we wanna see it because what we've seen for most of our lives is presidential candidates who desperately rely on our vote but have no agenda for us have no plans for us. They plan on being generally nice. But we need something more than general nicety like we need people that have an actual policy agenda for the concerns and issues that we have and I'm grateful For diddy who didn't say. Hey I'm not voting for Joe Biden he just said Hey We're at the stage. In American history where the Democratic candidate needs to have a serious agenda for black folk and anybody who looks at this situation says otherwise is ridiculous and I see other people saying. Hey He's saying that from a place of privilege I don't I don't understand that. No He's saying it from a position of authority of somebody who generally doesn't go into making a deal with somebody unless the deal is good for everybody in what we want to understand is HBO. We're GONNA make this deal with you. Not only where you are the Democratic nominee but where we go all out to make sure you win the race. Exactly what are you going to do? And if that's a problem for you saying something like that then we need to have a big conversation like we need to go deeper if saying that much Riles you up. And gets you frustrated? Then you have probably been eating crumbs under the table for so long that you are used to people over promising and under delivering. You're used to not getting anything like the U. S. just the standard and so I see a lot of what I think are just outrageous. Criticisms of what he said I think people understandably so so badly want to defeat Donald trump that they are afraid to even ask Joe Biden for favor and is lying. No no we can do. Both we can defeat Donald Trump and in April still argue that they are some things. Joe Biden needs to do and do differently for him to garner our full support.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Black America Diddy Charlemagne Naomi Campbell United States Instagram Kenny Burns Isaac Sholom Congress Barack Obama Riles State Representative HBO
Building Your Coping Kit

Therapy for Black Girls

4:28 listening | Last month

Building Your Coping Kit

"Last week's three for Thursday chat. I talked about how to manage dealing with the break-up in the midst of Cova eighteen one of the strategies I talked about was building a coping kit and I thought it would be great to share more information about that here on the podcast. So the basic idea behind coping kid is having a collection of things all together in one. Police that can be useful to you when you're feeling overwhelmed by emotions and needs some ways to distract yourself when I do this exercise with clients as typically suggest they other purchase a nice decorative box or spend some time decorating and beautifying a box that you already have at home decorating the box can actually be a really meaningful and fun part of the process. The purpose of having the box is so that all of the items in your coping kit will be together in one easily accessible place. It's also important to note. That is probably most helpful if you build your kid before you really need it so that it's there for you when you do now that we have boxall. Taking care of here are a few things you might want to include in it number one a journal. You've likely heard both myself and guests on the podcast discuss how helpful it can be to have a journal to write down how you're feeling in any given moment it's especially helpful in tracking any patterns that might exist in your feelings and can't give you information about potential triggers. That might need to be attended to. I want you to try hard. Not to approach the Journal as an academic assignment. It's not at all supposed to be that. Feel free to write in bullets. Draw pictures whatever helps you to get on paper. What's currently happening for you? The second thing you might WanNa including your box is some kind of puzzle or puzzle book something like a Word Search Book. Maybe a collection of crossword puzzles are other brain. Teases that you've enjoyed in the past your coping. Kid is not the time where you WANNA try some kind of puzzle that you've never done before that will leave you feeling frustrated and upset. That's not at all what we're going for here. You want to include some kind of puzzle like activity that you've enjoyed in the past and might enjoy doing again. The third thing I would including your coping. Kit is something that you can hold in your hand so maybe something like a stress relief ball some silly putty or some Plato. Having something that is tactile that engages your sense of touch can be really helpful in grounding you in the moment the fourth thing you might wanNA including your coping. Kit is a playlist of your favorite soanes. Our podcast episodes that has typically made you laugh or made you feel good in the past it will be helpful to go ahead and make the playlist on your phone or whatever device you typically listen on and then just have an index card in your box that reminds you to play your playlist and then the fifth thing that you might want including your coping kid is a list of shows you like to watch or rewatch or a list of books. You'd like to read again. You can use an index card to write out the list of shows are you can add them to a Q. On your favorite streaming service and just have the index car there to remind you of the list. You might also buy copies of certain books that you know you'd really enjoy and save those just for your coping kit. That way you know you'll be engaged and it's almost like a treat you forget you giving yourself some other things you might. WanNa consider adding to your coping kit or candles or lotions in your favorite since old pitchers that help you to recall. A happy or fond memories are a collection of quos or prayers. That have been helpful to you in the past again. The idea is to make this a collection of things that will help you to be distracted and engaged in something else so that your thoughts feelings are less overwhelming for you. If you're able to engage in one or all of these activities usually you will have given yourself enough time to allow the intensity of whatever you were experiencing to come down a little

