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A highlight from A creator-led internet, built on blockchain | Adam Mosseri

TED Talks Daily

05:00 min | 23 hrs ago

A highlight from A creator-led internet, built on blockchain | Adam Mosseri

"History has taught us that technology will take power from the establishment and give it to individuals, give it to people. This has been true since before the advent of the printing press, long before. But the path is not a straight line. There are always bumps and detours along the way. And the Internet is no exception. The original promise of the Internet was to push power down into the hands of people and to all of us. And it has. It has weakened yesterday's gatekeepers. Music labels, news publications, TV networks, they've all lost much of their power and prestige. But at the same time, the Internet has created a new establishment. It's push power into the broadest of platforms like Instagram. This was unexpected. But I believe that over the broad arc of history that this unexpected outcome, this concentration of power in the hands of a handful of platforms is not going to be a long-lasting trend. Over the next ten years, we're going to see a dramatic shift in power away from platforms like the one that my team and I are responsible for. And to a group of people, I like to describe as creators. Let's define a creator as someone whose personality is their brand and who uses platforms like Instagram to turn their passion into a living. Creators like Blair Armani and denies and Benny drama. They generate new ideas, push boundaries, drive culture. We follow them just to see what they'll do next. What if we imagine a world where a creators actually owned their relationship with their audience? They didn't rent it. They owned it. And where all of us were invested in their success. A world where the platforms acted more like platforms because we can and should do more to support creators. It's been maybe 50 years since the birth of the Internet. And we can all see how much it is affected almost every industry, particularly the attention based industries. Music, news, TV, art, they've all been disrupted. Musicians like childish Gambino, and Frank Ocean and chance the raptor. They found ways to reach an audience without a label. When Jessica Yellen was the chief White House correspondent for CNN back in 2012, about 670,000 viewers. Today, she reaches nearly that many people on Instagram alone. Star athletes are more relevant than the teams that they play for, which would have been unheard of 50 years ago. LeBron James has more followers on Instagram than the Lakers do. Cristiano Ronaldo makes more on Instagram. It's been reported that he did from Juventus. Okay, so I and my team, we work at the point where creators and audiences meet. And platforms like Instagram have done a lot to empower creators over the last ten years. My team is obsessed with finding more ways to support creators. But if we accept that it's power, continues to shift towards creators or that that's going to happen because technology will continue to change, then we're going to have to rethink some things, because today, creators are too dependent on too few platforms and our role as platforms has to change. Now, I'm not saying that platforms are going to go away. New platforms will certainly rise, all platforms will certainly fall. But all platforms will, and you're already seeing this happen, understand the value that creators create. And so they're being increasingly interested in handing more power over to creators. Now, you might think, this might be surprising coming for me. But I think this is actually a really good thing. I think that over the long run, what's best for creators is going to be best for platforms like the one I'm responsible for. The more art there is, the more there's an exchange of ideas, the more creativity there is in the world, the better off we all are. But we haven't always seen the world this way. For the 5 years before I joined Instagram, I was the head of news feed on Facebook. I was in that role during the U.S. presidential election in 2016. I was in that role during Cambridge Analytica. I traveled around the world talking to publishers and policymakers, most of whom took the time to tell me everything that we were doing wrong. I'm sure some of you hold my company and me personally accountable for all sorts of things. But I can tell you, we learned an immense amount from those experiences. I know I personally did.

Instagram Blair Armani Benny Drama Jessica Yellen Frank Ocean Cristiano Ronaldo Lebron James CNN White House Lakers Cambridge Facebook U.S.
A highlight from The local guardians protecting African lions | Resson Kantai Duff

TED Talks Daily

06:22 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from The local guardians protecting African lions | Resson Kantai Duff

"The world has lost 68% of its wildlife populations in under 50 years, and there are people around the world working to protect and grow the wildlife that is left. In Africa, however, the approach to conserving this wildlife has almost always involved a separation of people from nature, the involvement but never leadership from local people and the problem statement that has often come from outside our continent. Basically, years ago, colonial governments decided that we, as Africans, were not fit to take care of our own wildlife. And so people who had lived alongside wildlife for generations were removed from their ancestral lands and called new names. Coaches encroaches. Squatters. The story of conservation as a result has almost always been involved only a foreign scientist with a clipboard or a guy in green with a gun. There to protect that wildlife from everyone else. The rest of us have never existed in this story. And those who came to save species came from the outside and when they came, they were labeled heroes there to teach local people how to live alongside wildlife on the fringes of wildlands that they used to own. This has created two distinct problems. One, because we don't often tell our own stories. It means that those who are closest to the wildlife are not seen as as invested in conserving that wildlife compared to those who come from the outside. And because foreign conservationists have sometimes not taken into consideration the needs of local people, they are then seen as caring more for animal life than for human life. If we do not change this approach to conservation in Africa, we will lose all of our wildlife. And with it, a part of our humanity. I believe that the time for Africans to define conservation ourselves has come. And when Africa leads its own conservation efforts, we will not only restore our wildlife populations, but our land and our cultures and our broken relationship with nature. Through my work with iwasa lions and organization based in northern Kenya, doing lion conservation, I am working with a group of people who, together, we are co designing what that conservation could look like. But first, a little about myself, I grew up in a crumbling bungalow in the heart of Nairobi. Kenya's capital city. Long before it was called Nairobi by the Maasai, the nomadic pastoralist where I get my heritage. They had called it a different name. Naku so Intel on the beginning of all beauty. As they would graze their cows and goats on the banks of the river, they would watch the evening sun creep down the Acacia trees. That was their vision of beauty. Centuries later, I would do the same. I would watch the monkeys and the giant trees and colorful birds would call to each other in the morning. In October, when the nandi flame trees would drop the last of their fiery orangey flowers that we would use for hopscotch in school. There would be thousands and thousands of jacaranda trees in full bloom across the city, reminding us that it was the start of exam season. Have you studied? Are you ready? They seem to say. We were just a part of nature. It was just a fact. And then the chainsaws came. They cut down so much of what I loved. They cut down my memories. And they have kept coming, not just to my city, but to places around the world and not just for trees, but for everything. Let me put some numbers here so you understand what I mean. Lions have lost 92% of the area that they used to roam in Africa. Out of a possible a 100,000 lions may be just a century ago. There are now only about 20,000 lions left in Africa. And in Kenya, there are only 2500 lions left thereabouts. So what do you do when you're confronted with such loss? The answer for me was to study, and so at the university of Nairobi, equipped with news zoological expertise, I was informed that I could go out and teach local people how to live alongside wildlife. I where did that thinking come from, that I could go out and teach people how to live? At the University of Oxford, I took my studies further and I really began to unearth the conservation models that had led us to this point. And while my studies have provided a frame with which to view what was happening, it is really on the ground in my country doing the work that I have gained the most perspective and clarity. In the samburu region of northern Kenya, there is still little separation between people and wildlife and livestock. Here you can still hear the cowbells clanging as a little boy brings his goats to water on the mighty awas neuro river. And behind him, nibbling on the tops of trees are giraffes. And behind that, the rumble of elephants. It is here that I have found a group of people who are pushing back on that narrative that excludes us and tells us that we're not fit to lead and really building true community led conservation. There is so much to this approach that I believe could be important to form the new Kenyan and the new African conservation. So let me share some of those things. First, out with parachute conservation

Africa Kenya Iwasa Lions Nairobi Lions Intel University Of Nairobi University Of Oxford
A highlight from The future of the food ecosystem -- and the power of your plate | Ndidi Okonkwo Nwuneli

TED Talks Daily

05:39 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from The future of the food ecosystem -- and the power of your plate | Ndidi Okonkwo Nwuneli

"During the first world food crisis in my adult life. I recognize how connected we were. All price shocks, serial price hikes, which affected bread prices. All over the world. And the most vulnerable were hurt. 14 years later, my impatience has grown. Where even more connected and our food ecosystem is even more broken. Thankfully, the Rockefeller foundation has some pioneering research on the true cost of food in the United States. Which indicates that even though we spend 1.1 trillion on an annual food expenditure, we actually spend 2.1 trillion on cost linked to health and climate. All because of our broken food ecosystem. These same statistics have been replicated all over the world. In fact, according to the UN food system scientific group, food system is value destroying. There's a need for urgent action. From at least three lenses, a half lens, an equity lens. Starting with the climate lens, we must modify how we grow food and reduce food waste. Our food ecosystem is one of the largest contributors to climate change. We keep cutting down trees to grow more food. And we keep wasting food, which ends up in landfills and rods, generates methane. The good news is that we have the technology and the science today to grow enough food to feed the world and to address our food, waste problems. We have the knowledge we're not using it. That exciting examples from my ecosystem where we're seeing dramatic impacts. The songhai sensor in Benin republic, educates young Africans on regenerative agriculture and zero waste total production. And one of these young people is doing just that. Through his company, bio loop, he's feeding waste, has a peels, yam peels, to black soldier fly lava. They're growing really quickly and becoming wonderful fish feed. The byproducts and the residue from this process is wonderful soil supplements. And the entire production process is run on renewable energy. Through my work with Sahel consulting, with demonstrating that farmers can double and triple yields without hurting the environment. When using technology and science from our local research institutions and we're proving that in Africa, there are great examples for the rest of the world to emulate. Now, we need to scale these interventions. And we need to ensure that our governments are private sector, our farmers are incentivized to change behavior and see improved lives. If you are as impatient as I am, you also have a role to play. By reducing the food waste in your home, every single person here can take up a policy to ensure that their schools, their companies, their civil society groups, have a sustainability policy and a food waste policy. And please don't sell your children to finish their dinner because they're hungry children anywhere. Tell them to finish their dinner because it's good for the environment Second, we must ensure that healthy food is affordable and accessible for the most vulnerable. This is a huge challenge. On healthy food, kills, and we know this. One out of every 5 deaths is linked to unhealthy food. And yet, one third of our world's population can not afford a healthy diet. This is a big challenge. Now, food is medicine. Healthy food gives us long unproductive lives. And during COVID, we've seen the impact of closures, shipping challenges that have affected food prices, and the most vulnerable have had to shift from healthy diets to unhealthy diets because they're cheaper. This has caused more damage to lives all over the world. We must take a stand on this. And we can learn a lot from Africa. There had to be people in Tanzania, live in harmony with the land. And through their lives, we've seen the ability to have a healthy diet. They eat ten times more fiber than the average American. Oftentimes, we don't realize that even in our own traditional communities, we have so much to learn. In urban communities, we also have exciting social enterprises like M dog that's using digital technology, cell phones, and training to get urban populations that are struggling with diabetes, high blood pressure, and so many other health challenges. Link using ultra processed food to shift to more traditional lines and they're seeing measurable outcomes. We must scale these type of interventions, but we must also hold our private sector companies responsible for the amounts of sugar and salt contained in food. We must set standards for what healthy food is and define healthy food according to plant based diets, low salt, low sugar, and keep all of us accountable.

