African American

Listen to the latest audio content in African American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features African American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

Evil "Voo Doo" Dolls? Just A Figment Of The White Imagination

Black History Year

03:27 min | 2 hrs ago

Evil "Voo Doo" Dolls? Just A Figment Of The White Imagination

"This show is sponsored by better help. This holiday season do something for a special person in your life. You give yourself a gift to raise your spirits and not just for the day, better help connects you with a licensed therapist 100% online via video, phone, and live chat sessions, and the holiday season is the perfect time to try it and see if therapy is for you. After all, the holidays are a notoriously tough time between managing family dynamics, racing from thing to thing, and braving the cold and dark weather, it's normal to feel down. Having someone to talk to about how you're feeling and what you can do about it is truly a gift. When you're armed with more information about what you're experiencing, struggles can feel a little easier to manage. Better help is much more affordable than in person therapy. And you can do it from the comfort of your home on a schedule that works for you. So this holiday season, give yourself the gift of better mental health, a gift that really does keep on giving. Visit better help dot com to see if therapy is for you. That's better, HELP dot com. New Orleans, souvenir shops are famous, or should we say infamous for these little dolls. Often accompanied by pins and spells. But there's just one thing wrong with so called voodoo dolls. They don't actually exist. This is two minute black history. What you didn't learn in scribble. Walk down any street in the French Quarter, and you're likely to be greeted with gift shops selling little cloth voodoo dolls and pins that can be used to cast spells. But here's the thing. Those dolls aren't actually used how many of us think they are. So, what's the truth? Vodou originated in West Africa, at least 6000 years ago. And today, there are more than 60 million followers. Contrary to popular belief, dolls are not a major part of the religion. Voter practitioners don't use dolls to cast spells or to get revenge. The dolls you see in gift shops are poor representations of religious objects called minkisi. Made by spiritual leaders, these vessels are used to hold spirits, medicines, or sacred space. Unlike the souvenirs in gift shops, they aren't evil or used to hurt others. So what are voodoo dolls actually used for? Generally, the dolls are used to protect and communicate with the spirits of ancestors. Heal ailments, or ward off people seeking to hurt others. From there inception, vodou dolls have helped us honor our ancestral roots. They remind us to avoid buying into white supremacies appropriation, exploitation, and negative portrayal of them and black culture generally, as evil. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast by push black. Show your support by sharing this episode on your social media, and join us in amplifying black history stories. We all deserve to know.

New Orleans West Africa
A highlight from Session 285: Wakanda Forever, Producers' Chat

Therapy for Black Girls

07:37 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Session 285: Wakanda Forever, Producers' Chat

"The characters, costumes, and world building, but this time the experience of going to the movies with family and friends to see the new Black Panther film felt a little different. Many of us were adorned in white, bodies calm and heart steady as we prepared for what we knew would be both a cinematic gym and a grieving experience. Grief for the loss of our beloved Chadwick Boseman, our Black Panther, grief for the world that has drastically changed since the original film premiered in 2018, and the private grief we all hold in our hearts for our own meaningful reasons. It all felt like seeing your favorite cousins at a funeral, you're happy to see them because it's been a minute, but you wish it were under different circumstances. To discuss what kind of forever in depth this week I'm joined by our beloved podcast producers, Cindy Elise and Frito. We explore the complexities of grief displayed across characters in the film. Comment on storylines we were surprised and delighted by and make predictions for the future of the Black Panther franchise. Please note that this episode does include spoilers for the film. So if you haven't had the opportunity to watch, please put the episode on pause in return once you've had time to enjoy it. If something resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share it with us on social media using the hashtag TBG in session. Or join us over the sister circles to talk more in depth about the episode. You can join us at community at therapy for black girls dot com. Here's our conversation. So we are chatting today for another wonderful producer's Chad about one of our new favorite movies, Black Panther two, what kind of forever? So again, if we could just start by doing introductions of who you are in your role on the team. Hi, I'm Cindy. I'm one of the producers. Hi, I'm Elise, I'm one of the producers on the therapy for black girls podcast. Hey, I'm freedom. I'm also one of the producers here at therapy for black girls, perfect. All right, so I thought that we could start as Elise suggested by going around in saying three adjectives that would describe your experience of watching. What kind of forever? I don't have three adjectives, but I have three words. Colonizers watch out. You have a message. I'm just picking up with message of the film. Okay. What about you, Elise? It was soul stirring. I feel like that's a good way to describe it. Dynamic, and it was funny. I thought it was funny. I think my three words would be moving, beautiful, and thought provoking. Those would be mine. Cindy, did you have three words that would describe your experience seeing? What kind of forever? Three words. I think heavy isolating and beautiful. Isolating is an interesting choice. Say more about isolating. Yeah. I think it's also because I had recently experienced a passing. And so it was lovely to kind of like see grief manifested on screen, but I also went by myself and I also was like feeling very withdrawn personally 'cause I was just like in that reflective space. I think I was processing a lot of emotions in tandem with the movie. And so in certain ways, like there were moments that I felt very isolated just because I had been carrying a lot of grief and like all the different stages and phases, like the first one I remember being so excited and ready to celebrate, but going to see this one. I was a little bit fearful. I think it was because I was worried about how overwhelming the emotions were going to be for me. Both the fictional ones, but also the ones that are real for me. And so I ended up choosing to see it by myself just because I wasn't sure. If I was going to cry through the whole thing and just be disruptive, so yeah. So let's talk about your experience of going to the movie. So before we found out that it was coming out, of course, it was this whole family meeting around wearing white to the theater and bringing all of your people and what was your experience of seeing the film for the first time because I believe both of you have seen it multiple times. I'm only seeing it once. What was your experience the first time did you wear white? Did you go with your family? What was it like? I did not get the memo of wearing white and was properly annoyed with myself and my squad. We literally were looking like, oh, I think we missed something online. We didn't get, oh, this is embarrassing. Somebody have any white socks to show, please. What about you, at least? The first time I actually went by myself, I didn't wear white, but it was great, singing alone. The second time I went with a big group of people, also didn't wear white or anything like that. But it was, I liked chatting with everyone. I think I went with like 12 people about their expectations for the movie. And what they liked about the first one, if they really remembered it because Black Panther one was so long ago. And then after kind of deciphering what people like, did it live up to your expectations? Do you think they did Chadwick justice, all those different things? So going with a lot of people was exciting because I kind of got a range of opinions about the movie other than my own. I hear that. So even though I have not seen it again, I do plan on seeing it again. So I saw it for the first time with my husband and two kids. And so I felt like I was a little distracted because it's a long movie, so we had to have a potty break in the middle. So I feel like I missed some pretty crucial conversation. And I felt like I was answering a lot of questions, so I feel like I need to go back for myself when I can be undistracted. We did not wear white. So I do feel like there was more at least for me, it felt like I was in character for the first one, right? So I think I had a hand wrap on and all black. I don't think we had a specific color theme for the first one. I think it was just like getting in some kind of costume or what we would imagine people would wear and Wakanda. And I didn't feel that same energy for this one, and I think it was a part of grief. Like a loss of Chadwick is and I'm sure we will talk about but to me, I was very excited about seeing this film, but it didn't feel as like joyful maybe or like I didn't have that same level of a hike wanting to go see this one as I did the first one. So what do you feel like has stayed with you since you saw the film? I think the thing that has stayed with me is like the sunrise sort of feeling where there's always hope and joy. Like there's always something else on the other side like that seems to have been the theme that stuck with me the most after seeing it is that like the sun will still rise and you have the opportunity to have a

