Advertising

Listen to the latest news, interviews and analysis from the world of advertising. Sourced from leading podcasts and talk radio shows.

A highlight from Rejecting Colonel Harland Sanders

Under the Influence with Terry O'Reilly

01:12 min | 23 hrs ago

A highlight from Rejecting Colonel Harland Sanders

"It's a show about people who face debilitating career rejections. But then found a way to overcome all those setbacks and achieve massive success. It's a completely inspiring show. Now, on under the influence I often tell stories about people who founded great companies or created famous products like Steve Jobs who founded Apple or Frank epperson who created the popsicle and today's we regret to inform you episode is about colonel Harlan Sanders, founder of Kentucky fried chicken, or KFC. Now, I've done a lot of reading about his life in the past, but this episode contains a lot of things I did not know about him. And if you think getting rejected ten times in life is tough, or 100 times, imagine being rejected over 1000 times. That is Colonel Sanders story, and it's amazing. So from the we regret to inform you archives, here's rejecting colonel Harlan Sanders. Enjoy. This is an apostrophe podcast production.

Frank Epperson Colonel Harlan Sanders Steve Jobs KFC Apple Kentucky
A highlight from How To Hold Each Marketing Dollar Accountable

AdExchanger Talks

05:00 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from How To Hold Each Marketing Dollar Accountable

"In between those two stints, I went to grad school at the London school of economics and I worked in the House of Commons when I wasn't in class. And then before Simon media, I was at General Electric and I ended up running search and social and programmatic and House we actually fired our agency and brought everything in-house. I was hands on keys. And that sort of how you learned the business. So that was my first job out of college. And I went to wesleyan university where you went, so it's a special pleasure. To be talking to fellow cardinal today. Yeah, go cardinals. Well, thanks, Nikhil. And that sounds like really a great resume for Forrester in terms of having spent time on the practitioner side as a marketer. And of course, in ad tech and you kind of were in TV before CTV became a huge thing, which we're going to get into more later. But first, I just wanted to, you know, your title is senior analyst of performance marketing. Which I think is a term that has a meeting a meeting that's been a bit flexible over time. I often now see the term growth marketing used instead of performance marketing. Sometimes if you talk to the CML, they're not that excited about the performance marketing that we're excited about their brand marketing. So I'm wondering how you would define performance marketing at this moment in time. Yeah, it's a good question. Because performance marketing, I think, is typically defined by what it's not, to your point, right? So it's not growth marketing, which claims to be fuller funnel marketing than performance, which typically resides at the bottom of the funnel. It's not brand marketing. Which tends to prioritize outcomes that are harder to measure than outcomes that are more empirical, like did someone purchase because of this ad or not. But I think that performance marketing essentially is any advertising that's held accountable to outcomes. And those outcomes don't have to be at the bottom of the funnel. They don't have to apply to specific channels. I think that outcome based marketing is performance marketing. And I think because of that, performance marketing is becoming very popular. Now that every dollar needs to be held accountable to outcomes and the outcome that I'm hearing a lot about now from our clients is revenue impact. And so especially given that macroeconomic uncertainty that I know we'll talk about our clients are asking about how to hold each dollar accountable to delivering verifiable revenue impact. And that I think is synonymous with performance marketing. Well, and I think you're just like growth marketers are saying they're not just the bottom of the funnel. I think you're saying that performance marketer is not just the funnel. So yeah. Yeah. Yeah, I think that's right. And you know, I mean, I think that there's a lot of ink that's been spelled. About how to sort of define this rhetorical device of performance marketing or how to conceptualize it, but I think it still has a lot of currency. Especially now, as I mentioned, that marketing is under pressure from finance to prove the yield that it's able to actually generate from its budget. So you brought up the pressure already, so let's just dive right into this recession talk. How are you seeing those fears of a recession or certainly there's some macroeconomic signals that indicate that we might be headed for one, how are you seeing those play into marketing decisions? So I'm seeing those play into marketing decisions by increasing focus on consumer behavior. And so we're getting a lot of questions about how various demographics of consumers perceive the potential of recession. And we just got some data back about how baby boomers, gen X, millennials, Gen Z believe or don't believe that fears about an upcoming recession are greatly exaggerated. And somewhat unsurprisingly, about 40% of Gen Z, about 41% of millennials believe that those fears of upcoming recession are greatly exaggerated while only ten to 20% of gen X and baby boomers believe that those fears are exaggerated.

Simon Media London School Of Economics Nikhil Wesleyan University House Of Commons General Electric CTV Forrester Cardinals
A highlight from Yeah, Thats Probably A New Halftime Show

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

05:30 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Yeah, Thats Probably A New Halftime Show