Un Food System Scientific Grou Benin Republic Sahel Consulting Rockefeller Foundation United States Africa Tanzania Diabetes
A highlight from The Power of the Pope

Why It Matters

01:21 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from The Power of the Pope

"You know you've made it to the highest level of prestige when you get to meet the Pope. Actors, artists, athletes, and politicians, they all clamor for a handshake with his holiness. But aside from his star power, the Pope also has a lot of actual power. He runs a massive organization that serves over 1.3 billion Catholics worldwide. Nearly a 5th of the global population. On any given issue, you may find the church's position agreeable or egregious. What you may not realize, though, is that for some 2000 years, the Pope has been at the center of global affairs. He has a seat at the table alongside heads of state and is sought after for his distinct form of influence and diplomacy. I'm Gabrielle Sierra, and this is why it matters. Today, the Pope's one of a kind role in international relations. If men and women who transform society, they must begin by changing their own parts first. As

Center Of Global Affairs Gabrielle Sierra Pope
A highlight from The crime-fighting power of cross-border investigative journalism | Bektour Iskender

TED Talks Daily

04:59 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from The crime-fighting power of cross-border investigative journalism | Bektour Iskender

"It is very well connected across borders. Criminal leaders can cooperate over long distances, build efficient logistics and hide their wealth across many jurisdictions. How do we know about this? One of the reasons is journalists, we are often the first ones to reveal the enormous schemes of organized crime networks. At some point, journalists started connecting across borders too. During the last decade, there was a number of groundbreaking cross border investigations that had dozens of media organizations working together. Panama papers is probably one of the most famous of such cross border journalism collaborations. It had more than hundred media working on it. It affected countries on every continent. More importantly, it led to more than $1 billion to be recovered to the economists of the countries they were stolen from. Now let's take a look at maps that show which countries were featured in three major global investigations from 2016 to 2021. So this is Panama papers, Paradise papers, Pandora papers. As you can see, some countries keep being blank spots on this maps. And one of them is Kyrgyzstan, my home country. Does it mean there is no organized crime in Kyrgyzstan, or maybe no corruption? No way, there's a lot of corruption in my country and organized crime is a pretty powerful force. Kyrgyzstan was just not covered in major global investigations for a very long time. I'm one of the founders of club, a very unusual media organization that I cofounded in Kyrgyzstan back in 2007 with my friend reynard. Initially, it was just a news website and a journalism school. We would train journalists as young as 15 or 16 to cover politics, human rights violations, and many, many other stories that happened in our country. Throughout the years, our journalists grew up, and by the time they were in their early 20s, they thought they were too experienced to just cover daily news. They wanted to take on more involved stories, and they were eager to make a difference in Kyrgyzstan. So we started publishing bigger investigations. With our young and engaged journalists. But there were some difficulties though. In some cases, we did not have enough resources or experience to work on very complicated stories and sometimes it was just too scary. For example, once we even received a death threat for trying to investigate criminal activities of Dan president's son, and the problem was, we didn't know who could protect us. And we eventually had to drop this investigation. But then something important happened in 2017 when we joined the network of OCCRP. Organized crime and corruption reporting project. It is an organization based in Bosnia. It was initially formed to unite the best investigative media outlets from the Balkans, and later it expanded its network to many other countries in Europe and then to Central Asia, Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and the goal of this organization is in its name to fight organized crime and corruption with journalism. We were the first Central Asian member of this network and, oh, how many changes it has brought. We turned Kyrgyzstan from a blank spot on the map into a country where organized crime and corruption are investigated as never before. In 2019, we joined our efforts with osa therapy and also with radio liberty and media organization based in Czech Republic and bellingcat and investigative media center from the UK. And together, we published a series of investigations about an underground cargo empire, a secretive family plan that transported goods from China to Central Asia. And didn't pay all the taxes and tariffs, if you know what I mean. In order to do that, they bribed the Kyrgyzstan's custom service. And a significant chunk of this bribe went to this person, raim deck madrigal, the deputy had of Kyrgyzstan's customs. Our investigations revealed that even high ranking officials in Kyrgyzstan are involved in corruption, poisoning their whole institutions with the worst possible practices. People in Kyrgyzstan were outraged when they read this. And this led to an unprecedented chain reaction. So first, there were protests and Kyrgyzstan because of what was published in the investigation itself. A year later, in 2020, even larger protests happened when some of the politicians who were featured in our investigations had their party taking second place in the parliament elections. As a result of this larger protests, parliament election results were, and now government was changed and eventually the president of the country was forced to resign.

Kyrgyzstan Panama Occrp Reynard Central Asia Radio Liberty And Media Organi Bellingcat Balkans Bosnia Raim Deck Madrigal DAN Latin America Middle East Africa Europe Czech Republic UK China
A highlight from How to stop banks from investing in dirty energy | Lucie Pinson

TED Talks Daily

07:02 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from How to stop banks from investing in dirty energy | Lucie Pinson

"It's TED Talks daily. I'm your host, Elise Hugh. Financial institutions like banks have outsized power in the fight against climate change. They finance fossil fuel industries after all. In her talk from the 2021 countdown summit, financial responsibility campaigner Lucy pinson makes a convincing case for why financiers should stop backing polluters and polluting as soon as possible. Hey, I'm doctor Jen gunter, host of a podcast from Ted, called body stuff. We're back with new episodes, tackling more of the stickiest medical myths, like whether you can boost your metabolism. And if you should try to optimize your sleep and we're exploring some of our body's most fascinating mysteries, like how your sense of smell works and why we develop food allergies. Check out body stuff with doctor Jen gunter, wherever you listen. Support for ted-talks daily comes from Nissan, the future will be great, but today is just as incredible. Meet Nissan's most advanced lineup. If you can't get enough adrenaline, there's the all new 400 HP Nissan Z or for your off road adventures, check out the all terrain Nissan frontier. If you're more of a spontaneous road trip type person, hop in the Nissan pathfinder. And for something more electric, there's the stylish Nissan ariya. So let's enjoy the ride. 2023 Arya and Z not yet available for purchase expected availability, this spring for 2023 Z, and this fall for 2023 Arya. Support for ted-talks daily comes from progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget these days? Drivers who save by switching to progressive save over $700 on average and customers can qualify for an average of 6 discounts when they sign up. A little off your rate each month goes a long way, get a quote today that progressive dot com. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. National annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed who saved with progressive between June 2020 and May 2021, potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations. When we think about climate change and pollution, we usually think about also worlds, fossil gas platforms in the Arctic, or black smoke rising above core plans. We never think about banks insurers and investors. But we should. Because money is a driving force beyond fossil extraction and environmental destruction. The most polluting sector on the planet is not for fuels. It's finance. Sure. You've heard things are increasingly putting money into green projects. And yes, they are financing green projects. But they are doing it on top of new polluting oil, coal, and gas projects. I have been looking at the masks for a decade. And still a green droplet in the ocean of pollution. I started to campaign to protect the environment and human rights. When I was at university, and I can not count how many times I heard finance the thinning me, sorry, we need coal. Sometimes they said we can make it clean. Mostly I've heard it's impossible. There is nothing we can do. Rather than be discouraged, that gave me the strength to prove them wrong. But how does someone like me with a small group of partners take on the big bangs and insurers? Well, we stopped by making smart demands. Then we incentivize action. And finally, we are the spoonful of blackmail that I like to think of as a friendly nurse. When we say to serve the issues of the world, we might want too much at once. The end of poverty, a peaceful world, a healthy planet, but how do you climb an scalable mountain one step after another? The most important thing is to identify the smart demand smart as in. Something that is specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time bound. Some things that you can realistically achieve based on the resources you have, your target and the balance of power between you and your target. You don't want something that requires more than 12 to 18 months to achieve, because you will lose momentum. Victory says, defeat does not. However, you don't want your objective to be too easy either. Because if it's too easy, it's not likely to change anything in the way the system works. And we want to see them to change. So you want your objective to be disruptive and transformative to bring your clother to your final goal. For the past ten years, my goal has always been the end of all financing of old fashioned fuels. But back in 2013, even the IDs that banks could automatically reject her whole sector of the economy appeared as crazy and was not open for discussion. So at that time, a smart objective was to convince one bank to withdraw from one project. And it didn't take me long to come across one of the most insane projects. A huge coal mines that could open the way to 8 other core projects and destroy the Great Barrier Reef, a UNESCO site. This was alpha coal mine in Australia, supported by French bank society general. Our first math objective was to get this bank out of this project. And we succeeded after a year of relentless campaigning. Today. Today is the core of the alpha coal mine is still in the ground. And from there, we moved on to our second objective. To get French banks to commit not to finance any of the projects located in the same base in the alpha coal mine. We succeeded, moved on to our third objective. To get French banks to commit not to finance any new coal mines, any new coal plants worldwide. We did one bank two bank three banks full banks until we convinced all French banks. The fourth biggest banking sector worldwide to reject all project financing