Journal Cova WAN
Lowkey Unaware

Therapy for Black Girls

9:31 listening | Last month

Lowkey Unaware

"Finally the moment that many of us have been waiting for has arrived. Insecure is back for season. Four and right Outta the gate. They're already given us tons to talk about so. Of course I had to grab my friend and colleague. Dr Donna Oreo to chat all about what we saw. In this season Premier Dr Oriole will is an author. International Speaker and certified sex and relationship therapist in the Washington. Dc Metro area. The owner of nod right back to Donna's specializes in working with black women on issues related to color ISM and texture ISM and its impact on mental and sexual health. She's the author of cocoa butter and hair grease a self love journey through hair and skin. She's an advocate for sexual freedom self love acceptance and accomplishment for women of Color especially black women. She collects inspiring quotes eats donuts and loves pasta. She and I chatted all about the opportunities that were missed half them difficult but necessary conversations in this episode. Why brutal honesty doesn't work why it's important to have tough conversations even if they're super awkward and she gives us a beautiful script for anyone who needs to have the. What are we conversation? If you hear anything that resonates with you well listening. Please be sure to share with us on social media using the HASHTAG G in session. He is our conversation. We're talking about ISA's girls dead has seemingly happened. Even though she has not been therapy. Molly has been there is yes. I mean the way that she was able to communicate with. Tsa May like this position is not working. This is not working now. I would be remiss if I point out that you definitely kept going. Follow bit before He. He did what she had to say. A switch things up good. I mean aside from that whole consent. Error has that is an era inconsistent. I would be remiss if I didn't say one of my clients was talking about. How can you keep going? If somebody's saying that consent is actually a whole body. Ya Not just keep going. But a full body we. I'm in this urine as lesbian this piece together. Sorta space but for me. It was more about easier than anything. She was able to open her mouth. And say you know what this can. We switch not a couple of seasons ago. She might not have had that conversation now. She kept those feelings toward self. Yeah Yeah so okay. So let's get into the episode and we would just kind of see how it flows right So I really. There are just so much to unpack so we have is season premiere season four premiere of insecure. Which you know we all. We're waiting for all right and so I like the over. Arching theme for a lot of this episode was really difficult conversations. That people either did not have or did not have will. What are your thoughts? Oh yeah the communication was way off. I just like Ooh some of the stuff was those difficult conversations that needed to happen but happy kind of awkwardly but at the same time I was commending on even having an awkward conversation because I feel like Isa impacts you just aboard it. Whatever she could avoid you would have done that. That is such a good point. Oriole right like this idea. That conversations aren't always going to be perfect right and as much as we script in our own head and think okay. I'm GonNa say this and I'm saying it's against eighties right. Never actually plays out in real life but an awkward conversation in the interest of getting our feelings hurt being able to put things on. The table is still better than no conversation at all absolutely. Yeah I think that oftentimes we don't we don't necessarily as yet just because conversation is difficult just because it feels awkward because of bills a little off as being that we are still doing our stuff to make sure that we're having the conversation in the first place. Wherever the conversation comes out a dislike I'm a Cremona had the compensation and see what happens later. Then don't have the conversation at all as you did. So what are some things that you think that? Make it difficult for us to even engage in conversations. Well one that I have noticed and do my class test this is we have so much anxiety. About how the other persons were never sees it that instead of saying the thing that we need to say we say what we think we need say in order for them to better understand what we are trying to say was me in reality. We didn't say not. And this is where I redirect people. You gotta say in our asshole. I mean you're an asshole. Asshole is going to say it exactly the way that it needs to be state saying so like sometimes we're not saying it to the person sometimes we are is the. What is my main thing here? Main thing here. Is that your hurtful for. I don't like is that well. You know when you say this you know And then I was just thinking like Ooh that could meet now now. Now no say what you asshole write it down. What was the thing that you really need to say? You harm me with your words. That's what you really needed to say. So right now like you are asshole when you talk to me now lipid make it cleaner make it something that if someone told you you could hear it. Usually is statements wherever possible. I feel like this when this happens. It gives you opportunity to say what you actually need. The say is that a China interpret how they're gonna pay but you got so see I. I definitely want to stay here for a moment because I feel like this is what especially when we look at this episode right. I think this is kind of would a part of Mali's issue is right like this whole inner asshole so to speak and as high as other asshole right speaking no place her own insecurity. So you're advocating though maybe getting some of those thoughts out on paper before you actually have the conversation to make sure that it is in his purest form but there there is still a way to communicate with people that does not necessarily come across abrasive. Exactly as it's really about even more than being about having a conversation that needs to be had just like that. It's also about certain level of self awareness. Molly laxness Because if she was software especially toward the end of the episode talking about life is messy. Who's that sir? How does that for it? Doesn't I'm the best not constructive criticism? That's not constructed either back you'll life is messy. Ucla does it have to be this mess. I'm just an in. Where in here did you think this was supposed to be something that was helpful right and I think the other piece of that of course was concerning. Was the timing right like even if that was a conversation that you feel like you needed to have with. Isa Did it need to be this night. Where she's like on a cloud and she's really proud of herself or you know pulling off the mixer and you know feeling like okay. I'm really stepping into this thing. And now you have this conversation with her completely like dibs are like Yep math one of those moments like you gotTa Pause Boo. Who Does the serve as honestly molly? It's funny because I listened you send Jill off And I talked to. Who and Yvonne Yvonne or D. They both talk about like how Nigerians could be so rogo in their honesty. And I'm just like you know what is true in a problematic as as fellow Nigerian. I can say that. That is problematic because brutal. Honesty doesn't actually serve anybody. Brutal honesty honestly seems to be more about one person's hurt ego pride or the need to feel better than somebody else by bringing them down by telling the truth as harshly as possible. Right there is a way to be honest with your loved ones in people that you care about debt does not have to be brutal. Exactly because brutality does not necessarily bring growth as brain is defensiveness bring is distance and those things that you are trying to achieve attack conversation that you're happy but I'll go out on a limb saying that your brutal honesty is unnecessary and probably needs to be more compassionate honesty loving honesty friendship based honesty and none of those things would be brutal

Molly Laxness ISA Dr Donna Oreo Dr Oriole ISM International Speaker Washington Yvonne Yvonne TSA Ucla Jill Cremona Mali China
Is police brutality legal?

The Breakdown with Shaun King

9:52 listening | Last month

Is police brutality legal?