Elise Chadwick Boseman Cindy Elise Cindy Frito Chadwick
This Legendary Singer's Most Famous Song Sparked Suspicions Around His Untimely Death

Black History Year

03:14 min | 1 d ago

This Legendary Singer's Most Famous Song Sparked Suspicions Around His Untimely Death

"Officially one hour until your favorite show premieres. Time to get some snacks delivered through Instacart. Okay, let's get some popcorn seltzer, chocolate covered almonds, and wait, did they release the whole season? Better cards of ice cream for the two part finale. When your day should be ending, but a new season is starting, the world is your cart. Visit Instacart dot com or download the app and get free delivery on your first order. Offer valid for a limited time minimum order $10. Additional terms apply. Did this legendary singer's most famous song get him murdered? Two weeks before Christmas in 1964, the king of soul died in a roach motel. This is two minute black history what you didn't learn in school. White experts say he was shot dead, but something still doesn't add up. How did we lose such a gift to music and blackness that December night? Sam Cooke was found dead 60 years ago in a cheap Los Angeles motel. Allegedly, he kidnapped and attempted to sexually assault a sex worker. The motel manager said she saw the woman escape. Apparently scared for her own life, the manager shot cook in the chest. But there are huge inconsistencies in this already problematic story. Cook didn't have a history of violence. Not a single motel guest heard gunshots. And the bullets recovered from his body didn't match the gun the hotel manager apparently shot him with. Even worse, his face was severely disfigured at his funeral. So what could have really happened to one of the greatest singers in history? Cook's actions had been alienating his white fans. He'd been arrested for a registering in a white only hotel, and he was becoming increasingly outspoken for black equality and civil rights. But that's not the only coincidence. He wrote, a change is going to come after his arrest, and it became a rallying cry for the civil rights movement. Two angry white people, his death was the opportunity to make an example of black people who dare to speak out. To our people, it meant something else. Sam Cooke's life ended mysteriously. But our fight for liberation is not over. We refuse to allow his death to be in vain. Instead, we use his anthem to uplift ourselves and intensify our fight for justice. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast by push black. Show your support by sharing this episode on your social media and join us in amplifying black history stories we all deserve to know.

Sam Cooke Cook Los Angeles White
A highlight from Ep. 719 - Hundreds of brilliant students in Brooklyn need our help to study abroad in Africa. Let's do this!

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:08 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Ep. 719 - Hundreds of brilliant students in Brooklyn need our help to study abroad in Africa. Let's do this!

"One of my favorite places in the world. Is Ember charter school right in the heart of bed stuy Brooklyn. They are educating and changing the lives of students in ways that I just don't see it any other school around the country there, taking into account the trauma and the challenges that students face, they literally provide legal services for families when they need them, but now the school needs us. Because hundreds of their students are able to study abroad in Africa and the program has a resounding success. But after the pandemic, finances have been strained in a major way and we need to help them raise the funds to be able to send hundreds of black and brown students to South Africa to be able to study abroad, let's do this thing. I'm asking you to chip in so that we can do everything we can. You can click the link in my bio on Instagram and see all about it. They are right. Let me unpack and explain it. This is Sean king, and you are

Ember Charter School Brooklyn Africa South Africa Sean King
Why The KKK Was Sick of this Black Doctor

Black History Year

03:05 min | 2 d ago

Why The KKK Was Sick of this Black Doctor

"Officially one hour until your favorite show premieres. Time to get some snacks delivered through Instacart. Okay, let's get some popcorn seltzer, chocolate covered almonds, and wait, did they release the whole season? Better cards of ice cream for the two part finale. When your day should be ending, but a new season is starting, the world is your cart. Visit Instacart dot com or download the app and get free delivery on your first order. Offer valid for a limited time minimum order $10. Additional terms apply. One of the most famous doctors of his time could not step foot in a hospital to treat his own patients. Even if they were about to die. What did he do to deserve such treatment from the medical community? This is too many black history. What you didn't learn in school. If you got sick before the 1950s, chances were, you would either die for lack of care or be carelessly treated by a white doctor. If they would even see you. Why? In the Jim Crow era, endless limitations prevented black doctors from properly treating their patients. While some black hospitals existed, racially biased white doctors and nurses often ran and staffed these spaces. If black doctors had patience that needed to be hospitalized, by law, they had to turn over those patients to white doctors. That is, until this man came along. Doctor John a Kinney was born to enslaved parents in Virginia in 1875. After successfully completing college and medical school, he worked with Booker T. Washington and eventually became his personal physician. He also became an activist in fault against laws that kept black doctors out of hospitals, but then horror struck. When he tried to integrate hospitals with black and white doctors and nurses, the Ku Klux Klan burned down his house and tried to kill him. Still, he persisted and raised enough money to open the Kenny memorial hospital, named after his parents. His legacy wasn't finished, however. His children all became doctors and led hospitals across the nation. Isn't it amazing what we can achieve, even in the face of hatred and adversity? In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history. A podcast by push black. Show your support by sharing this episode on your social media, and join us in amplifying black history stories. We all deserve to know.

Jim Crow Kinney Booker T. Washington Kenny Memorial Hospital Virginia John
A highlight from Ep. 718 - The #1 reason Republicans refuse to denounce Donald Trump for dining with a Neo-Nazi bigot

The Breakdown with Shaun King

00:46 sec | 2 d ago

A highlight from Ep. 718 - The #1 reason Republicans refuse to denounce Donald Trump for dining with a Neo-Nazi bigot

"Last week, Donald Trump had a dinner. With an open bigot with an avowed neo Nazi white supremacist named Nick Fuentes. And Republicans just can't denounce it. One is it's obvious they are deep into Trump and they don't want to cross him. But there's a much bigger reason. Why they can't denounce something that should be so easy to speak out on. Just say you wouldn't do it yourself. Just say you don't approve of it. But they can't. For one primary reason, and I want to unpack and explain that today, this is Sean king, and you are listening

Nick Fuentes Donald Trump Sean King
A highlight from Healing Generational Trauma in Your Own Backyard with Yonnette Fleming

Black History Year

08:15 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Healing Generational Trauma in Your Own Backyard with Yonnette Fleming