"One of the biggest effects of deprecating third party cookies is the need for first party data. The problem is, most businesses just don't have enough data, enter full throttle, a patent pending, cookie less, and privacy compliant, first party data generator for agencies, media companies, and brands. If you want to start ramping up your first party data collection, unlock access to a guided data trial at full throttle AI slash podcast. Hello and welcome to yeah, that's probably an ad where we discuss trends. Pop culture and football because at the end of the day, everything is an ad. I am loose Corona ad today I'm usually joined by the wonderful Shannon Miller, but she's not able to join us today, so instead, so sorry everybody, we have Al manor senior producer of the Adweek podcast network. My friend Al, how are you? I don't know why they keep letting me be on podcasts. I think just 'cause I have podcasts in the title, but I'm always happy to be on this show and unfortunately Shannon couldn't be with us today, but I'm happy to be with our two guests. Okay, and thank you for joining us Al you know, we love you. You're a beloved member of Adweek team. Introducing our two guests two and a half guests for today, Paul hebert senior CPG reporter at ad week and Mali keiha lane, senior TV reporter, along with her cat, Doyle. Well, thank you for that intro. Hopefully he stays relatively quiet, but he might have some thoughts when we talk about football. Excellent. And Paul, welcome. Thank you. Paul, you've been on the podcast before, right? I've been here sometimes, not all the time, but yeah, I've been here before. Okay, cool. Well, welcome, Friends. And the reason we have you two on today is you both had really great stories this week and kind of last week too, since football season has started on football. And specifically the Super Bowl halftime show. So Paul, we'll kick off with you, starting kind of with our newest announcement around our new sponsor, which is Apple. And you broke the story on ad week. So do you want to give us a little bit of background here? Yes, sure, of course. So for ten years, Pepsi has been the sponsor of the Super Bowl halftime show. They decided to walk away earlier this year. The new sponsor is Apple music. It is, I think this story is captured a lot of interest from the marketing community because it is essentially, I see it as pitting old media versus new media in a way that the Super Bowl is still major event major time when people gather to not only watch lots of new ads, but they're actually, I'd say, actually interested in open and watching ads, which is not a common attitude to have year round. So it's a big big deal, new sponsor, Apple music is also, I think it's a good fit because there's more they're already on your phone. They're already on, they already have an app, people use. It's not an additional thing for them, whereas Pepsi I'm sure has tried with websites and apps and social medias to kind of get people to do more stuff in the digital realm. So I think it just makes sense in that way that Apple music is already kind of primed for this future of more digital digital forward future. And this isn't like the first time tech companies are getting into the football business. I was literally just watching Thursday Night Football on Amazon Prime. Yesterday and losing at sports betting, as always. So kind of question for both of you since you're both covering TV and stuff. Is this where we're going now? Are all the tech companies just going to be just taking over all of the major sporting events at this point and what does that mean for cable? And traditional television. I mean, I don't necessarily know if I would call them tech companies taking over. They might call themselves tech companies, but I do think you're seeing and I've written about this a ton. You are seeing a big shift in sports to streaming pretty much every major media company has done streaming service with some kind of sports rights deals. You just mentioned Prime Video and Thursday Night Football that they've been simulcasting that since 2017, but this is the first year that they have it exclusively. So for the first time ever, you can not watch football on cable TV on Friday on Thursday nights. And then you see that with the MLB, they just, they have a streaming deal too. MLS is moving entirely to Apple. So Apple really, as the halftime sponsor now, Apple really is starting to move into this space. And where do you see so for Pepsi, obviously they became synonymous with the Super Bowl, it provided a place for people just for the name recognition, potentially to promote products, things like that. So where do you see this as a push for Apple? Is it to just boost subscribers or is there another play here in terms of just what is apple's like kind of like overarching for you?

Football Shannon Miller Al Manor Paul Hebert Super Bowl Apple Paul Pepsi Corona Mali Shannon Doyle AL Amazon MLB MLS
A highlight from How to Know if Your Facebook Ads Will Work

Social Media Marketing Podcast

04:12 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from How to Know if Your Facebook Ads Will Work

"How are you doing today? I'm doing great, Mike. It is so great to be back on the show. Thanks for having me. I'm excited to have you back. And today Andrew and I are going to explore a process that will help you know if your ads will be successful on Facebook. Now, Andrea, I guess my first question for you is, we live in this era right now where TikTok is getting a lot of attention and YouTube is getting a lot of attention and Facebook isn't quite getting as much attention as it used to. Same thing with Instagram. It's not quite as hot and sexy as it used to be. So from your perspective, why should marketers still focus on Facebook and Instagram? Yeah, I mean, it is definitely not the hottest platform that people are excited about anymore, but it's still the top social network out there. It's got, I was just looking up to some of these numbers because I was curious to see where things were at. It's 2.9 billion monthly active users. And to put that perspective, YouTube is 2.5 billion. So, you know, definitely, I think, you know, some of these platforms are interesting and exciting to explore, but Facebook is still number one, Instagram is at 1.44 billion, and they recently did some different calculations on their monthly active users. But these platforms, if your advertising on Facebook, you can obviously advertise on Facebook and Instagram. And if we compare TikTok, it's at 1 billion right now of monthly active users, but your audience may not be there. You know, if your audience skews a little bit older, you're not trying to reach the kids who don't have as much of a budget anyway. Maybe to spend, then you really do need to be still advertising on Facebook, Instagram, and for sure, you can consider diversifying. I'm highly recommending that these days diversifying checking out Google ads if you've never done Google ads, checking out YouTube ads, maybe exploring TikTok and SnapChat and things like that. See how they do. It always helps to test to see what's working best because things shift and change. So you got to be out there and testing, but Facebook is still number one in terms of number of people on it. Well, and I think the other big advantage that Facebook has specifically over YouTube and TikTok is you don't have to have video. Your ads could be just images, right? With a lot of text. And if you're not at the point where you have a video person in house or you feel really comfortable about your videos, well you can still advertise on this platform where you would not be able to do so on YouTube and you would not be able to do so on TikTok. Absolutely. To the best of my knowledge. Let's think about some of the mistakes that marketers make when it comes to their spending because I would imagine from the limited experience we have at social media examiner doing advertising on Facebook and Instagram. And so many people listening right now probably have spent a lot of money on Facebook and Instagram and they may be shut off the campaigns really quickly because maybe they're making some of these common mistakes. So what are some of the mistakes that you see marketers getting wrong? I think one of the, you know, especially when it comes to spending, I mean, obviously the number one thing you need to be doing is testing. But that also kind of relates to how much you're going to spend because you have to spend some money in order to get a significant result with your tests. So one of the biggest things I see related to spend is that people aren't spending enough. And that could be, you know, they try like a $50 ad or something like that. And that didn't work. Or they're actually getting some results, but they're not spending enough to then maximize those results. So I've seen it both ways. Sometimes they're just not testing enough and not spending enough with their tests because a lot of times you'll find a different audience that does really well and you'll be able to cut your lead cost in half. And if you had stopped way earlier in your testing iterations, then you would not have found that audience not realize that your ads could actually be profitable. How can we equip someone to go to their boss and say boss, even though we haven't gotten results yet? We need to spend more. Because he understand.