Nissan Jen Gunter Elise Hugh Lucy Pinson Ariya TED Ted Talks Pathfinder Arctic French Bank Society Great Barrier Reef Unesco Australia
A highlight from The case for a 4-day work week | Juliet Schor

TED Talks Daily

08:15 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from The case for a 4-day work week | Juliet Schor

"Transformations of this kind have a history of leaving people behind. That's why GM is prioritizing equitable climate action. To help ensure an all electric future is inclusive for the GM workforce, customers, and communities, and to see that the carbon neutral zero emissions future works for everyone. Support for ted-talks daily comes from progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget these days? Drivers who save by switching to progressive save over $700 on average and customers can qualify for an average of 6 discounts when they sign up. A little off your rate each month goes a long way, get a quote today that progressive dot com. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. National annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed who saved with progressive between June 2020 and May 2021, potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations. I've been studying work since the 1980s, and I've never seen anything like what's happening today. Pandemic fueled anxiety is surging around the world. In the U.S., more than half of all employees report feeling stressed, a lot of the day. Job quits are at record levels running at 4 million a month. People are burning out. In response, a growing number of companies are offering a four day 32 hour week, but with 5 days of pay. Now, it's not a new idea, but the pandemic has turbocharged it. Employers are realizing that if they can rethink where people work, they can also rethink how many days they're on the job. Sound pretty great. But is it realistic? Well, actually, yes. Unlike policies in which one party profits at the expense of another, the four day week can benefit workers, companies and society, and it can even be a gateway for addressing climate change. But first, let's talk about the workplace. For nearly a decade, companies and governments have been experimenting with shorter hours with no cuts and pay. While the results do vary, the research shows that people are less stressed, value their jobs more and have better lives outside of work. In most cases, they are as productive in four days as they are in 5. Companies can also see benefits through lower turnover and a higher quality applicant pool. Less burnout reduces healthcare costs mistakes and poor service. With colleagues, I'm studying four day week trials now in progress in the United States and Ireland with summer start dates for the UK, New Zealand, and Australia. We have thousands of employees participating. Health wise, an education company didn't wait for a trial to begin. In June, their employees were quitting in droves. By August, they'd implemented a four day week. 6 months later, CEO Adam Hussein reports that people are dramatically happier and have never been more productive. Resignations and sick days are down, revenue has grown, and customer satisfaction scores are outstanding. Health wise employees are spending their Fridays off doing family activities like sports or errands. One mother of young children reported that now she can occasionally manage a guilt free pedicure. The four day week can help with self care and managing the daily stresses of systemic racism, sexism and classism. Now a key part of the model is that in return for the gift of the day off, people are willing to squeeze all their productivity into four days. So while they may be spending less time at work, they're not necessarily doing less work. The secret sauce is work, reorganization, cutting out the least productive activities. Meetings are a prime target. Most companies reduce their frequency and length and the number of attendees. At health wise, people save time by messaging colleagues rather than making phone calls, which inevitably include some social chatting. They shifted personal tasks like doctor's appointments to the off day. And yes, the pace of work at the office does go up. Let's be honest, one explained, I'm not goofing off or looking at Facebook, which I was. But people have adapted and they prefer getting their downtime as a whole day off rather than in snippets. Government initiatives have similar findings. In 2015, the city of Reykjavík and then the national government of Iceland. Started offering 36 and 35 hour weeks. Eventually enrolling more than 2500 employees. The results have been remarkable. Physical and mental stress went down, while work ethic, job satisfaction, work life balance, energy levels, all improved. Productivity and service quality stayed the same or got better. And the trial was revenue neutral today, roughly 85% of all Icelandic employees are either on or eligible for these schedules. The governments of Spain and Scotland have announced four day week trials in which they'll be subsidizing the 5th day's pay. Now, one reason for these successes is that with reduced work time, each hour typically becomes more productive. Norway and Denmark, the two European countries with the shortest average hours of work at about 1380 have outsized productivity. France and Germany are similar. In contrast, the long hours countries like the UK and Italy have much, much lower productivity. The U.S. historically led the world in productivity and would likely do better now if it's work time warrants so high. While tech firms comprise the biggest group adopting four day reduced our schedules, companies are also making the switch in banking PR, marketing and design, nonprofits, consumer goods, even restaurant chain. But it's also true that doing a 100% of the work in 80% of the time isn't feasible everywhere. Manufacturing was sped up decades ago. Many teachers and flight attendants need to slow down, not intensify. And of course, healthcare workers on the front lines of the pandemic need to work less, not more. Here, yes. Thank you, healthcare workers. Here another government effort is instructive. In 2014, the city of Gothenburg in Sweden gave nurses at one of its facilities a 6 hour day. As expected, the nurses health and overall well-being improved as did productivity and patient care. But in this trial, they hired new staff for the hours that weren't being covered. The striking finding was, how much lower sick pay and unemployment benefits helped offset those additional salaries. Now, the Swedish case raises a bigger, more existential question. How much time should we be dedicating to work? In many countries, jobs are getting more, not less demanding. And scarcity thinking, the idea that even rich

Pandemic Fueled Anxiety GM Ceo Adam Hussein U.S. TED Reykjavík National Government Of Iceland UK Ireland New Zealand Australia Facebook Denmark Norway Scotland Spain
A highlight from My long walk across India for women's freedom | Srishti Bakshi

TED Talks Daily

02:15 min | Last week

A highlight from My long walk across India for women's freedom | Srishti Bakshi

"All states and situations. After days of negotiation, for the very first time, my parents allowed me to step out and escorted for the movie with my friends. I was 14 and beyond excited with this new freedom I had. With a big smile on my face, I ended up back theater. Just ten steps from my seat. I felt these heavy hands grabbed both my breasts and before I knew it, these hands disappeared. I screamed and ran outside. And I still remember those dirty hand prints on my white crisp cotton shirt, announcing to the world what had just happened. I returned home devastated. Kept the lights on all through the night. And the outdoors terrified me. I didn't want to go out at all. It is not news that women face rampant violence inside homes as well across the world. So if it's unsafe outside and inside, where do we go? Women in India are over 600 million strong. That's a lot of people. You don't see many women walking alone at night because they're simply not safe. 400,000. That's 45 women every hour. Face varying degrees of violence ranging from domestic violence to rape in India. A 13 year old girl and her mother were gang raped on a highway, just 45 minutes from where my parents live. When I heard this, I just recall the same incident that happened to me. I was devastated. I found myself in the same hysterical state. I was outside of that theater. For everybody around me, life moved on. We are hardwired to think that this is just how the world is. Instead of asking the fundamental question of how wrong this is. I am here, and I am fighting for safer spaces for women by increasing their mobility by movement of the body and mind to take control over their lives.

India
A highlight from The future of the food ecosystem -- and the power of your plate | Ndidi Okonkwo Nwuneli

TED Talks Daily

05:05 min | Last week

A highlight from The future of the food ecosystem -- and the power of your plate | Ndidi Okonkwo Nwuneli

"Others are so privileged with abundance that tons and tons of food goes to waste. In our talk from TEDWomen 2021. Social entrepreneur and diddy okonko and winelle asks us to widen our perspectives before we consume our next meals. To better understand what a sustainable food ecosystem could look like for the world and for generations to come. My name didi means patience and ibu. But I'm probably one of the most impatient people you've ever met. I was in such a rush to enter the world that I was born in the parking lot of the university of Nigeria teaching hospital. True story. Agriculture was my favorite subject in school. My mom remembers me squealing for joy when I run home from school and so green beans. Ready for harvesting. Or when I sold a bag of avocados in our local market. I consider studying agriculture in school. But instead opted to study business. And started in corporate America, but many twists and concerns led me back to my first love. Consulting, working with entrepreneurs and then starting businesses. A defining moment for me was in 2007. During the first world food crisis in my adult life. I recognize how connected we were. All price shocks, serial price hikes, which affected bread prices. All over the world. And the most vulnerable were hurt. 14 years later, my impatience has grown. Where even more connected and our food ecosystem is even more broken. Thankfully, the Rockefeller foundation has some pioneering research on the true cost of food in the United States. Which indicates that even though we spend 1.1 trillion on an annual food expenditure, we actually spend 2.1 trillion on cost linked to health and climate. All because of our broken food ecosystem. These same statistics have been replicated all over the world. In fact, according to the UN food system scientific group, food system is value destroying. A health lens and equity lens. And a climate lens. Starting with the climate lens, we must modify how we grow food and reduce food waste. Our food ecosystem is one of the largest contributors to climate change. We keep cutting down trees to grow more food. And we keep wasting food, which ends up in landfills and rods, generates methane. The good news is that we have the technology and the science today to grow enough food to feed the world and to address our food, waste problems. We have the knowledge, but we're not using it. That exciting examples from my ecosystem where we're seeing dramatic impacts. The songhai sensor in Benin republic, educates young Africans on regenerative agriculture and zero waste total production. And one of these young people is doing just that. Through his company, bio loop, he's feeding waste, has ever peels young peels to black soldier fly lava. They're growing really quickly and becoming wonderful fish feed. The byproducts and the residue from this process is wonderful soil supplements. And the entire production process is run on renewable energy. Through my work with Sahel consulting, what demonstrating that farmers can double and triple yields without hurting the environment. When using technology and science from our local research institutions and we're proving that in Africa, there are great examples for the rest of the world to emulate. Now, we need to scale these interventions. And we need to ensure that our governments are private sector, our farmers are incentivized to change behavior and see improved lives. If you are as impatient as I am, you also have a role to play. By reducing the food waste in your home, every single person here can take up a policy to ensure that their schools, their companies, their civil society groups, have a sustainability policy and a food waste policy. And please don't tell your children to finish their dinner because they're hungry children anywhere. Tell them to finish their dinner because it's good for the environment and healthy food is good for them. Second, we

