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Former Congresswoman Katie Hill Does a Postmortem on a Lost Congressional Seat

Hysteria

9:05 listening | 5 d ago

Former Congresswoman Katie Hill Does a Postmortem on a Lost Congressional Seat

"When the news is bad? I know that it is tempting for me to tune out but I also know that sometimes examining bad news and figuring out how to learn from it is a good thing so with that semester. Monaco and I are starting this week. Show with the conversation with former California Representative Katie Hill. Katie resigned from her seat last October and in a special election last week a Republican one bomber. So where do we go from here? Let's ask Katie are welcome Katie Hill. Welcome back to hysteria. We're so happy to have you back. Glad to be back. Thank you first of all. How are you doing man That's like a loaded question. I feel like I'm you know I'm I'm okay. The results the election were pretty horrible. You know in a way it was of what we were expecting. But you obviously didn't ever want and at you know it's just like one thing on top another in life in in figuring a way to get up in Russia yourself off in new forward was I was again when I was a kid. Reverses a still own a horse and the biggest thing that you were taught was being you fall off you get back up and get right back on and that's just kind of against what length is so drilling down into that trauma? A little bit last week was was the special election in California's twenty fifth for everyone listening. What happens and were you surprised when you say what happened do you mean why did we lose or yeah yeah why Jillette. Why did why did why did she was. Yeah well I think the biggest chapter honestly is just people in a special election. Democrats don't show up and you've got the rented. Republican base. That was particularly riled up because of my scandal and excited the opportunity to take a seat back. I mean that was that was literally what they were plotting. They were trying to you. Know to find something they. They found something. They exploited it. They got me to resign and this officers their opportunity to take back. The seat they felt was stolen from them in the first place remember. It hadn't been held by a Republican ever in its current form and they really did not think that it's possible for someone like me. Let alone any Democrats there So I think that they really rallied around this opportunity and from what we know they actually did some very despite the fact that you hear them complain all the time about ballot harvesting. They had some very organized efforts around ballot sting and Them for figuring it out. Because like you know that's to me it's about helping people be a but the churches were really mobilized in getting people to providing drop off centers. And saying that they're gonNA mail to use of swing by the church in you know do it in your car or whatever and we just didn't have something like baton. I think you can also partly attributed to the fact that Democrats were pretty disenchanted by things right. Like you're GONNA be really really frustrated works so barred and felt like you were. Finally I heard over a felt like you were finally represented and have all go away. So quickly is is really disenchanting. Should okay so there was a special election in California's twenty fifth special action in Wisconsin. Seventh both know that these are anecdotal elections in every district is different but you can still kind of extrapolate things on a maybe on a larger scale from this like. Do you think that Democrats should see what happened in your former seat special election as a wakeup call I do. I think that it shows that you remember mine was one of the Houghton quote safest swing seats right. Hillary Clinton when by seven. I want by nine. This isn't one of the seats that should have at risk. So what it means is that you know. Depending on what things are looking like November especially depending on the energy that's coming from rate than district's length. The ones that we flicked that were that were ones that that trump won by sixteen points are really really wants. We need to watch out for so we should give up or stop paying attention to the house just because the Senate is looking like it's within reach or obviously presidency so that to me. The biggest of all first and foremost the second is that as we are adapting to this Nalen strategy. How we doing that right? Field is what has been our strongest most important. Get out the vote effort right and that's modified I don't take. You should give up on it all together. I think they're Balkans Altogether they have they have a different base of people who they can go soo and again reliably that will reliably answer their phones that they can you get to things like drop off ballots churches. But we're GONNA have to modify field programs to to frankly make sure people know how vote by mail. When they have many many of them have never done it before especially in these lower turnout areas of to begin with which are usually the most. Democrats held Katie. Beyond even just in. How do we re engage the Democrats that helped you win by nine points when now they're also facing the pandemic childcare challenges on employment and things that are just like so catastrophic question? I think I am hopeful that the loss actually was a wakeup call for a lot of people might have thought like while the seat will be fine. Now they're like okay. I have really have to bow part of I mean honestly. I think that the the district itself is democratic leaning enough now that if we get to turn out that you know is usually expected in November election. I think she will win. And we saw we saw it happened with the ossoff special in Lucy. Macbeth one in general. I think we're GONNA see that in this case but it still. You know it's something that can't be taken for granted in terms of the support that I had the volunteers mobilized rabbit. I think that's that's going to be the same thing right is how do you figure out ways of ways of getting involved? That may not mean. Move leaving your house And how do we get people excited about it? Especially when the Senate is in play in California and the The obviously dilatory votes are going to be there for Joe Biden. No matter what so. I think I think it has to be like maybe you know maybe the Gee let's get so excited about meeting the seat back because like that. That as it's more like Oh you fuckers. Hello and stand up and what's ours okay. You said the word motherfuckers. Let's expand on that a little bit because we we chatted briefly about this About this race and how it personal it was to you and how personal it was considering the person who ended up winning the seat. Can you talk a little bit about the people who helped promote Christy Smith opponent short so the first person the first slew of images that came out was through the publicly came out was through red? Sti His enemies are images of You. That were released without your consent without taking taken without your consent. Got It and the only person that could have done. That was my accent. Spin obvious denied it. And so it's a it. So that started at Red State. The person who published those who who was the investigative reporter has been a longtime Republican operatives in the region who writes I guess on side. Honestly don't really know what I know that writing as is not a full-time thing for her and she had worked for one of my previous owners. She worked for Steve Night in the past and the day after the day. After I resigned she endorsement ARSIA There were a number of other people who were involved and again. This is information as circling through like facebook groups and drew a the random people that are on the ground in. It's not it's not like a niffer court case starting to like that bitch so many of the people who were supporting my sem from the beginning. We're the ones that need new. Had the photos and some of that is actually on logs. There's still posted out there. A Joe Messina. And things like that so I think For me that that was the biggest thing right like it was misleading. That my favorite before all of this came

Katie Hill California Senate Monaco Facebook Joe Messina Hillary Clinton Russia Representative Houghton Christy Smith Wisconsin Steve Night Joe Biden Macbeth Investigative Reporter
We do not belong to the people who hurt us." | Chanel & Evan

Dare I Say

6:52 listening | Last week

We do not belong to the people who hurt us." | Chanel & Evan

"Evan Rachel Wood and she now Miller are known for delivering searing public testimonies of their personal experiences of sexual assault in two thousand eighteen. Evan Rachel would testify to Congress about her Harrowing Experience. A violent abuse a former partner. She did it to encourage lawmakers to implement the sexual assault survivors bill of rights across the country a couple of years prior Chanel Miller had addressed Stanford student who had sexually assaulted her in court directly. The speech ricocheted around the world. After it was published on Buzzfeed it was read more than eighteen million times on the news outlet and broadcast on CNN and in Congress both testimonies transformed the conversation around sexual assault cases in the US. They Sean a light on how our media an legal systems mistreat misrepresent and mishandled sexual assault survivors in this episode of Dare. I say Chanel and Evan. Rachel would talk about double standards in the Criminal. Justice SYSTEM ABOUT HANDLING TRAUMA ALONGSIDE. Intense public scrutiny. And about the high price that comes with naming your abuser or yourself. Chanel Evan Rachel. Wood are on a quest to make the media the law and society a kinder fair place for survivors of sexual assault. They are women who care. I think one of the scariest parts for me about coming forward with everything was a smear campaign or slander or someone trying to discredit my experience. Because it's very re traumatizing when that happens and I think because of experience while the abuse was happening in the press was so traumatic and no one knew I was being abused but they were calling me a whore and they were calling me crazy and they were calling me names before I'd even said anything and migrate is fear was when I said something all of that was going to repeat itself. I was really scared. I blamed myself because I was misbehaving quote unquote. Because I was doing things I wasn't supposed to. I was inappropriate. I was this I was that but none of that means that I deserved what happened to me and so I think it's important to say I'm not a perfect person. I haven't been a perfect person but no one has been but I know what happened to me and I'm very clear about that and very clear that it wasn't my fault and I'm very still scared to talk about it but I know that it's important because of this idea that you have to be this perfect being. That's never done anything wrong for anybody to take you seriously. Yeah I hate that. Credibility is never a given that it seems like it has to be earned that in order to earn a to prove that we can be level headed and obedient that we can maintain an even temperament even when we have every right to be angry for me throughout the court process. You doing stand up comedy to keep myself alive but I worried that if that got back to the courtroom they could use that against me to say. Look at her experiencing. How can a suffering person beginning up and immersing herself in laughter? That's extremely said to me that we have this expectation of how we must behave that looking like a victim has its own identity in another stunning thing is that. I was able to hide this for the last four and a half years so many of us are master's of concealing are stories much of the time being a victim means appearing completely ordinary. Were so good at pretending like nothing is happening like we can keep moving and functioning without missing a beat. I think every victim as soon as this happens you find ways to assign yourself blame. You can say I was drinking. It was my clothing. I was wearing a t shirt of his favorite band which might have been enticing in. We string them up on a little mobile and we sit beneath them and we watch it and we let it consume US and road us and meanwhile we don't assign blame to the source. We keep saying or assuming that you should be reacting a certain way even after an assault people think they would react differently in that situation or they don't understand why you wouldn't call somebody right away or why you wouldn't do you know in my case. The statue of limitations had run on my case I. I didn't report in time and a lot of people are very confused by how that could possibly be. You should go to the police right away but people just don't understand the process that you have to go through the fear that you have to go through the trauma that you have to work through. You know a lot of the times after a bodily violation victims may turn to toxic sex or drinking even more. Because you already feel like you've been deemed worthless or you feel like there are things inside you that you cannot tolerate in the only answer is to vanquish them or to punish yourself or to obliterate them in any way that you can and it's infuriating that we use that behavior as further proof that this is why she deserved it. We point to it and say we'll see. This is the kind of girl who happens to when really the root of it is. The violence itself is not her. Flaws is not her misguided judgment. It's the violence that prompts this behavior and we have to acknowledge that both Chanel and Evan Rachel. Wood are committed to using their platform in privilege to fight for the rights of sexual assault survivors. Snell's memoir was published in the fall. It advocates for more sympathetic response to cases of sexual violence. Evan Rachel Wood has just wrapped up a you. Long fights improve the sexual assault law in California. Thanks to her campaign. The state has officially extended the state statute of limitations on domestic violence cases survivors. Now have a five year window to report abuse to the police. This law is called the Phoenix Act after the mythical animal that rises from the ashes of its predecessor.

Assault Evan Rachel Evan Rachel Wood Congress Trauma Chanel Miller Chanel CNN United States Partner Evan Sean Stanford California Snell
The Broadband GapWhos Not Online in America Today?

After The Fact

6:53 listening | Last week

The Broadband GapWhos Not Online in America Today?

"Uh-huh connections don't just sort of fly through the air given how we operate and how we are so frequently connected to the Internet. Those of us who live in communities that have strong connections. We sort of take that for granted. You don't have to think about the time of day that you're getting online whether or not you need to kick someone else off in order to finish your homework for communities that either have slow connections or no connections. That's a normal part of life that's Katherine dewitt who manages Pews Broadband Research Initiative broadband is one of the main ways that Americans access the Internet. And sometimes maybe take for granted. Welcome to after the fact for the Pew Charitable Trusts. I am Dan La- Duke and we hope you're well during these days at home. Due to the corona virus pandemic many of us can read the news. Maybe join a virtual exercise class. Watch an endless number of movies all because we're connected to the Internet. We may not always think about how essential that connection is but millions of Americans without reliable connections. Think about it all the time and that brings us to our data point for this episode. Twenty one million. There are twenty one million Americans who don't have access to broadband Internet according to the Federal Communications Commission. And depending on your definition of connectivity that number could even be higher I spoke to Katherine Dewitt about the challenges for those who live on the wrong side of the digital gap. Catherine welcome who should say we're speaking to each other over broadband Internet right now and that you study broadband connectivity gaps and how we can expand access for communities around the country the twenty one million. That's our data point on the low side right. The Federal Communications Commission estimates that at least twenty one million Americans don't have access to the Internet across the country but including those for Microsoft put that number as high as one hundred and sixty two million. Let's define what broadband means for people? I mean a lot of people access the Internet only through phones. So could you sort of lay out? What broadband at its best is supposed to look like in do for people the Federal Communications defined broadband as high speed reliable internet at speeds of twenty five megabits per second download and three megabits per second upload? You can get those connections via fiber wireless satellite DSL or cable okay. That's a lot of technocrats. Speak but what you do need to know about your connection. Is that that speed that number that we talk about matters and it matters as it relates to public funding for broadband and of course we measure. Someone's connection the FCC says that for one user on one device you can make do with just about anything including streaming videos from services with that speed. That's up to twenty five megabits per second but as soon as you start adding other users or you have multiple users on multiple devices trying to send e-mail while someone else's surfing the Internet while someone else is trying to watch an instructional video. Your needs for speed drastically increase. What do we know about like geographically where these Pockets OF PEOPLE ARE. Who Don't have service. I mean for might be somewhere. Where populations disperse is it. Generally that is all over based on the FCC's data twenty one million of unconnected Americans. That's overwhelmingly effects rural populations. But we know both through our research and Through anecdotal evidence this problem affects communities of all types of all locations all across the country that means urban communities it means suburban Communities Immune to rural and remote communities some of those communities of those types that I just listed have excellent connections and there are many urban communities who have very high speed Internet But they are communities of both types that either have slow internet or they have no Internet connection at all. When we say that people don't have access are in trying to come up with these numbers is that because the fiber or the cable Doesn't run to their residents or does it also include folks who just can't afford it. 'cause it's not not cheap. Each month can accidents. Don't just fly through the air given how we operate and how we are so frequently connected to the Internet. Those of us who live in communities that have strong connections. We sort of take that for granted but for those communities who don't have the connections right now that can be for several reasons and it's complicated not just because we're talking about the geographic diversity of where can activity is lacking or talking about multiple policy areas that deal with multiple levels of government. But perhaps more importantly were talking about infrastructure and the Internet is a very physical network. It may be that It's just too expensive to connect to some of these rural communities that have low population density just doesn't make for a good business case for for profit companies in other cases it is because Folks can't afford the connection. It's too expensive. It's outside of their monthly budget. But I think what's interesting about? This current situation is how we are really seeing that relevance piece play out because our community centers are closed our schools our libraries are places where people can access the services that they need every day. Well now they can't go to those places. People used to rely on public libraries or fast food Restaurants down the street from their homes further Internet access with those spots not available. What are the temporary solutions? That are are coming forth. Well we're seeing things like Wi fi on buses and those buses parked in a school and library parking lot so folks can drive up and get online if they need to We're seeing libraries in schools. Also run out. Hotspots and laptops were also seeing to the federal government responds so typically those schools and libraries that have received FCC funding are not allowed to have those wireless networks on Outside of operating hours but the Federal Communications Commission in late March adjusted the restrictions for when those networks are accessible the state of Washington. Right now is thinking of setting F- They're calling them dry flies. So you drive up To a mobile hotspot and you hang out in your car for as long as you need to be there and then you keep on going and the next person uses it there. Bandaids There needed BANDAIDS. They're necessary for the situation that we're in right now and it speaks to the need for solutions that way folks don't have to rely on these backup options at their libraries or schools or community centers in order to get online and for kids. You know in order to simply do their homework.