Instagram Facebook Youtube Andrea Andrew Google Mike
A highlight from Episode 300: Scoping The Ad Tech Ecosystem, With Brian OKelley

AdExchanger Talks

05:03 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 300: Scoping The Ad Tech Ecosystem, With Brian OKelley

"That's a lot of episodes. The very first episode of this podcast was hosted by the always iconic, but now former editor of ad exchanger, Zack Rogers, and it went live on September 23rd, 2016. It was a chat with Brian lesser back then, lesser was running group M in North America. And because life is a circle of sorts, I have a different well-known Brian as our guest this week. Brian o'kelly, the father, godfather, progenitor, whatever you want to say, of ad tech. When Brian lesser was CEO of AT&T's advertising and analytics division, AT&T bought app nexus, which Brian o'kelley cofounded in 2007. At nexus DSP was shortly thereafter rebranded as Xander, which became central to AT&T's ill fated ad tech ambitions for WarnerMedia. So pour one out for telcos and ad tech. Ryan o'kelly left ad nexus shortly after AT&T's acquisition and Brian lesser is now the CEO of info sum purveyor of clean room technology. Microsoft bought Xander in late 2021, which helped Microsoft win Netflix's advertising business in July, so in a weird way, Brian o'kelley helped make Netflix into an avod service. As the world turns, in the years since moving on from app nexus and AT&T, Brian O Kelly hasn't stayed still. In between, he founded a company called commodity, now called weybridge, focused on modernizing the old school industry of supply chain and logistics management. He handed the reins of that company to his cofounder Scott Evans late last year, and now he's focusing on his new startup, scope three, which helps add tech companies monitor and reduce their carbon emissions. But the ambitions are a little bigger than that. Before we get started though, please allow me to do a quick plug for a programmatic IO, taking place October 17th and 18th at the New York Marriott Marquis. We've got a really good agenda lined up for you with speakers from NBCU, American Express, Amazon ads, Omnicom media group, Warner Brothers discovery. Microsoft Bloomberg media Kroger and lots more. Oh yeah, and Brian o'kelley will be speaking at pro guy O two. So head on over to programmatic dot IO to reserve your seat and see you there. Hey Brian, welcome to the 300th episode of ad exchanger talks. Thank you. So glad to be here. So it's a well known fact, your credited with basically inventing programmatic advertising. And I think most people are familiar with the broad strokes of the story. You led the tech team at right media that went on to launch the first ad exchange and that got sold to Yahoo and then you did the eth nexus thing and I believe you launched that from your apartment, which I guess is the adult version of a dorm room. And then AT&T bought app nexus and that got combined with Xander and salt and Microsoft. So it really is just the tale of ad tech in a nutshell. But I'm curious about some of the untold stories. Let's say this wasn't a podcast recording. That lots of people are going to listen to, but rather a chat in a bar or something or at a coffee shop. What are some, I don't know, funny kind of behind the scenes stuff that happens at any point in that journey that you would that you would share. Maybe something you haven't shared before. Oh my goodness. You know, I think one of the great benefits of ad tech is that there are just awesome people in the industry. And so so many of the stories I think of are about people that I had the privilege of doing stuff with. But what immediately comes to mind and this is one of those sort of silly things of like, what are the greatest accomplishments of my career? And for anyone who knows Michael Rubenstein, you know, I got him to go to In-N-Out burger and eat a double double. And I feel like of all the things I've accomplished. You know, that may be the most amazing. I need the backstory because I'm familiar with him, but not his eating habits. So why is that significant? Well, for one thing, he's likely a vampire. I mean, he is over the course of app nexus. Like I put on 30 pounds, maybe more, maybe 40 pounds. Having a young baby and running a startup and we were flying back and forth on airplanes to Seattle like twice a week to try to get the big app nexus Microsoft deal done. It was so stressful, right? I mean, imagine the difference of this industry had, I don't know, Rubicon, won that deal.

Brian O'kelley Brian Lesser Zack Rogers Brian O'kelly Brian Ryan O'kelly Microsoft Brian O Kelly Netflix New York Marriott Marquis Nbcu Omnicom Media Group AT Scott Evans Weybridge Xander North America Warner Brothers Kroger American Express
A highlight from Slightly Off Pitch

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

04:13 min | Last week

A highlight from Slightly Off Pitch

"Jameson is coming in on 7 years with Adweek. And he's held quite a few roles with us, but Jameson, let me pass it to you and just share a little bit about yourself. Well, thank you for having me. I'm excited for my first lose and Shannon podcast. I find crying nud, grinder and Coke, grinder, and Shannon. I feel like there's probably another host in there that I'm forgetting I apologize to that person. Maybe Doug Sanger. But yeah, I'm excited to be here. I oversee agencies coverage and for me I've prioritized new business as something that I write a ton of about and trying to help the industry solve the problems around pitching for new business because it's an expensive tiring awful thing half the time. So let's do it. Jameson is the go to and now whenever I have a pressing agency question, which is usually results into like, is this a thing? Is it okay for me to feel this way about this thing? And James, you'd be like, yes, because I feel that way too. So it always makes me feel really reassured when I get the Fleming sign off on a thought that I can't really put into words. And this week there was a lot of that actually jamison you wrote a story titled the Martin agency wins three more accounts. All without a pitch. And I'm seeing this as a bit of a phenomenon this week. Well, before we get into all of that, can you tell us a little bit about the smart and story? Yeah, so the Martin agency little history there, you know, 2020, they have a huge new business here added some pretty impressive clients, 2021. They deliver on those clients just exceptional work. And this year, it's like a cyclical thing because they are back. They won Bud Light, seltzer, because it was in August, which is one of the three or four biggest clients to change hands this year. So a huge win for them. And then a quietly, they've added a lot of other business. They added legal shield. They added Santander U.S., royal Caribbean. They have done a lot of work on Hasbro brands, most notably nerf, but they added a couple more lines of business there. They continue to add on and a lot of it is attributed to just prior relationships that they have with clients as opposed to having to go into these pitches that can run 6 figures or an extreme cases like Coca-Cola run into 7 or 8 figures investments. That's crazy. And you know what? Coming from agency side for being there for a few years. It's this headline was really attention grabbing. I particularly like your newsletter subject line the other day, Jameson, Martin agency wins, not one, not two, but three. Our brands, when I was agency side, we pitches were a big deal. You saw executives. You saw up and coming talent from all different teams, just locked themselves in a fishbowl room, just covered with paper and then you saw them pull late nights and all hands on deck. What do you think, what are your thoughts on this? Do you see kind of like a turn in the industry on going towards like pitch list wins or what is it about this instance in particular that was so different? Yeah, so there's definitely a growing movement. You'll see a lot of agencies use a term, ditch the pitch. I think we're going to see a lot more of that of better new relationship building where a lot of these brands, especially brands that are spending under 25 or $50 million a year. There's no reason to have a drawn out three month pitch for that business. You have odds are you have a specific need or two, and if you're using the right pitch consultant who has done their homework on hundreds of agencies, they should be able to just line up three to 5 agencies for you to do a chemistry meeting with, and maybe a second meeting. And you should be able to pick a winner. You shouldn't eat spec work.