"In nineteen eighty four a middle aged black man who worked for the North Carolina Department of Transportation named the Thorn Graham. He noticed that he was lightheaded. It experienced this exact feeling before he was a diabetic. And he was on the verge of an insulin attack but this time he wasn't at home he was riding in the car with a friend of his CO worker William Berry Engram knew that William didn't stop somewhere to get him some orange juice to balance out his blood sugar levels. Graham knew that he was going to pass out. So William pulled the car over and a random gas station in Charlotte to get Graham. Some orange juice Graham got out of the car walked into the gas station grabbed himself. A small bottle of orange juice prepared to purchase it. Then he noticed. The line was long so instead of purchasing the orange juice graham sat the orange juice on the top of the shelf. There in the gas station ran back out to the car and just asked his buddy to hurry up and take him home and stay as you may have noticed. No crime was committed. He didn't steal the orange juice. Nobody was harmed and at this point. We just have a friend trying to help a friend through a medical emergency but this is America and in the parking lot of that gas station was a Charlotte police officer. Connor remember the Supreme Court case. It's Graham versus conner in officer Connor. Who was white. Didn't think the what he saw was harmless at all when he saw a black man going to that store and come back out of the store without anything in his hands. Connor was convinced that he had just witnessed an armed robbery. The Graham didn't have a gun. You can have a bag of cash. He was just black and connor. Didn't like the way Graham walked in and out of the store so Graham got in the passenger side seat of the car asked his friend to leave and they pulled off to be clear and I just have to say this. They didn't peel out their tires. They didn't break the speed limit. William Berry just backed his car out of the parking lot and began driving Graham home but officer. Connor convinced that he had just witnessed two black men. Rob a gas station followed them in his squad car turned on his flashing police lights and proceeded to pull them over and they put over when. Connor got to the driver's side window. William Barrett calmly told him that his friend Thorn. Graham was about to pass out because of his diabetes and that he desperately needed some orange juice unconvinced that black people even had medical emergencies officer. Connor decided it's actually he who was in grave danger so he goes back to his car in calls for emergency. Backup mind you. They didn't threaten him but he believed they had just robbed a convenience store. And we're lying about it and guess what happens. Graham literally gets out of the car in passes out right there on the road desperate wondering if his friend might die William Berry begs connor and the new cops who arrived on the scene. He begs those cops to simply give his friends some orange juice. Give him some sugar anything to help him with Graham fully unconscious and this is it's ridiculous story with Graham fully unconscious in all of this. All Supreme Court records the officers instead tightly handcuff grams hands behind his back in literally. Throw him onto the hood of his car while he's unconscious the other than proceed to laugh and insist that grandma's faking the whole thing and another officer insisted that Graham didn't even have diabetes but was drunk and told everybody there. I've SEEN PEOPLE WITH DIABETES. And they don't act like this furious at Graham. Another officer literally slammed grams head onto the car. Which momentarily brought Graham back to consciousness. Graham hardly awake then begged the officers to simply look in his back pocket where he kept a medical card stating that he had diabetes. The officers refused instead with his arms cuffed behind his back. The officers through Graham into the back of the police car head. I in slam the door on him. A bystander offered Graham orange juice but the officers refused to give it to him. Finally one of the COPS decides to go back to the gas station to ask the staff about the armed robbery. That just took place and of course. The station attendant was confused. The line was still long and no type robbery had ever taken place and guess what was right there on the shelf grams. Orange juice no robbery happened. No crime no mischief. Nothing where police could have actually helped desperate man to a medical emergency. They instead imagined a series of crimes and they brutalized a man. Who could have really really used their help. At that point it would have made a lot of sense for those officers to take to Thorn Graham directly to the hospital. He was now completely unconscious in the back of their car but instead of taking him to the hospital they literally took him home in dumped his listless body in his own front yard when Graham woke up completely confused and battered. His foot was broken. His rotator cuff torn on his left. Shoulder cuts were all over. His wrists from the cuffs in his forehead was badly bruised from being onto the COP CAR. Police had literally just racially profiled a black man for a crime. He didn't commit ignored. His medical emergency brutally beat him then dumped him in his own front yard instead of taking him to the hospital presumably because they would have had to explain to the doctors and nurses how Graham got so injured so they're bright idea was to dump his battered body off in his own front yard and just leave him there he could have died. So of course thorn. Graham sued the city. He sued the Police Department and he sued the officers. Who did this to him? Of course he did. Of course he demanded that the officers who brutalized him be fired. But in this probably comes as no surprise to you Charlotte in North Carolina fought back. The police fought back locally and then in district courts until the case eventually went all the way to the Supreme Court in that Supreme Court Decision Graham versus conner which took place now thirty years ago in nineteen eighty nine has absolutely everything to do with. Wyatt is nearly impossible to hold police responsible for police brutality. Today let me break down that decision. Bring it back down. I believe that Graham versus conner is one of the worst decisions in the modern is through the Supreme Court of the United States. What Thorn Graham experienced was so brutal so racist so unreasonable and excessive. That the idea that any court could look at what happened to him and decide that it was legal that the Supreme Court could look at that and decide that it was justified is in and of itself unjust. But let me break it down. The Supreme Court in Graham versus conner determined that quote the reasonable use of force by any officer must be viewed from the perspective of what appeared reasonable in the moment of. It's application not from twenty twenty hindsight and so the Supreme Court. Let me make sense of this. So the Supreme Court ruled that of all the ways. The cops brutalized thorn. Graham an unarmed non-violent middle aged black man who broke no laws was in desperate need of medical attention. The Supreme Court ruled that cops cannot be held responsible for truth they did not know in the moment in other words because the cops believed that. Thorne Graham had just committed a violent armed robbery because another cop believed that he was drunk and lying to them. Even though those things were completely false because cops believe them. Cops cannot be held responsible for the actual truth. They can only be held responsible for what they believed in the moment. And the judges ruled that the cops believing the Thorn Graham to be a violent drunk non-cooperative felon had the right to brutalize him

Thorn Graham Officer Graham Supreme Court Connor Thorne Graham Diabetes Charlotte Robbery North Carolina Department Of T Conner William Berry William Berry Engram Police Department William
All About Virtual Therapy