Federal Communications Commiss Katherine Dewitt Pew Charitable Trusts Federal Communications Federal Government Dan La- Duke Microsoft Catherine WI Washington
Catch a Kite 5

Ear Hustle

4:41 listening | Last week

Catch a Kite 5

"Hey how you doing? Hey well I guess my closet and I are doing just fine. Thank you glad to hear it as you remember a while back we did a call out. Xm folks in prison to send a snail mail updates about what's happening inside prison during this covy at nineteen pandemic and we finally got some responses. Male takes his time coming out of prison. Yep So let's start with Richard Gross. He's in Pennsylvania at the State Correctional Institute at Phoenix. He writes at first. Corona virus. Didn't mean much here. It dominated the new cycle and fed the jailhouse rumor mills also known as INMATE DOT com. That's what you call prison. Twitter actually died. That's what your other co Holes Roussin Call prison twitter. That's right as you know. Prison do produce a ton of Gasol. Richard slider continues. It got everyone's attention when they cancelled visits in stopped. All are outside volunteers. Coming in as a SOP. They threw us some free phone calls and emails. Next handed up masks made by Pennsylvania Correctional Industries the library limited attendance to only ten people at a time as long as they were wearing their masks. Who Ten people. That's not a lot know. The libraries wanted him spots where you hang out at. It'd be like thirty people forty people in the NBA. People walking back and forth people could be on the computers people reading books so yeah ten people. That's only the legal beagles. Richard goes on to say that things are changing all the time last Sunday. I woke up to find myself block lockdown. They didn't tell us why. I found out from a local radio station that the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections had a case of Corona Virus Phoenix prison. They opened up four cells at a time leading eight guys out for about half an hour to an hour to use the phone or take a shower. Commissary has not been delivered but they do our laundry. They come by a few times a day to take our temperatures. This could last a long time and a sad postscript that since. Richardson is letter. The Pennsylvania Department of Corrections reported that one person incarcerated at that prison where he is did die from complications related to covert nineteen. That is with riches. Right though This thing could last a long time and prisons needs to be prepared for that Another guy who wrote is worried about how his prison is preparing. Tyrone Baker is locked up in Nash Correctional Institution in Nashville North Carolina. Tyrone says the most disturbing administrative action. I'm pertains to social distancing. The prison staff primary concern seems to be separating us from each other staff members of making no effort to distance themselves from US quite the contrary to staff is actually interacting with us more intensively and more extensively than they were prior to Covy at nineteen. They don't seem to realize that no prisoner would get sick with Kobe. Nineteen unless a staff member I brings into disease and that's a really good point. One of the reasons I stopped going in before it became a rural was just that I had no idea if I might be bringing the virus in right I mean prison. Basically sequester from society But they do need outside people to function so as tricky okay. We got one more letter here. This one's from intron price. Who's currently at two? Mocha Correctional Institution in Daytona Beach? Florida. Back when he sent this letter things in his prison were pretty quiet on the covert front of. Oh they've reported more cases since then any case. What about this guy is that he clearly respects lady? So can I please read this one? Go okay. I'm writing to you because my lady is a Superfan of your podcast. And she suggested to me strongly to write you guys. I'm not going to write a book but I can say a few things concerning how it's going. The institution is corona free in the staffer. Doing a good job trying to keep it that way. The VIBE is mellow no one is going crazy. There are people who have loved ones who have contracted the virus and we pray. Console them as much as needed. He wraps up. This letter isn't as informative as I wanted it to be but as a start and my girl will be happy. And that's accounts. Can we give her a shout? We can all right Haley. Thanks for tuning in spreading the word about your hustle and for strongly encouraging. Antara underwrite to us. We just got him some cool points. Unfortunately there are prisons where things are lot harder with covert nineteen and we'll be hearing about some of those places to in later episodes in the meantime those of you inside keep in touch. We WanNa know how you doing in there

Richard Gross Mocha Correctional Institution Pennsylvania Department Of Cor Covy Pennsylvania Correctional Indu Tyrone Baker Richard Nash Correctional Institution State Correctional Institute United States Haley XM Twitter Richard Slider Phoenix Pennsylvania Antara Richardson NBA
Deadly Discussions

Deadly Discussions

7:36 listening | Last week

Deadly Discussions

"John Weapon Daily discussions before I get started like to acknowledge the truce land on his on. Whose land where recode. Which is the bone people because my name is not on or injury like it usually recorded the year. It's unbundling. So he in Victoria and by Tribes Apart of the cooling nations. So John Welcome to daily discussions the live version of it. Hey going today. Yeah great thanks. Yeah thanks thanks. Have a pleasure to be Walsum. Awesome and before we started doing a share away from and What you position at the moment yes. Sure so I'm almost from bitter a country which is sort of at central west Queensland Basically at in there in the middle in Iway significant sought for people so add sort of special spring show. Why at that? Why yet really? I still don't know where that is a bit here. It's about eight hours north west of Brisbane. Yeah Wow so wrought out and you said the cultural significance. How high are we talking? These ranges in a huge this this tearing Ryan said there that sort of some a couple of hundred meters above sea level in yes. I ended up work at their that. Dates back to more than ten days and Yeah this is a lot of historic History of the divers for us yet I still like finding I know some Victorian so digressing before we get into it but so interesting Some ABS Dan. Hey Lodge mountains. I won't even say which ones but there's a lot of artwork that is still being discovered across the ranges Nfl Aboriginal is only that sort of a case there as well. Yeah there's a lot of second thoughts Cousins Arranger at the National Park Yet she goes on sighing loss. Wake that I found another another cultural sought yet just pitcher. Esca the mold New Way to go in and had explosive in a new way to go in terms of that. It's risky. I'm yet that that last last week. Still sought still being developed in an explode today. Yes incredible now. I've got three strains on hassle. I can always look at what other stuff. You've been doing a lot easier on. Usually just tolkien. I'd take notes but having the technology makes it a so much more convenient Your previous work with Avi A. I meant you went at Futures Forum which I think was a program that e sort of took laid on him put together Juwan explain what a futures form is and then. How does that work with Indigenous people because a lot of these terms and days a very foreign because we practiced these elements in different aspects of different ways but now with aligning so it makes sense in a in a Western context share. What a futures forum that works yes. Other futures will become that was born out of a of an agenda really engage with the future generation In terms of business economic sense and side what we've done is we raised Former colleague in MSL developed this concept. That really looked at. What does the future look like for indigenous people in this country in the next fifty years? What does that look like in relation to business? And let's get together deadly bunch of of a feature entrepreneurs and business people too early unpack. What that what that looks locking site that just got together. There are more country that we got and Yet we we tries back into into a pasta history and work towards a future vision statement as to what business. Lock in fifty. Is Tom here? There's some powerful stuff and was great to meet you there and have the caliber of yourself in the other people in the room. I think it was a fairly painful experience that we will go by. Yeah I think for me. It was a low the Tom I am. I'm coming onto thirty now. And so being a young entrepreneur and saying other young entrepreneurs full of indigenous latest. Probably like pretty intimidated. I was like Oh man these all these ideas a deadly like I should have thought of that But then I like you guys. Sharing and the facilitated tristen was sharing that A lot of people like early in the states have these expos in forums where I would pretty much plan how cities and how things would be divided in built and then from there that people have got the knowledge in the nine how where to position themselves to to get work where to position themselves to united. Start a business or bill equity and ask first nations people. We never really sold the reason to build up and build high things. We were living off the land sustainably living with each other trading with each other trading with Malays in Indonesia that went through China and dumb CEOS a concept that we sort of bring best both worlds really. I applaud you for that. And now you'll see you. Yes we'll get back to that. Let's rock back to dot. Cue the sound. That does time. What but let's take it back to growing up which you grow up you grow up. In country or country or countries all grew up in up McCulloch Soda Knowles In central Queensland depending on what body look at in jail grow up there in all of my family are in Rockhampton I basically Doesn't as denies dies was that my grandfather was a stockman escape. The mission law in skype in many ways living under the in that sort of thing and went from station to station appropriate. Property doing yeah. The stockman taught work fencing wholesale Some incredible stories of driving in Horses AND SHAPE AND WHATNOT INSIDE. Visually move from station station. He was born on country At at a major country and then ended up in a place called home Which is just enough canton and yum. Yeah as it was day of the policy was United Australia. Policy came in failure can equal pay came in and style of the. The property was working on Couldn't afford to pay the white that the business side I got booted at in the closest town was canton and yeah. The mobile is still there so I grew up. Just north of the. What's gone back and forth Rockhampton big family as as we are on my grandfather possibly one hundred six years old on on bitter country and had three hundred more than three hundred grandchildren gripe drain grandchildren and great grandchildren. And yet my grandfather's up to up to two hundred PSI The McCain down on having token I so yeah

Futures Forum John Weapon Hey Lodge Victoria Brisbane Cousins Arranger Walsum Iway Rockhampton Ryan Mccain TOM United Australia National Park Queensland Avi A. Indonesia Juwan Skype DOT
Get In Alignment

Let's Talk Game with Tiffani Lewis

3:00 listening | 2 weeks ago

Get In Alignment

"Today after lunch me and the kids danced and I'm not talking about routine dance craze dance. I'm talking about fill the beat your bones and let loose. We had so much fun but I had to say hey. Y'All look my left knee. It's fine and they looked. They said it is I say yes. It is because for the past three and a half weeks it was not fine all I remember holding the baby on my left. Hip stirring a pot with my right hand. I turned around to pick something up and immediately I felt the pain was no pop. No sound but when you're in tune with your body you pretty much know. Something's not right so I'll take my cousin trae the next day and I said trae. Something's not right. Well my left knee. Not sure what I did. What can I do exercises? What do you recommend because he's a phenomenal personal trainer here in Charlotte he said don't do anything rested and I'm like okay? That's what I need. Rest is probably with the issue was I. Don't rest enough. I go and I did the regimen that he recommend it for a good strong weak. I said keep the inflammation down rapid. If you can but stay off of keep it elevated wasn't getting better had some better days but it wasn't getting better and I could not pinpoint what caused the issue fast forward this week again. I go been down to pick the baby up and I pulled a muscle in my back and I'm not injury-prone thank God but with happened. My back was the cause in my knee was tied to what was happening with my back as a result of the baby more often than I took typically were for the past two months because there's no handoffs during the day right. I'm shifting my spine to the left. I was out of alignment. So what happens? When your car's out of alignment even? If you have new tire tread it wears down quicker. What happens when your finances are out of alignment. Poor money management feels might be late debt. And what happens when our relationship with God is out of alignment. Our relationship with other people is probably out of alignment to let this encourage you. Because it encouraged me to get back in alignment in a on a previous daily huddle. I did talk about how my daughter came in last weekend said mom. Let's do yoga because that's part of my practice but it hadn't been. I hadn't been going long or strong enough during this quarantine in time for me to get back in alignment in some areas. And only you know. What's out of alignment in your life? So made us encourage you to get an alignment

Trae Charlotte
Laughing through the Coronavirus Pandemic with Ben Gleib

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

4:08 listening | 2 weeks ago

Laughing through the Coronavirus Pandemic with Ben Gleib

"When the global lockdown started they shutdown comedy clubs and all live entertainment and told us. We couldn't have that right now and I disagreed so I decided to create a comedy club. Anyway sorry not sorry so Ben. The last time we spoke you were running for president. I was that like a dream. What was that like for you? It was insane intense. An experience really unlike anything that you could imagine that I could've expected. Even though I was consciously choosing to do it you had some really really great points that were really like even policy points but just like common sense things like what you were saying about certain misinformation and as twenty four hour news cycle. And how these quote unquote news networks. Were not really news networks. They were more opinion. Networks and that the FCC you should probably get involved in labeling them as such and I thought that was so smart because it's really true we don't we don't look at you. Know an article in the New York Times that is just straight journalism and the op eds that we read in the New York Times as the same type of news source that that was really smart. Thank you if only you're -tary things could have been different right now. I don't know why anyone would want to be president of the United States right now. Yes this is quite an unexpected curve ball. The world has gone through and a lot of it. Honestly were some of those same themes you just brought up that. I was trying to talk about how we've just allowed such a high level of misinformation and sensationalizing of our news that it's really become so hard to tell fact from fiction these days and we just don't have clear guidance. I mean it's quite obvious that but this guy in the White House whatever his name is Freddie or whatever. I've totally blocked it out. I think yeah we call him the occupant of the White House in my yes the hostile takeover. Yeah of the White House. It's so beyond obviously ineptitude. That's leading us. It's changing every day. But even through the media to they don't have the ability or the interest to present to us what's most important. And what's more crucial? End To create a cohesive set of for us to follow. It's just whatever the next sensational thing that next day is it feels like there's no standards anymore and I actually have a lot of friends that have said to me coincidentally recently. They've said you know what I'm watching the local news now because it's about their community. It's about what's happening in their community about their school district. It's about where they can go help or where they can find help. And you know local news you get a a half hour to Kinda get it all in there so there's none of the you know the fluff in between that. It's the exact same thing for me. I've started watching local news for the first time. Since I was a child I never was interested in local news always about robberies and bake sales and now. I'm like God do I miss robberies and bake sales right it is. It's just it's something real and tangible and you look at the National News and even though I've been taking quarantine incredibly seriously I have not left except for a visit to the vet and one market trip about seven and a half weeks now but you watch the news and the advice seems to be. We must stay inside to avoid spreading this but should definitely go on walks but not to the beach just to a park and if you go to a beach don't go to a beach and then make sure right. We cannot spread through the air just by touching things so make sure you just stay six feet apart but sneezes and costs can carry a twenty feet and all right might be in the air and we know what it. It's just every single thing. It's like double speak. It's a little creepy. How little even the greatest experts seemed to