"As inheritors of centuries long oppression, black folks have a lot to heal from. Caring for our bodies our minds and our emotions is imperative. But look into a racist food and medical systems for help has proven fruitless time and time again. But land is loyal to no man or systems. Only to mother nature. And in the soil, might lie the ancestral wisdom we need to heal collective wounds and strengthen the black community. I'm Jay from push black. And you're listening to black history year. To help us identify where to begin Tapping back into the lens regenerative power, we're sitting down with your net Fleming. Also known as farmer yawn. Farmer Yan is a Guyana born and Brooklyn based healer, urban food justice farmer and educator. She's authored the book titled a time for healing. Recipes for health and reconnection to mother earth. And she's the VP of the hattie carthan community garden. She's on a mission to bridge the gap between generations to unite and exchanging historical knowledge for sustainable living and health. All right, so stay tuned for a great conversation on how to restore our relationship with the earth's natural resources. First up is a story about a freedom fighter who refused to let racism run her or her community off the land. Racist poisoned their black farm, but her comeback made them sick. Fannie Lou hamer's family worked hard to go from sharecropping to owning a farm, but one day, they returned home to find that their cows had been executed. Who would do such a thing? It turned out a jealous white neighbor had snuck onto their property and poisoned their livestock. Ruining their years of hard work and forcing them back into sharecropping. Hamer remained haunted by the destruction for decades. However, she was determined to fight for civil rights and dedicated her life to speaking out against racism and injustice. In 1967, hamer secured a grant and purchased 40 acres in the Mississippi Delta to launch the freedom, farm, cooperative, and opportunity for black people to be self reliant and build something together. It was a sprawling oasis of fresh foods where folks lived and worked grew their own food and protected each other from white terrorism. Hammer knew firsthand there was freedom and farming. She wanted us to Stewart our own land and the freedom farm eventually spanned more than 700 acres. Her legacy continues to be a call to action for us globally. Today, only 1.4% of U.S. farmers are black. As South Africa, black people are still fighting to take back their land from white colonizers. Like hamer, we must commit to self determination and the power of black community to truly be free. Officially one hour until your favorite show premieres. Time to get some snacks delivered through Instacart. Okay, let's get some popcorn seltzer, chocolate covered almonds, and wait, did they release the whole season? Better cards of ice cream for the two part finale. When your day should be ending but a new season is starting, the world is your cart. Visit Instacart dot com or download the app and get free delivery on your first order. Offer valid for a limited time minimum order $10. Additional term supply. Tell me, what does black liberation look like to you? Liberation is such an interest in word. Because you could be liberated from one oppressor and find yourself smack dab in the middle of another oppressor. But liberation. In its highest form when I think of it, some people think that it means like freedom, but it's really an interesting word. Liberation to me means healing. And it means healing from self betrayal. They are levels at which we liberate ourselves from betrayal. And so it's ongoing. The process of liberation, this ongoing, for all of us. What does it look like for you and the work that you do? It means taking off levels of programming, false programs, and oppression, it means repair heal and repair for the most part in my work. Yeah, so when we talk about healing repair and the broken systems, I'd like to get a real solid understanding of what it looks like when it comes to the work you do with the food system and so our work is on the intersections. There is no single issue, it's all connected and interconnected. So our work finds itself at an interconnected place, we as a total group, meaning all of us on the planet are facing like a collective extinction and collapsed. That's where we are now. And so the work now as a maroon is to reconnect and to repair and to make sure that the consciousness of our people is intact for the next iteration of this game. yourself as maroon, dig more into that for me please. Well, I find myself as a maroon, that is my identity. I've always understood myself on Zoom or on someone who remembers the ways that we have managed to survive. I was born in South America, so where I am from, and my people are the duke of people, the people of the guyanas and the Dutch Guiana British Guiana where the Dutch the British and the French are explored and broke up those territories. The morons of always been a people, you've lived in mountainous regions. We've lived outside, mostly hidden for a very long time. And so that hidden feature has given us some resilience and some other things that we might be aware of that can help our communities to thrive what's up everybody. I'm hosting a new podcast, no mercy with Stephen a Smith. That's no spell K and OW mercy. Listen, as I pull back the curtain on all things beyond the world of sports. My no mercy podcast will be three new episodes every week, making this podcast a great one to add to your weekly routine. On no mercy, I'll be interviewing influential guests outspoken celebrities and thought leaders across the political financial and social spectrum. I'll be sharing my thoughts on social issues, politics, and beyond the goal is to keep an open dialog, of course. I want to spark your curiosity and give you answers. From a different perspective, you know me, I'll give you my unbiased opinion on breaking news and entertainment stories that'll leave you motivated and informed. Don't worry. I'll always offer my comments about what's going on in the sports world too. A new mercy episode drops every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. No mercy with Stephen a Smith. A presentation of K to 13 and Odyssey studio available on an Odyssey app or wherever you listen to

Farmer Yan Hattie Carthan Community Garde Hamer Fannie Lou Hamer Guyana Fleming Mississippi Delta JAY Brooklyn Hammer U.S. Stewart Dutch Guiana South Africa Guiana
A highlight from Ep. 717 - Donald Trump just dined with a literal Neo-Nazi and white supremacist. It's a dangerous normalization and escalation of bigotry in America.

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:07 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Ep. 717 - Donald Trump just dined with a literal Neo-Nazi and white supremacist. It's a dangerous normalization and escalation of bigotry in America.

"A huge percentage of my life has been spent tracking down and holding bigots, racist, white supremacist, neo Nazis and others like them accountable. And just this week Donald Trump had at Mar-a-Lago, Nick Fuentes. And expressed clear explicit neo Nazi. A Holocaust denier, a white supremacist, someone who is actually behind violence and attacks in Charlottesville and other places has been banned from all social media because of how dangerous this man is. He is meeting with an ex-president who is running for president. It is the normalization of hate in a way that we have not seen before. That this man is meeting with Donald Trump while he's running for president, is extremely dangerous, and I need to unpack and explain it. All right? This is Sean king, and you are listening to. The

Neo Nazis Nick Fuentes Donald Trump Charlottesville Sean King
A Brutal and Bloody Battle Of The Soul We Should All Know About

Black History Year

03:24 min | 6 d ago

A Brutal and Bloody Battle Of The Soul We Should All Know About

"With unlimited access to 10,000 plus workouts from world class studios and trainers. Lululemon studio is everything you need to be your best. Take a class in cardio, strength, yoga, dance, boxing, stretch, or any of our 60 plus class types, or visit any of our U.S. participating partner studio locations, including pure bar, rumble, and Y 7 studio, and save 20% on any in person class. The mirror is the center of your Lululemon studio membership. See your reflection alongside your trainer in a full HD display and track your metrics. All in an elegant design that fits any space in your home. For a limited time, you can bring Lululemon studio into your home for just $745. Visit Lululemon studio dot com and use code cadence to take advantage of our best deal of the year. Full price last offered ten four 22, Lululemon studio content features and member benefits subject to change. We will fight till the last of us falls in the battlefields. Bellowed these words, a charge to her people. They wouldn't bow out from this fight. They couldn't. The liberation of their very souls depended on it. This is two minute black history, what you didn't learn in school. As slavery ended, Britain was determined to continue colonizing Ghana, beginning with the ashanti people. They went after the ashanti's most sacred symbol. The golden stool. The golden stool possesses and protects the literal soul of the asante people. You can imagine the ashanti's disgust and rage when Britain demanded, they surrender the stool. Collectively, ashanti chiefs gathered to prepare for war. But some lost faith, knowing it was likely they would lose. They are standing tall and proud amongst these crestfallen men was the one and only. Yah asantewa. Yaa asantewa bellowed is it true that the bravery of the ashanti is no more? If you men of ashanti will not go forward, we the women will. I shall haul upon my fellow women. We will fight the white men. We will fight till the last of us falls in the battlefields. Inspired, the chiefs vowed to fight for ashanti liberation until their dying breath. Led by asante, the asante resisted Britain for months before yaw asantewa and other chiefs were captured and exiled. White supremacy wants to own our bodies and our souls. Knew its only when they own our souls that we're due. With white supremacy constantly coming for us, what are we doing to ensure we're ready for the fight? Physically, and spiritually. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast by push black.