Therapy for Black Girls

9:48 listening | Last month

All About Virtual Therapy

"Thanks so much for joining me for session. One fifth of the therapy for black girls podcast as many people are now beginning to work with their therapist. Virtually a might be looking so work with the therapist for the first time it will be meeting with them. Virtually I thought it'd be a great time to rewind and share this interview. I did with Melissa Douglas again as she has been providing virtual services in her Saint Louis Practice for the past couple of years. Melissa is the owner of goal driven counseling a private Tele Mental Health counseling practice where she supports teens and millennials challenging educational career and life transitions through secure videoconferencing. She's a native of Chicago Illinois but has called St Louis Missouri home for almost a decade. She's a proud Triton who received a best of social work degree master of social work degreen and also as a ticket in nonprofit management in leadership from the University of Missouri Saint Louis. She's a licensed clinical social worker and a distance credentialed counselor who has diverse volunteer work experience with us in juvenile detention community based and educational settings. Melissa and I discussed some of the differences between traditional in virtual therapy. How you can decide if it's right for you how to find a virtual therapist and she shared all of her favorite APPs for Mensa weld is if you hear something that resonates with you are listening. Please share with us on social media using the HASHTAG. Tgi In session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Listen thank you for having me Dr Joy. I'm very happy you were able to join us today. Because I know there have been a lot of questions about people looking Virgil at therapy or if they live like in a town that's further from a big city and they're not like a lot of therapists they're people are wanting to know do therapist offer virtual action so. I know that you have a completely online practice and this way correct. Yes so you are the perfect person to talk with us about some of these concerns so I can you tell us a little bit. About what virtual therapy is and how? It might be different from traditional therapy. Yes so it's very basic in so we're gonNA talk about has basically tele mental health and virtual therapy because there's a whole other section of just telemedicine that covers a lot of different professionals by talents evolve. Israeli when the clinician and the client are in different physical locations using technology to communicate pretty much and so it's referred to eat therapy virtual therapy online therapy distance counseling. And what I tell. Clients is Dora virtual counseling or virtual therapy sessions. We can do almost everything other than I can't handle a tissue if you start to cry at a time and I can't be a physical support in a crisis but because I use all video and actual platform designed for telehealth. It helps me to have the same relationship report to be developed and the resources to be used. Because I can share my screen. With people's we can work through resources things together in actually see worksheets and stuff like that. I can have more than one person in a session with me. So couples counseling family. Counseling can be just the same as as traditional therapy but when you talk about Tele Mental Health. There are other options other than video. So you have phone counseling as well as a synchronous methods. Such as email and text based counseling. And so all that means is that you there are not live communicating. So you may send a message and you have to wait until the counseling therapists can respond to that. And then you go back and forth that way. And so with those methods there has to be a comfort with communicating fillings in POPs in a in a written format but the largest difference. Is that the responsibility of ensuring privacy of the session is a little bit more shifted to the client because they're in their own space but I always share that tell them will help isn't better or superior methods to traditional counseling. It's really all about appropriateness and our preference so it sounds like it is very similar to coming into the Office for therapy except that you might be in your home. Like in Pajama Bottoms. So what kind of feedback have you gotten from your clients? Melissa about whether be you know like like it better or worse than traditional therapy. Like what kind of feedback have you gotten so again like I said it's all about preference but I received a lot of great from our clients because again because I use the video base we really are able to establish the same relationship and report because we can still see and feel each other's personality we can hear the to- now with the end we can see affect from each other and so it's a little bit more van just communicating written format? And so we're able to really Bill at relationship. They also enjoy the flexibility. It allows in their schedules as well as the convenience of just having to log on. And I'm right there. They don't have to travel or really fit it into their schedule. In addition to travel and things like that but I always share with people who are a little bit unsure about telehealth. Because you know honestly it's it's still a fairly new thing. It's been around for about thirty years and we talk about the telemedicine space but for Tele mental health. I think it's gaining more traction in the last ten years more visibility and so. I always tell people that it's been researched for effectiveness in solid in the early two thousands. There were a lot of different studies but a couple that I like. I like to share is added. Two thousand one. A study was conducted by the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University. Here in Saint Louis. So patients quickly adapt and establish report because the basics of relationship building. Is there with telehealth? And then there was another one another study done in two thousand five by a psychologist from northwestern university who conducted trials that show that clients living with depression tended to stay in counseling longer and saw a larger reduction in symptoms by participating on counseling. And so I like people to know that. There is research back to the effectiveness of elements of health and virtual. Yeah I mean and I'm glad you brought that up right. Because that he is I think another benefit of virtual therapy is you know sometimes one of the more significant symptoms of depression is like not wanting to move and not wanting to leave your house so if you can talk with your therapist via you know your laptop or your tablet then you can still participate in treatment in you know may receive some benefits from the treatment that you wouldn't have if you stayed home. Yeah absolutely as well as the social anxiety is as well and we know that. That's the largest mental health illness in the world and so police will stay in the US and so that's also a great benefit as well. And I think it is important for us to mention that this is not jumping on facetime with your therapist right so it's not like your therapist will just facetime call you and you just answer. These are very are at least therapist should be using hippo compliant software and platforms that will increase the security of the session. Correct absolutely yes. Yeah so there are precautions that your therapist should be taking but like you mentioned you know like if you decide to have your session and you know your partner is like right next to you. Then you're compromising you're all confidentiality but your therapist is taking the repercussions. They need to make sure the session is. Yes absolutely. You got you okay. So what kinds of consideration should somebody consider if they're thinking about virtual therapy like what kinds of things might be WANNA think about? Yes so I always say that. The virtual therapy is the method in which we're doing the actual therapy. You definitely want to consider the expertise of the clinician if their focus is what you need and saw. You WanNa make sure that that the actual option is not the main thing that the person if you're experiencing depression or anxiety that that actual clinician that's offering the virtual therapy specializes in those things. Another huge thing because of the the lack of geographical barriers would tell them it's a health. We WanNa make sure that the commission has licensed in the state that you resign him because legally required men. So that's a misconception that a lot of people have is that because we give us our phones or computers and things like that that we can work with anybody and that's not true. Also I tell people to do a real self assessment and consider if they would be comfortable sansom on from a distance the end because the confident the impact of separate therapeutic space is really important to some people in Psalm as well as thinking about if you have a support person that is is nearing assessable if there is ever an emergency situation and so that's not something that was mentioned yet but emergency planning. It's something that is very important when it comes to tell them health because if a client were to experience at some time some suicidal thoughts or things like that there has to be an emergency management plan in place that that usually includes a emergency support person near the town of triage. That with the therapist in the end client should be feel free to access their tele mental health therapist or counselor has completed any chiming in so some states required in Psalm. Donning in you also share that you know it's not just jumping on facetime call. Any really really speaks to the clinician operating in their areas of competence. Which is a a safeguard for the client and the client should be comfortable and aware of talking about that with the clinician. Yeah and like you said all the states don't require it but you know it does feel like most therapist who are doing significant amount of virtual. Therapy are tele. Mental Health have completed at least some like trainings in maybe even some additional certifications. Yes yeah so. Can you talk a little bit more about the emergency planning because I know that that is something that often comes up and I think something that you know frightened some therapists away from maybe wanting to do elements? Health is like okay. We'll do I do in case of an emergency. So can you talk a little bit about with their processes like with you? And your clients. Yes so assessment of fit is very important so when a client contacts me for consultation. We're having that initial call. I'm usually doing a brief assessment at that time and so I'm assessing if they are at high risk of currently having suicidal thoughts or have had a plan or intent also assessing for any homicide Any active substance use Any delusions around technology and so that means some people experience thoughts and things that someone is spying on their computer things like that. So that wouldn't be comfortable in a therapeutic face if that's some concerns as well as some complex traumas in some those are some things that I quickly assess floor in consultation with also the assessment phase and so with the emergency planning share with clients that if any safety issue were to come up and we'll just speak about the the suicidal thoughts and things like that. If that was ever be concerned that I definitely openly share with them. That is my ethical responsibility to call the police to do a wellness check and things like that but I also wanted to be a little bit more comfortable for them too so we talk about any support people that they have in their life that has click access to them. And so if it is a spouse work is a parent that they would give me permission to disclose and contact them and say that. I am their therapist in Bay are having a very hard time right now and if they could check on them. I remain on the phone or in a session with my client during that time but then I also triage with the support. Person is what okay so it is very similar to what you would do if you were meeting with the person in your office absolutely but unfortunately they have the ability to hang up and disconnect right thank you know they have the Leave your office. Like I've had clients that leave. You know like just abruptly into session if you know things are not going the way they want us something. So they're still option even in real life. That's true yeah so Melissa does insurance. Pay For ritual therapy yes. There are many insurance companies that pay for virtual usually equivalents of the cost traditional but it varies state to state and it also varies between insurance companies as well and so I always tell people the best thing to do is to contact their ensure to ask about the the details of their specific plans. Okay Okay and so if that is something that is going to be like a priority like if using your insurance

