Addiction and Sobriety

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A highlight from This is the Practical Mental Wellness Plan You Need

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:22 min | 17 hrs ago

A highlight from This is the Practical Mental Wellness Plan You Need

"There's just, I've been dealing with a ton of relapse, not my own thankfully, but it's just been a really, really hard time already in holidays are always hard. So I really wanted to dig into your mental wellness and how you can protect yourself, what you need to do, what things you need to be thinking about, how you can plan ahead. You know, I'm huge on planning ahead. The more you plan ahead and think things through in advance, the more protected you are and the better your outcome will be always. So that's one thing I want to talk about. You know this is my favorite time of year. I am already watching the cheesy Christmas movies that I love and I'm already loving the season. And when I tell you that the things that I share with you the tools that I give you and the exercise that I give you to utilize, when I tell you that their science backed, they are a 100% science backed. I will not ask you to do anything that isn't proven to work. And if you're a typical addicted person, I'm sure you listen to most of it and go, I'm not doing that. I don't need to do that. That doesn't work for me because that's what we all do, right? And then at some point, you grow up a little bit and you figure it out just like I did, and you'll go, huh, I wish I would have done that 5 years ago when they were telling me to do that. And you start doing it and you get crazy results and you feel better and everything starts to fall into place and then I sit back and wonder like why the F do I have to be so stubborn about everything. Like why do I have to make everything so difficult for myself? But I do. It's just how the addicted brain works, I think. So gratitude is one of these things. It is something that I don't just talk about it because it's a buzzword. I talk about it because it is proven to be effective. ready to test out this new technology that has come out recently that's supposed to be really good for the brain and relieving depression and anxiety and some of that stuff. And I'm getting ready to go into a whole testing phase. I'm going to document my whole experience with it and share that with you guys a little bit later. Once I can see if I actually get some results from it. And I got an email from the company today that had some really fascinating information in it. And here's what it says. It says practicing gratitude will actually change your brain and your life. In 2008, scientists conducted a study to measure the brain activity of people who practiced gratitude. And what they found was that gratitude causes synchronized activation in multiple brain regions and lights up parts of the brain's reward pathways in the hypothalamus. In short, gratitude can boost neurotransmitters serotonin and activate the brain stem to produce dopamine. So the more grateful thoughts you have the healthier and happier you will feel. Now, I'm not going to really nerd out with you on the brain science because you know I'm obsessed with the brain, but here's what I want you to know. Where addiction related brains are wired a little differently as in our reward center, right? Serotonin and dopamine are two of the major players in what level of happiness contentment you feel in your life. These are all the same things that are anxiety depression, ADD. All right, it all plays together. So when you can do something as simple as practicing gratitude and it actually boosts serotonin in your brain and gets your brain to produce more dopamine, why wouldn't you be putting a ton of energy into practicing gratitude? These are the same neurotransmitters that all your antidepressants work with, right? So why wouldn't you be doing this? That's what I want to know, why wouldn't you be putting some extra energy into creating this practice in your life? This is huge. And this is something that you can really

Anxiety Depression Anxiety Depression
A highlight from 209: Keep the Change with Bart Nollenberger

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:25 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 209: Keep the Change with Bart Nollenberger

"Name is Duane Austrian, and I'm your host, and today our guest is Bart Nolan burger. He is a successful motivational speaker, author, and trainer. He has taught sales and leadership for some of the top companies in the world, including Ford Motor Company, Toyota USA, and some of the largest auto dealership groups. Bart is a successful motivational speaker author and trainer, but his real passion is about recovery and living life in recovery and in this episode, Bart shares his journey of moving from someone who was self absorbed in his addiction to a person who is truly about giving and surrendering the self. He is author of the upcoming book, keep the change and also the host of the keep the change podcast where he shares his personal experience, wisdom, personal development, and spirituality and authentic way to spark change in others. If you are enjoying the podcast, please rate and review us or leave a review on iTunes or Google Play or wherever you get your podcasts that really does help people find the podcast and I really appreciate it. And I do read the reviews and they do mean a lot to me. So for all the people that have taken the time to do that, thank you so much. And think about joining our Facebook group.

Duane Austrian Bart Nolan Toyota Usa Bart Ford Motor Company Google Facebook
A highlight from Dr. Mark McDonald