Lululemon Britain Ashanti Chiefs Boxing Yah Asantewa Yaa Asantewa U.S. Ghana Yaw Asantewa Ashanti Chiefs
A highlight from Ep. 716 - The one solution for sports teams owned by open bigots

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:01 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Ep. 716 - The one solution for sports teams owned by open bigots

"For my entire life. Anytime I see photos from the 50s and 60s of young white students, sometimes in elementary school, middle school, high school, college. Blocking black students from entering elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges all over the Deep South and sometimes even beyond the Deep South. I always wonder. Where are these people? Who are these people? What have they gone on to do? And it just so turns out that in 1957, as white students in Little Rock Arkansas gathered together to block black students from entering. There was one Jerry Jones, the owner of the Dallas Cowboys. And there's no better day than Thanksgiving a day in which the cowboys always play. To unpack and explain it, let's talk about it. I have a problem, but there is a solution. This is Sean king, and you're listening to, the breakdown.

Little Rock Jerry Jones Arkansas Dallas Cowboys Cowboys Sean King
A highlight from The Sour, True History Behind The Baby Formula Shortage

Black History Year

01:32 min | Last week

A highlight from The Sour, True History Behind The Baby Formula Shortage

"Quadruplets in the world. And though they were perfectly healthy, what ultimately happened to them is downright sicknick. The white Doctor Who delivered them lied to their father and took advantage of their mothers and ability to hear or speak. He named the girls after his own family members and injected them with dangerously high levels of vitamin C then, he did something that still traumatizes black mothers today. Acting as the girl's legal representative, the doctor cut deals with baby formula companies thirsty to reach black women. Only a few generations removed from serving as wet nurses for white women while their own children suffered. Black women were taught to believe they were bad mothers if they didn't use baby formula. Once black women became major consumers of formula, the company's flipped the script. They used aggressive marketing, depicting black women who used baby formula as lazy or unnatural mothers. Today, black women face criticism no matter what they do. But formula shortages affect black parents the hardest. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute

A highlight from Ep. 715 - HOLD UP! Herschel Walker just admitted on his taxes that his primary residence is in Texas.

The Breakdown with Shaun King

00:58 sec | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 715 - HOLD UP! Herschel Walker just admitted on his taxes that his primary residence is in Texas.

"Did you know that Herschel Walker doesn't even live in Georgia? Why is there a neck to neck Senate race? With a man that was born and raised and does live in Georgia. Rafael Warnock why is it even close? When his opponent has filed with Texas as his primary state of residence, including in this year's taxes, it's ridiculous. They are many reasons. To not be a fan of Herschel Walker, but it's incredibly frustrating with me. We saw Doctor Oz try to do the same thing and he lost. Now we're seeing Herschel Walker trying to do the same thing and hopefully he loses. But listen. Don't vote someone in office that doesn't really live in your state. They're not going to represent you well. Let me unpack and explain it. We got to talk about this. This is Sean king, and you are listening

Herschel Walker Rafael Warnock Georgia Doctor Oz Senate Texas Sean King
Harry Belafonte Tricked A Racist Landlord In The Most Genius Way

Black History Year

02:56 min | Last week

Harry Belafonte Tricked A Racist Landlord In The Most Genius Way

"Officially one hour until your favorite show premieres. Time to get some snacks delivered through Instacart. Okay, let's get some popcorn seltzer, chocolate covered almonds, and wait, did they release the whole season? Better cards of ice cream for the two part finale. When your day should be ending, but a new season is starting, the world is your cart. Visit Instacart dot com or download the app and get free delivery on your first order. Offer valid for a limited time minimum order $10. Additional terms apply. Harry Belafonte tricked their racist landlord in the most genius way. This is two minute black history. What you didn't learn in school. When yet another landlord denied his rental application, he knew it could only be because of race. So he got an idea and they were not ready for the trick that he had up his sleeve. He was furious. How could they deny him again? Harry Belafonte had sold millions of records and had the bank account to prove it. But still, Manhattan landlords kept refusing him. Despite his fame, white supremacy was relentless. In 1958, housing was rife with racist landlords who refused to rent to black people. But mister belafonte not only had money, he had an extremely clever trick up his sleeve. First, he sent his white publicist to get the rental paperwork in his place. But someone told the building manager that a black tenant had moved in and with an hour's, they forced him to leave. So he went bigger. He set up a fake real estate company and bought the entire building. Belafonte moved right in and some of his friends did so too. Like Lena Horne, who was struggling to rent a place. Although the fair housing act exists today, this still happens. We experience housing discrimination when renting and especially when investing in a home. I've been a Horton experienced this firsthand when an appraiser low balled her family's Florida home. The value shot up on the reappraisal after she removed family portraits in black books, from their house. Racism remains ingrained in every part of our society and housing inequality is still happening. Like belafonte, sometimes we may have to get creative to beat this system. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast by push black, show your support by sharing this episode on your social media and join us in amplifying black history stories we all deserve to know.

Harry Belafonte Mister Belafonte Manhattan Belafonte Lena Horne Horton Florida
A highlight from Ep. 714 - Kyrie Irving NEVER needs to apologize again for sharing a link on Twitter. He has apologized more than enough.

The Breakdown with Shaun King

08:29 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 714 - Kyrie Irving NEVER needs to apologize again for sharing a link on Twitter. He has apologized more than enough.