Diddy Okonko Winelle University Of Nigeria Teaching Un Food System Scientific Grou America Rockefeller Foundation Benin Republic Sahel Consulting Africa
A highlight from The most powerful untapped resource in health care | Edith Elliott and Shahed Alam

TED Talks Daily

07:00 min | Last week

A highlight from The most powerful untapped resource in health care | Edith Elliott and Shahed Alam

"You're listening to ted-talks daily. I'm Elise hue. One organization is rethinking global healthcare with a remarkably simple, yet meaningful idea. In their talk from the Ted 2022 stage, global health activists shot ahead a lot and Edith Elliott described what they've learned about the power of close personal ties. When it comes to healthcare. Their work is part of the audacious project, a collaborative funding platform to support groundbreaking ideas across the world, which this year raised $900 million. Make sure you check out the other winners, which we've been sharing talks from all week. Support for ted-talks daily comes from Capital One auto navigator. Ready for a new ride, but not sure where to start, meet the tool that makes car shopping and financing easier. With Capital One auto navigator you can find a car and get pre qualified instantly. You'll get your real rate and monthly payment without affecting your credit score. It's so simple, you might feel like you're taking the easy way out. That's because you are. Capital One, what's in your wallet? Terms and conditions apply, find out more at Capital One dot com slash auto navigator. Support for ted-talks daily comes from progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget these days? Drivers who save by switching to progressive save over $700 on average and customers can qualify for an average of 6 discounts when they sign up. A little off your rate each month goes a long way, get a quote today that progressive dot com. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. National annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed who saved with progressive between June 2020 and May 2021, potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations. In the fall of 2021, I arrived in the U.S. to visit my parents. After almost two years of not seeing one another. I was coming from my home in Bangalore in India, where we were just getting out of a devastating second wave of the pandemic. Within weeks of my arrival, first my father, then me, then my mother all came down with COVID. And it hit us hard. My parents age and their medical conditions started to make each day more severe than the last. And despite my medical training, I was overwhelmed. It was a nightmare. When I'm guessing many of you all have faced, I tried to get them tested at sites that were booked for days. We call their doctors who were unavailable. We tried to get monoclonal antibodies, knowing that with every day that passed, that treatment became less effective. And this was all while just trying to figure out what to eat. And how to make them feel better. Thankfully, we all recovered, but I'll never forget the depth of how alone and helpless I felt. And my desperation to do anything I could to help. Like Shaw head and I'm guessing everyone in this room at some point in your life, you've been in the position of wanting to do whatever you can to take care of someone you love. We're here to talk to you about how our organization Nora health is rethinking healthcare. And yes, we have nearly a decades track record. We're driven by data and we leverage technology, but at the heart of what we do is a powerful force that might surprise you. It's love. It's that dogged determination to get your aging mom's meds sorted out. That tenacious energy to get your kid to the ER. Like oxygen, it is essential to our health and our well-being. It is ever present, but invisible. It's the fuel of family advocacy and for too long, it's either been seen as a nuisance or it's been ignored altogether within healthcare settings. When Shaw had and I met, we connected over many things. But we founded Nora on the shared belief that love is the most powerful, untapped resource available. And when valued and made visible, it can transform health systems. We work in India and Bangladesh. And when you stand outside one of the hospitals where we work, the first thing you'll notice is the crowd. When you walk in, you may see patients doubled up on beds, and you'll see hallways and waiting areas filled with families and their belongings. Because they've moved to the hospital to be there with their loved ones. Families are spending their time anxiously waiting while providers are doing the best that they can to keep up with the intense demand. And we know this will only get worse. Globally, there will be a shortage of nearly 18 million healthcare workers by 2030. The systems are overburdened, and this has life and death consequences for patients. Every year, in South Asia alone, nearly 1.5 million children under 5 die. And far too many of these deaths can be prevented with better health practices at home. At Nora health, we train, and we support families with lifesaving skills. We work with hospitals and clinics to meet people where they are at the patient's bedside in the hallways in the waiting areas. We train nurses so that they can run sessions with groups of families to teach them actionable skills. Things like wound care and how to recognize warning signs. Like jaundice in a newborn or slurred speech for a cardiac patient. And they leave plenty of time for questions and demonstrations. Once families leave home, we stay connected with them, sending them messages, videos and reminders that are relevant for their loved ones. And we're on the other side to answer any questions. So whether it's new parents, surgical or oncology patients, we've seen that this approach works across all types of care. Because the common thread is that loved ones are there, and they want to help. Along the way we've learned a few things. First, deep listening is key, nurses, patients, and families have guided us. They are the visionaries. They make sure our trainings incorporate objects that people have in their homes, visuals that people see in their communities and words and phrases that people actually use instead of complex medical jargon. Second, trust and timing are fundamental to behavior change. Nurses and healthcare providers are the people families trust, so we work with them to provide the training at a time and in a place where families need at most. Third, you do not have to start from scratch. We're not creating new systems we're building with and through existing infrastructure. Yes, Nora is there to kickstart and support. But the trainings are designed and introduced in a way that ensures they will continue to run sustainably. So far we've reached hundreds of hospitals and clinics across India and Bangladesh, and we've helped them change the way they deliver care. We've trained over 5000 nurses

TED Elise Hue Edith Elliott Nora Health Shaw India Bangalore Nora U.S. Bangladesh South Asia
A highlight from A bold plan to transform access to the US social safety net | Amanda Renteria

TED Talks Daily

06:58 min | Last week

A highlight from A bold plan to transform access to the US social safety net | Amanda Renteria

"Hey, I'm Elise Hugh, you're listening to ted-talks daily. You probably have plenty of examples in your own life of how technology has helped you and automated parts of your life that used to be cumbersome. But digital public servant Amanda renteria points out that automation hasn't reached people who really need it. She shares in her Ted 2022 talk how code for America is trying to change that. Her work is part of the latest cohort in the audacious project, a collaborative funding platform that supports change makers by connecting them with funding to actually put their ideas into action. This year over $900 million was catalyzed, and we've been sharing those ideas here on ted-talks daily all week. So stick around to hear them all. Today's episode is brought to you by logic 2020, a nationwide consulting firm that elevates client performance using strategy, technology, and data, voted a best company to work for a year after year. Logic 2020 is hiring remote and hybrid engineers, developers, data professionals, and strategy consultants in connected locations across the country. If you are collaborative driven and have a passion for new technologies, visit logic 2020 dot com slash PRX to learn more. Ted-talks daily is brought to you by progressive. Have you tried the name your price tool yet that works just the way it sounds. You tell progressive how much you want to pay for car insurance. And they'll show you coverage options that fit your budget. It's easy to start a quote, and you'll be able to find a rate that works for you. It's just one of the many ways you can save with progressive. Get your quote today at progressive dot com and see why four out of 5 new auto customers recommend progressive. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. So my dad's first lesson to me was look people in the eye Mika. Make sure people see you and you see them. He has been a proud janitor farm worker shoeshine or home builder and small business owner. He has seen the world from so many different lenses and has lots of stories to tell. But there's one I've never been able to get out of my head. A story when my dad was a young kid. He and my Theo mile knew exactly when the trucks would come in. Under the freeway, just as the sun set, they jumped the fence to get into the dump. And as they waited for the trucks, they'd make bets on who would find the best food. An uneaten apple they could clean a perfect banana, sometimes a candy bar or rap sandwich. And then they'd grab whatever they could find. And save the very best to bring home to their even younger brothers and sisters. I hate that story. But I share it because we can't solve what we can't see. In 1936, the image of the migrant mother captured the living conditions in the west, showing lawmakers what people were going through. After it published, the United States government sent 20,000 pounds of food, and that image solidified support for the very first safety net programs in America. Yet still today, more than 37 million Americans are still living in poverty. One in 6 kids. As a student of economics and a career public servant, I know we've been at this for a long time. But it's my work today that has given me the hope that we can finally end poverty, as we know it, and here's why. Right now, there are 80 public benefit programs all across the country, intended to provide critical anti poverty resources. Yet an estimated $60 billion in benefits go unclaimed every year. 60 billion, I believe in large part due to complicated outdated systems that weren't designed to see the people they serve. I want you to imagine for a moment that you lost your job, and you don't know how you're going to put food on the table, but you hear about this government program that can help. And so you begin the process of applying. The first thing you realize is you can't do it on the only online connection you have. Your phone, because the only way to apply online is through a desktop computer. So you head to the community library, you go through screen after screen answering close to 200 questions, wading through confusing instructions, it feels a little bit like a game of gotcha. Except your benefits are at risk. Now, if you're from a place like my hometown, a small rural farming town, there isn't an easily accessible public venue with desktop computers. So you have to find a ride to the nearest social services office, maybe 30 miles away. When you get there, you have to walk through metal detectors with two security guards past a long table of scattered paper forms into the main waiting room. It's loud, and there's a long line leading to that service counter. When you get to the front of it, you're met with a thick, clouded sheet, a bulletproof glass. Separating you from someone who could finally help. That has been the system in America for many communities like mine. So it's no wonder that 14 million Americans aren't enrolled in child and food nutrition programs or that 6 million are missing healthcare benefits. Technology has changed almost every aspect of our lives. It's made things faster, more efficient, automatic. We need to do the same for people seeking benefits. I work for an organization called code for America. We deploy human center technology. The kind that respects you from the start meets you where you are, provides an easy, positive experience. And our research has shown there are four factors we need to overcome. First, we know that far more people have access to the Internet on their phone than a desktop computer. So applications should be online and mobile friendly. Second, lots of people are falling off because the process is complicated. So applications need to be simple and easy to use. Third, we know that people who are eligible for one program like food assistance are pretty likely to be eligible for another, like healthcare. So let's combine processes where we can. And finally, we know there are unseen heroes in government, casework or social workers on the front lines navigating old systems, we can equip them with the data and tools to streamline their efforts. California's food assistance used to look like 183 questions, 51 pages of screens, available only by desktop computer. We took that application and redesigned it. This is get Cal fresh. A mobile first application available 24