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:23 min | Last week

A highlight from Dr. Mark McDonald

"Website is if you're not already sort of peaked in your interest by the fact that he has to go to substack and his website is called dissident MD dot com. I don't know what more I can do to pique your interest, but doctor Martin McDonald, I'm a big fan. As you know, and thank you for being here in person. This is great. I am so excited to actually be here in space, which is what we just talked about as I sat down. To my Polish listeners, once again, is also an a lot of followers in Europe. In Poland. Yes. Is Polish your one of your languages? It is not, but I have a close friend from high school whose wife is from Poland. He works in the State Department. And he travels there frequently to visit her and her family. And I went and spent some time there over the summer, and I loved it. I went back multiple times. And now I have this huge following. The country of Poland and I'm learning Polish. I found that learning language is very good for the aging brain. Like really good. It's fantastic. Yeah, I've been working out French and Greek. And it got me through COVID fog. I had a three month post COVID thing. And fogg was major problem. And working on a language kind of cleared it out. I love it. They come and say, I do le francais. Way as they say. In Geneva, they say, that's the accent that I learned because I was in Switzerland when I was in high school. And they said, well, my way is the French of the Parisians have adopted it now as sort of a man, no kidding. They were like, what? I'm sure that. And it's also, but yes, may we. Yeah, in the English translation. Okay, report everybody. We're talking about this off the ball. We'll move on. So why did you write this book? Tell us about the book 'cause we're gonna sell the book first. All right, so as I was saying when I sat down here, my editor pulled out a phrase from this book, which I just wrote with many others didn't even think much of it. And he said, this is a really important sentence in this book. This really encapsulates why you wrote this book. And I said, what is it? I was really curious. And he read it to me, and he said, our social norms have been redefined, and they have been redefined not by the most courageous among us, but by the most fearful. Yes. I think that sums up my motivation. As you said when I came here, it's so great to see you in person. I said, yes, absolutely. We need to be here. You said people in space sharing the same space. It has become normal. Acceptable, comfortable for people to live their lives through Zoom, I am violently passionately opposed to that. I think it's wrong on so many levels. And I believe that it's being encouraged by anxiety, fear, and essentially this fear addiction, which is the way I describe it in the book. And in addiction is something that arrests your development, it blocks your progress, it prevents you from growing and fulfilling your potential. Okay. I could not agree more wholeheartedly. I spend my day really just shaking my head. I feel like bamboozled all the time. What? Like, what's going on? I can't get it. And I think let's talk to a friend of mine this morning that's a financial guy, and he just says he goes, it happens all the time. It's tulips. That humans get into these crazes. And it is the, I guess, the most risk averse that end up sway with sway over everybody at the end of the day. That's exactly right. It's this altar of safety that we have now begun to worship upon rather than the typical, what does it even say conservative, just basic, traditional American quest, which is to expand to explore to take risks. We've tossed that all away, and we've now turned towards worshiping another virtue, which is a virtue of safety. Yeah, safety Uber Alice, I call it. Exactly right. And they came in with that at the beginning. Now I understand, I'm giving huge sort of swath for the public health officials to walk through at the beginning of this pandemic. They came through with, we think this is bad. We got to do something. What are we going to do? Oh, look what they did in China. That worked. Let me talk to my Chinese colleagues persuaded by these assholes that that's the right thing. Okay, you're wrong, but okay, you do that. And then we started to start looking at things trying to figure out where we are. At that moment, committed so completely to safety Uber alles that anyone who questioned it had to be destroyed. And that was the part that was weird to me. I don't know anybody during tulip mania. I think we're getting out of control here with the tulips. And they would put them in jail. Society. That seems to be the new thing. Although you could look at the French Revolution and sort of say, well, it's kind of the same thing there, right? Hysteria. Hysteria. So tell me about that. I think you just hit on a really important facet. I call sort of the fuel of the car of the pandemic in the last couple of years. And I just published this earlier today and my substack, dissident MD. Titled the pandemic in a nutshell. And I summarized without going into the weeds and the conspiracy theories. There's a lot of them. And honestly, some of them are probably correct. But that's not the point. I'm not going to talk about China. Bill Gates and nanobots, all about this. This morning, by the way, came out and went, gee, we thought it was a much more serious fatality rate at the beginning. We didn't know. You fucking knew.

Poland Martin Mcdonald Le Francais Fogg State Department Geneva Uber Alice Switzerland Europe Uber Alles Hysteria China Bill Gates
A highlight from Take Control of Your Life with Sloane Freemont

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

05:38 min | Last week

A highlight from Take Control of Your Life with Sloane Freemont

"Simple words. You're going to meet Sloan Fremont host of the create what you speak podcast. And I want to share these words with you that grabbed me right from the page from her website homepage. She says, navigating your reality to a place of success starts with taking control of your thoughts. This is what we talk about on every episode, your thoughts are everything. So we are going to get into some great conversation about taking back control of your life and creating what you speak. Let's welcome Sloan Fremont. Thank you. I'm so excited to be here and have this conversation. Yes, I'm so excited to have you. And I just want to dive into this because it's all the things that I love, but let's start with just really quickly tell the audience a little bit about you and what you do. Well, as you said, my name is Sloan Fremont, and I host the create what you speak podcast. And I started my show 6 years ago after I was at a breaking point with my life. I was I guess you could say addicted to the negativity, right? Like negativity controlled my life, negativity was all I knew. I didn't know there was any other option. And I got to this point where I was like, I can't do this. If this is living, if this is life, I can't do this anymore. I don't want to do it this way anymore. And I call that time like my awakening where I woke up to myself and I was like, you got to get a grip on yourself here, right? And so I went through, honestly, back then, I didn't even know what I was doing. It was what I, like I said, it was what I called my awakening, but I just decided, instead of focusing on what I didn't want, I focused on what I wanted. Every day, relentlessly, having arguments in my mind, day in, day out, exhausting conversations with myself, but I would not let up. In three months, my life completely changed, I quit my job, sold my house, moved to Nashville, bought a new house, got a new job. I described that time as the red carpet rolled out for me. And I was like, okay, I've lived this. I've done this. Now I want to tell other people about it. And so I have so many stories like that, but really it came down to making a decision to take my own control back about my life and not giving up. You know what I love about this too is, you know, for people with addiction, alcoholism, whatever kind of addiction, you know, we tend to feel like we are the only ones that have these problems. And one of the things, one of the reasons I've always been so public about my alcoholism and recovery is because I'm just a regular person. You know, and I have a lot of the stereotypical things, right? I have my fair amount of trauma and addiction in my family and all of that stuff, right? All the pieces line up for sure. But to hear you as a person with no addiction, talking about being in this place because how you described that to me is exactly how we talk about rock bottom. And rock, bottom, and I always say I've had a million rock bottoms, right? I've had a financial rock bottom, a relationship rock bottom. My alcohol rock bottom, like it's just a part of life and that's what I really love about hearing you talk about that is really you're not a person with addiction. You have the same struggles. We all, as human beings, have the same struggles. Yes, I 100% agree. And I think that feeling like it's only us having the problem, whatever the problem might be, separates us from everyone and makes us feel even more alone. It's just me. I'm the only one experiencing this. Everyone else has it together, right? And that's like one of the biggest lies we tell ourselves. This is just us because that is absolutely not true. But when we're willing to, I think, to me, it all came back to that choosing to take my control back. I think even first recognizing that I had control because there was so long that I lived feeling like I just floated along in the world and I was just a victim to whatever came my way, right? And that I call when I did that when I made the decision for myself. It was like the stake was in the ground and I was like, no more. No more floating around, like living my life on the sidelines, right? This is real. This is my life. I don't get to go redo this, right? I don't know what I'm waiting for, but I guess I'm waiting for myself here because I'm the only one that's going to give myself permission for this. And taking that stand and deciding in the decision there's so much power too, right? Because there was relief in that. There was relief that I was giving myself permission to live my life to live it in the way that I wanted to and stop making these excuses for why I was doing this or why I was doing that. And or why I wasn't doing this or that. And that that power that I remember feeling in explaining this to other people and people were like, why didn't know we could do that? Whatever it was, right? Decide you want something and go after it. And I can even remember it during the time when I moved to Nashville. It was literally like I was playing a game with the universe. I'm going to go really big and see what happens. And then test the universe to see if I'll get this. Or and then it almost became a joke because it was so easy. It was so easy, and I'm like, why did I do this to myself for so long?