"Print. He's apologized in social media. He's apologized in person. He's apologized privately behind the scenes. He's apologized at press conferences. Do not ask this man to apologize again for the link that he posted on social media. Don't do it. What we're seeing now in so many ways is what happens when almost every member of the sports press and sports media is white and almost every athlete in the NBA is black. Yesterday, at a press conference for the Brooklyn Nets over and over and over again. White member of the media after white member of the media after white member of the media continued to press Kyrie Irving to either get caught up in his words to apologize again for something that he's already apologized for to address something that he's already addressed to address new issues around anti semitism and no matter what he said. The next member of the media and the next member and the next member continued to press him on it. And at this point, he has done and said more than enough. He has apologized more than I can recall any white man ever apologizing for anything. It's crossed a ridiculous line. I want to play this clip from his press conference. And we'll also have a quick word from one of our sponsors. But let me play this clip from the press conference, and then I'll be right back. Breakdown. Outside, hundred possibly more they were wearing a called Israel united in Christ. There are a group of people who think there's a conversation for another day. I'm just here to focus on the game. Carrie, but you've said this whole time that you didn't know what kind of like what basically what kind of voice you had. And but if these are the people that are out here in your name, do you feel like you have a consequence that we've done? Again, I'm just here to focus on the game. Kyrie forgive me if you've been asked this already, but when you were suspended, there were a lot of players around the league, you know, Jalen Brown is one specifically that didn't like the way your suspension was handled. I'm just curious if you ever thought about filing a grievance or exploring those avenues at all. I got a lead out to my legal team. And leave it to the warriors I have around me. I have some strong people men and women around me that are going to do everything possible to make sure that I'm protected and my family's protected and we protect one another. So, you know, I'm sure some things will be done in the future. There's no timetable on that right now. Hank, Harry. I know you said you just want to talk about the game, but this morning you talked about using a recognizing the platform you have, why not unify you're being asked about things that are being said in your name and reaction to the movie promoted. I'm curious, I guess how you go about deciding when's the time to use a platform and when it's not and what you decide to react when you say it's one here to talk about basketball? I would like to be on a platform where I could openly share how I feel without being harshly criticized or being labeled or dealing with outside perceptions I have nothing to do with me. So I want you to hear what Kyrie Irving is dealing with at the press conference. It actually went on for one whoever recorded it at sped it up a little bit and it wasn't going that quickly. But it went on and on and on. Nobody asking anything about basketball and continuing to ask him in essence. If he disavows anti semitism, if he disavows white supremacy, some protesters were outside of Barclays center, they were actually, it appeared to be they were black Hebrew Israelites who were just outside showing solidarity with Kyrie, Kyrie didn't organize it didn't make it happen. He wasn't affiliated with it. He's not affiliated with the black Hebrew Israelites. And everybody continued to press him over and over. If he knew them, what did he think about them? And it was clear that they weren't trying to get good information. They were just trying to get him caught up. And no matter what Kyrie said and said, listen, I'm just here to talk about basketball. I'm not going to address this. It's clear that they didn't want to talk about basketball. And it wasn't that they were trying to get new information. They just wanted to get the man caught up again. And, you know, he's going to have to. It's the NBA rule. You have to go out and do your press conferences. I damn near would prefer to just pull him from the press conferences. If this is all we're going to see, like just take the fine, remove him. Like, he is not an expert, nor am I on anti semitism. Stop trying to get him to talk about it, stop trying to get his opinion on it. The man has already said, he disavows all anti Jewish sentiments. He disavows anti semitism, he does not support anybody else who was anti semitic. He has apologized, profusely. It's too much. And he never needs to apologize for this again. Period. If he chooses to ask his business, to quit pressing this man to apologize, yesterday a clip went super viral of what looked like a few hundred black men standing outside of the Barclays center as a show of support for Kyrie Irving. And a lot of people retweeted it and shared it across social media, I couldn't hear anything they were saying, it just seemed like a good thing that these black men had showed up to support Kyrie. Kyrie had nothing to do with organizing it or anything else. The men were somehow affiliated either with black Hebrew Israelites or another group. I am not a 100% sure because I only hear other people talking about them. Jaylen Brown of the Boston Celtics retweeted the video and just said, this is the kind of energy we need, where black men are supporting black men. Well, then the media started calling for him to apologize because they said those black men were not the kind of black men that you can support. They are not on the list of available black men for athletes to support in essence. And started calling on jaylen Brown to apologize to disavow himself with those black men. And Jalen Brown said, listen, I don't know who those black men are. I just saw a lot of young, strong brothers out there supporting Kyrie and was glad to see it. Then he said, hell, I thought they were members of omega sci-fi, the black fraternity. It kind of looked like that. They were wearing the omega colors, whether that was on purpose or not. I have no idea. But here's the thing. The over policing of black speech has crossed a ridiculous line at this point. Where everything that every black athlete and every black entertainer says is being basically scrutinized to the highest degree. As if black people are the primary or a primary threat to Jewish people in America, it's not true. And yet, this hyper focus on the tweets and words and actions and thoughts of black people is too much. It's outrageous. And it's crossed a line where I'm incredibly frustrated. And it's frustrating a lot of people. This is not helping. At all. Not even a little bit. And while the overpolicing of black speech is not new, it's, I don't remember it in modern history. Being this fierce.

Kyrie Irving Kyrie Brooklyn Nets Jalen Brown Basketball Barclays Center NBA Carrie Hank Warriors Israel White Harry Jaylen Brown Boston Celtics America
A highlight from The Spiritual Significance Behind This Color Was Important To Enslaved Africans

Black History Year

01:58 min | Last week

A highlight from The Spiritual Significance Behind This Color Was Important To Enslaved Africans

"Exodus 39 one. Tells us for the priests who served in the holy place. They decorated finely woven garments with blue, purple, and scarlet thread donated by the people. Blue was special to priest, but our people have a spiritual connection to this color. What is it? Traveling through the south, you might notice a pattern. Many homes proudly showcase porch ceilings, doors, and window treatments, painted a specific color blue. The selection, many are surprised to learn, goes way deeper than a design preference. The color symbolism honors many rich African spiritual traditions. Including honoring one Europa deity, I am meatball. Many black families believe this color blue protects their families against evil spirits, known as hints. Conjuring up the illusion of uncrossable water, or of the expanse of the sky. But that's not all the appropriately named heat blue signifies. In the 18th century, indigo plants produced coveted blue dye. Its production drove the economy of colonial era South Carolina with a value that far exceeded cotton. Its rich tone served as a reminder of the atrocities committed against enslaved laborers on indigo plantations. In spite of the historic wrongs, perpetuated against their ancestors behind this rare die. A reclamation movement is rising. Blue has a history of suffering within our bloodlines. But it also signifies the ability of our people to survive boundless racism and oppression. Find something blue

South Carolina
A highlight from Ep. 713 - The Internet has made too many of us mean as hell

The Breakdown with Shaun King

04:56 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 713 - The Internet has made too many of us mean as hell

"Listen, the Internet can be a very ugly, very intolerant, very bigoted, very mean spirited place. And that doesn't come as a shock to you. We all know this. And at any given moment, that means spirited, ugliness can come out into the real world offline in ways that are deadly, I am thinking in particular of a brutal mass shooting at a gay club in Colorado Springs, Colorado. And at least 5 people were killed. Nearly 20 more shot and shot obviously with some of the most horrific weapons on earth, and so when you're shot with these weapons, it changes your life forever. And this attack, we don't know all of the details yet about who the shooter is and want the shooter was motivated by, but we do know. Every single day, people are saying and doing ugly things to the LGBTQ community. We see it often. People now politicizing drag shows and making it as if, you know, people are trying to harm your children, what drag shows. All types of foolishness. And what I know and whether this bears itself out with this particular shooting or not, what I know is if you demean a person or group enough, it can motivate people to do ugly things to them. Obviously, I've experienced this in my own life. When you demean a person so much, even when that person suffers harm, people stop caring, because that person has already been demonized and belittled and made small, and made into an enemy. And so when harm comes their way, people just keep on moving. I see right now. I'm just going to own it, it's hard for me to change this reality. And I'm not, I'm not even frustrated that it exists. I bring a lot of different people together. And so if you are a part of the community that I've built on my Instagram page, on there is every race every ethnicity, every nationality, every faith and religion, every orientation, it's all there. And they are virtually no rules on how people interact online in these comments sections. And I see sometimes in the comments, it can get very ugly. And most often I see people say something offensive. And it's clear to me that they frequently weren't aware that it was offensive. So they genuinely offended somebody. We didn't know they did it. They didn't say it to offend somebody. They thought they were being insightful or they thought they would just participate in the conversation. And it might creep into what I would call casual bigotry. Where they just very casually very comfortably walked right into a created a bigoted moment for the rest of the people. And then everybody will pile up on that person and say, you can't say this or that's racist or anti semitic or whatever it may be. And the person just is like, hold on, hold on, hold on. Why am I being attacked? And there's rarely. Much understanding or forgiveness or education going on in the comments section. People try all of those things. But people tense up and don't receive it. And it's to the point where I'm seeing a lot of good people. Say things that are harmful, frustrating, irritating, about entire ethnic groups and nationalities, et cetera. And I have one lesson. One key idea that I want to share with you is something that I try my best to practice every day and have done so for years. I'm going to tell you what it is right after the break. We have a quick word from one of our sponsors that I'll be right back. The breakdown.