National News White House President Trump Freddie New York Times FCC United States
Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

Dare I Say

8:54 listening | 2 weeks ago

Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

"Jane Fonda was arrested five times for environmental protest outside the Capitol this fall. She accepted a BAFTA film award while being taken into custody and photographs. The actor cast a striking figure in handcuffs in red will coat. It's a color fitting for the protests which are inspired by global school strikes and called Fire Drill. Fridays fresh from her arrest streak. The activists joined environmental justice campaigner and community organizer. Peggy Shepherd to record a live episode of Dare. I say in partnership with AMEX AT SAKS fifth avenue in New York City Peggy has been at the forefront of the Environmental Justice Movement in the US for a long time. She founded nonprofit organization. We Act for Environmental Justice in North Manhattan in the eighties. It helped low income New Yorkers in particular communities of color fight harmful environmental policies. It now fights for better environmental and health policies on a local and national level in the I live recorded episode of Dare. I say peggy and Jane discussed civil disobedience the green new deal resilience and why it is important for women to lead the climate conversation. How can we remedy empathy crisis? That has hurt generations of Americans. Why is the cult of rugged individualism driving climate disaster? What can older generations learned from teenagers at the decades on the frontlines? Peggy and Jane Have Not Stop Fighting. They are women who dare. Hi You know. We have a lot in common where activists arrested. But why have you decided to be arrested and to be active at this moment in time over Labor Day weekend? I felt great malaise because I drive an electric car and I do away with single use plastics and I make all those right personal lifestyle choices but I knew that they're not going to be able to scale up in time to get us where we need to be is a good place to start but it's no place to stop and so. I read a book by Klein that talked about a green new deal and talked about gratitude and it inspired me to get out of my comfort zone as Greta says we have to do and not behave business as usual as you know better than a lot of people. We have decades many decades more than forty years writing speeches and books and getting the word out about the science. What the science says. And we've marched and we've rallied and we've played nice and it hasn't worked enough and we only have eleven years left and so we have to up the stakes and I think we have to mobilize and go into the streets and put our bodies on the line and engage in civil disobedience and risk getting arrested. I don't WANNA BE ARRESTED. But you know you have to be willing to risk it so I went. I moved to DC for four months to win gaijin fired real Fridays because Fridays is the day that Greta and the student climate strikers have chosen to strike for climate so I want to support them and helpless their message teenagers today were born more than a decade after NASA scientists warned Congress about climate change in nineteen eighty eight. James Hansen told lawmakers at the time that he was ninety nine percent sure that human activity was causing temperatures to rise. Teenagers today have inherited the climate crisis. They have grown up. In a world of apocalyptic headlines and increasingly volatile weather. It's no surprise that they are extremely intelligent educated and now taking to the streets sweetest teenager. Greta Tonsberg inspired a wave of student protests across the world when she skipped school to strike outside of her country's parliament. And so how do you feel that? We really can motivate young people and youth to really be the strong activists that they need because they are going to inherit this climate this globe right now. What I'm feeling is I don't need to motivate them. They're motivating me. They're the ones because they see that we've taken their future not we. The fossil fuel industry has is robbing them of the future and we can't let them shoulder this burden by themselves. So Granny's unite. Older people have to get out there and and we have to stand along side them. This is a collective crisis that's going to require a collective solution that means all of us together because it is a stomach and we know that we can each take the issues that we need. Whether it's changing light bulbs whether it's recycling. We know that we can do all of those things. But we know that it's systemic and that we gotta come together collectively to educate our elected officials and to pressure the policymakers to really pass the kind of legislation that we all need. But we know that we can't do that with the message. Simply reducing carpet or a message. Simple energy efficiency. We've got a really embraced the values that appeal to all of our communities because Oliver Communities are not whole. They're not healthy. We know that millions of people in this country are living with bad air. They don't have clean water and they are disproportionately impacted by pollution and the Environmental Justice Movement has really for the last thirty years were to achieve environmental protection for all communities and we know also that when we talk about climate change and you hear people talk about climate justice. Climate Justice is not just a cool phrase. It's really a term that is focused on the most vulnerable communities. And how we've got to take action to ensure that the most vulnerable are protected because when that happens we're all protected and so we've got agreement deal and we know that that's been an important framework that's been proposed and it's wonderful that she was not prescriptive. Afc and the others who have talked about this framework we know that it has motivated sectors of of our country to get together and fill in the blanks. What they think is a green new deal what they need for their communities and for their lives and that's been a very important motivator. I think in this moment for a long time. There's been this rap that the environmental movement is white and elite. I think even Obama kind of felt that way but my experience is that that is not the case and then in fact people of color who live in the frontline communities have been very much at the forefront of the environmental movement and are the bravest strongest voices. It's a stereotype that people of color don't really care about the environment. Because they're really concerned with with jobs and food and of course we're all concerned with that but what? I've found predominantly above ninety sixth street when we have monthly membership meetings. It's not the more fluent Brown's donors who are coming out on these sites. It's people from public housing. We get so many calls about air pollution coming into their apartments about odors and emissions from trucks cars buses. We have worker training program for under employed young men and we invited them to come to our membership meetings to hear about issues of climate change or toxins in and chemicals cosmetics and they were able to understand the issue they were able for the probably the first time in their lives to talk to an elected official and tell them what they felt in what they needed and so it's about support. People know what they need. They just need some support to be able to advocate and to be able to. Maybe have a place to come and use computer. Have a place to come and ask some key questions. Let me just tell you that the upcoming mayoral public housing tenants are going to be a major factor in who gets elected and we're going to be organizing them and there's coalitions all over the city to ensure that some of the most vulnerable people are the ones who are going to be part of the solution and so I would simply say that the most vulnerable when we address them we lift all boats. It's not about trickle down. It's about lifting everyone up together and that's what creates an equitable and just society.

Peggy Shepherd Greta Tonsberg Environmental Justice Movement Jane Fonda Official United States Amex Oliver Communities James Hansen North Manhattan New York Barack Obama Granny Klein
The Fight Against the 'Sheriff Joe' of Massachusetts

Latino Rebels Radio

5:50 listening | 2 weeks ago

The Fight Against the 'Sheriff Joe' of Massachusetts

"Listen I wanted to talk to you. Because of the current case attack happening in Bristol County and the lawsuit that you guys have filed before we get into the recent developments. Can you explain exactly sort of history of this lawsuit? And who you're representing so people get the context. Yes we filed a corona virus class action against immigration and we focused specifically on the detention facility in Bristol County Massachusetts of which is run by the Sheriff Thomas Hodgson who is a a poster child for right wing anti immigrant policies and practices He fashioned self Under mold of Sheriff or Pyo from Morocco County Arizona Who was notorious for his anti immigrant in inhumane practices at who eventually was sued very successfully for discriminating against Latino community Not a first time. Suing the lawless sheriff at here in Bristol County. We have sued them repeatedly And it always pivots on extreme practices against Latinos one of our earlier lawsuit against Bristol County. It's because they were refusing to release Individuals who qualified for sale even though they had no legal basis for keeping them. They were not allowing them to post bail because they were immigration immigrants. Just based on Durham Immigration Status and so we successfully sued the sheriff over those practices of Bristol. County fast forward to this pandemic were seeing the same problems. essentially an institution where immigration trump's public health and that cannot provide any type of support for people who are at risk of Corbin nineteen infection and the conditions in Bristol. County are life threatening. They are unconstitutional. And that's why we sued. We sued because we knew that it was just a matter of time that the Bristol County facility becomes lit with Dacoven nineteen and just lights up like a tinderbox and so our lawsuit is based on the humanitarian release of immigrants who cannot be safely capped in immigration custody. It's what's happened so far from what I understand you. You had a decision that allow for a full out. You know several immigrants to be released. Let's talk there. Let's just keep time. Let's keep tick talking this and when you talk about it when you mean unconstitutional constitutional and conditions. What does that mean exactly in the context of the law? Well the the law is very clear. That detention cannot have cruel or inhumane aspects and so we're talking about exposure to Kovac nine teen and the failure to provide adequate and protections as an added punishment to people right you. You're not taking precautions to prevent the spread of disease and in so doing. You're subjecting. These immigration detainees to illness infection and potentially even death that is not a part of the punishment that is not a part of the detention. And so that's what I mean by unconstitutional conditions. It is that risk very serious risk of infection because the facility has not done enough or or anything really to meaningfully and materially. Protect the immigrants. And so were really happy to see that over. The course of this corona virus class action that we filed in Bristol County we have secured the release of fifty immigrants from the facility. Which is incredible. So tell me about what happened on Friday. At least what you you understand happened. Delegation has been contentious The federal government refuses to release the individuals. And it's really happened through court order. One by one through court order up to fifty now But the situation has been tense and Bristol County. Sheriff Has Gone Fox News and done other media programs to express public enter About the lawsuit to express anger at at me at my legal team at the judge. calling activists Saying that we are

Bristol County Bristol County Massachusetts Bristol Morocco County Arizona Thomas Hodgson Kovac Dacoven Corbin
Coping with the food landscape during a pandemic

Body Cons Podcast

9:56 listening | 2 months ago

Coping with the food landscape during a pandemic

"This is where we are not recording on our kitchen table as we normally do. We are currently speaking to each other looking each other through video recording on like a video chat. And that's why the audio doesn't sound as great as what you know released to. We just wanted to kind of fit together already. Quick Emergency Series to help you navigate. Diet COCCIA BODY IMAGE ISSUES. This weird kind of food landscape that we're in at the moment this weird time full of in dieting tate. We wanted to help give you some good stuff resources positive and saying how you feel better annisten how we doing it say currently I can see Lachey on a video screen. She can say me we've done into these people they sway as well and Yeah I mean how you really naughty how you doing well. I had a bit of a realization yesterday. Thoughts this kind of cycling through lots of different emotions I go. I was reading giggly for example and then I realized that if I stalked and just thought about it for minute that she fading Really Sodom ready scattered semi giggles like tips over NSA crying and the very rapid change in how. I'm feeling which I'm sure that listeners could probably relate is grief so I think I think we're collectively grieving will pass. Lives the wells where we could just step outside the front door Down the street in Kathrina Silva isn't it? The the freedom of both psychologically and physically is on the loss of that is something that I'm I'm ready feeding the moments but I'm okay. I'm alright just so weird. Isn't it how you how are you feeling really similar really? I think the Iranians that I've been looking at on social media like radio impressed an absolutely loving reading people's posts about how that ray enjoy his time to meditate and do yoga Latin language and a new hope night at tonight themselves and I think that's a lovely. I'm one hundred percent not doing any of that because I'm schooling. My children. Work is absolutely just so hectic busier than ever. And when you're self employed you tight what when when you as well so I feel like I'm spending a lot of time walking which is good because I enjoy the WOK and I'm spending a lot of time with the kids and I think this weekend probably be the first time that it really hits me because I've been busy And I'm just kind of getting through hour by hour antiquing list and being with the kids. I haven't really had a huge amount of time to kind of price. That's what's going on in amendment. I'd love to learn mandarin or something like well. It's I think it's really interesting though because I think what this is showing us is. How all kind of natural states respond in a change of circumstances. So you know. I'm finding who accepted the on. Probably a bit more of an introvert than I used to be. So this toll staying home thing. Knock seeing anyone. I am down with that. I'm quite happy to to be at home but I think there's something about the The the list of projects like Oh. Now's the time I can read this thing and do this. E Costa Last year and I can spring clean house. I think but it is a form of trying to take control of your situation in which we don't have any control and that's just all brain just protecting us from that so I think we just need to kind of making the list is enough like to feel like we have some control over the situation. I don't think we actually need to learn them under three interesting sang. That 'cause I'm always say body. Collins is all about body Image Diet Colin and mental health. And how the subjects into secretary parenting on social justice issues on the thing. The thing I really night chased is how when people are anxious it might offend all sorts of different ways people who have made a been an recovered from Diet Coccia or maybe in a eating disorders or disordered eating or a variety around body image. Who've been fine now their anxieties coming back a situation that we have no control an old. She's that they've gone through before and I think he's really interesting. That whole thing about you wanting to gain some control so people looking to gain control by do not nights of high workouts for example which are like everywhere lyman or being where he controlled about that reaching and then that whole feed landscape where the moment where people are shopping in different way and then why that is going to run out or maybe. They've got a lot to of food in the cupboards and then used to having that much freedom competence and that that can be tricky for some people. We've got a brilliant gas dawn today. Hyper Guy who's a campaign? She got an amazing book. I'll link all of her places in the show nights. That hype campaign is dumped scales campaign. She's not over. She just reached over a hundred thousand signatures on her changed all petition. She's campaigning to change the way that eating disorders are diagnosed in the UK. And taking away from how having a minimum white basically in order to help and we have actually talked about her campaign previous on the. Po Costs into a that will share in a minute talks about food. Lion's gate and how to kind of navigate this this weird time from the angle and it might be really helpful if you are recovering from an each disorder old disordered eating or even just you know diet culture which I think. We're all kind of recovering from two CY. Young Son How he's been managing that whole aspect of things not well. I've really noticed. All of those kind of body shaming soft tweets and memes and stuff going around about people saying what their body might be like after this is over on the basis of what you've just said. I you know different Change to our eating habits or exercise habits or whatever I find that really fascinating that that's something that people are focusing on because that sought to sort of direct line between our bodies function on. What's going on out there in the world right now like the idea that health is at such a premium right now and. I don't know I'm still kind of figuring it out. I guess I'm really grateful to be in a body that is healthy that doesn't have underlying health conditions understand. That has a massive privilege in that I think about my friends and my family situations Nano people you do have those underlying health conditions I'm worried for them. But it's it feels like it's kind of a few steps down from about these look like now and that's really fascinating that when we get out of this. I'm ready interested in whether that will just change Perceptions of our bodies. What how we prioritize them. Oh how we perceive them what do you reckon I cannot say Lonnie I can ask really helpful positive looking on I feel like diet collishaw and like some of the FA favorite memes and Jake's have been going round and say like influences like selling immunity boosting recipe ease at which also at the same time. Get Your own point Arabs. I feel like what could could die coach. You don't give us a break. Like the world is on his knees right now. Can we know what just no life for second? I think that I say that says you can point about kind of let's cut like actually practice. Gratitude for bodies can day. I'm on and say these like literally fighting off this invisible virus and and I think that's interesting. I think with it with regards system the means and stuff that I've seen gotten around always see in a situation like this. Humor is is a valid coping strategy. Or how people are dealing with earnings authority over rain via and Huma is often used as a tool for that and I guess it's just a shame the alot of The Hema at the moment that people seem to be finding comforting is around basically fat shaming and I. Guess not just comes back to that thing that we've always said is that like fat shaming and body shaming is like the last bastion of accessible.