Sloan Fremont Nashville
A highlight from 208: Finding a New Purpose in Life with Maroon 5 Founding Drummer Ryan Dusick

The Addicted Mind Podcast

07:42 min | Last week

A highlight from 208: Finding a New Purpose in Life with Maroon 5 Founding Drummer Ryan Dusick

"Today, Ryan is going to introduce his new book harder to breathe, a memoir of making maroon 5, losing it all and finding recovery. So in this interview, Ryan shares candidly about what it was like to be at the height of his recording career in how maroon 5 was taking off and they were selling millions of records and albums and Turing yet for him. He was suffering in a lot of physical pain and anxiety and how eventually he had to leave the band and going through all of that trauma and challenge and how he found his way through it to the other side to make a new life full of meaning purpose and fulfillment. It was great to interview Ryan. He was just so open about his struggle and was just authentic and sharing and really wants to help others who might be struggling in some kind of emotional pain or with mental health issues. So it was great to have Ryan on the podcast and talk with him. I really enjoyed it. And I hope you enjoy it as well. So stay tuned for that. Quick reminder, if you are enjoying the addictive mind podcast, please rate and review us wherever you get your podcasts. I do read them and thank you all for the people who have taken the time to do that. That really means a lot to me and I really appreciate it. All right, stay tuned for this upcoming episode. Hello everyone. Welcome to the addicted mind podcast. I have a wonderful guest today. Ryan dusick and he is going to share his story about, I guess, in a way kind of being at the top, fame and fortune, and with a chronic injury, losing all that, and then dealing with the aftermath of all that and dealing with addiction and coping with all of that pain with alcohol and drugs and let's just start there, Ryan, you introduce yourself and tell us about you. Well, first off, thank you for having me on Dwayne. You're welcome. I'm Ryan. And wow, you know, introducing myself at this point in my life is more complicated than it used to be. I would imagine. It's been a long journey and to get to where I am now as a therapist and with a book coming out called harder to breathe about my story and my journey. I'm at a place in my life where I'm talking to people and hopefully being helpful in a way in terms of inspiring hope and recovery. For me, it was, you know, it goes back before the band really my story realizing that I did have anxiety and some other issues as a teenager even before we started the band. I didn't really have a name for it then. But when we started the band, I was 16 years old, we started in my parents garage, we spent a decade building this band from there to, you know, the world's biggest stages, and the time I was in my mid to late 20s, you know, we were becoming one of the biggest bands in the world. We're in 5. And in the midst of that, I really had I struggled physically on the road as a drummer with joint and nerve issues. And in retrospect, I realized psychologically that struggling as well. And it all kind of came together and formed this breakdown that led to the end of my career as a performer, which was devastating, and I went through depression and grief, dealing with that loss of identity. I was self medicating with alcohol and some other things that my anxiety became worse during that time over those years. One of the things as I was reading your book kind of setting this up is that this whole, like you said, ten years of building to this place where, in some ways, I guess it's the dream everybody wants, right? Fame and fortune and all of that. But I think the part that kind of really struck me is how this it didn't just happen. It was this time of being together with all of these people and building it and it was so much a part of your life when you were young, sneaking into clubs and it's such a part of it. Yeah, there was so much of that life in the band that was a part of my identity and my passion and my sense of purpose, really, because I was very connected to the other guys in the band Adam, just seeing Mickey were my best friends when we were teenagers. We spent the majority of our free time together and our time at school. I mean, we were together all the time, you know? And we went from being the idiot kids, you know, watching the butt head and trying to emulate Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and soundgarden. To all of a sudden, you know, writing better and better songs and growing as musicians as creative people as individuals just growing up and becoming a young man. We did that all together. And we really kind of evolved and grew as the band as we evolved and grew as friends and as people individually, so it was so much a part of the fabric of who I was in my own self identity and so losing that and having to walk away from it right at the moment when we were reaching the Pinnacle of success was Atlantic having the rug just completely torn out from under me in terms of self identity and self esteem. Right. One of the things I was wondering as you were talking was, did this fame and fortune and this success? Did it come to you pretty quickly? Like, here you've building this over ten years and did it just kind of shoot up and here you are in this space. Yes and no, it felt very gradual. Obviously when you're a decade into your career already, anything that happens feels like it was a long time coming, even though the world and the public, they see an overnight success. Even when it did finally happen in 2004 that we had global success and major tours and number one hits and all that stuff. We were two years deep into promoting that album already. And those two years were some of the most inspiring, enjoyable and exhausting years of my life. I would imagine. Yeah, I mean, you know, you put out an album. We didn't even release it until we were 6 months into touring. We had a long-term plan to build a grassroots following. And we went out there in a van for like a year and a half, just driving around the country. Over and over again. And it was fun. You know, it was a lot of hard work, and it was exhausting, but it was a lot of fun. And then we moved up to having a bus. And then we, you know, each time we traveled around and every time we did another tour, opening for another more established artist, the crowds were getting bigger. Our first single was growing a little bit at radio. We were starting to get a little buzz at MTV and VH1. So when we finally had a little bit of a hit and we had our first headlining tour, it was something that we felt like we'd been working towards for a long time, and it was a gradual process. But then in the next year, when the second came out, this love, and that was a massive hit, everything did change a lot quicker. It ramped up in terms of all of a sudden we're playing on Saturday Night Live. And at the Grammy Awards and we're selling out arenas and so yeah, it did feel like all of a sudden there was a tipping point, but it was a long time