Colorado Springs Colorado
A highlight from The Fight for Food Justice with Cheryl Whilby

Black History Year

02:12 min | Last week

A highlight from The Fight for Food Justice with Cheryl Whilby

"So we've all heard the saying that goes you are what she, but when you don't know what's on the plate, what are you? I'm Jay from push black and you're listening to black history year. Like all imperialist institutions. America's food system is killing us. By controlling who can and can not access food by determining what we can and can not eat. White supremacy has starved millions of black folks while demanding we pay for a commodified natural resources like water and food. But black people come from a long line of survivalists and self sufficient farmers. We are the descendants of enslaved and free black people who independently form the land to feed themselves, their families, and their communities. Today, black activist farmers are tracing their ancestors footsteps and the fight for food justice. That includes our guests today. Sarah will be is the communications and development director and soul fire farm. And Afro indigenous centered community farm committed to uprooting racism and seeding sovereignty in the food system. She's coordinated the recovery of fresh fruits and vegetables from local farmers and other community partners and has served as the market manager of the synecdoche green market. She's also one of the 12 black food system leaders who developed the antiracist farmers market toolkit in collaboration with the farmers market coalition. Get ready for an insightful and important interview that would change your idea of what it means to have a good meal. Before we jump into it though, we need to talk about a Jim Crow farming system that still affecting black folks today.

JAY America Sarah Jim Crow
A highlight from Ep. 712 - Democrats are going to have to quickly make some hard decisions about who all runs for President

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 712 - Democrats are going to have to quickly make some hard decisions about who all runs for President

"Now that Donald Trump has announced that he's running for president, it really does shape the race. It shapes the Republican primaries in so many ways. And in my opinion, it really also shapes how the Democrats are going to need to run against him. Will it be Joe Biden against him? But what if Ron DeSantis runs, if Ron DeSantis beats Donald Trump can Joe Biden beat Ron DeSantis? Should Joe Biden run? I've even changed my opinion a little bit on that and want to tell you what I'm thinking. The Democrats have some real decisions to make. And none of them are easy. Because they've lost control of the House, they have the Senate majority by one vote. And if they lose the presidency, the Democrats for all intents and purposes were really be out of power. And the race is already underway and a lot of stuff is going on behind the scenes. And so I want to just game plan a couple scenarios with you and talk you through it and unpack and explain what I think is going to happen next. This is Sean king and you're listening

Ron Desantis Joe Biden Donald Trump Senate House Sean King
The Little-Known Civil Rights Leader Who Paved The Way For Rosa Parks

Black History Year

02:41 min | Last week

The Little-Known Civil Rights Leader Who Paved The Way For Rosa Parks

"Sweat, drip down her back as the bus driver told her to move for a white lady. She said, absolutely not. We're not talking about Rosa Parks. We're talking about someone, they never wanted us to know. This is two minute black history, what you didn't learn in school. In 1955, 15 year old claudette colvin stood up for her right to sit where she pleased on a segregated bus. As police forcibly removed her from the bus, she kept yelling. It's my constitutional right. So why was her story cast aside? The NAACP considered using her case to advance their cause. But galvin was a poor and pregnant teenager. Unfortunately, the NAACP didn't think her story would be appealing. So they tapped NAACP secretary Rosa Parks to try the same action. According to colvin, quote, parks was an adult. They didn't think teenagers would be reliable. Kevin also reported that parks skin color and hair texture made her a better representation for the NAACP. Quote, her skin texture was the kind that people associate with the middle class. She fits that profile. Parks went on to become a civil rights icon. But colvin's story didn't become well known until decades later. Both women were crucial to the movement, but unfortunately, respectability politics dictated cold and story was not good enough for white approval. We must know that respectability politics won't save us. It only serves to hide the richness of our community and our humanity. Like colvin, we must know our worth and always stand up for our rights. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast by push black.

Naacp Rosa Parks Claudette Colvin Colvin Galvin Kevin Parks
A highlight from Ep. 711 - EMERGENCY. Conservatives in Pennsylvania just voted to impeach Philadelphia DA Larry Krasner

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:21 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 711 - EMERGENCY. Conservatives in Pennsylvania just voted to impeach Philadelphia DA Larry Krasner

"Yesterday and the Pennsylvania state House, Republicans voted on a party line vote to impeach Philadelphia district attorney Larry krasner. Larry, of course, committed no crimes violated no laws. He did nothing to deserve impeachment, but they went ahead and did this in a political stunt anyway. Although it's a political stunt, they actually did vote to impeach him. And it will now go to Republicans in the Pennsylvania state Senate, where they have control. And may actually vote at a quote unquote trial to remove Philadelphia's district attorney Larry krasner. It's a catastrophic development that will overturn the will of voters in Philadelphia. It's a major major setback, for those of us that are fighting for criminal justice reform and deep systemic change. And it not only matters to the people in Philadelphia, it matters to all of you who help Larry get elected, and you need to understand that this is coming to a city and a state near you. What they're doing now to Larry, they're going to cut and paste that and try to do it in your state as well. I need us to talk about it. Let me unpack and explain it. This is Sean king, and you are listening to the breakdown.

Larry Krasner Pennsylvania State House Philadelphia Larry Pennsylvania Senate Sean King
The Man Who Made Malcolm X The Hero He Became

Black History Year

02:51 min | 2 weeks ago

The Man Who Made Malcolm X The Hero He Became

"Officially one hour until your favorite show premieres. Time to get some snacks delivered through Instacart. Okay, let's get some popcorn seltzer, chocolate covered almonds, and wait, did they release the whole season? Better cards of ice cream for the two part finale. When your day should be ending, but a new season is starting, the world is your cart. Visit Instacart dot com or download the app and get free delivery on your first order. Offer valid for a limited time minimum order $10. Additional terms apply. The man who made Malcolm X the revolutionary hero he became. This is two minute black history. What you didn't learn in school. The story of the man who helped Malcolm X become Malcolm X Malcolm X might have stayed as Detroit red. If it wasn't for a chance meeting in prison with Elton bembry, better known as bindi. Who showed him the power of education. But who was bendy? Malcolm X wrote that bimby was the first man I had ever seen command total respect with his words. Other inmates and even prison guards would sit around and listen to him. Bim B's inspiration motivated X to become the legendary figure we all know today. But who was he? John Elton benbury grew up during The Great Depression in North Carolina and was orphaned young. Despite his brilliance, work was scarce. He tried to survive, however he could, and ended up spending time in jail. During one of those stints, his passion for education would change the world. In the Malcolm X film, bimbi is called baines, and not only encourages X to read, but introduces him to Islam. But that part wasn't true. Ben B and Malcolm did develop a friendship and envy's intellect and power inspired X two develop his own. The push towards self enlightenment put him on a path to become one of the greatest black leaders of all time. Education and self improvement are powerful forces that can enlighten us in the worst circumstances. Even incarceration. But they can also empower others. For what might have become of Malcolm X, if he had never met and been inspired by bin B and how radically different, might our lives have become. In order to move towards the future, you've got to learn from the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast from push black.