Melissa Douglas Tele Mental Health Tele Mental Health Counseling Chicago Illinois University Of Missouri Saint L Saint Louis St Louis Missouri Depression Mental Health United States Pajama Bottoms Facetime Virgil Dr Joy Bill
Keisha Holmes - The Woman Behind Curvy

The Chenese Lewis Show

8:11 listening | 2 months ago

Keisha Holmes - The Woman Behind Curvy

"Welcome Kishan to the show. Hi Hi hey it's been so long how are you? I'm good. How are you thank you for talking to me? I know you've had a busy day to day already Then a really busy day We're really really excited about you. Know People You know the excitement about being able to to to be safe and we were happy to heed the call of the mayor here in Los Angeles to Get the fashion industry. You know to us all together and You know to start making mask which we were doing ahead of time but you know it's nice that when they you know they heeded the call. We were like we're right here prepared so we turned our warehouse from making apparel into medical masks. And we're working on hospital gallons as well. Oh yeah yeah so. We're getting that up and running but it's coming okay. Now let's start talking about a little bit about you first so you started your career and bashing twenty eight years ago. Tell us how you got started in fashion. Well I mean when I say that out loud. I'm like wow how old am I? It flew by. You know I had a you know just I had come home from summer camp. I was working at a summer camp and I was like you know eighteen years old and I was looking for a job. My neighbor was the manager of the Frederick's of Hollywood store in In one of our local malls here the pointy hills mall and she says hey. I'm looking for some holiday. Help you know if you need a part time job until you kind of figure out what you WANNA do. I knew it was gonna be starting college soon. I was one of those kids who knew I wanted to go to school and go to college but I had not settled on a career. I thought I was going to go into social work. Or you know something you know. Admirable like that and Once I started working in the retail store I kind of found my calling like I fell in love with fashion and I you know looked up to see like how is this a career. What do I do? And I enrolled in the fashion program and Mount Sack Mount San Antonio College here and I worked and went to school. Got My college degree and kind of worked my way through the company into the buying office and I mean you know it's all uphill from there so it's it's been a nice little journey from laundry to you know it's a clothings kids close to and then I started When I was at Frederick's a really make sure that that plus size customer was spoken to so making sure that I worked directly with the buzz when I was on the sales floor of having enough plus size merchandise on the floor and then when I went into the buying office like plus I just became like you know my baby of making sure we had all the right size bras and underwear and every single item that you know we were purchasing came in plus sizes so we had a wonderful collection of plus size lingerie In in the on the floor because you know women of all sizes WanNa feel sexy and It was it was a nice journey into into you know making sure that all women were color covered and felt beautiful. Also now when I first met you you were working at Torrey in the corporate office tour and then from from torrid you went on to forever twenty one but I did not know you helped launch the plus size division F- forever twenty one. Tell me about that experience yet. That was a fun little You ever like gone to work one day and you did one job and then the very next day you were doing something else. So that's kind of how that started. I went to forever twenty one. I went to work with My friend Hannah who I worked with that. Frederick's she was there and we were on the ECOMMERCE TEAM. We were on the very beginning side of When they were launching the website so we were the ECOMMERCE buyers sort of liaison between e commerce and the rest of the buying team. And you know we scheduled all the photo shoots and made sure all the product was there and you know we did special buys for just the website and then one day Mrs. Shang came to the two of us and she said whatever you're doing right now. You're not going to do that job anymore. She says we're finally ready. We have been talking about it for a while but she keeps saying we're not ready or not ready. Finally one day she said. I think we're ready. You guys are going to plus sizes and that's it so that very day ECOMMERCE was not her thing anymore. We called every vendor that we knew we talked to the design team we worked with the other buyers and we started pulling you know pulling samples and pulling a collection together and We launched maybe a couple of months later at the most. And that was that was definitely journey of starting from scratch out of nowhere to pull this customer together and to To launch a plus size division within forever twenty one who had been around since nineteen eighty four and was just now at that point to be ready for plus as in two thousand nine now. How did you transition from forever? Twenty one to Kirby Center so I mean as you everybody kind of knows forever was going through a transition and I was on the beginning In the beginning wave of a layoff and so once I was laid off. You know I was trying to figure out what I wanted to do next. I knew I didn't want to just head straight back into another buying office for retailers. I wanted to you know. Use My skills to try to you. Know find something special and you know what they say. Be careful what you pray for so you know those doors kind of kicked what wide open and I was approached by a former sales. Rep that That I worked with that. I work for this company and said that they were looking for somebody to launch an e commerce. Plus I've website and they sought me out and so I came in and spoke to the owner of the company who I used to purchase. Um from what I was the buyer and they have everything ready right here and I was going to spearhead this this new launch of this new website right here and it was great. We have an in house designer. Her name is Michelle and she's fantastic. And we have sewers and cutters and to be able to watch something ourselves right here and kind of oversee merchandising from from the very beginning from fabric ordering cutting patterns to have it launched. We shoot here. Everything is done right here in our in our building here in the city of commerce. So it's been a great transition because I felt like I was really being able to. Finally you know kind of spearhead kind of my own thing and all sense of what it was from our experience of what you and I know that you know back when I first met you. You know you knew sort of sort of our struggles at forever as you know really trying to identify that customer trying to get people are sort of on board with what we know plus women to be but of course. There's girl my whole life so to try to get people to understand like who she is. She goes everywhere. She has multiple occasions. She's you know she's she's the same as a smaller girl. Just as fancy just as fantastic and you know. She embraces her body. We're not scared of our bodies and if we are we kind of learn to you know to embrace who we have. It's kind of hard to teach people that stuff when it's already being read in you so to be able to. You know kind of start. That sort of you know How would I say like the attitude of who this girl is and not have to convince somebody like was great from Day One? We knew who she was she was going to be. You know just as fantastic woman who has a million places to go and it's been a great journey.