Ryan Ryan Dusick Trauma Dwayne Pearl Jam Depression Mickey Nirvana Adam MTV Saturday Night Live Grammy Awards
Healing Early Trauma Through Somatic Experiencing and Brainspotting

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Healing Early Trauma Through Somatic Experiencing and Brainspotting

"Let's talk a little bit about what semantic experience in. It is because a lot of people listening. That term doesn't have meaning so explain that a little bit because i think it's important of what we're gonna talk about your book and some of the things you say in your book to really know what that is. Sure sir let me talk about fanatic experiencing and grant spotting together because even though they're different modalities. they're really both trauma. Healing modalities at focus on nervous system regulation. And when i say that what i mean is let me give you an example dwayne. So let's say you're on the freeway and somebody cuts wasch. Oftentimes what happens in our nervous system. Is we go into either fights or flight right we can either yet range full or we completely shut down. It depends on our particular nervous system. Now one of the keys to regulating the nervous system is knowing when we're this regulated right so at this regulation would be something like rage or panic or hyper-vigilance something like that which is what we might call a regulation or it could be something in the other direction like a down regulation which is disconnection dissociation depression shutting down etc.

Wasch Dwayne Depression
Interview With Dennis Berry of Funky Brain Podcast

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Dennis Berry of Funky Brain Podcast

"Let's take a minute and welcome dennis berry to the show. Hi dennis how are you. Oh so awesome. Everything's really great. I'm happy beer and talk with you again. 'cause you're a bundle of energy funny because i'm such an introvert. I do like connecting with people. Though i do enjoy like having some people time i just appreciate that. It's in my house in our houses. All houses right so take a minute and tell everybody a little bit about you in what you do. I am a life. Nasseri coast mostly addiction recovery but work with couples of loving relationship stuff just high performance health and wellness. All around stuff. And i've been since a sobriety thing had been sober for eighteen years until i in the beginning they said you know what you need to be of service and i was like. I don't have time to be of service but now i've set my life up to help people not have to suffer the same way i did or for his long amen to that so talk to me. Eighteen years sober. What was your path to sobriety. I think when we say eighteen years sober. It's kind of obvious. But what did you do to get sober and It was a long time coming. You know just like everybody else. I want people know like when you see somebody has long term sobriety like if you look at me or you you see these late you know happy healthy successful. People that are smiling. But we don't see is the dozens and dozens or even hundreds of failed attempts leading up to that moment.

Dennis Berry Nasseri Dennis
Pregnancy and Addiction With Dr. Charles Schauberger

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Pregnancy and Addiction With Dr. Charles Schauberger

"And today my guest is charles. Shaw burger and he is an obgyn and a doctrine addiction medicine. And we're going to talk about a topic. That i don't know is talked about a lot out there or there might not be a lot of resources about it. We're gonna talk about pregnancy and addiction and charles. I'm so thankful that you reach out to me and wanted to come onto the podcast. Because i think this is a topic that Like i said earlier just might not be out there and there might not be a lot of resources about it with. Thank you dwayne. I have enjoyed your podcast for probably the last year. Urine a half. And you're correct. I have not seen or heard many podcasts. In the addiction world that relate to the subject of pregnancy and re patient with substance use disorder. So i appreciated the opportunity to bring this discussion to the public and help to answer questions. Perhaps and to compete in a better frame of reference when it comes to understanding how the two interact awesome. So i i wanna just know a little bit about your story and how you got into this field as an obgyn and specifically working with people who are struggling with substance use disorder. And how kind of came together for you walls Interesting question and i think my journey is relatively first of all so many people in my profession do have a personal history of addiction. But i have been blessed to have not had to take that course and i have no personal addiction Other than maybe that sugar addiction which was mentioned a couple of weeks ago.