Elise Hugh Amanda Renteria TED Theo Mile America Mika United States Government Apple California
A highlight from Ep 158: 3 Big Trends That Are Altering the Nonprofit Sector (with Eric Nee)

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep 158: 3 Big Trends That Are Altering the Nonprofit Sector (with Eric Nee)

"When I consider the ingredients for effective leadership, I find myself thinking about understanding trends. Either in the sector or in society writ large that will impact or change or shape how you lead. And I know that in your world it's hard to keep up with this. It's easy for it to head to the back burner or fall off the stove altogether. So I thought I might be helpful by focusing an episode on this very subject. A dose of context and trends from a person who curates the leading voices in the sector and is one himself and who presents insightful and thought provoking articles to those of us committed to the power, impact and possibility that the social sector presents to a society that really needs us to do our very best work. A publicist friend of mine once told me that he turned a client down and I asked why? My friend said, this guy wants to be a thought leader, but after an hour long conversation, I realized he really didn't have any thoughts. I thought that was funny. So today, a conversation with a leading expert on the social sector, and I promise you,

A highlight from A transparent, easy way for smallholder farmers to save | Anushka Ratnayake

TED Talks Daily

03:24 min | Last week

A highlight from A transparent, easy way for smallholder farmers to save | Anushka Ratnayake

"At GM, how they achieve a carbon neutral all electric future matters a lot. Climate change impacts global communities differently, and major transformations of this kind have a history of leaving people behind. This is why GM is prioritizing equitable climate action to help ensure an all electric future is inclusive for their workforce, customers, and communities. And to see that the carbon neutral zero emissions future works for everyone. Stay tuned after this talk for a bonus idea, brought to you by GM on how we could curb climate change by spending just 2% more on everything. So my dad's first lesson to me was look people in the eye Mika. Make sure people see you and you see them. He has been a proud janitor farm worker shoeshine or home builder and small business owner. He has seen the world from so many different lenses and has lots of stories to tell. But there's one I've never been able to get out of my head. A story of when my dad was a young kid, he and my Theo mile, knew exactly when the trucks would come in. Under the freeway, just as the sun set, they jumped the fence to get into the dump. And as they waited for the trucks, they'd make bets on who would find the best food. An uneaten apple they could clean a perfect banana, sometimes a candy bar or rap sandwich. And then they'd grab whatever they could find. And save the very best to bring home to their even younger brothers and sisters. I hate that story. But I share it because we can't solve what we can't see. In 1936, the image of the migrant mother captured the living conditions in the west, showing lawmakers what people were going through. After it published, the United States government sent 20,000 pounds of food, and that image solidified support for the very first safety net programs in America. Yet still today, more than 37 million Americans are still living in poverty. One in 6 kids. As a student of economics and a career public servant, I know we've been at this for a long time. But it's my work today that has given me the hope that we can finally end poverty as we know it. And here's why. Right now, there are 80 public benefit programs all across the country, intended to provide critical anti poverty resources. Yet an estimated $60 billion in benefits go unclaimed every year. 60 billion, I believe in large part due to complicated outdated systems that weren't designed to see the people they serve. I want you to imagine for a moment that you lost your job, and you don't know how you're going to put food on the table, but you hear about this government program that can help. And so you begin the process of applying. The first thing you realize is you can't do it on the only online connection you have. Your phone, because the only way to apply online is through a desktop computer. So you head to the community library, you go through screen after screen answering close to 200 questions, wading through confusing instructions, it feels a little bit like a game of gotcha. Except your benefits are at risk. Now, if you're from a place like my

GM Theo Mile Mika United States Government Apple America
A highlight from Ocean, People, Planet: A Wildlife Refuge On The Brink

After The Fact

02:32 min | Last week

A highlight from Ocean, People, Planet: A Wildlife Refuge On The Brink

"Along the Harriet Tubman underground railroad byway on the Maryland shores of the Chesapeake Bay sits the new revived United Methodist Church, one of four traditionally black churches in the area, founded after the Civil War. The area is rich in American history and biodiversity, and rising waters are putting it all at risk. Too bad you weren't here last week, we had a ton more waterfowl. Swans, a couple thousand geese, snow geese too. I think they took off. I'm not sure if they're still down there. Still a few. I'm Dan le duc for the pew charitable trusts. Welcome to after the fact, and our season on ocean, people, planet. And that was Marcia trading's long, greeting residents in Cambridge, Maryland. She manages the nearby Blackwater national wildlife refuge, and she is working to ensure a sustainable future for this unique place that's home to the iconic bald eagle, as well as thousands of migratory birds each year. Her job goes well beyond the wildlife, the surrounding community depends on the jobs and tourism revenue from the Chesapeake Bay. And people are a big part of her work, which has made all the harder, by climate change. There is no time to waste. We have a limited little window to be able to save our marshes. It's certainly an issue that we can not tackle alone. We need all of our partners, and we need the public. We need the public to care. And that's where I think refuges can be so important when it comes to sea level rise and climate change. Because not everybody lives this, not everybody sees it, not everybody cares about wildlife like some of us do. That brings us to our data point for this episode, 2.1 feet. In a report on climate change for Maryland officials, scientists estimate that coastal waters will rise as much as 2.1 feet in a little more than two decades from now. That means if you're patient and stand at the water's edge, it'll rise up past your knees by 2050. It's happening now. Black water has seen thousands of acres of its land, submerge in recent decades. Like many communities, a changing climate is affecting the local economy and wildlife. This region's future and its past. We travel to Blackwater national wildlife refuge and spoke with Joseph Gordon, who directs pew's work on conserving marine life in the United States. His team's research is helping us understand how the health of

Dan Le Duc Chesapeake Bay Pew Charitable Trusts Maryland Harriet Tubman United Methodist Church Marcia Cambridge Blackwater National Wildlife R Joseph Gordon PEW United States
A highlight from An election redesign to restore trust in US democracy | Tiana Epps-Johnson

TED Talks Daily

08:11 min | Last week

A highlight from An election redesign to restore trust in US democracy | Tiana Epps-Johnson