Jameson Doug Sanger Shannon Royal Caribbean Jamison Martin Fleming Bud Light Santander Hasbro James Coca Cola U.S.
A highlight from How to Sell More With Instagram

Social Media Marketing Podcast

04:22 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Sell More With Instagram

"I like thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited and so honored to be here. I'm excited to have you. And today, Carla and I are going to explore how to sell more with Instagram and who that's a marketer doesn't want to know how to do this. But before we go there, I would love to hear your story. Start wherever you want to start, how in the world did you get into Instagram? Yeah, so my story actually starts in 2011 in Argentina in Buenos Aires. I had just moved there for an adventure really. I had 6 months in which I was waiting to get my permanent residency in Australia where I was living before that. And I wanted to learn Spanish and just kind of see what happens. And as life happens, I met a guy, I fell in love, and I decided to stay in Buenos Aires. So for the next few weeks, I was trying to get a job. I went to so many job interviews, my Spanish was pretty bad at the time. So surprisingly, no one wanted to hire me. And my boyfriend, he had just started hosting dinner parties together with his best friend who's a chef for these groups of travelers that were coming through. And it kind of came to a point where I was like, okay, I don't think anyone is going to hire me, so I probably am going to have to leave and that's when he said, why don't you start working with us? We could use an efficient German in our team. And I said yes, so for the next 18 months, we were hosting these data parties for tourists in our living room. So it's called a closed door dining experience or closed door restaurant and that's actually quite a common concept in Argentina where you're just having people over, they pay you in cash, nothing gets declared. It's not a real business. And for some reason, it worked really well. So within a few months, we made it to number one on TripAdvisor. And we just had the best time. Cooking for people dining with them, drinking with them. And just living our best life. And it kind of came to a point where we thought, okay, if we want to take this to the next level, we need to hire a team and we need to find an investor because really what we want to do is just make a lot of money and travel the world. And continue having fun. Fast forward a few months, we actually met a guy who at the time was Argentina's number one poker player. Oh. And he needed a way to funnel his money into the country. And so he gave us a bunch of money. We moved from our two bedroom apartment into a two story building on the best corner of Buenos Aires. And open the restaurant with a team of 20 in the middle of low season after having put all the money into decorating and renovating the place. Just out of curiosity to set the context, what year was this when this was all happening? This was 2011. Okay, cool. Keep going. Yeah. And that's really when things kind of started to go wrong because none of us had any idea of how to run a real business or a restaurant or manage a team and our investor was a poker player so he didn't really bring a lot to the table except for money. And we just kind of were hitting problem after problem and the next two years were just all about surviving and just trying to make enough money to pay the rent to pay the team and it just was awful. The only thing that kind of kept us going was really the positive feedback that we were getting from our clients. But the whole everything around it was just really, really bad. And eventually in 2015, it kind of came to a point where it was just about making the investor happy making the team happy, just trying to make more money and eventually I decided to leave. And at the time I was 29, I was completely lost. I moved back in with my mom for a few months while I was trying to figure out what to do next. And I just knew that I didn't want to go back to Germany. So I took a job working for a friend in Mexico in cancun. He had online marketing agency, and he offered me a job, and I said, okay, script, let's just go. Was your Spanish really goodbye then? Yeah. Okay. And that was really the first time I got to see that people were actually paying people to manage their social media or to help them attract clients online.

Buenos Aires Argentina Instagram Carla Australia Cancun Germany Mexico
The 4 Stages of Personal Branding

Brands On Brands On Brands

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The 4 Stages of Personal Branding

"Number one is understanding. What the suite of products is you want to develop in other words. What are you to offer for. That's like the most complicated thing you do. What do you want to offer. That is the easiest smallest way to work with you And then what do you want offer. That's in the middle right and they call this evaluator or you can google that in other words there are sometimes things that you may want to offer that. Just bring people into your world because a lot of people just to get started need help with something very small and that'll help build trust and if you help them succeed and you give them some cook winds he might be willing to move onto the next phase and hire you for the thing that you do that you are known for. That is the service you really want to help people with but you may have to start with something smaller right so building. This suite of offers is part of that phase right now. What i want to also add to this is. It's not just about selling things. The idea of offering your help is huge. And what i want you to be able do is before you get to the point where you are selling something. I want to make sure that you build out resources right. What are the things that even while you're teaching are things that you would give people that are templates. That are checklists that are resources that they can use books. They can read approaches to follow whatever it is build them outright them out any kind of list of tools that you might use that you would recommend all of that and start to catalogue them and save those things number one because it'll help you serve your clients when they do decide to be clients and pay you for your service but number two day will help you figure out what the resources are that you could be offering people when you meet them in person or online when they are just trying to get a question answered you could say oh actually. I have a resource for that. Why don't you go get it here. I it should solve your problem for you right. It brings them into your world in a non sales away.

Google
Stas Tushinskiy on Making Audio Advertising Conversational

Advertising Is Dead

02:31 min | 1 year ago

Stas Tushinskiy on Making Audio Advertising Conversational

"So how'd you evolved from what is in a sense of a one way stream You're going to go back to when you sarah huckabee set to solve The full speed of what the initial learnings. And how'd you count on for up. You have right now. Yes so we were thinking a lot how we solve the engagement challenge in the one days struck us a voices. The answer goes. That's not the way to engage with everything actually back then. We already had siri but he was. Maybe six months of before alexa happened. Alexa alexa boom in high. Remember clearly with cs. Does that thousand seventeen when everybody started talking about alexa and we were lucky with the timing because when we introduced our first pilot product. This is exactly when alex to hype stock and it helps a lot and it also helped us in on a macro level because it it it made. The voice adoptions faster and those that was the first part to realize what needs to be done but then the second was. I think it was even. It was a hot a task for us. Like how would you work wasn't obvious it back then and instill. This is the reality. Even today. we have thirty seconds at spots so all audio ads supposed to fit thirty second ad. Lots like ninety percent of them. You have fifteen as well. Majorities thirty seconds. And when he when he can speak with the consumer when he can have a dial feed it in thirty seconds because Can go in. Many directions started with a one of their more. No the way to leave me alone. I don't wanna talk to cannot be same second hand. And i think that was the biggest breakthrough that we had when we just said to ourselves. What if we had no retirement today. So why don't we forget about radio. How would be one adds to build to build like today right and it was clear. We want it to be a driven conversational interactive in funds. And it'll be short because today everybody's like multitasking. Always a hurry. And so we're like okay if that's the case why don't we make ads batter. Let's be real people at. They love brands if they hate