Shaw Burger Charles Substance Use Disorder Dwayne
How to Find the Right Mentor and Why Its a Game Changer

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

01:52 min | 1 year ago

How to Find the Right Mentor and Why Its a Game Changer

"I'm going to share something with you. That isn't a secret at all. The thing that has helped me thrive in my recovery business building fitness journey digital ceo hood All of that. The thing that has helped thrive has been working with a mentor. Whenever i'm working through something. I immediately turned to my mentor or coach. In one thing i know now is when i have to make big changes in my life. I have to get connected to other people who are doing the same thing. I have to link arms with and be connected to people who are facing the same challenges and working through them if nothing else to be reminded where all in this together also a mentor is someone who shows up in their life. The way you want to show up in your life and you can count on them to show up with you. And lastly from more than fifteen years in recovery and slowly working through a ton of issues and character defects. I know from experience that mentors are essential to my success. No matter if you're just getting started or if you're well into your journey and enjoying some sober success. I believe you always need a mentor. Or if you're like me. Many of them so mentors are equally important for me today as they were on day. One and just to make sure you're with me here. A mentor is someone who has already walked the path before you

Stop Hiding and Start Healing With Craig Brown

The Addicted Mind Podcast

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Stop Hiding and Start Healing With Craig Brown

"So break introduce yourself. Tell us a little bit about your story and how you got there. You got the book. All of that stuff. Appreciate the invite. Thank you for having me my story. Short version. I grew up in the church. My dad was a minister. I had it. We grew up in a church. Family that i come to find out as i got older and became an adult and had to deal with some rather dysfunctional things. I looked back. I realized that it wasn't all what i thought it was at that time but as children you just don't know you know any different but Yeah i had. I had to be as a as ministers kid a similar to other professions. I had to be on all the time out of my family. Look good dad look good. It was just a ton of pressure from my sisters and i to be in that kind of environment and always have to kind of fake. It and you know what i saw from the pulpit from my dad was entirely lot different than what i saw at home. He had a lot of demons lot. Struggles things you know. And some took him out on us. You know as as children and so at a very young age i had learned coping mechanisms and skills and escape plans. And everything else to deal with that. What i was going through. Sharpeville didn't have a real good nurturing emotional mental spiritual development. You know Because of that and for the last twenty two years i've been serving others who have very similar backgrounds and it's very hard to find Someone that had a real nurturing caring loving parents that invested in them and just you know supported them and gave them their own identity. Very hard to find very hard to find. My parents were very old school much older than most of the parents at that time. But i just grew up in that environment and it was a fun of armagh to be in but little did i know that everything our whole purpose was to make daddy look good and in seemed be that way for a very long time and then once i got the highschool drinking socially searching just looking searching his good athlete but i had this huge voided in how many mission purpose of controls of discipline so when it came time to go to college man. I was out

How to Avoid Loneliness, Cut out Boredom, & Have Fun

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

01:48 min | 1 year ago

How to Avoid Loneliness, Cut out Boredom, & Have Fun

"You guys. I am so excited to do this. Episode in this is almost in its own way a part too because we had somebody from this organization on the show a longtime ago back in the very beginning like i think probably in my first twenty episodes maybe britney was on. And she was talking about the phoenix. Such a cool organization in today. We have scott strode with us. Who is the originator. i will call him. Hey scott thanks for coming on the show. Thank you so much for doing this with me. Thanks thanks for having me on. Why don't you take just a minute and let everybody know about you and what you do sure. So on on the executive director and the founder of the phoenix and the phoenix is a nonprofit that uses the inherent transformative power of activities and connection to help people who are healing from substance use disorder. So we use activities Such as yoga meditation outdoor activities cross fit boxing climbing whole bunch of things. They're all free Most of our active leaders are volunteer peers recovery or someone who's been touched by addiction in their life and there were all across the country we started in colorado but we're now in fifty five plus communities and just getting started and i'm i'm in recovery myself. This is a big part of my own journey to the to start moving my body and find a group of people who would rather get up at five in the morning and climbing mountain than stay up till five in the morning drinking and using

Scott Strode Phoenix Britney Scott Boxing Colorado
The Ultimate Recovery Recipe

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

01:41 min | 1 year ago

The Ultimate Recovery Recipe

"People look from the outside in at my recovery my lifestyle. They see a busy professional life. They see that. I have confidence and clarity in control of my lifestyle and some even say. They hope to have a similar lifestyle. One day well my friends. That's certainly didn't happen overnight. But over the years through so much trial and error. I feel like i've cracked the code. And now i'm spilling my secrets. On how i built my lifestyle so if you want to know how to thrive in your life and not just survive and you went to be clear about what needs to be done to move you forward you wanna feel in charge and you wanna make sure you absolutely love the life you create than this episode is for you because when it comes down to it. There's one thing i know you need to move to the top of your list. You may need to move this to the very top of your to do list to begin shifting toward a lifestyle that you love. It's your recovery recipe and i know that doesn't sound super exciting but hold up because i'm gonna flip that script for you today. I'm showing you just how important the recipe is whether you are two days into sobriety or fifteen years. People often ask me like angela. What's your secret and i always say. I live in die by routines

Angela
Overcoming Addiction in the Restaurant Industry With Mickey Bakst

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Overcoming Addiction in the Restaurant Industry With Mickey Bakst