"Hey Hugh, you're listening to ted-talks daily. Democracy all over the world is fragile. And in the United States, it's under threat. Technologist Tiana eps Johnson paints the picture of the situation. In her talk from Ted 2022, and shares how she's fighting for voting rights in the U.S.. Tiana and I also got to sit down and chat more after her talk, so stick around after the talk to hear that. Her work is part of the audacious project, a collaborative funding platform to support groundbreaking ideas across the world, which this year raised $900 million. We're sharing this year's winners on ted-talks daily all week. Hey, ted-talks daily listeners. I'm Adam grant. I hosted another podcast from the Ted audio collected. It's called work life. And it's about the science of making work, not sunk. Next time, on work life. The way that fiction is built, it makes us a very sensitive and vulnerable to those setbacks affairs which occur all the time and of course that creates a lot of worry and stops us taking risks and pushing ourselves forward. How perfectionism holds us back and how to overcome it. Find work life on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen. Support comes from the University of Texas at San Antonio, one of only 20 Hispanic serving institutions in the nation with a prestigious tier one Carnegie classification for research excellence. As a recognized national leader in advancing Latino student success, is modeling the public research university of tomorrow. Creating bold futures, more at bold futures dot EDU. Support for ted-talks daily comes from progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget these days? Drivers who save by switching to progressive save over $700 on average and customers can qualify for an average of 6 discounts when they sign up. A little off your rate each month goes a long way, get a quote today that progressive dot com. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. National annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed who saved with progressive between June 2020 and May 2021, potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations. It's dark days for democracy. And our crisis is global. If you're like me, you can feel it in your bones. My expertise focuses on democracy in the United States where I live and work. And while we've long lifted up our own system on a pedestal as an example for the world, we're one of those democracies that's currently in a years long decline. So much of the conversation in the media and among experts is about our broken two party system. Democrats versus Republicans. And so much of the conversation about voting is about the outcomes. The winners and the losers. These are the wrong conversations. If we want to tackle the threat to U.S. democracy today. Because we have a much more fundamental challenge and it's quickly growing. The United States, election infrastructure is crumbling. By infrastructure, I mean the technology, the physical infrastructure, like facilities, and most importantly, the human infrastructure, the people who manage the U.S. voting process. Election infrastructure is so essential that it's been designated critical infrastructure by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. That puts it on par with systems like our power grid and water supply in the eyes of the federal government. But they have an invested in it like it's critical. The average portion of a county budget spent on election operations is about half of 1%. To put that into context, we spend about the same amount to maintain parking facilities as we do our election system. If we zoom out a little bit, the U.S. election system is actually pretty unique by global standards. Unlike some other places, we have no central election authority that's responsible for managing the logistics of voting for our entire country. Instead, we have thousands and thousands of local departments that each have some independent mix for figuring out how to make voting work where they live. These departments are staffed by professional election officials with support from volunteer poll workers during peak election season. So with no government run how to for how to administer elections, we end up seeing widely different voting experiences throughout the U.S.. We're voting can legitimately work one way in one community and look totally different somewhere else. For over a decade, my work has focused on providing technology and training and other resources to state and local election officials to support them and their work serving voters. In my current rule, that has looked like working with election departments in every corner of the country that together serve about 75% of our eligible voters. This has given me a really unique window into what it actually takes these public servants on the front lines to do things like keep voter rolls up to date. And quickly and accurately count ballots. And inform their communities about how the process works. This year round work is hard. And it's often super thankless. And the last two years have been some of the worst. Election officials who serve millions of voters currently lack the basic technology that they need to reliably do their work. It either doesn't exist or it's shockingly outdated. In the year 2020, we supported a small New England town replaced their hand crank ballot box that they had been using since the early 1900s to count ballots. One was literally held together by duct tape. Even worse, the people that underpin our voting passes, the elected officials are currently under attack. In exchange for being outspoken about the integrity of the process that they managed in 2020, which, by the way, turned out to be our highest turnout election in the U.S. and over a century. And the most secure election ever administered in our history according to our national security community. In exchange for the grit and determination that it took to make that possible during a global pandemic, today election officials are receiving death threats, their children are being bullied. And some have had to flee their homes. A recent survey shows that one in three election officials, one in three, currently feel unsafe doing their work. It's appalling. And enough is enough. We are at a tipping point for U.S. democracy and frankly democracy globally. I don't know about you, but I personally don't feel comfortable just standing around leaving things to chance. And I especially don't feel comfortable standing by asking election officials to keep figuring out how to make it work alone while our system is getting pushed to its brink. We need to rally around a set of shared values and standards. A north star. So that every single voter, regardless of their zip code, has access to a process that's both fair and trustworthy. Election officials need a place where they can come together to keep their skills fresh. So that they're ready to tackle whatever challenges might come. Whether it's trading to bolster cybersecurity or to combat disinformation or to help them keep voters safe during a pandemic. And every election department rule, urban, large, small, needs access to 21st century, secure technology. So that every single community has access

U.S. TED Tiana Eps Johnson Adam Grant Carnegie Classification For Re Public Research University Of Tiana U.S. Department Of Homeland Se Hugh University Of Texas San Antonio Apple Federal Government New England
A highlight from Mental health care that disrupts cycles of violence | Celina de Sola

TED Talks Daily

05:59 min | Last week

A highlight from Mental health care that disrupts cycles of violence | Celina de Sola

"I want to share with you. Latin America is home to only 8% of the world's population. But one third of its homicides, this is especially extreme in the northern triangle countries of Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, where I'm from and where I live. Just imagine the impact that this kind of unrelenting violence can have. On a person's health, productivity, and well-being. Especially because we know that if we're exposed to violence, this can result in trauma. And when that happens, our brain stress response actually shuts down core functions, like problem solving, critical thinking, and emotional regulation, and it elevates the ones that we need to protect ourselves and survive. So this makes it really hard to learn to make decisions and even maintain relationships. It can also increase our risks of lung and heart disease, diabetes, anxiety, and depression. So imagine what this can mean for entire communities when almost everybody can be walking around with unaddressed stress and trauma. Then picture what can happen as individual and collective trauma collide. To make matters worse, we know that exposure to violence can lead to more violence. Researchers shown that survivors of violence can be up to 6 times more likely to either be involved in violence or be re victimized. It's literally the definition of a vicious cycle. The good news is we know that we can interrupt this cycle by addressing the underlying trauma with better access to mental healthcare. The only problem is access to mental healthcare in these communities is virtually nonexistent. So just to give you an idea, in the United States, there are about 270 mental healthcare workers for every 100,000 people. In Honduras, this drops to two. So we're left with this classic conundrum. We know how to help solve the problem, but we don't have the resources to do it. But what if we re envision what or who these resources could be? I think we should. Because there are ways to flood communities with access to mental healthcare. It's already being done. And it's working. And I want to tell you a little bit about how we're doing it at glasswing. We're training thousands of existing government employees like teachers, nurses, doctors, and police officers on trauma education and self care. We're essentially trying to create a whole core of lay mental health workers who are already serving on the front lines and can therefore step in and buffer the impacts of violence and trauma on themselves and on the communities they serve. We've trained healthcare workers to be able to recognize the science of trauma to be able to help patients understand what their experiencing and equip them with tools to cope or refer them if they need it. We've actually seen that trauma informed violence prevention, work in hospitals can reduce the likelihood of re victimization by up to 30%. In schools, we know that if children and adolescents have access to a caring adult that can help them cope with stress, their grades improve their conduct improves and their resilience. And in our work with police, 90% of the police we trained actually felt better able to regulate their emotions and to deal with anxiety and fear. 80% even told us that they felt better equipped to help their peers. I want to share a story with you. Back in 2018, our Guatemala team was working in a community with really high rates of crime, violence, and stigma. One of the schools we were working in is actually the school where kids ended up if they got expelled or if they got in trouble. So that's why Walter, a 17 year old student, was really surprised and a little confused when Eluvia, one of our trauma and formed school coordinators showed up to recruit him and his friends to work at the local primary school. But Eluvia was from that community, and she knew that if she could empower young men like Walter to become involved and become a school coordinator, she could not only transform his life, but also the life of the kids he'd work with. So sure enough, a couple weeks later, while there was trained and leading a group of 20 little kids in the glee club. He loved it. He loved it. He loved it so much that he continued to show up every week for over two years. But one afternoon, one of what those neighbors ran into the school screaming that what they had to get home because his sister had been shot and killed. While their sprinted out and as he described it to me, he felt his mind and body go numb. Then he felt his heart start to race and his chest filled with rage. He knew he had killed the sister. And he ran up to his room to get a gun. Let me pause there for a sec. Do you remember what I told you a minute ago about how violence can lead to more violence? That could have been right there. But it wasn't. Because he told me that when he pictured his mentor, luvia, and the little glee club kids finding out that their role model had killed someone. He put the gun down. And

Honduras Guatemala Eluvia El Salvador Latin America Heart Disease Trauma Anxiety Diabetes Depression Walter United States SEC Luvia
A highlight from How ancient Arctic carbon threatens everyone on the planet | Sue Natali

TED Talks Daily

06:50 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from How ancient Arctic carbon threatens everyone on the planet | Sue Natali

"You're listening to ted-talks daily, I'm Elise hue. We have to talk about permafrost, because what's happening to permafrost in the Arctic, threatens all of us. In our talk from Ted 2022, Arctic ecologist soon Italy shares the urgent problem presented by thawing permafrost. And her plan to tackle it with the urgency it deserves. Her work is part of Ted's audacious project to hear more about this initiative which supports groundbreaking ideas across the world. Stick around after Sue's talk. I'll be joined by the project's executive director Anna verghese. To hear how they catalyzed $900 million this year, and the impact of the ideas that were chosen. Hates ted-talks daily listeners. I'm Adam grant. I hosted another podcast from the Ted audio collected. It's called work life. And it's about the science of making work, not suck. Next time, on work life. The way that affection is built, it makes us a very sensitive and vulnerable to those setbacks affairs which occur all the time and of course that creates a lot of worry and stops us taking risks such as pushing ourselves forward. How perfectionism holds us back and how to overcome it. Find work life on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen. Support comes from the University of Texas at San Antonio, one of only 20 Hispanic serving institutions in the nation with a prestigious tier one Carnegie classification for research excellence. As a recognized national leader in advancing Latino student success, is modeling the public research university of tomorrow. Creating bold futures, more at bold futures dot EDU. Support for ted-talks daily comes from progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget these days? Drivers who save by switching to progressives save over $700 on average and customers can qualify for an average of 6 discounts when they sign up. A little off your rate each month goes a long way, get a quote today that progressive dot com. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. National annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed who saved with progressive between June 2020 and May 2021, potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations. So whenever I tell people I'm an Arctic scientist, the first thing that they always ask me is how cold is it up there? And yeah, the Arctic can get pretty cold. Trust me when I tell you that working outside at -40° is really, really challenging. But in the summer of 2019, it was anything but cold. So that summer I was working with my research team and Alaska's Yukon Costco klem delta on the traditional lands of the yupik and chuck people. And we were up there hauling hundreds of pounds of equipment across the tundra and the middle of a record breaking heat wave. It was 90°F. There was no breeze, nowhere to go for shade and seemingly endless miles of tundra as far as my eyes can see. To make matters worse, the land had drastically changed since we had been here, just one year before. The ground was sinking. And it was cracking and places it was literally collapsing beneath my feet. I've been working in the Arctic for more than a decade and I had never seen changes happening this rapidly ever before. The changes we saw were remarkable. And they were also really concerning. But we were there to measure changes that we couldn't see. We were there to fill a major gap in our understanding of how the changing Arctic is impacting the earth's climate. So we were installing what's called an eddy covariance tower, which is a series of instruments that measures the exchange of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane between the land and the atmosphere. It's essentially like measuring the earth's breath. And so the reason the land around us was collapsing is because the ones permanently frozen ground called permafrost was starting to thaw. And once it thaws that collapsing ground can drastically alter the vast expanse of the Arctic's tundra and boreal forest. And it can also threaten the homes and life ways of Arctic residents. Just imagine if the ground beneath your home suddenly started to sink. That's what's happening across the Arctic. But thawing permafrost also threatens everyone on the planet because it stores a massive amount of ancient frozen carbon. And when that carbon thaws, it can be released into the atmosphere as greenhouse gases, leading to more warming and more thaw. So let me place the magnitude of this problem in perspective for you. By the end of this century, greenhouse gas emissions from thawing permafrost may be on par with some of the world's leading greenhouse gas emitting nations. Perhaps as large as or larger than emissions from the United States. The second largest greenhouse gas emitting country in the world. And you know, I want to point out this is not a new phenomena. Arctic residents and scientists have been observing permafrost though now for decades. But the scale, the research hasn't been sufficient to meet this enormous challenge. Because no one country is directly responsible for permafrost thaw, no single nation has taken responsibility for fully monitoring and tracking its impact across the Arctic. And this is not a case where ignorance is bliss because what doesn't get measured doesn't get accounted for. Because we can't put a precise number on permafrost emissions, policymakers are essentially excluding them, setting global emissions targets that are wholly and sufficient to protect us from catastrophic climate change. Ignoring permafrost is essentially like leaving a major greenhouse gas emitting country like the United States at a global climate negotiations, which is not a good idea. What we need to know is where permafrost is thawing across the Arctic and how fast what that means in terms of greenhouse gas emissions and how that will impact our climate in ten 50 or a hundred years from now. Answering these questions requires a massive and integrated effort at a scale