Lachey Kathrina Silva UK Self Employed Lyman Secretary Collins RAY Lonnie I Colin Jake
Trump May Be the Single Dumbest President in American History

The Breakdown with Shaun King

8:47 listening | Last month

Trump May Be the Single Dumbest President in American History

"A few minutes ago on Instagram I posted screen shot of the NBC News Story of Donald Trump saying e wondered if people injected themselves with disinfectant. If it could kill the virus and some people reasonable people to say did he. Did he say that? Like is this fake news And I understand these weren't even supporters of Donald Trump. These were real everyday people who just said hold on hold on. I don't trust the man but this seems so outrageous so ridiculous so beyond the Pale. Did he really say that so? Let me play the clip for you. Where he indeed wonders aloud in one of many moments of stupidity across this pandemic wonders aloud. Whether or not infecting injecting rather disinfectant could kill the Koran invites. Let me put the disinfectant with Nazi out in a minute minute. And is there a way we can do something like that By injection insider or almost a cleaning. Because you see gets in the lungs and it does a tremendous number so it'd be interesting to check that so that you can have to use medical doctors with but it sounds it. Sounds interesting to me. So we'll see but the whole concept of the light the way it goes into one minute that's That's pretty powerful. So yes there. It is Donald Trump at a press conference very smartly holds. These press conferences every single day. Because he knows they'll be covered and he is operating under a philosophy that he's used his entire life is that all press is good press and listen that literally got him into the presidency where he feels strongly that if he can dominate every new cycle. If he can dominate social media that he can do that all the way into the presidency and indeed. That's what he did in two thousand fifteen to twenty sixteen when he actually one. He did that in a lot more. But for his entire life going back even to the early seventies he has always been a master manipulator of the media and wouldn't mind if it was good press bad press horrible press. It could be about anything about his personal life about his marriage but his release. It's marriages about his relationships. It could be about him. Being a bigot. A xenophobe anything. He understands that being in the news and not just on nightly news but dominating it from morning tonight dominating social media indeed here we are talking about him right now and I. I have a principal to not really speak about him on the breakdown because he is covered and analyzed everywhere and doesn't deserve our attention here when there are so many other issues that just don't get the coverage but this is one of those moments where he says something one. That's dangerous now. You have to remember that just a few weeks ago. He was touting a particular malaria drug as a miracle. Cure for the corona virus and finally scientific studies are coming back on that drug and are saying not only is it not helping the corona virus but that in the trials the patients who were treated with it have a higher rate of death than those who weren't treated with it and not only was he touting it for weeks on end but so was Fox News. So we're conservatives across the country they have all now gone silent on it including Donald Trump no longer pumping it no longer talking about it and he literally yesterday. He said two things actually he then started saying how the corona virus dies under heat. What again he does not say when he says that he then starts talking about how people should go out in the sun and how the virus dies under heat. There is a study that shows that win. The Corona virus is not in a human body but his out of the body and is then put under extreme heat like two hundred degrees and above which is a temperature that we could not live in once outside. It gets above a hundred and fifteen degrees. Human beings can only be outside but for so long you literally could not walk in two hundred degree temperatures. It dies outside of the body in extreme heat but the man literally said I I think maybe people should inject disinfectant and go out in the sun. You only laugh to keep from crying because it's so ridiculous is so preposterous and outrageous and dangerous. That it to me reveals something it reveals like we always we always known that Donald Trump was problematic. And I don't think anybody obviously. He thinks he's a genius and anybody who calls themselves calls himself. A genius is not a genius but it reveals a base level of ignorance and stupidity. He is surrounded by doctors and experts and could have any expert in the world at his side at a moment's notice particularly during this pandemic and because he wants to dominate the news cycle. He just gets on the Mike and says the first thing that comes to his mind and began saying things that are dangerous minds you last month. A family began taking that anti-malaria drug and one member of a family died. Another was hospitalized and in a normal world and they both said that they did it because they heard Donald trump touting its effectiveness its efficacy in a normal world that moment would have ended. His presidency would've ended anyone's presidency. Oh you just touted a drug that got a man killed like there is a literal argument for ARRESTING DONALD TRUMP. For this in fact. Some doctors have lost their medical license over celebrating. What Donald Trump was saying about? It like it's a scandal for everybody but him and that's because there's a new scandal a new problem new issue new beef every single day but that he got up yesterday in front of the media in front of doctors just randomly saying things that are not only untrue but are dangerous and are again going to get people killed shows the risk of his presidency. Listen if you've followed me over the past year you know that I'm not a fan of Joe Biden or Joe Biden's policies. You understand that there is a marked difference between the ignorance and danger of Donald Trump and who Joe Biden is even if what you need to think through with that issue. Is this old notion that I'm tired of that. You are tired of of choosing between the lesser of two evils. Any man who says you may need to inject yourself with. Lysol is saying something so preposterous in dangerous. That he should not be trusted with nuclear codes. He shouldn't be trusted five dollars. Let's be real. The man is dangerous. I wanted to deviate from the norm today to just talk for a moment about how preposterous he is I don't even like to say his name here on the breakdown but I had to break the rule and talk about it today.

Donald Trump Joe Biden Nbc News Malaria Fox News Principal Cure Mike
Elisa Villanueva Beard's Path to Teach for America

Latina to Latina

5:51 listening | Last month

Elisa Villanueva Beard's Path to Teach for America

"It is such a hard transition into story. We hear again and again top of your class. Big Fish in. What you don't realize is a small pond. You went all the way to Indiana for college. You continue to play basketball. Show up a campus by yourself. I mean you must have felt so overwhelmed like a fish out of water. I can't even imagine being that far from home and sorting through all of that. Yeah it was. It was pretty extraordinary when I look back in. What gave me the guts to do that to like show up to college by my. That's it right like I never braver than when I was eighteen. That's probably true. An important part of that story as though Mr Joe disc who was who was an incredible mentor in essence passed away but he and his wife are truly. She was my biology teacher. Ms Karen disc there why I ended up at depauw university She went there and he sort of just took this interest in me. And he's from Indiana originally went to purdue and U. Law and got to know my family starting my junior year and just He just kept saying a Lisa. Your extraordinary you can do anything. I want you to get out of your comfort zone. And that's how I ended up at DAPA. He did show up that first day of school with me. I didn't know who's going to be there but as I pulled up a van that had picked me up from the airport. He was there waiting for me. And so he. He was my parent that day and it was pretty extraordinary. I felt like I had. I was at a different country altogether. Most stunning about it. I will say is that I thought. Wow getting used to just a community that was predominantly white middle upper middle class white and three percent five percent black. At the time I I was a bit intimidated by that and thought this is going to be really hard and just felt like really hard to relate to each other's lives culturally in every way but I quickly realized that that was quite energizing for me. I learned that I'm very adaptable person and conservative. Connect with different groups of people which is become a I think of a strengthened and has served me well in my career. But I didn't expect was that I would be under prepared for the rigors of college because of all you just heard me say and that was the most traumatizing thing and even when I reflect on it. I sort of get emotional because it was so hard. At least it'd be like I'm ready. I checked every box. Everyone told me I was ready. I worked really hard and then you feel completely light to. You're like Oh my God. Did everyone know this is going to happen to me? And what was like the toughest part about it was because I was quote unquote minority on campus. And you're not doing well and I'm the kid that like work. I work really hard. That's what I learned from my parents like -cation and hard work. You don't quit that's me so I'm like getting up at four. Am to study on. Saturdays and Sundays like for fourteen hours. And I'm still getting CS and C. minuses. And so you're like oh my gosh. I'm not smart enough. I can't hang with these people like maybe it's true. Maybe why people are smarter than me and when you start to internalize that. It's so dangerous in so traumatizing so I called my mom three months in and said mom. I'm not GonNa make it like truly. There's nothing more I can do. I've never been more focused. I've never been more doing everything right And I'm I'M NOT PULLING IT OFF. And my mom listened and then she she said me he. I'm so sorry that it's it's so hard for you but I said I think I'm going to have to come home. And she said you're not welcome home until you complete your degree at Depa University. That's where you said you're going. That's where you are and that's where you're going to do it. You can do this so I can't help you with that but you should maybe get off the phone and go back to studied. So how did you turn that corner? There was something about The fact that I just knew there was another option as so even the energy when you know at night. You're you're laying there and you're like maybe I should just go home. Maybe I just can't do it. That was now out of my head. I'm like there's no going home I just have to. Just keep keep doing it. I think some of the moves I started to make as I started to ask for help which was another good leadership lesson. I learned early on. I just went to my professor and finally said I am doing everything I know to do. Can you help me like who? Who SHOULD I ask? Here's what I'm doing. What am I doing wrong so I started to get different kinds of help? My professors became invested in me. I did find one. Let up professor. Who's not even my teacher. But I met her at a thing inside when made an appointment with her and she was able to tell her this like what I was really going to do and she leaned in and helped me which was extraordinary and was really helpful for me and mattered a lot in in that trajectory. And so that's what I did. I did terribly my first semester. I did better my second semester and then I was flying then I was like on the Dean's list then I was like. Oh I'm I can do this better than a lot of the kids accidentally. That was what ended up started. You'll buy deep passion and outrage for educational inequity. Because I started to understand like our did I grow up. I we place core members where I went to school. I had no idea and you know and I. I realize like wow. My Dad was the only college graduate in my whole neighborhood where we lived. I didn't understand the context in which I was growing up. I grew up in a very rich community in so many ways that have kept me grounded and I think it's why I am who I am today but hadn't realized the lack of access and opportunities so That's what set me on the path to teach for America and here we are more than twenty years later

Professor Indiana Basketball Depauw University Mr Joe America Dean Purdue Depa University Lisa U. Law
'Fleabag' play to be streamed online for COVID-19 relief effort

The Guilty Feminist

2:39 listening | Last month

'Fleabag' play to be streamed online for COVID-19 relief effort

"I would love to rally the guilty feminists troops. Who if they cross over into fleabag fans might find a few that Dogra something in this for them flip on the TV show was originally a play? It was a woman show. It lost seventeen minutes. And it's just me being fleabag on a stool that two thousand thirteen stepper knows about because she was responsible for me watching the first ten minutes. I'm always very clear. Say when I'm asked in the press about it that I am one hundred percent you've written it any way you might find something slightly different but that was bursting to come out and I'm sure it would have come out but I'm also obviously delighted and thrilled to that. Came out of that that moment. And you know that there's always magic and midwifery in the theater is always always. There is magic midwifery. I love that. The longest show is the national fate. Live recording of fleabag. The West end production of it is now up and can be watched on Soho Theatre. Domon website or Amazon prime for a minimum donation of four pounds and everything we make be split between various charities the national emergency trust and just together charities and acting for others and finally there will be fleabag support fund for people in our industry who basically are struggling and need grants to help them get through this time seventy percent goes to the national emergency trust. Nhs together charities in thirty percent goes towards community through this other charities which is very important to us goes back started in the first place so if you liked a fleabag the television show. It's wonderful to see the evolution and also you don't just play back you transform yourself into the other characters and it's so beautiful so if everybody who listen to the guilty feminist who could afford four pounds more downloaded that today that would provide so many pieces of protective clothing. Four and it just off it will save lives. And if you can't afford to that's Okay. It's possible you've lost your job. You're one of the very people who works in a sector that needs this kind of grant you can help by just amplifying give it a follow. Give it a re tweet. Tell a friend tell somebody you know who loved fleabag. Hey did you know that you could do this and I really appreciate you doing that? Because that's a a valuable piece of intellectual property and a beautiful production and the fact that you're now putting it out there and making accessible also through the crisis when people are at home desperate fulfilling like there at the theatre again to be able to have that theatrical experience which is different than televised