Frederick Los Angeles San Antonio College Mount Sack Hollywood Michelle Torrey Mrs. Shang Wanna Hannah Kirby Center
Author Colson Whitehead on 'The Underground Railroad'

The Book Review

8:32 listening | 2 months ago

Author Colson Whitehead on 'The Underground Railroad'

"Colson. Whitehead's new novel. The underground railroad is already making a mark as a work of fiction that combines history and metaphor telling a story about slavery in America in new and surprising ways whitehead is the author of many books including zone one and Sag harbor and he's also received a macarthur genius grant and many other awards Colson. Thanks so much for being here. Shurmur pleasure so this is not your first novel. Obviously but how many novels have you written? And the last one was about poker this is my sixth and I have to nonfiction and last nonfiction was about Playing the world series of poker and having to bone up on a game and and trained for a couple of weeks and crash course in order to play at the annual big game that was the no Hustle Noble Hustle. Yeah so how did you get from the Noble Hustle to the underground railroad? I'm always sick. Like whatever style is working in on the book and the last book was first person a lot of jokes. I saw it as a humor book. That's tried to cram as many weird jokes in as I could With the underground railroad. Well it's fiction. Try to have humor in my books but obviously you can't really have as many jokes for page in a book that slavery so that so that was good. My last couple of novels had a ton of black dudes walking around thinking about things and it seemed Have a female protagonist and mix it up and never explored a mother daughter relationship before so it seemed good for me to break out of sort of a mode. I'd been did part of the idea of this scary you to brighten the voice of a woman example multiple her. I mean I think That's your job. I mean. It's Nice if people say oh you got a female characters voice and I just think well. That's what you signed up on when you pick the book and said as female character like if you have a plumber and Drain you go. Wow you were the UNCLOG that drain. That's why you call them and That's why he did it. So it was hard to tackle slavery and get into the Research and really contemplate and immerse myself in the horror. Hadn't only people walk around thinking about slavery in a deep way all the time and Obviously exposed to route. I was very young and studied it in college but I had immersed myself in slave narratives and a very long time and now that I'm older you know affects me more than it did when I was a teenager in my early twenty s and so I'm realizing how much the true ours was not to submit my protagonist in her companions to Dante and terrifying. It also seems that I mean we're roughly the same age that depictions of slavery obviously there was roots and there was a beloved but in the last decade or so have almost reexamined it and in a way that's a lot more fearless and visceral and that you're kind of fits in well with that Well I think You know taking liberties with historical record. I mean I'm playing with time. Once Cora gets deep into her journey but that first section mergers George. I want to be as realistic as you know. I can make it. Which means a lot of brutality? And it means impressing upon the reader the psychological tortures that they were forced to endure so for those who have not yet read the buck. Let's just talk a little bit about the the story line We start off as you mentioned in Georgia with Cora. Court is Sixteen or seventeen year old girl Owners didn't keep track of their slaves. Birthdays she has no idea how old she has. Her family has gone. Her mother has run off years before. And she's a an orphan astray on the plantation. A man named Caesar sold down South From the north he has contacts underground railroad so they light out to the north availed themselves of his contacts. And that's when the book changes I guess I had this idea that you know. What if the railroad was an actual literal railroad would apprentice not so much of a full story? Was that the first like one of the first things that you came upon when you were yes about. Sixteen years ago I was thinking. Oh isn't funny like when you're a kid and I hear about anything other little subway and that was like one little well actually on twitter. I'll search for the entire book and it'll be teenagers in school. Like Oh missy stupid. She thinks of underground wherever and as always like a couple of those a day. So I think it's a common Fantasy the notion and then I was thinking mcdan- to a story like what if every state Georgia South Carolina North Carolina. She goes through is a different state of American possibility. And so I was thinking about how each different character and the first place she ends up is South Carolina which is seemingly benevolent paternalistic place. Where a lot of programs for black social uplift jobs programs housing North Carolina is a white supremacist state. Where black people were outlawed and not allowed to step over the state line and so I was trying to sort of tweak American history to expose various tensions and I mean did you sort of create certain rules for yourself like well. This is going to be this part of me. Maintain kind of historical accuracy and integrity. And I will place these sort of discreet. What could have been or what might have been or what was then and not there within Georgia where we meet on the plantation going to be very realistic and traditional depiction of plantation life. And then the first gets the WHEEL ROAD. She looks up and sees a skyscraper and that's As a writer that's why I'm GonNa let it rip and have fun and go crazy and and the beaters notions and it's a you know. Obviously a big signs of the reader that we're not I think you know. I thought the Book Sixteen years ago and initially in for many years each state took place in a very different time frame and so South Carolina would have been like in this very stylized future place with with gene experiments and enslaves bread for different roles. And it would have been an fantastic. Gestures would have been much more broad and a sort of cloud atlas type style and so you're in a different world and the North Carolina chapter was going to some sort of fifty suburbia Myst- sort of Eisenhower Era America. That was the default for many years of the Voice of the book and a structure and then has to be read and as mentioned in the review. Glad to see it a hundred years of solitude which I read when I was in high school and had been an impact on me and I read it a few months before I started writing this book and it just seemed what if I just toned it down and didn't have to have these broad gestures ever sort of my default setting. There's a section in the book where she's a living exhibit in a museum and she acts out scenes from a plantation and a slave ship behind glass for the museum's patrons and I feel like five years ago would have been a ten page. Like huge like setpiece announced like two pages. It's interesting because I think just in the paper today. There was a photo from one of these museums. Where you know wasn't the Museum of Living Wonders but place where they reenact an earlier incarnation of America and you know and there were two African American people dressed up in costume. The first world's fairs you know often had an jungle natives and garb Dancing around to fit some some some sort of idea of darkest Africa Their various African pygmies were you know paraded For the delectation of American audiences you know once I decided not to make a historical novel and play with Time. Allowed to bring in things like that. Which occurred in eighteen fifty but were part of America in the late nineteenth century and the various things about eugenics and the Holocaust which I bring in. That's novel eighteen fifty but they ranked true and so I think another rule of besides concision was stick to the truth and not the facts and so There seem to be a truth in that museum. Section and where core funders in North Carolina that. I wanted to be loyal to even if it didn't actually

North Carolina Georgia South Carolina America Cora Colson Colson. Whitehead Museum Of Living Wonders SAG Twitter Africa Macarthur Dante Caesar Writer
Chryl Laird, "Steadfast Democrats: How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior"

The Electorette Podcast

10:02 listening | 2 months ago

Chryl Laird, "Steadfast Democrats: How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior"