Malcolm Malcolm X Malcolm Elton Bembry Bimby John Elton Benbury Bindi Bimbi Malcolm X Ben B Detroit Baines North Carolina Depression Bin B
Balenciaga’s $1,200 Sagging Pants Are Being Decried as Racist

The Breakfast Club

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Balenciaga’s $1,200 Sagging Pants Are Being Decried as Racist

"Is being criticized over these. I'm sure you guys have seen. These sweats have boxes attached to them before. Yeah and women. They've had that for women like all different brands like the underwear shows above the longtime ago. Right so they're saying it's a boxer detailed designed to be visible above the waistline of the sweats so people and these by the way it costs eleven hundred ninety dollars but people are saying that gentrified sagging now and that's what people are upset about. He's saying that if we slash black kids were are this. We were going to be statistics and not do anything with our lives. Just for some years to pass him balenciaga to sell it for twelve hundred dollars. I don't care if they balenciaga's or you know just some regular levi's what you boxer briefs showing why you want you boxes showing. Why why are you want you draw. Sean there's been literally laws that make it illegal to have sagging pants at fashion designers are profiting off of the same thing. Black people were criminalised for

Balenciaga Levi Sean
Influential Educators: Fanny Jackson Coppin

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Influential Educators: Fanny Jackson Coppin

"Jackson coppin was born in eighteen. Thirty seven in washington. Dc she was born into an enslaved household fannies grandfather had managed to save up and by the freedom of four out of his six children. Fanny's mother was not among them as fanny recalls. in her autobiography. It was on account of her birth that her grandfather refused to buy her mother's freedom. So fanny remained enslaved until the age of twelve when her aunt bought her freedom for one hundred. Twenty five dollars after that fanny was sent off to new bedford. Massachusetts to live with the different ant by the age of fourteen fanny was fully supporting herself. As a paid servant in rhode island. She worked for author. George henry calvert household for six years during her time. They're fading used the money she earned to pay for tutoring and leader public schooling. It was at the rhode island state. Normal school where fanny. I realized her love for teaching and for making education accessible for all black people in eighteen. Sixty fanny enrolled in oberlin. College in ohio oberlin's courses were rigorous and it was the first college that accepted both black and women students while studying at oberlin. Fanny broke several glass ceilings. She was selected to join the highly coveted. Young ladies literary society. Fanny was the first black person chosen as a student teacher. She used this role to organize evening. Classes for newly freed people in her last year of college. Fanny was scouted by the institute for colored youth and philadelphia. The school was run by quakers who were in search of an african american woman who could teach greek latin and arithmetic officials at oberlin. Immediately new fanny would be perfect for the role. Fanny was an excellent teacher within a year. She was promoted to principal of the women's part of the school. Four years after that van became principal of the entire institute her position as such was extremely radical for the

Fanny Jackson Coppin Oberlin George Henry Calvert New Bedford Young Ladies Literary Society Washington Rhode Island Massachusetts Institute For Colored Youth Ohio Philadelphia VAN
The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:12 min | 1 year ago

The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

"Me was born on april eighteenth. Nineteen seventeen in hot springs arkansas. Her father was a well to do physician. His position gave the family comfort. Rarely afforded to black people at the time especially in the jim crow south while mamie attributed her later career successes to growing up the she did. She was not shielded from the stark racial realities outside her home. When she was six years old she witnessed a lynching in an interview in nineteen seventy six. She described knowing she was black at a young age. She said i became acutely aware of that in childhood. Because you had to have a certain kind of protective armor about you all the time. After graduating from high school. Mimi received a scholarship to attend howard university. A historically black college in washington. Dc she intended to study math which she loved but the professors proved uninspiring. Then she met a student. Named kenneth clarke who encouraged her to try out psychology. Kenneth suggestion led to me means lifelong career and to their forty six year. Long marriage the summer after mamie graduated. She worked in the law office of the prominent. Acp lawyer charles hamilton. Houston it was there that she witnessed preparation for racial segregation cases. When she went back to howard in the fall for her master's degree in psychology she planned to address racial disparities in her work. Mimi's thesis surveyed one hundred fifty black preschool age children and set out to understand at which age black children became aware that they were black for the study. She and kenneth presented the children with different photographs including of white boys black boys and images of animals and other objects. They asked the boys to pick which picture looked like them and then asked the girls to pick which picture look like their brother or other male relative mamie and kenneth concluded that the boys showed a racial awareness at three or four years old which kenneth described as disturbing mamie and kenneth were on the forefront of a shift in the field

Mamie Jim Crow Mimi Arkansas Kenneth Clarke Howard University Charles Hamilton Kenneth Washington Houston Howard
interview with Comics Creator Tyler Martin

Black Girl Nerds

02:09 min | 1 year ago

interview with Comics Creator Tyler Martin

"Give you a little food for thought here to kinda start us off. Bush your definition of evil. You know like a little devil like sitting on your shoulder like who will. What if i tried this. What if i did this are how about this quote. This is my favorite from the comic series. We're going to talk about today. The road to hail is paved with good intentions It got me thinking. I'm talking about the antagonists comic book series. I'm here with comic book. Creator writer tyler martin. He's also a publisher editor antiquated creative director. How you doing tyler. I am doing amazing ryan. Thank you so much for having me here. I'm so excited about today. Yeah i. I've been so excited talk to you about this. This is so cool before we dive into the tag and his family and these characters who are so cool. I got to start from the beginning. Because i know you're a self-proclaimed blurred a lover comic so we gotta start there and so my question is is there a character or just what about comics in general kind of captured. Your attention early on so. I was Raised by a single mom and just remember As early as five or six Mom and dad was calling. It was just tons of arguments tons of chaos. Sometimes and i remember that comic books and cartoon just that star wars and just that whole Nerd geek thing. At the time was my escape. It was a way to another reality and fell in love with it from then on. Yes you can tell like. I always love talking to the craters. The writers of these serious because you could tell us like that it kind of gives you that release a little bit that we're all like ooh. I wish i can just make that character. That's you know kind of taking me away from life a little bit and kinda right through. That character is pretty cool. Yeah i think you're absolutely right. I think all of us I always say that creative writing saves lives. I think all of us need some kind of outlet The world is too dark. Especially right now. Dr. too stressful if you don't have some type of outlived so hard out here for you so for me writing in comic books that was my way to say you know what forget what's going on. I got my own world to figure out

Tyler Martin Bush Tyler Ryan
Back to School With the President of the NEA

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Back to School With the President of the NEA

"When we talk about how you having an up close and personal view you really did with your family leading the nea. And i really appreciate you hitting on the point. That teachers are also parents. Because i think so. Many people forgot that they're just not here. You know schooling your kids. They also have to do the same for years. So when the pandemic hit. Let's go back to the beginning. What were you immediately thinking when you knew that. The majority of teachers and students couldn't be in physical classrooms in. How was that going. To impact education system in our i immediately started thinking about the disparate impact and that showed up right away but used the irony of the timing for me is that The nea had just convened over sixty groups education group civil rights groups at the end of february february twenty twenty. We combine them in a coalition that we called the homework gap coalition because we had so many students and families who did not have access to the internet who did not have technology tools that they had at home and we already knew that they were going home and coming back to school with a gab of opportunity because so much of the homework now required that they had that connectivity and are black and brown indigenous students did not have that mpm lease did not have that accident so we have put together this coalition to to address that and to demand from the federal government that they allocate funds to close that gap within a month. It was no longer about the homework out. It was about the learning and access to the classroom. Gap that again. Disparately impacted are black and brown digital students are students. Living in poverty are students with disabilities in our marginalized communities that had always all ready and always been impacted by these inequities. Now all of a sudden they're very access to learning had been cut off from them their access to meals. You saw that you saw that on full

NEA Federal Government
The First Lady of the Black Press: Ethel Payne

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:44 min | 1 year ago

The First Lady of the Black Press: Ethel Payne

"Hello and welcome back from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia manica. Today we're talking about a fearless journalist and civil rights activists witnessed and reported moved the most monumental moments in american history known as the first lady of the black press. Meet our pioneer of the day. Ethel l payne born in chicago in nineteen eleven to the children of slaves at those one of six siblings. She was raised by her single mother after her father's early passing in nineteen forty eight. Ethel was working as a senior library assistant at the chicago public library. She decided to move across the world to work for the army special services club in tokyo. When the korean war broke out in nineteen fifty ethel wrote extensively in her journal about the discrimination. She saw against african american troops stationed in japan. Even though the military had been ordered to integrate she noticed that soldiers were still segregated. She also noted the racial slurs commonly used against african american soldiers and the regular abandonment of babies born to japanese mothers and fathers. Ethel eventually showed her journal to a korean war reporter and he sent her observations to the chicago defender a newspaper that served african american communities. Breeders were