Fleabag Soho Theatre Dogra NHS Amazon
Supporting Women Leaders

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

8:43 listening | 3 weeks ago

Supporting Women Leaders

"The share of women in the House and Senate has increased over time. But it's still well below the share of women in the US population. And if you dig deeper. Congress looks even less representatives women of color make up eighteen percent of the US population but before the two thousand eighteen midterms the accounted for just seven percent of Congress and LGBT women. Make up about two point five percent of the US population but there are only two openly lgbt women in Congress that's less than one percent even with the recent wins by women candidates in the two thousand eighteen midterms. There's still a long way to go before. They're fully represented. I look at someone like just send our during the prime minister in New Zealand. I the way that she dealt with the terrorist attack on her country. Yeah the way that she wouldn't name the terrorists that was you know. She's amazing. Amazing. We will not talk about their names and then also the way that she's dealing with this crisis she is incredibly humble and that and just real like you really feel like she's telling you the truth this authenticity. Just I think is is one of her great strengths and I think just very clear. Nobody panicked. This is what we're going to do and we're going to do better for. I think she's really good also at hope and inspiration which people need people made in times like best. They need to know. We're all in this together and we're going to get back and we can do this and done things like this before we've done things that have been harder than before. Did you see that? The princess in Sweden actually took an online nursing class and entered into the frontline fighting this pandemic. It's the most amazing thing I was like. This is brilliant. She's a princess and she was like Nope. I'm going to take an online class and I'm going to really make a difference and it's just spectacular. The majority of frontline healthcare workers around the world. Are Women. Yeah actually in China. I think the numbers like ninety percent methods. And then there's also that stat that the country is that have been least hit as far as numbers go with Kobe. Nineteen have women leadership. Yeah so I'm wondering if you could shed a little light on how the challenges women face around the globe are maybe similar or different. Well certainly you've been a huge champion around Combating Violence Against Women and sexual assault and harassment. And that is in my mind. The biggest challenge women face I. Yeah globally there is no country no community no religion no social economic background of women anywhere on Earth who are not affected by gender based violence. That's just full stop. That is the only issue that seems to get worse. Not Better over time right. We're going to get more. Women elected to political office. More women are going to start and grow business. People are going to see. Oh Wow this is great for the economy okay. Yes let's keep funding. You can see steps forward on many of these issues but on violence against women. I mean the harder hit. Humanity is the deeper violence against women growth. Right now with this crisis in China triple. They had triple the cases really at the epicenter of Code. They had triple A. Cases of domestic violence in the height. They're of the virus and that is not a winston. It is a fact that when people lose their jobs and anxiety and stress is running high. That will be my own skin for that. There will be domestic violence. Bounce GonNa Children as well and then of course you add to that. Being locked down with an abuser or higher. Yeah it's horrifying. Yeah so to me. I mean that's that is the biggest issue and of course it takes different forms in different places you know in the DRC have rape as a weapon of war and other countries ravaged by war like Syria or Iraq in places like Afghanistan. You have girls being hung just because they're girls girls being burned with acid late certainly by strangers by partners by boyfriends acquaintances college. Campus Violence Sexual violence child marriage. Honor Crimes Cream genital mutilation. It takes on a different look in different places but we run. Something called an emergency assistance. Fund FOR EXTREME FORMS OF GENDER based violence is called Voices Against Violence Fund. And we will open up the fund and literally the cases that it's small bits of money that we can get out the door within twenty four to forty eight hours to quickly help a woman get back on her feet. Nadia Murad. Who is the is eating woman who escaped Isis in Iraq? Acting twenty fourteen. She was actually one of the first people to receive one of these. Just very quick fusions of financial support to help her family and she get healthcare relocation. You know her brothers had been killed. Most of her family was killed. The bill back something and I'm allowed to tell her story because she tells her story and obviously winning a Nobel peace prize a number of years later for suing Isis. But the fun that we continue to run at a number of cases is just through the roof and we you know quite frankly. We need more money to fund. Yeah believe me I would rather be preventing these Reno. And why should we were throwing money at a problem rather than trying to get it a solution but we're doing both let me ask you this. The numbers are just staggering. But do the numbers go down when women have power. I'm thinking about just even in the United States and domestic violence and violence against women and we have some really incredible women that are fighting in Congress and Senate and yet these numbers are still mind blowing. You know we fight so hard to get a seat at the table and then I'm wondering. Do you see changes within the community. Do you see that numbers go down. What is the tangible evidence of that? This is this is shifting or changing. Well certainly I think when the economy is strong right when other things are stable. That is certainly better. But that shouldn't have to be the case. Things be better never should be that humanity. I think we're not challenges. Honestly with violence against women is what I would call. One of the women leaders will work with called the silent. Majority silent majority is the majority of men who are good and who believed that bounced. Women should never stand but they don't do anything about it I well. I don't know anybody. You know one that. Maybe they don't know enough about it. They don't think there's a place for them to be part of the fight or minimal. And I think it's about. How do we engage those men to recognize that? This is a human problem and that they're part of the solution they have to be part of citation otherwise things will never change. Yeah so I think you see grace forward when Powerful men or influential men get it and they don't just get it and like a check the box way but they they really get it on a fundamental level and every decision that they make it somewhere in the calculus of how they're making those decisions and that's a big piece queer on an awards program here called the voices of solidarity and it's really about honoring those great guys who are in the fight. I love that and often risking their livelihood. We all met all around the world. There's some great. Ceo's and leaders that we've honored but there are also different young guys. I don't know if you're familiar with the Nail Polish undercover Keller's. No that into drank and it will turn a color. If you drink has been Mufi right yes and so these guys came up with this formula basically so that the nail Polish we turn a color if it was and now there's you just young college guys that they had a personal experience with a friend who had been drugged and raped in college and they decided to do something about it. It's kind of engaging men at different levels in doing good. I think that can make a huge difference.

Congress United States Violence Fund Senate China Iraq New Zealand Prime Minister Nail Polish Reno Sweden DRC Nadia Murad CEO Assault Keller Syria
The Mind Financing The Future

The Portal

6:19 listening | 3 weeks ago

The Mind Financing The Future

"When powerful people use their advantage to engage in new involuntary transfers of wealth safety or freedom from those too weak to defend themselves. The winners are almost always forced to create an idealism as a cover for their siphoning in simpler terms. These idealisms are actually cover stories or bespoke fig leaves which almost exactly fit. The extraction are taking that they are tailored mask once. This is understood. We realized that to test this theory. Each wave of idealism would have to be matched to a highly specific effective confession for an injustice that pervaded the era in which it was found. This concept of idealism as disguising theft is of course an upsetting cognitive shift get is therefore naturally initially difficult to come to see the waves of idealism that characterized each era that we have lived through not as the best of our aspirations for a better world but rather as the photographic negative of the greed of our own ruling classes for example. The idealism of United States competitiveness was everywhere in the nineteen eighties and early to mid Nineteen Ninety S. At that time it seemed to be about the need for all Americans to pull together and get back into fighting shape as a country looking below the surface however it was not really about the need of managers owners and workers to pull together through shared austerity to reinvigorate American industry. Rather it was a false idealism. That instructed organized American Labor to give up hard won gains that were then not matched by comparable sacrifices from the other groups. Once the United States Labor had been sufficiently humbled in attenuated in its power by the Mid Nineteen Ninety S. The drumbeat of patriotic competitiveness gave way to the post National Davos idealism of a world without borders singing the praises of Financial Inclusion Trade Immigration and philanthropy with the Maudlin sediments of nine hundred eighty five. We are the world as its anthem. The purpose of the Post National Movement was not to include those overseas but instead to allow the wealthy of the industrialized world to break the bonds with their fellow citizens of the working class and to access cheaper labor. Pools abroad using far-flung supply chance likewise the idealism of so-called constructive engagement with governments like communist China's would be seen through this lens as the rationalization for ignoring issues of human rights and strategic risk in such a way as to benefit economically in the short-term selling out American interests in the long-term meanwhile back home in the states the techno Utopian perspective that arose dominate. The Bay area of California held. That information just wants to be free and that now. Transparency is king because privacy is dead perversely as you would expect in this theory. This hippie dippy sounding digital vision is exactly what ushered in the surveillance economy as the platforms became not windows but half silvered mirror through which the social media barons learned every intimate detail about their users. These startups turn techno behemoths. Turned the most intimate personal details of our private lives into their proprietary business. Data which was as far from free or transparent as one could possibly imagine the idealism of gender and identity to fits the exact pattern second wave feminism seemed to be about recognizing the intrinsic worth of women in the workforce but it may also be seen as an employer dream to push out the labor supply curve in such a way as to make the previous single breadwinner household require a second income just to keep pace the politics of identity which caught fire in the wake of the twenty ten. Colorado Senate upset are explained largely by economists. Pm Alana's theory. That identity is the cheapest substitute for the Labor Voting Block which demanded far more significant economic concessions. More bizarrely the strange media ritual of pointing the finger of Islamaphobia at anyone who dares ask about a mass murderer in which the killer triumphantly shouts of the hawk. Bar Emits. Bloody and sadistic mayhem may well be about protecting transfer. Payments from oil-rich monarchies while the official admonition to see the Niqab hit job burqa and clitoridectomy predominantly ethnic differences or symbols of female. Liberation is so absurd to go along way towards establishing the need for some theory. Is this to fill the space. The left-leaning idealism of making housing affordable for all that too many bad loans inflated the housing bubble while the right-leaning Ayn Rand Ian Idealism of self regulating markets practiced by Alan Greenspan allowed the banks to privatize gains while socializing the risks losses. The giving pledge to May well be an attempt to keep governments from clawing back unpaid taxes from carefully sheltered fortunes or establishing wealth and asset taxes in a period of radical inequality. In this sense it can be seen as something of a bargain if I promise to screw over my own children for charity. I hope that you will leave me alone and unquestioned to enjoy my vast and carefully sheltered wealth while I'm alive and as we have just seen with the Biden endorsements from Speaker Nancy Pelosi Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and former Senator Hillary Clinton. The metoo movement appears to be less about sexual assault and more about adding a tool for extra-judicial vigilantism which can be wielded selectively or kept sheath according to taste suffice it to say that. Hashtag believe all women has now given way to hash tag believe convenient women so you may ask. Why bring this up now? Well in my opinion what we need now is someone who is not part of any of the official idealisms. Of course that would have sounded quite weird in isolation if I had simply said that we need an anti Utopian to lead us. Wouldn't we want someone envision a dreamer doer hybrid two point the way? No we want someone who is not signed on for any of these horrible anti patriotic charades from either party. Someone who never believed in free trade free markets nationalism housing for all deregulation competitiveness etcetera etcetera. We need someone who is not closed with Jeffrey Epstein who does not possess significant financial relationships abroad. Additionally someone alienated by both the hardline pro-life pro-choice perspectives. Would be perfect for where most Americans are today since the time of Nixon. We've been in an era of predatory idealism with our best impulses used against us from both right and left. It is now time to get back to the hard work of cleaning up from two disastrous generations of failed business people politicians reporters in professors and perhaps most importantly we need to flush our dependence on near totalitarian communist China out of our system before it is too late

China Official Ian Idealism Mid Nineteen Ninety United States Labor United States Jeffrey Epstein Post National Movement California Theft Colorado Ayn Rand Alan Greenspan Alana Nixon Islamaphobia Senator Hillary Clinton
Was Diddy right about forcing Joe Biden to have an agenda for Black people?

The Breakdown with Shaun King

8:35 listening | 3 weeks ago

Was Diddy right about forcing Joe Biden to have an agenda for Black people?

"You never really know who's going to shine during a pandemic during a crisis but A person in a voice that I think has really stepped up in a major way has been Naomi Campbell who has done some amazing interviews and And even just had some conversations herself about the pandemic about politics and Of course I mean she is a woman who's traveled and seeing the entire world but she's just been brilliant throughout the pandemic with just deep insights and thoughts and yesterday she had a conversation with diddy and apart of that conversation was about the presidential race and did he gave his thoughts on it. And I want to play that clip for you now. Black born is now going to be for free. We're going to have to see some promises. What are we in return for? I'll quote nothing has changed for Black America and in order for us to vote for biding. We can't be taken for granted like we always because we're supposed to be Democrats off because people are afraid and trump so I was going to take him out. Community level was to make a deal. This is business at this point. You know we can't truth follow. Titians you know so. We WanNa know very clearly just like trump made it clear that he wanted to build the wall vitamins to make clear that he's GonNa Change Lives in quality of life of black and Brown people else. He can't get the boat. I will hold a vote hostage. Ivine now. I saw and heard that clip earlier this morning when my friend. Sholom in God. He posted it and he posted a loan. Caption if you go to my instagram now or Charlemagne's Instagram I reposted Charlemagne's caption where you could just go to Charlemagne's page and check it out for yourself. I agree with everything they did. He said they're like I. I would say it even stronger. I think it's it's ridiculous to say otherwise but it's a bit of a roar test Which wish if the ink blood tests where you Somebody shows you ink blots and you tell them what you see I heard what did he said. It was like Yep. That's right we need to make sure that Joe Biden actually has an agenda for us and I I heard that and I'm like yeah of course. What other scenario are we saying that we don't care if Joe Biden has an agenda for us because what did he is saying is true? Black people almost exclusively put Joe Biden in the position. He's in right now and he doesn't come close to winning. The presidential election in November without the black vote and all saying is. Hey we need to let him know. Hey if you actually in real life want us to show up and vote for you like in a major way if you want us to put you over the top talk to US clearly about your agenda show us the policies show us the plans show us the strategies instead of just saying that you're going to be different than trump or that. You're better than trump. Can WE BE PRACTICAL. Can you talk to us about your economic policies? Can you talk to us about your justice policies? Can you talk to us about your healthcare community development policies? Can You? Can you speak on these things? And I see several of my friends including Kenny Burns who? I'm doing an interview with later this afternoon saying. Hey Hey that's reckless asked my brother Isaac as the third also posting. Hey everything they did. He said right. There was completely wrong and I was shocked because everything I heard in everything charlemagne heard and and I see many of you even on my instagram debating. It right now. I agree with every bit of it. It's outrageous I mean if it's a city council person if it's a local mayor if it's if it's a state representative if somebody for Congress we should always require of them that they have an agenda that as much as we can make it is binding that they have some type of binding commitment to our concerns and other people are saying no no no. No No. Don't say that. Don't say that you just need to vote for Joe Biden no matter what. And here's the thing. Black folks are gonNA show up and vote for Joe Biden Black Folk vote almost ninety five percent for the Democratic candidate and black folk will show up. But what we know in Michigan in Wisconsin in a place like Georgia Florida North Carolina and others. Is that if you actually want to win? Black folk have to go all out and we saw that in two thousand and eight and two thousand twelve of course with Barack Obama but black folk while black folks showed up to vote in huge numbers for Hillary Clinton in any place where the turn out was depressed even a little bit in in Milwaukee in Wisconsin or in Michigan. She lost. And it's okay for us to say to Democratic candidates to democratic nominees. And let's be real as I record this. It's still April. Were still in the primary. It's okay in April to say. Hey Joe Biden I wanna make sure you actually have an agenda for US okay. Like that's not an let's be real did he is not making threat. He is saying that we all deserve to have a presidential candidate. That has an agenda that actually represents our needs. Our concerns are our biggest issues and that they have to have a plan. And we wanna see it because what we've seen for most of our lives is presidential candidates who desperately rely on our vote but have no agenda for us have no plans for us. They plan on being generally nice. But we need something more than general nicety like we need people that have an actual policy agenda for the concerns and issues that we have and I'm grateful For diddy who didn't say. Hey I'm not voting for Joe Biden he just said Hey We're at the stage. In American history where the Democratic candidate needs to have a serious agenda for black folk and anybody who looks at this situation says otherwise is ridiculous and I see other people saying. Hey He's saying that from a place of privilege I don't I don't understand that. No He's saying it from a position of authority of somebody who generally doesn't go into making a deal with somebody unless the deal is good for everybody in what we want to understand is HBO. We're GONNA make this deal with you. Not only where you are the Democratic nominee but where we go all out to make sure you win the race. Exactly what are you going to do? And if that's a problem for you saying something like that then we need to have a big conversation like we need to go deeper if saying that much Riles you up. And gets you frustrated? Then you have probably been eating crumbs under the table for so long that you are used to people over promising and under delivering. You're used to not getting anything like the U. S. just the standard and so I see a lot of what I think are just outrageous. Criticisms of what he said I think people understandably so so badly want to defeat Donald trump that they are afraid to even ask Joe Biden for favor and is lying. No no we can do. Both we can defeat Donald Trump and in April still argue that they are some things. Joe Biden needs to do and do differently for him to garner our full support.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Black America Diddy Charlemagne Naomi Campbell United States Instagram Kenny Burns Isaac Sholom Congress Barack Obama Riles State Representative HBO
Community support in the midst of crisis