Arctic TED Elise Hue Anna Verghese Adam Grant Carnegie Classification For Re Public Research University Of University Of Texas SUE Italy San Antonio Apple Alaska United States
A highlight from Jenny Dell: Broadcasting & Meeting Her Husband Will Middlebrooks PT2

The BosBabes

04:58 min | 37 min ago

A highlight from Jenny Dell: Broadcasting & Meeting Her Husband Will Middlebrooks PT2

"Sports show. It's real, it's wrong, feeling positive. You are now rocking with the buffets. What is the future for Jenny Dell? Do you want to potentially cover another sport? Like, I can see you alongside, actually, I just recently interviewed her and she has a super chill personality. I could see you guys co hosting together at UFC, Laura sanko, would you ever want to do anything with MMA or get involved with the boxing world? What is the future for you, sports reporting, and would you ever take on a squirt that you probably don't know much about? Yes. I and that's what makes this job so fun. And I am so lucky because I've had opportunities to work on sports that I did not know much about and learn about it. And for the last three, two years, three years, three years. I've covered the world's strongest man competition for CBS. And it's like, what? So the first year, CVS called me. And my boss said, hey, got kind of a random one for you. Have you ever watched those world's strongest man competitions? And I'm like, yeah, where they like pull cars and trucks and yeah. And he was like, would you want to do sideline for it? I was like, yes. And he was like, okay, it's in Africa. And I was like, what? I was like, yes, count me in. So that was three or four years ago. And I got to go to the Philippines for it. I got to go to Africa for it. It is literally, that's something I never thought I would ever do in my entire life. And you're standing behind me is like, I mean, literally the mountain from Game of Thrones is how George Julius born, and it was like one of the guys. But it's like you're standing next to these mountain men. And doing these interviews and just learning an entire new world is something that I loved doing. I got to work a world robotics competition. Like just random stuff that I'm like, okay, I know nothing about this. I'm gonna just do as much research and learn as much about it as possible. And then just relish in the experience because when would I ever think I'm gonna be an Africa interviewing like a giant human being? Never. Like, let's bring it on. So I am willing to try anything. Just ask and I will be there. I love it. I'm glad that I asked that question because sometimes people are so stuck with either just one sport or they're stuck in like this comfort zone where they don't want to explore and it sounds like you literally are just like up for anything. It sounds like they're probably stems from you kind of with like the no pressure like hey man I didn't even want to be on camera to begin with but now I'm just killing it so I'll take on all the fun jobs and seek on like what happens. I think that is so cool. I love it. I love it. That's what makes this job so fun. It's like you just never you never know where it's gonna take you and like of course I love football. I love basketball. I love covering baseball. I love the major sports, but like bring on the random ones. Like I wanna experience all this stuff. You guys are now listening to Jenny Dell former Boston Red Sox reporter. You guys just listen to her talk all about her experience working in Boston as a sideline reporter. working for CBS. Please stay tuned because we are going to jump in a little bit and talk about her family life of it. She is currently married to former Boston Red Sox third baseman will middlebrook. She has two adorable girls, but we know right now that you are currently married to former Boston Red Sox, third baseman will middlebrooks. What is it like being married to a professional baseball player having those two young daughters meeting him in Boston? Walk us through the steps of what that was like. Well, this could be a whole hour show. No, will was like, I always laugh because people are like, did you know right when you met him that it was like, that was gonna be your husband? I'm like, no, not in the slightest. He was like this little 23 year old cutie that just came up and was crushing it in Boston and he was like so sweet and innocent and it's just our love story should be right into like a fairytale someday and I hope that we're able to share it from start to finish at some point. But once we got to know each other, I think we both knew that there was something special there. And I, you know, people are always like, oh, did you date athletes? And I was like, never. And I never would have the reason that I was willing to risk it with will is because I knew that there was a reason that we were brought together. And that he was going to eventually be my husband. Once we got to know each other well, but it was tough at first. So we dated in secret in Boston for a while. We lived in an apartment together in southie and we would have to leave at different times and we weren't allowed to be seen in public together and we'd go to the fields at different times and the team knew my production crew knew my boss is new.

Jenny Dell Laura Sanko George Julius Africa Boston Red Sox CBS UFC Boxing CVS Boston Middlebrooks Philippines Baseball Middlebrook Basketball Football
A highlight from Jenny Dell: Her Early Years & The Red Sox

The BosBabes

03:16 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Jenny Dell: Her Early Years & The Red Sox

"What is up my boss baby's fanatics? We are back at it again, baby, for yet another brand new, the boss baby was left. So sports podcast. And I'm your host, Brittany Baldi. Before we get into this week's special guest, I wanted to first thank you all for tuning in week after week. You all know that I drop about four brand new episodes a month. Please hit the subscribe button on both iTunes and Spotify. It is free to listen and free to subscribe. Please also leave me a good review. Great reviews from you all allow me to keep creating fantastic content for you, my favorite listeners. I could not be more excited to drop this two part special with former Boston Red Sox sideline reporter Jenny Dell. I have been holding on to this episode for quite some time now, and I felt like this was the perfect time to release it, especially with baseball season upon us. In this two part special with Jenny Dell, you will learn a ton about her upbringing, childhood, and how she got involved in broadcasting. And of course, much more. Here comes the fun part. She also spills lots of tea on how her and former Boston Red Sox, third baseman, will middlebrooks, had to hide their relationship from the Boston fan base. After her exit from Nelson, Jenny has since kept up with her fabulous broadcasting career. She is now married to will middlebrooks, and they have a few children together. Will middlebrooks also recently just joined the Boston Red Sox broadcasting team during the spring of 2022. Full circle for the middlebrooks family. Big congrats to all of their success thus far. I hope you all enjoyed these two episodes. Here is misses Jennie Dell, middlebrooks. I think because I didn't have all that added pressure of like, okay, this is the dream job. You need to go out there and don't mess up. Don't like you have to be perfect. I never had that. So I was like, this is not even something I ever thought about doing. Now, if this was if I was given an opportunity to plan the Super Bowl halftime show, I probably would have been like scared out of my mind. But because this was something that kind of fell into my lap in a way, I was like, I'm just going to enjoy every second of this. Like, I'm 23. I'm going to the Super Bowl. I'm meeting all these celebrities. I'm like doing these fun interviews. I was like, okay, what do I think people at home want to hear? And that's kind of been the way that I've always looked at working on air is like, and even when I got a job with the Red Sox, I was like, why did you pick me? Because at that time, I had four years under my belt of working for ESPN dot com, but I had never done live TV. I never covered a baseball game in any capacity. And I'm like, people would kill for this Red Sox job. Like, why me and they were like, because you were real. And because you came in here and you're like, listen, I'm not going to be perfect. And I'm probably going to mess up, but I'm going to give a 150%,

Middlebrooks Jenny Dell Boston Red Sox Brittany Baldi Jennie Dell Spotify Baseball Jenny Super Bowl Nelson Boston Red Sox Espn
A highlight from Jenny Dell: Her Early Years & The Red Sox

The BosBabes

03:16 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Jenny Dell: Her Early Years & The Red Sox