"All right everyone. Welcome to the addicted mind. Podcast my guest. Today is mickey faxed. And he's going to talk about a little bit about his own story. I think and a little bit about his community ben's friends and how that came to be and everything like that. So mickey please introduce yourself twain into pleasure to meet you and all audience and everybody out there. My name is making baxter's twain said. I am the co founder of an organization called ben's friends which was created to help struggling addicts in the food and beverage industry find sobriety. I am a forty seven year. Veteran of restaurants mostly high end fine dining. I am thirty eight years sober. And i'm going to take it back to ben's friends You know for me in terms of my history. I over thirty years old from sixteen to thirty. My life was nothing but a living hell. I'm not gonna go into details. Orient evolve the story did die from an alcohol and drug overdose on an emergency room table. They found me in a hotel room. After four days of non-stop round the clock drugging and drinking. They opened up the door. Thank god 'cause they didn't know what was going on and they died at an emergency room table as a result of that they found me just in time.

BEN Mickey Baxter Twain
10 Things to Tell People Why You Aren't Drinking

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

01:44 min | 1 year ago

10 Things to Tell People Why You Aren't Drinking

"Today. We're talking about all awkward summertime situation or how we make them awkward before they even happen. Because we're future tripping about how uncomfortable we're going to be an anxious about what people will think if you're not drinking and what will you say. And how will they react today. I have ten things you can tell people why you aren't drinking to help you get through the summer situations with confidence and with yours. Sobriety in tact now listen. I don't think it's a great idea to put yourself in super awkward situations especially when you're newly sober. But i also know you are on your own journey and you have to learn for yourself what works for you and what doesn't if you are going to go into challenging situations or if you have to go into challenging situations because it's a family thing or a work that you can't avoid then i want you to be prepared. Today's episode is a cheat sheet to fast track. You from struggling with overwhelming zaidi about what you'll say and how everyone else will react to being able to relax and feel confident like you've been alcohol-free for hundred years it ain't no thing all by planning ahead if you take some time to think about in advance what you'll say and how you'll respond to people then it doesn't seem so scary

Zaidi
Cant See the Forest for the Trees

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Cant See the Forest for the Trees

"I just had a major breakthrough moment the other day about this rough patch that i've been going through and i shared with you guys a few weeks ago that i've been going through a rough spot and at the time i couldn't pinpoint what was happening Because i was too close to it. But i knew like my energy was down. I wasn't following through on things. But you know when you're in it you're in it and you can't always see the pieces clearly because you're just in it and you know that saying you can't see the forest for the trees. I didn't understand what that meant for a long time. And it's only been in the last few years that i've come to understand what it really means and it makes sense to me and this is exactly what i just went through so when you're in the middle of your life in the minutia the day-to-day stuff you're in survival mode. Like jumping from one minute to the next trying to keep it all together. The kids in schools in pick ups and drop offs and working spouses and houses. And i mean it's a lot right. You're just trying to keep it all together. That's the trees you're in the trees and when you take a breath and look up all you can see. Are the trees all you can see over the next five things you have to do. And the last five things. You didn't get done right like that's the trees but if you could jump in a helicopter and fly up above the trees and look down you see the whole forest when you have that thirty thousand foot view the past becomes more and yes. I know helicopters. Don't go thirty thousand feet airplanes thirty thousand feet. But you know what i'm saying. You can look down on the whole forest in easily. See the path. You can see where to go where to turn left go straight turn right because you're looking down on the whole picture. That whole picture is your life but when you're in the trees yet can't see the path because you look up and see nothing but trees you can't see the forest for the trees. That's how i describe the value coaching too. By the way you hire a coach or mentor because they have the thirty thousand foot view and then they can see all the moves where all you can see are the trees. You need the person that isn't so close to it to see accurately what moves need to be made.

Interview With Army Veteran, Tom Spooner

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Army Veteran, Tom Spooner

"I guess we should start with the documentary. Tell us more about what what we're going to see their what the reason was for the documentary. And give me all the particulars. Okay said the number one reason for the documentary was to continue to spread the word and get the word out about warriors heart in about the struggles that our veterans and first responders that population firefighters. What they experience so that that was that was really the why behind it then And then we captured it with the warriors heart story which is is pretty rare. Rica's it's a little bit behind the scenes of we have staff members that are on there that tell their stories and also what we do that that connect the dots. You know 'cause we talk a lot about veteran issues like hey how do we actually go about. You know what goes on behind behind closed doors per se you know with the actual treatment. Most people don't even really know what that means. And what what treatment means. Yeah yeah we gotta talk about that but keep going with this population For those that know this the population that we treat here is primary diagnosis chemical dependencies with co occurring conditions. Pt s more grief injury although buffet that we know that we all have and But that's with the active duty. Veterans offers responders. Emt's law enforcement that whole group and there's a lot of them have the same specific something from just a curiosity from a treatment. Standpoint is mixed gender or do you have to separate its makes gender obviously separate for the for the housing aspect of whenever it comes to the treatment modalities in everything that we do is together which it mimics the what they did on the profession. You know as far as working females males together you it always says that same dynamic

Rica EMT
Be a Free-Thinker in Your Recovery

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Be a Free-Thinker in Your Recovery