Nonprofit Luminaries

13:50 listening | Last month

Community support in the midst of crisis

"Amber Alice. Thank you so much for joining me. How are you guys doing today for having us live talk about a couple change the organization has gone through some changes? In the last W- it's almost been a year now The episode itself launched in May. But I had the conversation with at the time todd McNeil who was the executive director then back in March so it's been over a year now. let's talk about some of the changes that handed has gone through what? What's what's been going on with you guys great so after your conversation with todd last year todd is our founder and the executive director. At that time he decided to retire. Sadly was in the middle of a project with US remodeling a new safe place location as a shelter. So that's been completed in open so during that time from December until just a couple of weeks ago I served as the interim director and then was offered. I accepted the position as executive director. Congratulations that's that's fantastic. So let's talk about this new because I recall that there was. I think this is at the beginning stages at that point the new facility that was being built and so that's been completed. Now tell me a little bit about that what. What kind of changes that brought about so safe place is our seventy two hour shelter that was created to meet the needs of youth entering foster care after hours and so for ten years of safe places life? We were in a office space that we turned into a home and so we realized that in order to best take care of kids. We need to be able to provide at home type space in that shelter. So it's less of a shelter but more of a home and so in January of this year. We actually moved into our safe house. It's absolutely beautiful and the kids have absolutely loved it. That's great so yeah because I remember it was more kind of an office park. This is a house that you guys have turned into the Safe Place Program. But it's definitely more of a house field than it is an office. Feel that's correct. Yeah you know. I think we did the best that we could in an office space. We made that office space like a home and so now that we are House. We still want to feel like home has led to any programmatic changes. Or how changed? How you guys kind of do services differently or is it pretty much the same just a lot more comfortable because it's home? Instead of a office building surprise it stayed the same. But now we're in a place that we can best take care of kids you know. We have places for them to play outside and they can help cook in the kitchen. And it's just great all round so this speaking of safe place because that was the the big change with the home. Let's talk a little bit more about that program. And what's safe? Place does just to remind our listeners. Who weren't able to catch the first episode? So can you tell us a little bit about safe place? And how you got. Served these kids that come into your program absolutely so I'll give a little bit of historic historical content on hand in hand as well so safe place actually started in two thousand and ten to meet the need of youths entering foster care after hours on weekends. And so. That's after five PM on weekdays or Saturday Sunday and historically what would happen is his would ride around in the back of the social workers are awaiting placement and so thinking about a kid being in that situation. You were just removed from your home and now you're in the backseat of a stranger. Listening to the story of what happened to you over and over again. And so that three traumatizing in of itself. An so safe place was created to meet that need and so now kids no longer have to ride around in the back of a social workers car they can outcome directly to safe place where we can provide emergency shelter personal hygiene items initial health screen. They go to the doctor. And then just get the opportunity to be a kid's again if so and if I recall that's for a seventy two hour period from when that child comes into foster care. Is this for kids. Who are first entry into foster care? This is their first foster experience or does any child who needs an emergency placement. Can't find a home. For whatever reason are they able to take advantage? I guess I can't think of a different of SAFE PLACES PROGRAMS. Sherry asset safe places for kids initially entering foster care or for us to have a place spent disruption through no fault of their own plan. Changes or anything like that is not something that safe places for you really intended for. Hey you're kind of in a moment of crisis man either. It's your first time or like you just mentioned the disruption not of their own fault so either foster parent health issues or other emergency than you guys can step in for that. How many kids can you serve? What's what's your capacity. At this point you can save up to five at one time in generally speaking. What's kind of the experience from one child? Or when you guys get a call saying hey we. We need some support. What does that look like to exit? Where do they go? Afterwards can enter foster care for three main reasons. So whether that's through police custody your court order through voluntary placement agreement and some kids enter safe place than once in safe place recently. Actually seen a lot of kids go back home. Just their reunified with their families. Maybe their family just needed a couple days ended and find some supports. Just get back on their feet and we really wanted to be the organization that really supports all families in that Sometimes kids do enter formal hoster air and then sometimes inskeep replaced with a suitable other adult. So maybe that's their teacher. Maybe that's their daycare. You know someone at their Jay care or an aunt and uncle and so you mentioned initial health screen surreally in those three days. You guys are trying to do everything you can to get a kind of comprehensive view as much as possible within those seventy two hours of this child to help give them the appropriate care whether they go back home or go to a foster home or as you mentioned suitable adult. This is another community member or person that they have a relationship with so the idea is to really equip the other people to best care for these kids absolutely. Yeah we just really want to wrap our arms around you know the child or youth but also the family as a whole and so do leave safe place. We have resources more on our outreach side that they are able to have access to that they need additional closer. Maybe their caregiver needs help paying their rent. Our utility bill. We just really want to support that family. As a whole as they transition to their next step so the seventy two hours then that that's the period of the children are in your home. What you're providing direct care. What but you continue providing services beyond that then to the family. Well okay tell me a little bit more about that. So they ended up going to a foster home. How do you guys maintain connection with that Charlton Foster Fan so at that point? You know. It's voluntary hand has always been about relationships and so we want to build a relationship with at and wherever they're going next and so if they want to continue that relationship were always here for them? Whether that's through service delivery. Sometimes that's just a listening ear. Hey I have a question aid. You have them in it and just being present with them through that hand-in-hand has two main programs. We talked about safe place a second programs outreach and outreach was really designed from what we saw in safe place and that was the same story happening over and over again. That story was why he threw entering foster care in that way to neglect and neglects can be classified in many different ways but the neglect that we saw was actually the effects of poverty and so hints outreach program is able to provide those services to meet that additional need host safe place within. That's rent utility assistance or personal hygiene items. You know kind of like I said before we're all about that full circle and all about family and relationship so this outreach than really to address poverty you mentioned I remember when we had it when I had the first conversation. There was a lot of community programs going on. Kinda soccer outreach at todd was doing and some of that was things that he had done. Are those types of things? Still things that that safe places is doing or you more focused on the outreach efforts. Being to help address these poverty issues that are leading kiss to getting into foster care. Actually say it's both are we. We've seen kids that are involved in our homework. Labs on the outreach side then enter foster care so we see them kind of on both sides of I think the most Communist. Oh Hey I know you. I was in safe place and then we see them again somewhere in that community and so I think they're coming from both

Safe Place Program Todd Mcneil Executive Director United States Interim Director Amber Alice Soccer Founder
State Budgets and COVID-19

After The Fact

8:30 listening | Last month

State Budgets and COVID-19

"Seventy five billion dollars. When was the last time you thought that might not be enough money for well? Almost anything for the Pew Charitable Trusts. I'm Dan Lewis Duke. And this is after the fact. We hope this finds you safe and healthy. That's seventy five billion dollars. Is Our data point for this episode. And it's the combined. Total of money states had set aside this year for a rainy day in order to protect critical services for the public like healthcare and aid education in case of a downturn. Of course this is more than a rainy day. The Corona virus is more like a daily show and it's lasting for months and it's taken most of the last decade since the end of the great recession for states to save that money and stabiliser economies the federal stimulus package. Congress passed at the end of March tops. Two hundred billion dollars helped to states and localities and that includes one hundred fifty billion dollar Corona Virus Relief Fund. But will it be enough for more? We turn to Josh Goodman a senior officer on Pews State Fiscal Health Team on how covert nineteen is affecting. The state's Josh Goodman joins us. He's a senior officer on choose state fiscal health team. Josh we hope this finds you well and your family doing okay. Yeah definitely thank you so much for having me on. We're talking of course about the importance of of state budgets. Let's remind listeners. Just why they're important. What happens at the State Level State? Governments are just central to the lives of every single American primarily. What States Fund is Education Healthcare Transportation and public safety? And so if you're someone that drives on State Highway Sates are paying for that road if you or your family are on Medicaid states or contributing to that funding if you send your children to public schools that's dependent on state funding in additionally everyone that pays taxes when you go buy almost anything and pay the sales tax on it when you have personal income taxes withheld from your paycheck. That's linked to state decisions. And so if state governments aren't healthy if their budgets are struggling that means they'll have less money to provide all of those critical services it also means that Your taxes may be going up in a variety of different ways beyond that state governments are also important for the national economy. One thing that economists saw coming out of the great recession is that even as the federal government was making efforts to stimulate the economy states were delaying our economic recovery because they were raising taxes or cutting spending either of which take money out of the. Us economy states played this role of Limiting the recovery slowing down and so having healthy state budgets matters for all of us. We're going to talk about what all of this means for the states And their budgets which are gonNA have a huge impact economic impact. The data point for our episode is seventy five billion dollars. Which sounds like a lot of money because that's what the states is sort of stockpiled as of the end of this past fiscal year disorder. Get ready for tough times. Josh today anticipate tough times? This tough I don't think anyone anticipated a situation quite like this states always do need to plan for difficult budget situations one way. That states are different than the federal government is. They have generally constitutional requirements that forbid them from engaging in deficit spending and so states really do have to balance their budgets each year each two years and one way they do that knowing that the money they bring in in in good time will be a lot more than it is in bad times. Is they build up these reserves and so By saving in the rainy day funds as they're known states can have money to get them through tougher times but even states that have done a really good job saving. Didn't expect something to happen. This quickly and this dramatically that would affect their budgets. Josh breakdown were state. Revenue Comes from and why volatility poses such an issue for state budgets. State governments get most of their tax dollars from personal income taxes and sales taxes. And so we have. People are spending less money in the economy. Sales tax revenue will decline. If people are working fewer hours if there were layoffs then personal income taxes will also go down. States have pretty limited options to deal with those problems. They really depend heavily on their reserves to get them through these difficult times at bet also. They rely on the federal government during the great recession. The federal government offered substantial aid states states really need a lot of help but they're also making difficult choices for themselves as their budget situations deteriorate and for some context here. Congress and the president of created a two point two trillion dollar stimulus package for the nation. How much of that is is targeted towards state and local governments? One of the biggest parts of that for state governments is a new one hundred fifty billion dollar fund. That's designed to help states pay for their responses to Corona virus and all. The public health costs that go along with that and in addition to that money though there's a variety of other funding streams said are intended to help both state governments and local governments. One thing Congress has done for example is increase. The amount of money that the federal government is paying for Medicaid Medicaid is jointly funded by the federal government and states and so to help states out to get through these difficult budget times. Congress IS INCREASING. What the federal government will pay. You know we're coming out of the aftermath of the great recession was an it offered. I'm sure a lot of lessons to state policy makers on how to how to deal with calamities. What are some of those lessons right? We saw lots of sort of short term thinking during the great recession. Some of that was due to the degree of the crisis. That state's really didn't have great options but states were doing things like saying our education payment. What we're giving the school districts on June the thirtieth if we just push on into the next fiscal year which begins July. The first that saves us a lot of money this year but of course. Then that's more you have to have next year and so it's those kinds of decisions that if states are really desperate they turn to. But they don't ultimately solve the underlying problem and so saving money in good times to use in bad times is one of those key steps. So what does it? It's been doing since the great recession to prepare for the next downturn one concept that came out of the great recession was idea of stress. Testing state budgets in the idea of a stress test is just sort of to analyze different scenarios of you know if the economy declines by this mound if personal drops by this amount of unemployment goes up by this amount those kinds of things. What does that mean for our budget? And it's something that some states have begun to embrace in really use it to drive their decisions and of course that's also going to vary state by state right each state. Scott their own economy based on the natural resources for example. It could be a huge part of their state's economy or the businesses that are located there. So there's no one size fits all we see a lot of variation in the volatility from state to state which is linked to the state's economy as well as their tax structure. And that's really where stress testing can be such a useful approach. What states are doing is customizing their stress tests to their own budgets and circumstances and so you know if you have an economy that's really linked to the price of oil. You're going to want to assess well if oil is thirty dollars. A barrel versus forty five dollars a barrel versus fifty dollars a barrel. What does that mean for our budget in? Do we have enough savings if oil prices are depressed to make it through those times until we would expect to see. See Things bounced back. Every state has a different level of volatility in its revenue structure in every state is maybe more sensitive as well to spending pressures that might occur during a downturn something like Medicaid which is a means tested program if people are earning less money more people qualified for Medicaid and that costs state governments more money so states really ought to be thinking about tax revenue. They bring in as well as the spending side. What are going to be spending pressures during a challenging times

Federal Government Congress Josh Goodman Medicaid States Fund Josh Officer Pew Charitable Trusts Dan Lewis Duke United States Josh Breakdown Education Healthcare Transport Scott President Trump
Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