"I'm Jen Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with Cheryl Laird. Shirl laird is a professor and political analyst who specializes in race and ethnic politics and political psychology and she joins me to discuss new book titled Steadfast Democrats. How SOCIAL FORCES SHAPE BLACK POLITICAL BEHAVIOR? She Co authored the book along with Ishmael White and if they analyze historical data to better understand why black Americans by far the most unified racial group in American politics and our conversations share laird and I draw parallels to the historical examples from the book and we correlate them to more recent political events. Like of course the Democratic primaries instance. This is a book that I personally will have to read more than once. It's that important. So without further ado here is my conversation with Cheryl. Layered sure leered welcome. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you for having me you know. I just have to say when I was reading this book as a black woman. It was really interesting because I was basically reading an analysis of my own political behavior. And I've never actually read it examined in this way. It was really strange for me to read this. And because I don't think that much about my own political motivations right like I think about policy but I don't think you know why Democrat. Why have I always been a democrat? Why do I never question right and that was really interesting for me yet? No I think That's literally what are trying to do with this book and we also are african-american and I'm trying to speak from experience of understanding politics in a particular way And often I think the literature thus far in some of the fields of political science sociology and other areas where they examine behavior and even in this case political behavior. We haven't really seen something that takes on this kind of question And particularly like wire wiser people doing this thing The way that they're doing it and we're able to really tackle it in a political science sort of way but a lot of it is based off of our own lived experience as African Americans and understanding that politics works differently. Yeah and so. The thing is the open. The Book Win Alabama Senate Race Between Doug Jones Roy Moore. We all remember that race for some really terrible reasons because of the allegations around. Roy Moore but what? I think what keeps happening elections like this. Is that people try to analyze and predict a black voter behavior. Right they have all. These assumptions aren't right. And then what happens? Is that black voters in surprising them like they did in this election. I think ninety eight percent of black women voted for Doug Jones then it was following that when Tom Perez made this statement online that Blackman backbone of the Party and I think that was the first time that someone at that level of leadership the head of the DNC made a declaration like that and acknowledged that publicly. I think that that's that's right. It's like it is. It is clear that the partisan norm is very strong. The loyalty to the Party is incredibly significant. And in this defining to the Party itself and its success in numerous elections and I think the Alabama election would just put that into high relief. A you're just able to really see that at work and black women being like the people at the front lines of it not only in the voter box but also on the ground like they were the ones shepherding. The grassroot efforts on the ground they were the ones behind a lot of the the poll souls to the polls or gathering people up to get them to go vote informing people about what was going on And so they are. They're they're doing that work for the Party and often just getting knowledge for it. So what actually happened in that race? Why wasn't it as predictive as people? Thought? Alabama is typically. A red state was at the mobilization on the ground that happen in the context of the election right so we have two individuals Roy Moore and Doug Jones and Roy Moore has especially this incident that comes up about Some sexual impropriety. Right like this situation of pedophilia as part of the conversation. But I also think part of the reason why people didn't see it coming is that the speaks a lot to the data that gets collected that goes into the predictive models of elections. Which is the sample sizes often in those data are very small when it comes to the African American sample And so if you do not have very good. Data data that is large in terms of the size of the black sample. That's in it. Additionally that is broad in that it's not just focused in any one location but is spread across sets of black communities the predictive nature than of what you're going to get from that data is not going to be right. Like a selection bias can create a problem with that Additionally I think people also don't know of some of the resources that African Americans are often dealing with in this case if we look at in political science the way that African Americans participate in politics all of the indicators that we typically use things like education level income on all typically are things that would say what is likely for someone to participate. African Americans have to make up for all of that because they're very resource deprived especially in a place like Alabama. And so what you then have to rely. On our black institutions black churches black colleges like organizations became the frontline for trying to mobilize people and again most types of tapping of that information through polling or through other forms of assessment. If you don't know about that you wouldn't know where to go. Look for it and so people did it. They did it not go look there. They didn't know that people would be energized. In this election. With these circumstances that play to get themselves out to vote and at the partisan role of that vote would matter so much right. Did you think that's true? Nationally that black people are underrepresented in polling. Generally I think they are. I think that's how you get often. Polls for instance. I remember not too long ago. The president had cited to a poll where he said he thought he had a whole bunch of black people who are supportive of Ham radio or something like thirty percent of black people saying they were okay with Donald Trump. The mmediately my thought was I need to see the data because I want to know where the poll was taken. Is this a random? Sample poll is a poll that is targeted to black communities. Are you targeting? This poll to black people at a certain location like what's his taken at a convention of some sort like all of that would matter because it's going to skew the data and if you're not attentive to this in the sampling that you're doing and waiting the sampling and the size of it so often times really. It has to do with the size of the sample often in a poll of maybe a thousand or thirteen hundred people in terms of African Americans that are in that sample. You'll be lucky if you see a hundred people in it well enough when you're talking about about black political ideology and I think another thing that's misunderstood about. The black voting block is just how conservative they are like socially conservative in a lot of ways and I think it's because there's this confusion around. We are generally in allegiance to a non Conservative Party. No I think that's right. I think because we think of ideology and political science typically the conservative Liberal ideology spectrum that we have is used heavily to predict partisanship and in most literature which is often used basically assessing white Americans. What we find is that people's ideology very predictive of their partisanship especially in a polarized environment for African Americans. It's different right and I think part of that has to do with how ideology works for African Americans. Black people are very politically diverse in their views. Say That again why he very click over to the partisan behavior needs to be thought about much more from a strategic advantage at the group is trying to do to be able to minority group in majority system and having a voice but people have varying opinions and a lot of people are very conservative. Especially on things like social conservatism fiscal conservatives on religiosity often as a driving force and we know from data especially from Pew Research Center. They find the African Americans as a racial group are some of the most strongest actors when it comes to their role engagement of religious institutions and those religious institutions are also African American. Right like this is like Martin Luther King talking about the most segregated day of the week is Sunday right. Like that is where they are. And it still is true. So conservatism manifests differently. For Blacks and ideologically. It also is very shaped by race. Where the goals of what people are leaning into in terms of their ideology could have a lot more to do with what they believe is important for trying to improve the status of the group even if they are varying in how they believe one would try to approach that but at the end of the day the partisanship though is done. In a manner that is trying to elevate the voice of the black community And political power in a space where we are a majority based system the one of the things. That's really interesting about that is that it's almost subconscious right. We don't necessarily like myself. I don't think necessarily my role in this larger picture of what we're trying to do collectively but we just we just do it. We just do it. I mean it's interesting because when we presented on this before we like to use this episode of black ish again. I think it's like elephants in the room. Or something to that effect about their son Junior Andrea. Both junior decided that he wants to join the young. Black Republicans Club at school. Or something and Andre is stunned and he's trying to explain it as family members and they all can't understand see China explaining to bow Chinese to his mother And they're both like what do you mean? He wants to join a republic. He wants to be like he wants to be a the Republicans like the League. Keep he wants to go to Banana Republic and buy clothes like they can't even process it because you're right it is become such a partly to be black is to Democrats and people who seem to be different from that are seen as strange right But I think it speaks so heavily to how long this norm of collective group race behavior has been informing black political behavior over

Alabama Party Cheryl Laird Doug Jones Roy Moore Black Republicans Club At Scho Political Analyst Jen Taylor Skinner Conservative Party Ishmael White Banana Republic League Pew Research Center Martin Luther King Professor Tom Perez Junior Andrea Donald Trump Andre
Acclaimed 'Beasts of No Nation' Author, Uzodinma Iweala, on Science, Power, and Race