Sarah Huckabee Alexa Alexa Siri Alexa Alex
How to Write Podcast Ads That Sell

Sounds Profitable

02:02 min | 1 year ago

How to Write Podcast Ads That Sell

"I'm really pumped about this conversation today. Because the more time i spend in this space the more. I'm realizing that right now where. We are in podcast. Advertising is that the actual creative is the thing that receives the least amount of attention. And it's probably the most important. Yeah i think that is often the case particularly in this space. That creative doesn't i was just looking through here in these little. Keep these little note. Cards of all these quotes and things to inspire me and this is for bill. Byrne bach who said creativity will become the last unfair advantage where legally allowed to take over our competitors. And so the fact that creative is i think under exploited particularly in this space or not focused upon is bears bears focusing upon it. Because it can be this kind of leave behind as a creative director at an audio agency. There is a piece of it. But i mean you see the same thing across all creative. It's like well anybody can do that right. Like anybody can pick out colors. Anybody can edit something on their laptop and it's true. I mean all the tools have been democratized. They've been democratized for all time. Though when it comes to writing or performing you know the alphabet spin been around a good long time but it doesn't make everybody a world class writer but it does seem particularly in the audio space that the copy points can kinda be this thing. That's just like well just you know. Just basically have anybody right it. Just yeah we kinda got that. We got our team will. We'll go after it. And it's not given the time care and attention that like anything. Anything could benefit from more time. Caring attention to refine it and make it better and make it punch harder to make. I think particularly in the realm of worlds to make it clear. Brief and

Byrne Bach
Ad Tech Meets Wall Street

The Big Story

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Ad Tech Meets Wall Street

"James you tuned into the big tech earnings this month facebook and google and then trade desk which is the challenger and torch holder for the open web. What did you get out of the contrast between the tail facebook. Google certainly just jot the world by having huge monster revenue quarters when people thought for facebook in particular. This might be a tough quarter because of apples. Privacy changes or policy changes that just restrict app tracking. I think that sort of the narrative coming out of both of those was really just. There's been this huge digital advertising rebound And a lot of that. Going to google and facebook amazon their ad platform had the same story for their earnings So so. I think that that was sort of that story in the trade desk. The trade desk is certainly pitching itself. More as as this sort of like emblem of protector of the open web. And i mentioned in the story. His is more combative where they were conciliatory with with amazon and google. I think they have always been careful to be like these are important partners. Like the trade desk buys a lot of google supply. They work with amazon they. Were you know jeff. Green had tons of amazing things to say about amazon when they set up a program to let the trade desk by fire tv. But that's been cut out And to desert underscore why they're going for tv. I think that that's where the money is. Trade desk has just cleaned out the the independent. Dsp world sort of that whole huge ecosystem of startups. That were all competing for the open web programmatic market. There's not a lot of low hanging fruit their trade as has covered all of that up. And tv's really the growth opportunity

Facebook Google Amazon James Jeff Green
InMobi Has Its Eye on Telcos, With Abhay Singhal

AdExchanger Talks

01:30 min | 1 year ago

InMobi Has Its Eye on Telcos, With Abhay Singhal

"I'm delighted to welcome obey single founder and ceo of imo. Be marketing cloud to the podcast. Talk about this fascinating company. And what where. It's where it's going next obey. How are you. i'm very well rosette Thank you very much for having me on your podcast yet. Thanks for doing it. So i thought maybe we could start with a minute on the origin story of in moby. If you will walk us back fifteen years. What was the first version of this company. Fantastic now this is It's it's been a long story and one that are incredibly proud to talk about the very first version of a mobile. Believe it or not. It started with being a sms. Search engine kind of group on before groupon became the thing. All we wanted to do is solve. The problem of discounts discovery for consumers using the sms on On on on the phones all pre smartphone era remember that iphone launched in two thousand six late two thousand six ali two thousand seven and since then the entire industry has changed. So yes that was very first version of moby which was guarded. 'em korge at that time. M for mobile and coach is a hindi word for search but since then it's it's an interesting interesting right nothing short of a

IMO Groupon Em Korge
Martha Lane Fox on Responsible Tech, Social Justice

Influence

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Martha Lane Fox on Responsible Tech, Social Justice

"So martha thank you very much for being on the show. Thanks for asking me You chair of many different boards. Of course the most interesting being we transfer. I personally most interested in your life outside of we transfer so i want to jump straight into the house of lords and for our friends in the us They may not have any idea. What the house of lords is in my opinion. It's probably the stuffiness branch of uk. Parliament your cross bench peer. And you're one of the few women. I believe they're in the house of lords. And the first woman mazzone only allowed into the house of lords in nine hundred fifty eight so relatively new fad in in the history of british politics. I mean we are a that. I'd love to hear from you. Why you chose to be a part of it and i had done some policy work worked in e commerce and then i wrote in the on the edges of government and policy night helped in the uk create something called the government digital service and a website would go to uk. And i realized that. Actually i was not regular good at business to anyone louis. Transfer boot. But i am in a way interested in the way that the next wave of digitization was affecting institutions society buddha context of i'm facing disruption and so i helped create this incredible machine in the middle of government gupta. Uk and. She says he added way. The government was we thinking itself my thoughts you know. I'm really interested in trying to think about how to continue to use my voice. Mice move voice in policy in tech discussions. And i decided i'd apply not thinking for one minute that i would. I get accepted at points. They might say come back in five years time when you know something but i think they must have been desperate that yet. It's kind of an incredible opportunity because the cross-benches the independent you're not affiliated to political party. You'll not just put the house. Because he given a big party donation not that everybody. There is because of that. But they're still in my opinion too many at all and you have to bring some kind of outside expertise perspectives to the house of lords