PEN America Works of Justice

8:56 listening | Last month

Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

"I'm Sean Kelly. I'm here live at eastern state penitentiary for our weekly searchlight. We're going to START SEARCH LIGHTS OFF For the foreseeable future. Unfortunately we running through some numbers As of today and US prisons in jails. There are three hundred three thousand three hundred. Thirty eight cases confirmed infections of covert nineteen. There have been fifty fifty deaths today to people incarcerated in jails and prisons. There's also prison staff again. More than three thousand members of the prison staff around the United States have been confirmed with a virus and sixteen deaths. We're going to keep looking at these numbers at the start of every searchlight moving forward for those of you who don't know eastern state penitentiary. We are a prison museum in Philadelphia. The prison was built on the belief. That people are inherently. Good and can be rehabilitated. Through solitary confinement that is has a distinctive wagon wheel floor plan that was copied all over the world and there are about eighty three thousand people who were incarcerated inside this building men women and yes children as well. The prison was opened today for tours was abandoned in Nineteen seventy-one today we give tours when we're able when it's safe to do so we have artist's installations like this glorious piece by Jesse Crimes. This is a mural that he made while incarcerated in federal prison this is our graph illustrating the US rate of incarceration the highest in the world by far and our exhibit companion exhibit is called prisons. Today ask questions like have you ever broken the law and what is criminality and do prison work. And what are we? What should we do next last year? We had three hundred and ten thousand daytime. Visitors including twenty-eight thousand school visits. We are proud. Second chance employers. We seek out people with the experience of incarceration to join our education team. We find it's one more tool if they choose to use it That we can use that. They can use to engage our visitors in discussions of the impact of the policies. Around incarceration in the United States are big project. Last year was called hidden lives illuminated. We worked for over a year inside of two prisons here in the Philadelphia Area Teaching animation to artists or incarcerated This is working on his On his film and then we projected those films onto the front wall of eastern state penitentiary for months last summer. You what we're doing here. We encourage you to become a member. I can also support us in many ways from our website Which you see right there. The science close to the public because of the virus through at least may thirty first I. We have wrought much of our programming online. Those hidden lives luminated. Films are being feature one per week out. Different different film focused on every week this week. It's Davids film called freedom. We have a twice weekly visit video. Podcast it's called prisons and the pandemic. It's three minute episode twice a week covering what's happening in American prisons in jails and detention centres with this virus. I can find that on facebook. We have what we call the hospital tour twice. I saw once a week Wednesdays at two thirty live Matt Murphy from our team talks about issues of health both historically and currently in prisons and of course we have the searchlight series. Next week's topic is cove in one thousand nine hundred impact on incarcerated youth. We have heard on contain Martinez from youth. I rethought on a Terry from New Jersey Institute of Social Justice Vincent Schiraldi from the Columbia School of social work. And it's moderated by Liz Ryan from. She's the president and CEO of the youth. I initiative join US. One week from tonight for searchlight but tonight we have Cates Meissner She is a pen America. She's the Panamerican Prison Injustice Writing Program Director Welcome cates we're going to be joined in a few minutes by Justin Reveals Monson. He's pen America writing for justice fellow in his poet. He'll be calling in. So hey it's welcome to searchlight from eastern state penitentiary. Thank you for having me and I was just smiling to see Vinnie. Giraldi on your next week is he'll also an upcoming issue of our newsletter. He is a a real leader in this field. Bigtime happier topics about right now. But agreed what? It is We're just a few minutes actually. Did the introduction a little faster than I thought I would few minutes our second guess. Justin is going to be dialing in hit. You want to tell us a little bit more about our guest Justin and how you know him And then we'll be a unfortunately kind of a lab process them online here with us but a little bit about how you know Justin while I knew of Justin's work a little bit. Before he became a writing for justice fellow. He'd won our prison writing awards and honorable mention a number of years back and so I have read this poem. Thought it was quite a phenomenal. So it's really exciting to see his work elevated through the fellowship the fellowship by the way the prison writing awards and I'll talk a little bit more about our program down the line in prison. Writing Words is solely for currently Karsh Writers and the rain for Justice. Fellowship is a very prestigious opportunity. Eight hundred people apply to across the US. It is an ecosystem of writers. Confronting mass incarceration through various mediums. And is not just people justice involvement? Certainly we have currently and formerly incarcerated to a currently incarcerated fellows. Each round justin was part of our inaugural class last year cohort but but we have people representing all different interests in the field so through that Justin one obviously the fellowship and because he's able to be in communication more than some other folks because Jay communication system which will also talk about a little bit down the line. I found that I was able to communicate with him almost as easily as somebody on the outside. Not Quite. That's not always the case. It's rarely the case in fact says through that because I'm also poet in my other life and Justin's a poet and we share a lot of the same influences reading looking at who are interested in we really developed also a friendship through the work in in a in a shared aesthetic. So it's really a pleasure to get to each your him and bring him on today and hear his thoughts. I think they eat will offer a lot of insight around a variety of topics for people who are tuning it tonight more about communicating with people who are incarcerated as do. This work is a challenge that we have as well in our work. And I'm sure you face it at least as much as we do that you know you wanNA partner with people and bring their voices into the projects And the communication is often We'll hear it here in a moment. Even when a good situation I say relatively good like Justin's where three of us spoke yesterday or speaker got an a moment Even that at such there's so many barriers in the the communication ends up being so challenging. If you say more about working with creative people on these projects yeah and I think it's part of what I will be later but certainly you know I mean in a kind of lucky way or a decision made is that we don't work with. We don't actually do classes on the inside. Where National Program? We work with individuals through the mail snail mail and occasionally through one of these kind of pay to play email systems depending on people have access to it depending on the money on etc. So right now. It's even harder because we're doing a once a week. Mail pick up because the virus at the office thankfully. My team member has a car. If he didn't we would be really at a luck and And we get a stack of mail. Uk High Foot high a week and people are requesting all kinds of support. And so obviously when you're doing an editorial process are awards that I mentioned earlier are in theology that the work is very raw and unedited. Because we can't go through a real aditorial process in the turnaround. You need a good couple months because of the snail pace all prison mail is reviewed as we're GONNA here tonight and I'm thankful in advance to everybody who sticks around embarrassed with US Justin's phone calls aren't fifteen minute increments Hang UP AND CALL BACK. The gotTa go through a whole screening. That would in a moment so people's people's lives and communication are one hundred percent red often censored it's often up to the mail room whose mail gets through or not clerk working that day Actually I I. I don't know if we can include this. I wrote a Tony. Eighteen Bed about it for the Guardian. That details of what that looks like

Justin Reveals Monson United States Eastern State Penitentiary Searchlight Philadelphia Sean Kelly President And Ceo Pen America Facebook Jesse Crimes New Jersey Institute Of Social Cates Meissner Philadelphia Area Teaching Davids Liz Ryan Uk High Foot Martinez Karsh Writers Matt Murphy
Coronavirus Update with Dr. Peter Hotez

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

6:24 listening | Last month

Coronavirus Update with Dr. Peter Hotez

"My Name is Dr Peter. Hotels and I believe that everybody in the United States deserve access to new drugs and therapies vaccines for cove in nineteen regardless of their ability to pay Arina. Sorry Dr Hotels. Thank you so much for joining us again. A lot has happened since last. We spoke some of it. Good and a lot of it bad. Can you just give us an overview about the status of the pandemic in America right now? Well of course the big over you for the US was this really horrible humanitarian tragedy in New York New Jersey Connecticut in the northeast. And we're still not nearly done. It's probably still going to go on for a few more weeks but I never thought we would see that level of the station in terms of death and admissions to the hospital in intensive care unit. And it's given me a real perspective on how things could go terribly wrong here in the United States so for me. Now it's all hands on deck and making certain that what happened in New York especially in places like Queens New York which you know I know you know very well would never happen again elsewhere in the US. Well I mean you call that a humanitarian crisis. Why do you identify it as that? Well it's the level of suffering that I'm seeing and it goes beyond you know it's not just the ticks of the number of deaths. I mean we're hearing about scores of schoolteachers. For instance getting sick and dying. And even you know there was an article that really broke my heart about the doormen New York. Yeah numbers of them have gotten sick and died and I went to medical school and Graduate School in New York at Cornell and Rockefeller. And you know you'd have a bad day in the lab and you just take a walk and the only people up at that hour would be guys standing in the doorway and on some evenings. They'd be your only friend and you'd have a little. You know nothing little informal chat with them and and that all those people are getting so sick and dying is really heartbreaking. So that the situation in New York and New Jersey and the thing that I'm really concerned about now is whether we really learned our lessons from New York and New Jersey. Why do I say that's so? For instance here in Texas. We saw what was happening in New York. We implemented social distancing early on really ahead of the virus so we never saw peak anything close to resembling what happened in New York and New Jersey. And that's been great. We've not had a huge number of admissions in the Texas Medical Center to the hospital the ICU we've got some. But it's definitely a manageable problem but now I think we're starting to hear from the governor that now they're anxious to open things up again right and relaxed social distancing even though a number of the epidemiologic models and I know the epidemiologic models are not perfect they have their flaws are basically saying for some states like Texas. We need to maintain that social distancing until June. One until we go back to containment vote and the problem is that the governor's in many parts of the south and the West. Just don't have the appetite for that. They're going to open things up earlier than June one. And maybe even by next week or the week afterwards and I understand the realities of closing down the economy. I understand the hardships that many people are facing that. They're not getting a paycheck and I understand the need to open segments of the economy. The piece that bothers me is that I'm not confident. We have the public health infrastructure. That's been put into place in order to manage what's going to be a new surge. We don't have places of business well set up to do testing a regular basis. We don't have the staff in place from public health agencies to do the contact tracing. We don't have syndrome surveillance activities in place so I'm very worried not so much for the next few weeks but I'm worried we're going to start to see a brand new round of searches that could even dwarf the ones. We've been seeing what happens starting over the summer. So I'm very worried and going on cable news a lot explaining this that come July and August if we don't have national plan in place not only around the economic recovery but linking at the public health we could even see unfolding situation. That's worse than we saw in March and now the first couple of weeks of April. Well the thing that I don't understand is has it. Peaked and with governors wanting to open up their states. Will there even be a single national peak or are we just going to keep peaking state by state and not get on the same page with this? And is it necessary to get on the same page? That's basically the worry right. The peak in New York according to the models is already happened a few days ago and one in Texas maybe in another week or so and then the numbers are starting to go down. The problem is we often forget. This is like the eye of a hurricane just because the first wave of the hurricane hit and you see the eye doesn't mean I go outside and play. It means the second part is coming so that part has to be considered and then not having a system in place to prevent a bigger resurgence in the summer of great concern. Because if you look at the models and yeah anybody can do this by the way. It's that's what I'm thinking about the models that they've set up in Seattle is anybody can go to just go to health data dot org and you can click on your state and see what's happening the models basically show a peak and then decline going all the way to August and don't really try to predict what's going to happen after that because they don't know what's going to happen in terms of relaxing social distancing by understand the urgency to relax social distancing. It's just that with out a plan in place for my during it. We're just asking for a huge problem. Potentially much bigger than the one. We've already faced

New York United States New Jersey Texas Dr Hotels Dr Peter Arina Texas Medical Center America Seattle Cornell Connecticut Rockefeller
Cuomo's inaction cost Leonard Carter his life

The Breakdown with Shaun King

5:50 listening | Last month

Cuomo's inaction cost Leonard Carter his life

"For most of his time as governor. I mean long before this pandemic New York Governor Andrew. Cuomo has had a callous indifference to incarcerated in his blatant refusal to use his clemency powers now in throughout all of his terms is but one small bit of proof of this not dedicate in. My Book was actually supposed to come out. Yesterday in my heart is still broken. And it's not out it's small potatoes in this pandemic. It's now coming out in August but I dedicate nearly an entire chapter in my new book to showing how impossibly difficult it's been across the years to try to get Andrew Cuomo to even pass tiny measures for justice reform. He hates them. He's an old school tough-on-crime war on drugs. War On the hood type of Democrat his father who was governor before him was the same way too and for years. We all New Yorkers all knew that Cuomo was going to run for president in this current election cycle. He telegraphed it for all New Yorkers and everybody following politics to see it was obvious but here in New York his approval rating and popularity was so low that he regularly polled worse than other leading candidates in his home state and once it was clear that he likely wouldn't Win New York or anywhere else. He quietly bowed out of the running. An at the root of New Yorkers frustration with Cuomo has always been his complete in action for justice reform in many other progressive policies. He's a moderate now. He does hold good. Press conferences in those press conferences in the middle of this pandemic have helped his approval ratings but his actual policies on so many things are as terrible as ever in fact during this pandemic some of his policies are worse none more than his absolutely cold hearted approach to incarcerated men and women all over New York while the state has become the epicenter of the corona virus. Lynyrd Carter Ness a name that I want you to know. Leonard Carter was one of at least three hundred forty four different New Yorkers that had actually been granted parole weeks or even months ago but was still incarcerated. He had been granted parole but was still behind bars. Most of them most of the three hundred and forty four incarcerated New Yorkers who were granted parole are still behind bars today. Some have been released but most haven't every single activist injustice organization in the city and all over the state have begged Cuomo to release these men and women. We begged CUOMO to release everybody. That has less than six months left on their sentence and Leonard. Carter was at the top of that list and I mean that literally actual list of names of people who should have been released from prison to save their lives and to keep them from dying. Those lists were given to Cuomo Leonard. Carter was on all of those list. He had been granted parole already. For God's Sake. Why didn't Cuomo release some faster question because just two weeks ago? We now know Leonard. Carter contracted the corona virus in jail in died. After serving a thirty year sentence. The man was weeks away from serving his term and had all ready been granted parole. Why did CUOMO NOT RELEASE HIM? What's the justification for ignoring our pleas for the past month as other governors? Who aren't even in the epicenter of the corona virus. Like Andy Bashir in Kentucky. As they use their clemency power in commutation powers to save lives. What New Yorkers know is that Cuomo is just being Cuomo? This is how he always acts toward incarcerated people. He is unbothered in his press conferences. When he gets pressed on why he's doing so little he plays dumb or avoids really answering the questions and I think the root of this is actually much more nefarious. He's a former prosecutor. He literally used to work in the District Attorney's office. He doesn't really believe in our reforms he doesn't really believe in our pleas for help and he knows damn well and he knew damn well that people with days or weeks left on their sentences he knew they would die. New York's jails and prisons if they weren't released and Leonard is not the only person who died under these exact same circumstances. Cuomo DOESN'T CARE. He hasn't been caring and it just cost. Leonard Carter his life.