Jenny Kaplan Ethel L Payne Army Special Services Club Ethel Chicago Public Library Chicago Tokyo Japan
Black Women Athletes Reimagining Sports

Therapy for Black Girls

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Black Women Athletes Reimagining Sports

"Just so excited to have this opportunity with you. Because i feel like in like an academic in a psychologist life. There are few times when like the work that you do kind of comes to life right in a big big way on such global scale so i know that you have been incredibly busy in the past couple of weeks and we're love for you to just start by like sharing. You know your thoughts about all of the things that have unfolded as it relates to black women specifically in the olympics guy. I mean this is one of those moments right where you like ten years of your research and you're like i've been hell y'all until y'all y'all ain't nobody been listening now you listening. That's the feeling that honestly with feeling where you're like. It's definitely a fool. Socal moment not just myself but for other researchers and practitioners whose work is deeply at this intersection of the ways in which these kind of racist and sexist stereotypes and trope clay out in performance based made and seeing the way. It's kind of live. It's kind of been demonstrated. It's like this is what we've been seeing all along and this is how it impacts wellness. This is how impacts women's wallin's. It's right you're right in front of a

Olympics Wallin
InterPop Comics With Brian David-Marshall and Rachel Gluckstern

Black Girl Nerds

02:11 min | 1 year ago

InterPop Comics With Brian David-Marshall and Rachel Gluckstern

"And you know if there's one thing i like more than talking about comics is talk about the future of comics and how advanced the technology is getting if i can get it out. Sound way to talk back on and just where it's going just in general when you talk about digital comics. And how do you get the ownership when it comes to the riders to the creators. And so i have inner pop comics joining me today. And i have brian david marshall. He is the president and publisher of inner pop. And i have racer concern. She is the group editor of the emergence universe. Brian racial thank you so much for joining me today. Oh thank you so much for having us. It's really exciting to talk about all this. Yeah thank you very much ryan. I'm and i have to thank you for joining me. I have to admit off the top here that i had to have guys on because i need to make sure i'm invited to ever enter every inter pop block party ever assign invited. 'cause that was way cool for you guys do that. I couldn't believe it was like a comic convention all my computer screen right. I was so impressed that the technology because we do the zoom things. But it's still not. It still doesn't have that person to person contact and the topiary platform that we did for internet block party amazing. I threw my hands up in amazement and realize nobody can see that in mind. It was great. Because you know like like rachel said you. Zoom is very efficient. And obviously you know for podcasting in for meeting and producing all sorts of stuff. But but it's not great on serendipity and you know it was. It was first of all. I just being in that call. I ran into people lying new from all over the world. And i haven't seen obviously in close to two years so that was that was pretty amazing but then also i think the most satisfying moment of the of the convention in this was event. We put on for the launch of our comic line. Gave away free. Comic was having a panel and having somebody come running across across this virtual space last minute to join the panel because they got lost in one of the side halls. Oh yeah this now. This is a convention

Brian David Marshall Brian Ryan Rachel
To MY BLACK SISTERS, It Aint Over

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

02:06 min | 1 year ago

To MY BLACK SISTERS, It Aint Over

"The struggle is real right now. Trying to stay in a game and implement the strategies that felicia is giving you to get promoted while also try to die from the stress that we are often subjected to because of discrimination in a workplace that stress is a ravishing our bodies and yet because we have a corporate warriors that we are the you are especially as black women. You keep checking keep going you keep fighting so i'm here to help. You equip yourselves to fight smarter not necessarily harder. You see the problem at least the problem that we think is the problem is us when drama pops off in a workplace are very first stop is to wonder what we did wrong how we could have done. Xyz better. but like a prophetess naomi. osaka in apostle simone biles. You're not going to stress us out. And more and more we as black women are getting to that point where we are no longer going to accept simply being beat up in a workplace even as we are climbing the so called Ladder which you know. What a corporate lavender. Even the corporation itself is actually not a problem. The real problem is emotions emotions on both sides. You see. Discrimination is an emotional transaction because discrimination is an extreme dislike or hatred for a group or type of people as emotional as a motion

Felicia Simone Biles Osaka Naomi
Dream Big Quilt-a-Long With Mary Davis and Shereece Spain

Stitch Please

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Dream Big Quilt-a-Long With Mary Davis and Shereece Spain

"Week we are talking with two wonderful quilters who are not only amazing creatives in their own right. They have come together to put on a spectacular quilt along for a really wonderful piece of fabric or series of fabrics. And i am speaking of course of. Mary davis with go round quilts and cherie spain of so cooked on treasures. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much and welcome. Thank you hear those of you. Who are patriot on subscribers. In if you are not a pastry on a subscriber why are you not. I mean for as little as two dollars a month. You can support amazing programming like this in honestly like catch cushion money and i know damn well. I'm worth more than cash. Cushion money. okay but anyway. You'll get to see these amazing panels in. I am actually wearing a dress that i made from one of the panels. That's going to be part of the challenge that you could see me in my this. Lovely lovely okay. fine. I'll stand up this lovely lovely amazingly rich and textured fabrics. So thank you so much. Y'all for a hitter day. I'm so grateful. Thank you and welcome. Thank you excited. Whose idea was this to get started. Did it wisco- who's to blame. Give credit to i. I'm a nation deal. Actually automation deal. Cherise was talking. About how many screen big panel. She had that she's never quilted in how someday she's gonna get you. And i. maybe. I can get a dream big paneling kind of cheer each other honest. We do the panel and then thought. Oh gosh but it'd be really great if we could do like a quilt awhile. Which i've never done before. And so cherise and i talked about it and she was all in birth of a quilt along

Cherie Spain Mary Davis Cherise
Romance Novels for Black Women

Therapy for Black Girls

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Romance Novels for Black Women

"You so much for joining these day. I really appreciate you hanging out and talking about romance novels with me this afternoon. I'm so excited. It's my favorite thing to talk about likewise so to you i would love for you to just kind of get us started by talking about what actually makes a romance novel a romance novel. Like how is their genre classified. Well there are some actual hard and fast rules that you have to follow. Were to be considered a romance. Like a romance isn't just fiction with a love story in it. The love story has to be prominent. So it can't be like a thriller where they're solving a murder or something and they accidentally way in the background fall. But that's not point at all so the love has to be or front and there has to be a happy ending if there is an. Yeah if there is no happy ending. It's not a romance in. Who says these rules. Where do these rules confirm. Maybe the romance writer association Their long-held hardened basked rules. Okay and the phantoms. Get into battles over at honey yes it. Yeah this doesn't classify you know so like we were speaking in technical terms. That's what that is. But like i grew up on romancing the stone and things like They're like on adventures in cartagena colombia. Like solving insane mysteries following romance to me that might not technically classify. No yeah interesting. So very i saw you shaking your head when she said the phantoms. Kinda get into a would have been some of your favorites. And how did you get into this genre. I would say like. I've always been a reader. I don't know how to explain that. The people but i've always been a deep reader and one of the children were meet other women. They're like yeah. I was picking books that people's houses and disarray minimum. That was me picking people's houses.

Cartagena Colombia