Science Friction

9:45 listening | 2 months ago

Acclaimed 'Beasts of No Nation' Author, Uzodinma Iweala, on Science, Power, and Race

"Living on the time of the Cova epidemic or corona virus. I just read something that made me laugh because someone said something like the Covet Nineteen virus which came out of China's an intelligent. It's not like he bowl which is rather dumb virus now. Obviously bullet comes out of the continent of Africa just like just think about that framework and that construct and what has been printed in a major magazine virus from Africa dumb virus virus from China. Smart virus you know. I say this about the corona virus like virus had emerged in the Netherlands. Just think about the way it would have been reported from the outset. Think about what would have happened. If it had merged in on the continent of Africa and the American President Donald Trump has been gratuitously coaling sods cove to the virus behind the current covet non epidemic the Chinese virus. Let's be clear your respective of what species and what place a virus might have been forced to take the dean pandemics. Have NO ETHNICITY. Science tells us that medical history tells us that but as we're about to explore xenophobic conclusions drawn from scientific observations can have an enormous impact on the course of history and on people's lives while is a novelist. He's a doctor a filmmaker and a whole lot more in his early twenty while still in college studying literature. He wrote the critically acclaimed novel baseds of Nine Nation which tells the extraordinary story of a child soldier. A little boy recruited given again and sent to wage a war in two thousand fifteen. That book was turned into a film. Don't like really look into my eyes since my nose picking is because I can't be explaining myself and leaving a damn not like be I am leg. Oldman try to talk to me about movies variances. I saw this an idea there would is. It would seem that some sort of this on Devon all this. I also having us I was really lucky to have the opportunity to write that novel diving. Into the stories of child. Soldiers around the world but mostly specifically in countries like Sierra Leone and Liberia which had just kind of come out of their own internal conflicts at the time and then of course going back and talking with relatives. My parents my grandparents aunts and uncles great aunts and uncles about their time during the Nigerian civil war from nineteen sixty six really sixty seven three thousand nine hundred seventy and trying to understand not just what it's like to experience that kind of turmoil from the perspective of a child but also what. It's like to have everything that you thought. You knew that you understood blown open tournament and and unfortunately that's an all too common and all to universal subject after painting beasts of no nation Dima went on to train as a doctor right more books including speak no evil and Al kind of people. He worked for a time as well in health policy in Africa and today he's of the Africa Center in New York City. A storm speak at last year's will conference of Science. Journalists Center. Really wanted you to have the opportunity to he him too. So he joins us from the radio art studios in the heart of New York. You had such an interesting childhood. Born in Washington to Nigerian parents mother a former finance minister of Nigeria. And growing up. I get the sense that you very much spent time on on both continents and I'm curious to know. Have that shaped your sense of self as a as a boy and a young adult. My parents took it upon themselves to make sure that we could always get back to Nigeria. That this was to be so much a part of who we were growing up and it really did actually provide us with a really interesting way of seeing the world. You're not from one place near not from another place. You're from both places. It's kind of a glorious thing to be able to grow up knowing that there are multiple perspectives on everything in the world. What someone sees for example in the village that my grandparents grew up in is necessarily going to be from what somebody sees in suburban Washington? Dc things might be a little bit more difficult in Nigeria. But at the same time everybody is still living. I think that's something that a lot of people who only grow up saying in industrialized if we WANNA use that term or you know United States type or western context don't have and therefore very afraid of the wider world beyond. We just grew up not being afraid because of exposure and I think that's so important. Oh that's such a potent comment about FIA holding back so much dialogue and possibility in the world. Why a medical degree trying to be a doctor? Why did you save that time in your life as a part of any decision? I think there are multiple reasons for why you do something and not all of them are the most. I will freely admit that I did medicine because my dad's a doctor and you can kind of see okay. This is what a doctor does. You see the stethoscope. You see the medicines. It's already very concrete. You know in the little kids mind and as as the kid of African immigrants. There's this thing where you do. The practical like you become a doctor. You become a lawyer and then you think that the way that you have impact is through those practical professions. I think of course. There's this idea that doctors save people and that you can have a profound impact on on a person's life and so you know with all of that. It seemed like a natural choice. I think it became clear to me that one of the things that was missing was for me in full form. Was that creative output that flow and that ability to render the world as I saw an as sort of my talent allowed me to and I think one person can have an impact in multiple ways. Interestingly in many ways you work and your books have connected with how history in politics and in Dade Science and medicine in Western societies read and interpret and Judge View African bodies. If we think of the base of nomination also your your book. Our kind of people sharing stories from people living with HIV is in in Nigeria. That lenses interested you. It strikes me in house and I. I think you can't grow up in a black body and you can't occupy the space as an African person. Occupies space in this world is offering person or as a black person without thinking about the gains that is upon you because in in many ways that gains does and has adversely affected the lives that we all live both again in a very individual way and also on the macro level and so understanding. How black bodies move through space are interpreted? I think is something that's really important to me. And I say that not just from the Games of the other but also from the the way that we look at ourselves and this is where you presented last year at the World Conference of Science Journalists in Europe and gave extraordinary address on racism at the heart of modern science and medicine. What did you want that audience of journalists and scientists and? I was one of them in that room to think about to interrogate. I think oftentimes we just assume that the structures we operate within our for one solid and somehow especially when it comes to signs that they're they're vetted and true and one of the things that became increasingly clear to me. As I wrote the book I wrote on HIV AIDS was just how much quote unquote scientific. Ideas were grounded in people's biases and prejudices about black bodies and how that impacted the quote unquote science or signs. At least that initially was dedicated to trying to stop the epidemic and in some cases may have done more harm than good. Initially I think back to a lot of the articles that when I was writing my book I read about HIV AIDS academic articles about sort of the linking of the spread of HIV AIDS and promiscuity. And the idea that Africans were having sex like monkeys where promiscuous like monkeys like which came up in published scientific papers and then is it makes its way into the journalistic mainstream this idea of like African promiscuity as it relates to the spread of this disease you know things about like Africanness and and being unable to quote unquote keep the time why early. Hiv treatments which required like large. Regimens of pills like wouldn't work for people. And that was you know story that made it into major publications impacted policy that impacted the way the epidemic was dealt with you know these are things that are important and people need to be responsible for the way these stories are told and need to think about the frameworks in which the stories are

Nigeria Africa China Washington Aids HIV Donald Trump Cova The Netherlands World Conference Of Science Jo Oldman Journalists Center Sierra Leone Liberia President Trump Africa Center United States Dima