"As you know. Many years ago. I found myself at that same fork in the road where i had to make a super tough decision and break up with alcohol. I didn't go to detox. They didn't go to treatment. Not because i didn't want to. But because i didn't know back then how dangerous withdrawal is and i thought treatment was only for celebrities so i went to aa. All i knew about a was that that's where people went when they didn't want to drink anymore and i knew i wanted to be a person who didn't drink anymore. Also i got sober a long time ago and there weren't dozens of different options back in the day. And you know you're getting old when you start using phrases like back in the day a long time ago. I'm since i got sober. I became a life coach. I went to school for addiction counseling. I went to social work school. I got certified as a recovery coach studied in lp and neuro psych. And i've learned so much more about everything not only recovery in quitting drinking but about life and how our brains work in human behavior and how we act and react trauma self esteem breaking habits and thousand other things. What i've learned on this journey is that changing. Your life is about knowing yourself. It's about knowing who you are. What works for you and knowing your limitations you have to have that self awareness to know what you aren't great at too because you will have to work around those areas to be successful. Like i know i don't like to drive so my gym has to be right up the street or i won't go you know when i got sober. I was the same way with my. aa group. I found a group that was right up the street from my house. Because i knew that's the only way that i would go. I know i struggle with being lazy and wanting to quit things in wanting to shortcut. And i'll talk myself out of doing things because it'll take too long so if i want to be successful. Whatever i'm doing. I have to find ways to work around those issues.

Aa Group
Microdosed Mindfulness With Janet Fouts

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Microdosed Mindfulness With Janet Fouts

"Hello everybody welcome to the addicted. Mind my guest. Today is janet fouts and she's gonna talk about mindfulness one of my favorite topics. So janet please introduce yourself well. Thanks dwayne gosh. How do i introduce myself. I'm a lot of things. I'm an author speaker a caregiver. I do a lot of stuff. I wear a lot hats but the one that really floats my boat. The most is mindfulness on. I'm really glad that we're gonna get a chance to talk. Awesome i am. I am excited to talk with you about that. I know you have like books out there which just amazes me. I've i've never written a book but Maybe one day but that seems like a big number. I don't know why. I'm thinking that but it does well anyway. Let's just been tell me a little bit about you. And how mindfulness came into your life. Well it's Always had kind of aspects of mindfulness to my life. But i remember way back. Maybe the seventies early eighties. I decided i'm gonna learn to meditate and it was really due to the show. Kung-fu because i was really convinced of come was convinced that if i just learnt to meditate that everything would start to move slower and i be able to manage my life and everything would be wonderful and you know if somebody attacked me. I'd be able to just stop them in a heartbeat. These are things you get when you're a teenager absolutely. That's so funny. Because i i loved same that same feeling you know you just thought why he's so cool to be can't and then i studied taichi for while and i did meet some people who were actually amazing human beings. That could do all kinds of crazy things. And then i realized that i don't i'm too busy. I have monkey mind. I can't do this. I ran through all the usual

Janet Fouts Dwayne Gosh Janet
Drinking and Exercise With Mike

Recovery Happy Hour

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Drinking and Exercise With Mike

"All right. Let's get to mike. And hey mike happy third sober birthday. Hi mike how are you doing. Well i'm good. Thank you so much for sitting down with me this morning to share your story and well. Let's start with the basics. Tell me what your name is and your sobriety date. Would you have described yourself as a high or a low functioning. Drink gra some name. Is mike schuck actually keep going. Mice june scenes of two thousand and eighteen. So june nineteen eighteen. Yeah i would like to describe myself as a high functioning drinker until i was not once and and with the everybody else news for you now. I love it when people say that. Because it's owed relatable it's like when do you go from one to the other. It happened so fast well before we get into your story. Tell me a little bit about you right now where we live. How old you are career. Hobbies family find anything like that. So originally from slowly Ben in dc. About what four or five years at this point Work i actually work with a non alcoholic beer company which is huge huge Aesthetic company and for hobbies. I may try which is also huge. will get into here but is it and how old are you. I'm thirty four. Twenty eight hundred eighteen so you got sober when you were thirty one long

Mike Mike Schuck BEN DC
Paying Attention to the Subtle With AdaPia D'Errico

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Paying Attention to the Subtle With AdaPia D'Errico

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind my guest. Today is to rico and we are going to talk about intuition and and your book productive intuition but i i love to hear your story and how this all evolved. Yeah thanks so much joining such a pleasure to be here when we were kinda speaking prerecording. I was saying that you know this book and even me being here and talking about it has so much to do with a time in my life. one of many but Specially point in time in my life where i was so completely lost where i essentially went through with. A lot of people would call a spiritual crisis. It was out it. Was this time in my life. Where the person that i thought i was successfully especially around career. I've always been like really career driven. I'm going to get things done. I'm in business. I wanna like do things in the world. They want to be a human doing instead of a human being. Right right link. Everything i knew how to do was not working. And i completely lost my marbles because i was like i can't be effective can't make money. I can't do anything. And then i didn't know who to talk to. I didn't have anybody to talk to you. Because i sounded in my own crazy person. How how how do i explain to people that this basically at that point is twenty year career that i had worked so hard to build up. I typically walked away from it with this idea that i was going to use a purposeful work and i was gonna you know i was gonna make really meaningful more meaningful than what i was doing so i was prejudging myself before even going into something into something new and instead what life or the universe or god delivered to me was just failure

Rico
Why People Pleasing Isn't Healthy for Your Recovery

Recovery Happy Hour

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Why People Pleasing Isn't Healthy for Your Recovery