"What is up my boss baby's fanatics? We are back at it again, baby, for yet another brand new, the boss baby was left. So sports podcast. And I'm your host, Brittany Baldi. Before we get into this week's special guest, I wanted to first thank you all for tuning in week after week. You all know that I drop about four brand new episodes a month. Please hit the subscribe button on both iTunes and Spotify. It is free to listen and free to subscribe. Please also leave me a good review. Great reviews from you all allow me to keep creating fantastic content for you, my favorite listeners. I could not be more excited to drop this two part special with former Boston Red Sox sideline reporter Jenny Dell. I have been holding on to this episode for quite some time now, and I felt like this was the perfect time to release it, especially with baseball season upon us. In this two part special with Jenny Dell, you will learn a ton about her upbringing, childhood, and how she got involved in broadcasting. And of course, much more. Here comes the fun part. She also spills lots of tea on how her and former Boston Red Sox, third baseman, will middlebrooks, had to hide their relationship from the Boston fan base. After her exit from Nelson, Jenny has since kept up with her fabulous broadcasting career. She is now married to will middlebrooks, and they have a few children together. Will middlebrooks also recently just joined the Boston Red Sox broadcasting team during the spring of 2022. Full circle for the middlebrooks family. Big congrats to all of their success thus far. I hope you all enjoyed these two episodes. Here is misses Jennie Dell, middlebrooks. I think because I didn't have all that added pressure of like, okay, this is the dream job. You need to go out there and don't mess up. Don't like you have to be perfect. I never had that. So I was like, this is not even something I ever thought about doing. Now, if this was if I was given an opportunity to plan the Super Bowl halftime show, I probably would have been like scared out of my mind. But because this was something that kind of fell into my lap in a way, I was like, I'm just going to enjoy every second of this. Like, I'm 23. I'm going to the Super Bowl. I'm meeting all these celebrities. I'm like doing these fun interviews. I was like, okay, what do I think people at home want to hear? And that's kind of been the way that I've always looked at working on air is like, and even when I got a job with the Red Sox, I was like, why did you pick me? Because at that time, I had four years under my belt of working for ESPN dot com, but I had never done live TV. I never covered a baseball game in any capacity. And I'm like, people would kill for this Red Sox job. Like, why me and they were like, because you were real. And because you came in here and you're like, listen, I'm not going to be perfect. And I'm probably going to mess up, but I'm going to give a 150%,

Middlebrooks Jenny Dell Boston Red Sox Brittany Baldi Jennie Dell Spotify Baseball Jenny Super Bowl Nelson Boston Red Sox Espn
A highlight from 183: Responsible vs Safe Gun Storage

Red, Blue, and Brady

01:04 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 183: Responsible vs Safe Gun Storage

"Where I tell you that the views thoughts and opinions shared in this podcast belongs to our guests and house. And not necessarily Brady or Brady's affiliates. Please note, this podcast contains discussions of violence, but some people may find disturbing. It's okay. We find it disturbing too. Hey everybody, welcome back to another episode of red blue and Brady. On one of your hosts, Kelly. And I'm your other host, JJ. Yeah, and thanks for joining us today. As we sit down with Michael sardini, president of lock the talk America, a nonprofit that sits at the intersection of mental health awareness and firearms. Michael was super kind to join us to talk all about safe and responsible gun storage. The importance of credible messengers and where we need to be more open in our discussions about mental health. My name is Michael sadini, I'm the founder of walk the talk America, which is a

Michael Michael Sadini Michael Sardini Kelly JJ ONE Today Brady Red Blue Lock The Talk America America Hosts
A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

Rewilding Earth

03:23 min | 7 months ago

A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

"I'm still Just in the throes realizing how wild it is where i live and yet where i live is the most biologically altered state north america. We've converted roughly ninety eight percent of the state for ume needs farming mostly roads highways and cultural kind of things like that. And so. I feel like i've been really lucky. I have a numerous france that i still maintain visiting one. Those main couvert island and so for example. And so i get to go to these places still. But i really like teasing him in particular like wait. You left i with this front on it. We don't figure out here where we're gonna figure it out. I mean he wanted to go over. There was something left a lot of friends in that but it became clear to me. I go visit those places like going to wilderness areas. But really the wildness is about more my relationship to my place wherever i am and so i've really come to love. I will bear very deeply and lake. I love it a lot. Because of what's been done to in a very short amount of time and yet i see potential there that i don see other places and i think that's really how i got into the reviled and so here. I am with the re wilding nut connecting with the people. I know and so i met roger. Ross give for this process and we kind of formed a partnership and Ross is extremely important in my life at that time because he's very challenged to me. We both agreed on. We were following rewinding We at read most all the same odd. We read most all the same books in southern deep understanding the language of each other but we came from past history a whole different way as was a local agricultural a business And here's mine trying to work with all the different environmental organizations trying to learn every plant species all that kind of level and between the two of us. I challenge each other tremendously and that's I think would really Catchers be wild Wild ethic that we're trying to do. We're both trying to learn how to be wilder and what rewinding me. And it's changed me tremendously. I just keep reading and reading a read most of this stuff before. How do i apply that to my own thing about. I don't have to wilderness anymore. I used to go a lot and well supposed to grow up. I still love places. I still find that interesting. But i have never been a wilder place in one sense of the word than i am where i live now on. I and i'm surrounded by corn beans. Two thirds of the statements covered into animal species. It's absolutely frightening how that green curtain and what's frightening is how people look at it and see that as a agreeing healthy thing on the national level what was being addressed was wilderness series or what we have stuff that's left. Where can we

Science Biology Wilderness Wildlife Environment Nature Rewilding Conservation Ross North America France Roger Wilder
Influential Educators: Abolitionist Prudence Crandall

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:23 min | 9 months ago

Influential Educators: Abolitionist Prudence Crandall

"Was born on september third. Eighteen three in rhode island booth of her parents. Pardon and esther were farmers. Imprudence was young. Her family relocated to canterbury connecticut. There prudence studied arithmetic. Latin and science topics not normally taught to girls at the time. But prudence is family was quaker. Quakers believe in equal opportunity for education in eighteen. Thirty one. prudence opened her own private school for girls. The canterbury female boarding school. The school served the wealthiest canterbury families and was a source of great pride in the community. It was ranked as one of the best schools in connecticut with the curriculum that rivaled even the most elite all boys schools but prudence is school was not entirely equal. All of her students were white to encourage prudence to take a more aggressive stance. Prudence is black housekeeper. Marsha davis began strategically leaving copies of the abolitionist newspaper. The liberator in places where she knew prudence would find them. The liberator promoted the need for immediate abolition as opposed to a gradual abolition. That was more commonly supported by the new england. Delete sarah harris who came from a prominent black family in the area was the first to actively approach prudence about integrating school. Sara was eager to continue her own education so that she could become a teacher for other black children and in eighteen thirty. Two prudence enrolled sarah in the canterbury boarding school. The decision was met with outrage white. Parents demanded that prudence expel sarah when she refused. They withdrew their daughters from the school realizing that she'd need to find new sources of tuition. Prudence went to speak with william lloyd garrison. The outspoken white abolitionist publisher of the liberator prudence and william discussed the possibility of converting the canterbury school into a school entirely for black girls. William connected prudence with money of the most prominent black families in new england and in eighteen thirty three the school reopened with a new mission to educate quote young ladies and little misses of color. The class consisted of twenty four students and the curriculum remained identical to that of the original. Can't school

Prudence Canterbury Female Boarding Sch Connecticut Marsha Davis Sarah Harris Quakers Esther Pardon Canterbury Rhode Island Canterbury Boarding School New England Sarah Sara Canterbury School William Lloyd Garrison William
Equal Too: How We Change the Law for Disabled People

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

01:37 min | 9 months ago

Equal Too: How We Change the Law for Disabled People

"Today over one point two billion people around the world are living with a disability. We make up fifteen percent of the global population and yet despite many countries establishing laws to protect our rights. No disabled person is immune to discrimination. Last year across thirty six police forces in england and wales more than seven thousand three hundred disability hate crimes were reported but only one point six percent resulted in perpetrators being charged disability. Discrimination often called abe limb comes in many forms from not providing a wheelchair ramp or an interpreter. At a press briefing point six million spent on the new pressroom still no interpreter to more extreme breaches in human rights such as the practice of shackling or forced sterilization all around the world disabled people depend on laws to safeguard our rights in the uk. We have the equality act in the us as the ada in columbia. There's law sixteen eighteen and in australia. There's the disability discrimination act in some countries. These acts took disabled activists years of blood. Sweating tears to bring in. I highly recommend watching the oscar-nominated documentary creek camp to get an idea of how hard fought the. Ada was in the us but even when there are laws in place when researching for this podcast we came to find that more often than not it falls upon disabled people themselves to enforce those laws or in some cases outright change them

Wales England Columbia UK Australia United States Oscar ADA
Museum Activists Say Real Change Is Needed to Combat Racial Injustice

Solvable

01:51 min | 9 months ago

Museum Activists Say Real Change Is Needed to Combat Racial Injustice

"Last year after george floyd. We saw a lot of racial recommends happen across multiple fields. We saw happened in hollywood. We saw it happened in the food industry. Surprising we saw it happened in very many unexpected places did any fallout happen with these racial reckonings. End museum industry. You know there was call for greater racial equity racial justice within the museum fields as well there was a whole survey done by museum next which is an international organization. Asking people do they feel like museums are relevant and a lot of people said he thought museums was important but not necessarily relevant because they didn't feel like museums. We're talking about issues within our society and wasn't standing up for for anything and so that's incredibly important to know that our society wants to see museums become more involved. There were a lot of people asking for changes made within the leadership And within policies of museums as well. And so what i did was i created the very first map and directory of museums created by black indigenous and other people of color. The map now has over a hundred and fifty museums throughout the country. The list is still growing but it shows these community museums or also known as culturally specific museums. Their pedagogy is one that puts community before collections. These community museums or doing incredible work across the country by work right now. Looks like Supporting those institutions and in the meantime challenging the racial infrastructure of those larger Museums that we know by

George Floyd Hollywood