Andrew Cuomo Cuomo Leonard Leonard Carter New York Governor Andrew Carter Ness Andy Bashir President Trump Kentucky
It's Time to Build

a16z

5:08 listening | Last month

It's Time to Build

"Every western region was unprepared for the corona virus pandemic despite many prior warnings. This monumental failure of institutional effectiveness will reverberate for the rest of the decade. But it's not too early to ask why and what we need to do about it. Many of us would like to pin the cause on one political party or another on one government or another but the harsh reality is that it all failed. No Western country or state or city was prepared and despite hard work and often extraordinary sacrifice by many people within these institutions. So the problem runs deeper than your favorite political opponent or your home nation. Part of the problem is clearly foresight. A failure of imagination. But the other part of the problem is what we didn't do in advance and what we're failing to do now and that is a failure of action and specifically are widespread inability to build. We see today with the things we urgently need. But don't have we don't have enough corona virus tests or test materials including amazingly cotton swabs common reagents. We don't have enough ventilators negative pressure rooms in ICU. Beds and we don't have enough surgical masks shields and medical gowns as I write. This New York City has put out a desperate call for rain. Ponchos to be used as medical gowns. Rain Ponchos in twenty twenty in America. We also don't have therapies or a vaccine despite again years of advanced warning about bat born corona viruses. Our scientists will hopefully invent therapies Anna vaccine but then we may not have the manufacturing factories required to scale their production. And even then we'll see if we can deploy therapies for a vaccine fast enough to matter. It took scientists five years to get regulatory testing approval for the new Ebola Vaccine. After that scourges two thousand fourteen outbreak at the cost of many lives in the. Us We don't even have the ability to get federal bailout. Money TO THE PEOPLE AND BUSINESSES. That need it. Tens of millions of laid off workers and their families and many millions of small businesses are in serious trouble right now and we have no direct method to transfer them. Money without potentially disastrous. Doha's a government that collects money for all its citizens and businesses. Each year has never built a system to distribute to us. When it's needed most. Why do we not have these things? Medical Equipment and financial conduits involve no rocket science whatsoever at least therapies and vaccines are hard making masks and transferring. Money are not hard. We could have these things but we chose not to specifically. We chose not to have the mechanisms the factories the systems to make these things. We chose not to build. You don't just see this smoke. Complacency this satisfaction with the status quo and the unwillingness to build in the pelvic organ healthcare. Generally you see it throughout Western life specifically throughout in American life you see it in housing in the physical footprint of our cities. We can't build nearly enough housing inner cities with surging economic potential which results in crazily skyrocketing housing prices in places like San Francisco making it nearly impossible for regular people to move in and take the jobs of the future. We also can't build the cities themselves anymore. When the producers of HBO's Westworld wanted to portray the American city of the future? They didn't film in Seattle or Los Angeles or Austin they went to Singapore. We should have gleaming skyscrapers and spectacular living environments in all our cities at levels way beyond what we have. Now where are they you see it? In education we have top in universities. Yes but with the capacity to teach only a microscopic percentage of the four million new eighteen year olds in the US each year or the one hundred and twenty million new eighteen year olds in the world each year. Why not educate every eighteen year old? Isn't that the most important thing we can possibly do? One built a far larger number of universities or scale the once we have way up the last major innovation in k through twelve. Education was Montessori which traces back to the nineteen sixties. We've been doing education research this never reach practical deployment for fifty years

New York City United States HBO ICU America San Francisco Anna Westworld Singapore Seattle Austin Los Angeles
Mia Ives-Rublee: Talk to us, not at us.

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

4:03 listening | Last month

Mia Ives-Rublee: Talk to us, not at us.

"What was the moment when you decided that activism. What's for you? You know count. I wouldn't say there's a specific moment. I got to see sort of how. My parents really advocated for me when I was A and public schools and you know unfortunately when I was in public school that was right around when the Americans with disabilities act came online and was signed and schools sort of scrambling to you know. Update things Even though the idea had been out there the Rehab Act All of those were out there but you know schools were still sort of scrambling to meet the needs and they're still scrambling to meet the needs of disabled students across the country. And you know I got to see sort of how. My parents spent a lot of time. Just advocating for my needs and then eventually When I was in high school seeing them advocate for other folks needs and I think that helped show me the importance of finding your voice and being very aware of how systems work and how to use systems to gain access to gain equality across the board. And so you know. I really started to use that when I was in college because I suddenly found out that you know the idea doesn't cover you in college and you become the student without a lot of rights and a lot of without a lot of the combinations that you sort of presumptively thought that you had one year in and secondary school and so you know. I think that was sort of a time that is starting to find my voice and went to the University of Illinois and You know began working on immigration issues around. Lgbtq issues around campus rape In sexual soul issues and specifically around A mascot that I believed was racist Chief Lineup Wick Spent some time. advocating As a student activists there And we were eventually able to get rid of it so you know. I think there are different points in time that I really began finding my voice and you know I worked as a vocational rehabilitation counselor here in Chapel Hill Carbonaro and got to really know a lot of the details on how systems can function and then not function for for people on the ground and you know got really frustrated there and decided to leave that job because I was getting burnt out and I'm seeing a lot of my clients coming back. You know without jobs without a lot of hope and just really struggling day-to-day to try and find a job and maintain job. And so you know. Each part of my life had have really given me a lot of understanding of of systems and helped me learn to empathize with a lot of different issues. And you know eventually you know it. All seemed to come to a head win. This current administration came into power. And you know gotten sort of dovan headlong into the women's March and by that point I was like you know. I've been to protest before been to these events where they don't think of disabled people they don't think of women color they don't think of a lot of things and that tends to lead us out and leave us vulnerable. And that's why really decided to to just like in you know headlong and to activism after that. Oh I love your Surrey. That's so

Chapel Hill Carbonaro Surrey University Of Illinois Rape
Earth Day with Bill McKibben

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

6:09 listening | Last month

Earth Day with Bill McKibben

"Hey this is bill mckibben. I've spent thirty years working hard for climate justice. Sorry not sorry I wanNA start with trying to get a clear eyed look at where we really stand with climate change today and also what's happening in the US versus what's happening around the world. Most of the news about climate change is pretty bad. Wrote the first book about this thirty years ago. Nineteen eighty nine. A book called the end of Nature. At that time we were offering warning about what was going to happen if we didn't do anything. We didn't do anything so now. Now those things are happening. We've raised the temperature of the earth about one degree Celsius so far and that's been enough to melt about half the Shiites in the Summer Arctic. The oceans are about thirty percent more acidic than they were forty years ago sea levels begun to rise we see huge disruptions to the planet hydrological system the way the water moves around the earth. That's because Warm Air holds more water vapor than coal. She get more. Evaporation and arid areas and with that. Evaporation in that drought comes horrific fires of the kind. We've seen in California or most recently in Australia where we think a couple of billion animals died of course those seven or eight weeks of blazes. Once that waters evaporated up into the air. It comes down again and increasingly. It comes down and kind of gully washing storms. We've just come through. The what is twelve months on record in American history. We've seen the biggest storms and our country's history including the champion of all time Hurricane Harvey which trump something like fifty inches of rain. You can vision that on parts of Houston so this is the new normal now. That's a one degree increase Celsius and global temperature. The problem is working on a path to increase the temperature about three degrees Celsius. A little more right now even if we kept the promises that we made in Paris which of course our country is keeping and that won't be three times as bad as one degree. It'll be many times worse than that. The damage we're doing now is exponential not linear because we're going pass tipping points so that's the really tough news if there's good news and there is it's that the engineers have done their job as well as the scientists. The politicians have done. There's badly you know In the last ten years they've dropped the price. Solar Panel Wind Turbine something like ninety percent. And that means that the cheapest way to generate power around the planets now usually the cleanest way and that gives us way out if we chose take it if we mobilized like we did at World War Two or something then we could make enormous progress very quickly. We're not doing that. That's why we're building movements to try and force that kind of action and we're seeing now you know we're seeing the effects right. We're seeing these fires. We're seeing weather unlike anything we've seen in the past and it still seems like there's people that just don't see this as a critical issue. What do you think could change their minds? How do we get people understand the magnitude of this problem? The first thing to say is one needs to have swallow amount of sympathy for people because for the last thirty years when now no the oil industry has waged an all out incredibly expensive. Incredibly effective dish information's paying to get people to disbelieve climate science. You know they went and hired the same people who used to work for the tobacco industry and they spun the same set of livestock. Science was clear that we didn't know for sure on when as great investigative reporting over the last five years now makes clear the oil companies knew everything there was to know back in the nineteen eighties. You know they understood what was happening. Exxon had great scientists. The product was Qurban. Of course they were going to study it and when scientists told them with great accuracy. How much and how fast it was going to warm. They were believed. Exxon started building. All its drilling rigs to compensate for the rise and she level they knew was coming. They didn't tell the rest of US instead. They embarked on this very expensive and very powerful campaign of lying so I have some sympathy for people who were taken in by that. Why the good news is their number. So fallen dramatically with about seventy percent of Americans. Now who understand that? There's a problem the polling in the Democratic primary shoes. It's either the number one or number two issue back and forth with climate change voters minds and that's true for all voters Republican Democrat Independent. When you ask them below the age of thirty young people really get in our leading on this issue so I think the problem at this point is less trying to persuade the remaining thirty percent who are ideologues and unlikely to get persuaded. I mean if you spent the last couple of decades marinating and rush limbaugh. You'd be resistant to clear thinking to the challenge. Instead is to get some part of that. Seventy percent really engaged in the fight. We don't need all of them. We can get five. Six seven percent of Americans really engaged in this battle. What I think we can win it and change the political and economic ground rules. But it's GonNa take that kind of hype.

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Internet Voting Won't Help a Democracy, Even During a Pandemic

Latino Rebels Radio

6:28 listening | Last month

Internet Voting Won't Help a Democracy, Even During a Pandemic

"Let's talk about elections and I'll start with you Kevin because obviously cove it has transformed everything right and I think we can talk about. What were the Rico's doing with online? But could you provide sort of a like an overview about discussions happening about voting and the time of Corona virus? Like what's being discussed. What are the challenges? What are the advantages? Were the challenges. How before really get into sort of the dangers of online voting and look at the Puerto Rico situations specifically absolutely so. There's sort of two things one is that there was already a Senate bill in progress Senate. Bill Thirteen fourteen. Right which would allow Internet Voting Puerto Rico. And that happened even before. All of this virus stuff happened now. Though of course everyone is concerned about having in person voting in polling places and it's also quite challenging to get poll workers to commit to show up at a polling place and interact with dozens and dozens of people over the course of a day and potentially put their health risks so that has really been asserted second conversation on this in a sort of crisis that that has happened with our elections. We've seen lots of elections being postponed. The Puerto Rico elections were postponed once and then postponed a second time. Yeah the primary the Democratic Primary Right. They presidential primary exactly. And that's that's because of this so I think there's a general feeling of you know we need some option immediately for the current situation and then there's also a desire to think about the future and the way we hold elections in general and everyone has a smartphone in their pocket. Everyone does online banking and things so easily. It's very seductive to think that we could just do our elections from our cell phones. Wouldn't that be easy? Wouldn't that be great? Why can't we do that and it's deceptive because it's really not that easy. It's very difficult. And when we look at something like you know online ecommerce or credit card usage. There's a tremendous amount of fraud. A tremendous amount of problems. There that are acceptable in business as part of the losses that they take but are not acceptable in our elections. And we just don't have the technology yet to be able to conduct elections securely over the Internet. Maybe in ten or twenty years we will but we aren't there yet. That's interesting the way you framed in. I really appreciate it because I want to talk a little bit from the Puerto Rico context because you know when you hear it. It's like what Kevin says and like I think any person now like when they hear online voting they're like Oh yeah I do like online polls whatever and then you and then in the context of Cova D-. You're like yeah. We should do this and we'll talk a little bit about mail-in ballots after this. Because I want to kind of give some other solutions but but this bill was happening before it was gaining traction in Puerto Rico and then covert happened. Obviously that changed but to me when I hear online voting. Dorigo me being Puerto Rican. Just don't trust the government. I I mean I mean. Let's start there. I mean there's been a history of information being manipulated but you know what I mean. There's not A. There's not a trust to think that I mean Puerto Rico. Couldn't even do certain things during the hurricane reporting that that all of a sudden you have an election system that is online and perfect it just to me like like Kevin said it sounded appealing. But then when you start looking under the hood it wasn't why wasn't it appealing and what? What were the problems and so in terms? There's there's two two main arguments to this. We have the technological arguments we have the constitutional arguments and the practical arguments referring to what you're saying specifically intern impractical terms. If we look at the last four years of Puerto Rico which is two thousand. Nine Elections Happened Two Thousand Sixteen. January two thousand seventeen. This government starts were hit with Maria Hurricane Maria and there was widespread coverage of the devastation. We didn't have power. The electrical grid problems were exposed there. Since then we've seen different People Different government officers get arrested for corruption in different agents for FEMA and whatnot for mishandling government funds as to necessities in aid. That was needed. We've seen protests and having a governor have to Leave because of these protests because of animals. Now we have a governor who is constitutional government governor because of how the law is and since November of two thousand nineteen. We have this reform. They're calling it. The electoral reform of twenty twenty originally started as the electoral reform of two thousand nineteen. And what they're proposing is that we be at the forefront of technology for the Regal should be at the forefront of technology and the objective and I can maybe later right now kind of giving you a run through. I don't want to speak for too long and take up all your very smart. I Kevin Iro enjoying this so continue. This is very good. We're faced with a bill that had it was it was filed by the President of the Senate which is important on June tenth. Two Thousand Nineteen they only s held one day of hearings with only political parties. Have as the as the proponents of their positions on this bill. The ACLU wasn't allowed to to provide any testimony on the

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