House Of Lords Mazzone Government Digital Service UK Martha Louis United States
HBO Max  14 Months Later

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

01:55 min | 1 year ago

HBO Max 14 Months Later

"We've got kelsey sutton are streaming editor kelsey. Welcome back to the show. What an introduction. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited. To be bad. Kills he is such a joy to work with Every single day and also to have on the show and today we've got a really a fun topic a hyper specific content because for those who listen frequently or just pay attention to anything advocate covers or to your life as a modern human being streaming services obviously just exploded Over the past two years it went from just being the same old options of. Oh you got your net flicks in your hulu and your one or two other things. And then all the sudden it's like you have nine hundred options And we have had several episodes devoted to that into this explosion of streaming. And at the time we kind of asked what's to what's gonna settle out you know what are going to be the ones that end up being kind of required Required viewing and that you actually are worth your money each month and i feel like there's some consensus that. Hbo max has become one of those services shannon before we get to the experts What's your what's your take on. Hbo max so h backs hbo. Max set a little bit of a rocky start. But it's become one of the sort of like hubs of like hidden gems like that. You start that superlative net flicks. I felt but when it comes to just really nice nuggets of content. Hbo max has really a ton to offer. And they have you know the benefit of like a really robust ip. it's just nice to find these sort of like one off like romantic comedies and Kind of cringing comedies which tend to like fall pretty middle lane for me.

Kelsey Sutton Kelsey HBO Hulu Shannon MAX Nuggets
A Supply Shortage in Programmatic CTV

The Big Story

01:27 min | 1 year ago

A Supply Shortage in Programmatic CTV

"So tony and i have both been checking out the lympics and talking about it all day on slack. Just kidding just a little bit. I'm a huge olympic span myself. I live for those every two years. I've got senior sail over me So what's the experience for. you will admittedly. I'm not a big olympics watcher. In a heaven. Tiny i know but but i was really was really interested in checking out surfing this year because it was the time it you know. It was as an olympic sport. But i was watching it mainly on nbc in usa and then it would like check peacock for the recaps mainly So it was cool. Like peacock was cool in the sense that they really recaps. That were no more than five minutes. But if you wanted to watch. Like if. I wanted to watch chris. More like the entire like final. You had to subscribe to premium and that was awesome because she won the gold for the usa in in surfing and then on linear. Like i just happen to turn on nbc. And i caught simone biles and went down with the olympics team which just turned out to be one of the more dramatic things during the game.

Olympic Tony Olympics NBC USA Simone Biles Chris
How Yahoo Is Experimenting With Platforms and Partnerships to Grow Its Audience

The Digiday Podcast

01:59 min | 1 year ago

How Yahoo Is Experimenting With Platforms and Partnerships to Grow Its Audience

"Kili this week. You spoke with join a. Lambert who is the head of consumer yahoo who obviously has been in the news this year. Because rising media's parent company was acquired by apollo global management had been owned over as in now has been sold off. Did joya talk belic where it has or hasn't changed over yahoo since the deal was announced back in by yeah so obviously a fairly new announcement. She couldn't really get into too much of it because the deal hasn't been finalized and all that but at the end she did talk about some of the. I guess prospects for this change and how she anticipates it to be a positive For the company so she'll get into a little bit on it but yeah ultimately unfortunately not too much could be said about the actual Deal and who obviously one of the original internet portals been around since the ninety s. What's yahoo audience. Look like at this point. Yeah so that's a big focus of this conversation because they have been doing a lot in the way of trying to get jen's ears Into the yahu portfolio sphere the company launched a couple of years ago. A brand called in the know which is a video arm that previously sat on top of like its portfolio of brands. It has since been built out into its own Brand itself which has a very big emphasis on consumer revenue. So you're commerce. Plays shop will video things like that but she also talks a lot about the other areas of the portfolio that they're looking to incorporate more of genzyme audience so Everything from yahoo finance in a focus on things like personal finance crypto to tech crunch and also over to like the fantasy side of

Apollo Global Management Belic Yahoo Kili Joya Lambert JEN Genzyme
Connecting the Dots for Publishers Feat. Kavita Shenoy

Advertising Is Dead

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Connecting the Dots for Publishers Feat. Kavita Shenoy

"Welcome back to advertising his dead beard. Coweta aiko w we finally doing this And i'm seeing finally because we went through some circles to start off this recording value for you. You had to figure room. Happy valley do the he'd be head of walmart. Divide before we could record. I have had a warm up in more than one. Run up and down. These takings is a be shouting about connected loom. That's not sounding roomy. Because she was upset about the fact that might have f. But i'm also happy doing this. Because i know over the last few months of admin gonna visions space in what's happening with that going to india listener unnoticed. Ingeborg the ghana. Meaning everything else. But there's another huge offered. And i know what you been building really focus on. I i want to start off by asking a The idea for the company come about our the inception and and what can lead you to starting it off so we started out long back we. We broke ground on this company. I wanna save ideo. As i was at google and i was. I wanted to work with above decide. Oh because there was a steam On the youtube side of the business of gruber who was doing a lot of work with publishers. And i happen to go along with them for some meetings and realized that most of these publishers relying heavily on youtube under decision because of that time you know Disposing aren't dando. Content distribution was still a bit expensive proposition for most. Oh more sto- in content creators. it hadn't been democratize as much as it is today. And it wasn't as cheap but they understand that data. They didn't know what do and youtube and actually google as an organization is all about simplifying scanning they don't actually give each publisher. You know very very alert expedience is onto lacrosse required for scheme. And that's davis martin but every publisher like you know has different contents dodgy so they have to use their data differently so when the ida struck me back in two thousand thirteen and then by the time i must have the courage to quit twenty fourteen and i met the founder who then don't duma co-founders Beat the tech Background an illegitimate. Who come with who has offered engineers and we basically decided to tackle the long tail. Initially world'll all of these were publishers. And tell them how to use u.