"All right. Let's talk about people pleasing this topic. I've discussed on episode six or seven and it's been a few years so i have some more thoughts on this. So miriam webster defines people pleasing is an emotional need to please others often at the expense of his or her own it needs or desires. So that's what we're talking about today. Not people pleasing in a general sense of wanting other people to be happy but doing it at the expense of your own needs. Many events can connect drinking problem in some small way to being people pleasers and like i always say the problem isn't the alcohol. It's what's underneath the alcohol. What's causing you to want to drink and being a people pleaser. Isn't the problem either. Actually still the symptom of something else. Perhaps he grew up in a scary household where fear or a sense of danger. Were ever present in your daily life. My guess is that you were probably a people pleaser and it helped you as a survival mechanism and then those habits gained in you early on and usually continue to repeat themselves throughout adulthood. Perhaps you're a people pleaser in the form of needing validation from other people to boost your competence. The people pleasing again. Not the problem. It's the symptom of problem and the problem is probably closely related to having deep rooted self esteem issues self esteem issues and growing up around. Fear are really common issues within the recovery. Stories that you've heard shared on the show people pleasing is not unique and drinking. Alcohol is a very common coping mechanism but the point is that quitting drinking doesn't automatically solve this. You don't stop drinking and suddenly you're not a people pleaser you have to peel back the layers to understand where the root of everything begins and that's recovery. It's quitting the substance so that you're in a sober state of mind to dig in and explore the feelings around what you've been numbing.

Miriam Webster
Neurosurgery and Poetry With Paul Kaloostian

The Addicted Mind Podcast

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Neurosurgery and Poetry With Paul Kaloostian

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind podcast. I have a wonderful guest today who we were just talking. And i have a lot of questions dr paul collusion. Who is a neurosurgeon. And he's going to talk about the brain and addiction and all the different parts of that. And what's going on up there. So paul please introduce yourself. We'll good morning. Thank you so much have me. I'm a big fan of yours and i may neurosurgeon. I deal with a wide variety of problems affecting the brain the spinal cord and variety of our nerves throughout our body of work in for about seventeen years now and the brain has really been such. A fascinating oregon. Just i remember going through training and going through my first few surgeries where the skull was opened up. The the covering of the brain was opened up at you see the actual pulse ation of the brain and the structure of Always fascinated me and to this day. I mean it's just It's really all inspiring and really is so important that we really understand our brain. Our spinal cord functions in really become more appreciative of what they do for us on a daily basis. The question i want to ask is how do you say you know. I'm going to be a neurosurgeon. How did that happen. And how did you start to kind of this is what i what interests me. Yeah first thing that came from a family of physicians. So honestly i think medicine was in was in my dna so to speak sitting at the dinner table. I mean that's what we spoke about. Dna all the time and my brother and sister also physicians as well. But i do recall. A course i took it. Brown university in rhode island was a introductory neuroscience course that was taught by a wonderful professor who actually wrote the textbook used in. That was my first introduction to how our brain spinal cord function we literally learned about the sales of the brain and spinal cord what these cells do how they function newbies. So amazed if you just looked at these books and research articles on how this once a single cell of the brain has so many different functions within it.

Dr Paul Paul Oregon Brown University Rhode Island
Let's Talk About Trauma and How to Heal

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Let's Talk About Trauma and How to Heal

"Hi everyone it's some. How excited are you. I'm really excited. I am very hopeful that this summer we will be taking better care of ourselves better care of each other and we're all in this world having a more content driven life. Not sure it's going to happen. A certainly not just gonna happen for me. But that's what i'm putting out to the universe this morning as i'm recording this podcast and i'm hopeful that in our little piece of the universe for everyone listening we can put that out there for ourselves today. All right with that said i would love for everybody to take collective big breath in hold it for a little bit and then let it out. Why because today peeps. We're gonna talk about trauma and this can be a heavy subject but as usual. I'm gonna try and have a little fun with it where we can overall. I want for you to learn more about what trauma is how trauma has changed in definition over the years. And what you can do to feel better. If you have experienced trauma in your life when bad things happen to us it can take a while to get over those feelings. The pain and feel safe again but most of us don't really get over it you know. That's not one of my favorite phrases and the reason is is because trauma lives deep inside of us

Trauma
Interview With Author, Therapist, Dr. Anadel Barbour

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Author, Therapist, Dr. Anadel Barbour

"Today. It is dr del barber Her book is sex and sobriety equality of narrative that utilization mindfulness practices for enjoyable sober. Sex bailed on amazon and dell in a d e l barber b. a. r. b. o. u. r. dot com is her website. You can follow me on twitter at an a. s. c. h. m. a. n. a. Ns amana Dr barbara welcome all added that long. I never got rid of that email for him out like i i completely get. I've got some arbitrary numbers after my name that the person who sent it by email which i didn't understand really what email was et cetera. Whatever number it's been my email address for god fifty. I don't wanna talk about it. But but but the really scary part is for me. That seems like five minutes ago. So that's the part. So let's i want to talk about. Amd are but let's talk about you. Look at your book. I just what. What is it that people would go to the book form. What is in the book. The book was really came out of my dissertation. And it's about how drugs affect the body and mind when people give them up and have sex very disconnected. And so there's mindfulness practices. It's not this meditation. It's getting to know the body. It ain't no you know your own ears and being able to face them. In with mindful practices we can connect with your body. But you can also learn how to hopefully out that

Dr Del Barber Dr Barbara Dell Amazon Twitter AMD