Coweta Aiko Ingeborg Youtube Walmart Ghana Gruber Google India Davis Martin
How to Market Commercial Space Travel

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

02:15 min | 1 year ago

How to Market Commercial Space Travel

"I'm delighted. Honestly the lights between by one of the legends of british advertising are so great to see. You travel hurry alot about but i'm okay. generally yet. publishable never been bolted origin. I've seen. I've definitely seen you think it's been incredible few weeks when it comes to the space race of the billionaires one of us thinking about who the advertising sector news motivating us today to announce the bletchley only yourself. Can i ask. Could you explain what you're going to be doing. you're involved one. The first flights when it comes to verging a galactic war. You're gonna be doing. I'm going to be his later. Although saying good he space you do about it yeah It has been a strangely Rolled back by coincidence. Robot by coincidence and covert because we're not the coded over already would have beat spice saddam notion of space race ability as a with accident Those two flights come back in a few days at one another because we should have gone anxious ago because of law various lockdowns. It's stolen delighted. Tesla program so it was actually just a coincidence. Those two floods happened the so close to one. Another to kinda means attended. Let's celebrate as balaki bycatch which ashby so. That's the most goals thing him long. When did you first become reality for your will definitely good question because this is a kind of a gap between the becoming reality. And i i wanted to go. You know Because of wanting to go over it Of the good wife. They set the audio. But this is my spice book. Myspace projects which i did when i was a child

Tesla Ashby Myspace
Evolving the Phygital Consumer Experience With Vivek Srivatsa

Advertising Is Dead

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Evolving the Phygital Consumer Experience With Vivek Srivatsa

"Preparing for this edition now. One of the things Board is that as we have moved from a largely physical and partially digital existence as human beings and now moved boop largely digital and partially physical in that sense From vita mo- macro part of the hall of you seen marketing as a function itself. How you seen that in data Change i think It's something i've said often. The lost hero. Suppose the defined kitting us. I think As probably his one eighty this chain the most probably be vaccinated about five years in terms of the neva. Devoted nominees outdated of time so he will change his obviously Most of the mass media effectiveness had to be art. And how you talk to customers like you and meanwhile sitting in front of the screens at home now but as you know the traditional A mass marketing mass communication change completely. So he'll changes. I think Changes for the better. In some cases in some cases i guess marketeers like me had to make a very tough calls and make a i would say Be more nimble in terms of making a tough calls trauma mindset along the few so extremely challenge but at the same time center. Future facing the exciting astro you

Podcast Prefix Analytics Explained

Sounds Profitable

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Podcast Prefix Analytics Explained

"I wrote an article all about podcast prefix analytic and their value. It's in the description for you to check out. But i never really got into who was four and how useful this data can be for johnny pot gasser. So he spoke to karo. Chuck lasts chargeable to get into the nitty gritty of how these analytics are not just for the big podcasters but for anyone with the desire to learn and take the lead. Thank you so much for the opportunity that with you about this. Thank you so much for the in. By congratulations on your success. It's amazing to see what you've done in such a little time. And and i can't wait to see what happens in the coming months with ya. That news on. I know the context of this is kind of like an extension of that article. You wrote about analytic prefixes. The article does a really good job of explaining what it is right. And i think. I've explained it more times than almost the entire city of pasadena's fingers and toes right so i think if you don't mind just kind of reiterating that might kinda get picture right. The analytic prefixed. The way i always explain. It's a piece of code goes on the rss feed reason why that's important. Rss feed is distributed essentially everywhere right more or less prefixes acting as a redirect so what's happening is regardless of device or player when a user clicks player download right however with that analytic prefix ping's that prefix that piece of code and redirects download information. Somewhere and my case chargeable right but still passes through the request of the end user receives the mp three fall asleep right the key things to know what is download at the end of the day right. So ip address user agent user agent means you know ios fourteen apple. Podcasts iphone. Twelve the main reason why i wanted to kind of hit on that definition is because you know we're touching on the key thing there which is it's a it's allowing us to see what's going on with regards to the download and then be of course what what makes up the download the ip address which is so important

Johnny Pot Gasser Karo Chuck Pasadena Apple
Pivot Your Personal Brand With Kelly Roach

Brands On Brands On Brands

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Pivot Your Personal Brand With Kelly Roach

"All right everyone. Let's get going here today. As i mentioned excited to bring to you kelly roach kelly first off and before anything else. Thank you for being here. Thanks for coming on the show. Thanks for using today to get to know each other absolutely and they say deva phone conversations today me to you know what i what triggered me in terms of really wanted to bring you on was 'cause you never that you need a lot of people on random different ways Yours happen to be online via email through just connections and one of the things that spoke to me. Was you coach business as you coach people you coach entrepreneurs you've worked at fortune five hundred companies to help turn them around us that a lot of things but i really liked the idea that you work with people to help them figure out in what they need to do their business to move forward and as someone right now who's like looking also grow and i've invested in coaches and like in looking at different ways to do that for my business i i've seen the value. I've seen the idea that you get someone to help you. Unlock some things you want to like learn. It's over the course of two three years making mistakes you learn from the people that either can help your lock something in your brain or the way you're thinking about things. Just give you a new perspective. So i love the you do that. But how did you get into that. Like wh what brought you to to this being part of what you do every day. Yeah definitely will. I was doing business. Growth strategy and sales leadership and coaching and training in a fortune. Five hundred armed. Before i started my own business. I was super super passionate about helping people build the confidence to market themselves. Effectively and set goals in ultimately accomplished their career. Dreams make more money in all of that through their work. And when i decided to start my own company i really just looked at. What's my zone of genius. I knew maisonet genius was business strategy and helping others to succeed. And so you know i said who can i focus on. That is really motivated yet. If they don't get as help you know it would be really detrimental to their ability to achieve their goals and it was small business owners right because small business owners start with a big goal. Passion daydreams all of that but many times are non equipment with the skill set in sales marketing leadership. Business strategy needed to actually bring the desired outcome to fruition with the actions that they're taking so it was just really kind of a natural step into that next evolution.

Kelly Roach Kelly
Facebook Groups Marketing, Content That Make Sales With Christina Jandali

The Email Marketing Show

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Facebook Groups Marketing, Content That Make Sales With Christina Jandali

"Now kennedy august christina. Today i've got three statements about one of them's a truth. The other two are just iran lies. I'm going to try and guess which of these things is true christina. Give anything away here. So did she fly to england to buy a dog. Oh she could have done did she. Go the caribbean for a week's holiday and stay for a month old. She learned to ice skate by teaching. Someone else oh it's good. It's good do. I think christina flew to england a by a dog. I don't know if i can imagine a like in a dog. But i don't think she flew to the caribbean for weeks old and stay for a month. Maybe i think she probably. I can imagine her liking this idea of living and working wherever she quite fancies and sticking. That sounds good ice skate. My teacher somebody else. I think rob you made that up christina. Did you end up. Staying in the caribbean for a month i did i flew to england to buy god was it it was not it was a cavalier king charles spaniel i used to show dogs and i was sick of losing so i decided i was going to get the best dog to bring. That's amazing that's commitment. I love it. Oh my goodness that's great. Wow beautiful so your known for many many things but one of the things that you've really being been helping people do is work with facebook groups now. Facebook groups a lot of them around all they. I mean they're still pretty hot though right hundred with anything it goes through stages and with facebook groups are they dead or are they still around. What are they using. And i think when you take a look at anyone that is launching their programs. And you look at like tony robbins. As an example in their launches guess what they're using now maybe teaching something else that they're using a facebook group to launch their program. You're looking at gabby bernstein. The running and doing her book launches using face liquor so hundred percent. Facebook groups are the place to help the part with increasing those conversions with your lunches and turning more leads into buying.

Christina Caribbean England Kennedy Facebook Iran ROB Tony Robbins Gabby Bernstein
Let's Make Podcasting Metrics More Meaningful

Sounds Profitable

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Let's Make Podcasting Metrics More Meaningful

"I've talked with you all before. About how the way we study podcast. Metrics need to evolve and change. I wrote an article on the topic. All about making them more meaningful in that article. I've talked about the l. Intego williams who wrote an awesome piece for neiman lap. Discussing better ways to engage metrics. She was kind enough to come on the show and talk with me about her thoughts on the ways. We should be measuring success. Thank you so much for being here. I'm really excited heavier. We wrote an article a little while back in one of the main focuses was about not just looking at downloads looking at other metrics in wrote like a really killer article for nieman lab something. I wasn't super familiar with. When i kicked off problem so i want to turn over like tell everybody a little bit about your article and demon labs and what your goal was with that sure i will. Thanks for having me. I love talking shop with you. Your resign and your own. Thank you so. I genuinely believe and i think now. Of course four years have actually proven that the download is kind of useless as a measure of success. Then i think you agree at the armed. Smart people casting agree. It's like the emperor has no clothes kind of thing. And so i had just been a passive -ly other measurements for our shows over months and then neiman invited the invite a bunch of people at the end of the year to write an opinion. And i thought a if there is any marriage what you've been obsessing about for the last six or seven months put it down on paper and they share it so that people can scrutinize it right. Because i'm a journalist and so that's really where you test your idea in the public arena

Intego Williams Nieman Lab Neiman
Repurposing Video Content With Molly Mahoney

Brands On Brands On Brands

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Repurposing Video Content With Molly Mahoney

"Right. Let's get going today. Welcome everyone to brands on brands on brands. I'm excited to bring to our guest. Today molly mahoney first off molly. Thanks so much for being here today. I cannot wait to dive into this with you today. And when i'm excited because you know i love when i run into people in these social media marketing community speakers authors are like my favorite people out there. Because you've you've figured out how to teach other people the things that you're good at and one of the things that you specialize in his creating like facebook video content and a lot of live video as well and let's start there. Have you always been comfortable in the spotlight per se. Man i would say yes. It's a you know. Mom has like photos videos of me when i was. I don't know maybe four. Three or four singing into the vacuum cleaner on the man like standing in front of the fireplace like putting on full concerts and we used to make videos. When i was around eight my sister and i would make videos of my baby brother in the walker like watch. We're gonna beat him just up here and my mom would like stop the camera and we were like doing our own tiktok videos. Basically when i was eight and we'd wheel him out and then we turn the camera back on his own. But i was a professional musical theatre performer for twenty years. That really has been something. That's been me my whole life so definitely yes. Yeah that's gotta help. I mean the the trial by fire is what they say like. That's definitely a way to get there and not a lot of us won't have that kind of background that are that are venturing into video. And i knew you had some kind of knack for because you know. I not only got to see that you were speaker at social media marketing world which is a huge marketing conference when just being a speaker takes a lot of practice and at skill but on top of that i i also notice that you were part of this ensemble musical like introductory hurt you know production that they put on which has always kind of funny and awkward because it's like media people that you're now seeing is doing musical performances and i'll say you you definitely stole the show for me in that performance. Thank you so we have done this for years in a row as a musical spoof. That we've done is intro right before the opening keynote for social media marketing world which has been such an honor and so fun to be a part of

Molly Mahoney Molly Facebook
How to Email Your Abandoned Email List

The Email Marketing Show

01:48 min | 1 year ago

How to Email Your Abandoned Email List

"There's a lot of people tell us that. Oh well you know. I've got an email this. But i've been a bit shit. Not even even the very often and they say go your complete daily email strategy on the number of the league and study only stuff. So i'm gonna email every three and a half minutes now. I'm gonna email of every day or every week and we have to go like that cowboy. Who the whole says. Please don't do that right. I mean a lot of people do this without realizing. And i think there's two two major causes of at one. Is people build a list because the tool to build a nest and you should but then they feel worried about emailing them too much. So this of overcompensate and put it off and get paralyzed by that complication and then they go. Oh well i'll just no email him. Because i do an email and my conny mellon too much and then that's one side of it and then on the flip side of it. It's the people who see that this as like an asset that it'll be there when they need it so like i only pick up food and when i want to send somebody a text message or a phone call look on tacos and thing and the rest of the time. It's just on the desk and when you look at it. I think people look at our email list. Does this thing that go right Not really looking not doing a sale right now launching. Anything anything special happening on not doing. I'm not doing any of those things. I'll get my list to be right there when i need it. And then when they do need it. It's like the climate in the attic and take out the wooden box the cable subscribers in and then they blew the dust off a big cloud and then open up to see see if subscribers still paying attention. That's such as blinded by the light. Avance seen they lie. You never feed me feed us. You're gonna give us give them nutrients right right. So that's what happens. I think that's like the two major causes of weather's comes from for sure. So the thing is we need to make sure that we want to encourage you to start emailing those subscribers again book doing it carefully doing it with a bit of thought

Conny Mellon