Activism

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Here's the Thing About Vaccine Lotteries: They Work.

The Big Story

01:50 min | 1 d ago

Here's the Thing About Vaccine Lotteries: They Work.

"Jordan. heathrow this is the big story adam. Rogers is a senior correspondent at wired where he writes about science and miscellaneous ski korie and today joins us to talk about vaccine lotteries. Hey adam hello there. Why don't you start by telling us. Because it's such a neat idea. That kind of showcases both sides of this tell us about what united airlines is. Yes this is a fascinating example. And it's especially interesting to me because it's it's a a. I'm not sure how to say this in the right way. It's a non-state actor right. It's not a. It's not a government using this approach right so united airlines out of desire both to encourage people to get vaccinated against covid nineteen and also a great deal of self interest after a lot of conversations internally what they adopted. Was this idea that if that anybody who flew and who signed up for mileage plus which is their frequent flyer loyalty program you know you get miles points for every time you fly and uploaded their vaccination card in the us. You get a little card that says you know people sign the pharmacist. Who ever sign says. Yes you got your shots. Bright would be entered into a sweepstakes a lottery and the prize. There were a bunch of different prizes but the big one the grand prize was a year of travel for to anywhere. The united flies in united's like super first class up in the front of the plane that nobody ever gets. Cause they close the curtain. Where there's good food. And i don't know really nice stuff. It's really nice. I wouldn't know about. I don't know i've only heard rumors. Apparently it's pretty great and so that that became the inducement. What united wanted to do is say yes. We want people to fly again. We want people to get vaccinated. We want people find united. Here's the reward. the you might win these fabulous prizes.

Adam Hello United Airlines Heathrow Rogers Jordan Adam United Flies United States United
How Marijuana Reform Could Repair, Reclaim and Restore Communities

TED Talks Daily

02:24 min | 4 d ago

How Marijuana Reform Could Repair, Reclaim and Restore Communities

"What did you want to be when you grow. Up is a question that i'm sure many of you have heard in your childhood but if your upbringing was anything like mine it is a question that you heard over and over again and it wasn't until i became an adult that i began to understand the significance of the asking the questions by our community leaders and my grandparents but it was only recently in the last two years that i get some true understanding of just how much -nificant and wait there was am the answer back then and even today you see growing up black and female in the south more than forty years ago there are some limitations to the answer to that question whether real or perceived there were limitations all the same and so what. I want you to understand that this moment as a young girl growing up with all that was happening. Right after the civil rights movement all of the advancements of the struggle things that were meant to push in advance the african american community things like the voting rights act the fair housing that and affirmative action and my generation was supposed to be taking full advantage of all of those opportunities so when they asked the question. What do you want to be when you grow up. It meant something to them. I remember hearing this question one summer at vacation. Bible school vacation bible. School is not to be confused with. Btu trainee school or sunday gotomeeting school. It is vacation bible school. I'm still trying to figure out who thought it was a good idea to put vacation bible school altogether but the first week of every summer during my childhood i was it was spent in vacation bible school and this one particular summer there was a teacher. She wasn't too much older than me. And my middle school friends. She wanted to make sure that we understood scripture and was able to connected to the real world question of what you will be when you grow up

B.C. Has a Blueprint to Save Its Oldest Forests

The Big Story

02:07 min | 5 d ago

B.C. Has a Blueprint to Save Its Oldest Forests

"Jordan heath. This is the big story. Sarah fox is the bbc investigative reporter for our friends at the narwhal. Sarah hi how are you doing. I'm doing really well. how about you. i'm well thanks ya do. You want to explain as we get started for people who don't live anywhere near bc. And i've never seen it. What is old growth forest. Exactly and What does it look like sure. So old growth forest. There's kind of the the official definition. And then there's a y you think of when you hear the words old growth for us so the official definition is that on the coast where where the growing season is longer in tends to be wetter. That trees that are older than two hundred and fifty years are considered to be old growth in other parts of the province. It's trees that are one hundred and forty years old. But i think when when people think of old growth imagine those kind of icon ick photographs of these enormous cedar. Douglas fir trees that are as tall. Skyscrapers in is wide as a boss. The the old growth forest because the trees are so large the kind of the light filters through them in a different way they're draped in mosses and lichens and just kind of fallen logs. Over centuries have become nurse logs for for other trees but the the will growth force are much more than the trees. Of course there. Hot spots for bio-diversity their home to all kinds of species including a species at risk of extinction that to depend on these forests on the interior of b. species like a caribou on the south west mainland part of bc. We've got the spotted owl here on the island and other areas. We've got the marbled murrelet bird and of course these old forests are huge stores of carbon and they filter water. They have many many environmental

Jordan Heath Sarah Fox BBC Sarah Douglas Fir South West
Anneliese Bruner, White Primacy, and Telling the Whole Story

Pod 4 Good

01:43 min | 5 d ago

Anneliese Bruner, White Primacy, and Telling the Whole Story

"Now a lotta people in oklahoma have similar story about when they first heard about what was called the tulsa race riot which is now called. Telomerase massacre appropriately. What this is a very hard question to both ask and answer but at that moment when you learned this horrible thing that happened. What was your first feeling. I would say that. I was shocked. I knew about the kinds of racial violence that has taken place in this country for centuries of course but i had not of course this was unprinted. Unprecedented expected that there would have been an act of utter warfare. Basically unleashed on citizens of the united states of america with n. It's very own borders. So it was a a shocking realization. It was farther along the continuum of racially animated violence. Than i had ever really gone before in terms of what i learned about our own history here in our country and one of the things that occurred to me when i actually had opportunity to sit down and read all the way through was to begin to have a deeper understanding about my grandmother's live in san francisco and some of the chaos that she exhibited and endured along with some of the effects of her own coping with all of

Tulsa Oklahoma United States Of America San Francisco
A New Approach to Defending the Human Rights of Migrants

TED Talks Daily

01:54 min | 6 d ago

A New Approach to Defending the Human Rights of Migrants

"A decade ago after peaceful revolution toppled longtime tunisia dictator bin. Ali i was sitting in an orange grove outside athens. Greece documented migrants. Were hiding there. I came to interview them about human rights abuses suffered while enter europe one of them. Tunisian fellow in a leather jacket explained the people who overthrew ben ali they want democracy and identified life. We across the mediterranean want. Democracy didn't life. What is the difference. The migrant is a kind of revolutionary is idea stuck with me and informed might work as a lawyer and a scholar ever since as middle eastern revolutions turned into civil wars. The refugee crisis unfolded in the measuring. This exacerbated political pressures against asylum-seekers. Initially the european court of human rights took a strong stand against sport or violence in two thousand twelve court decided that the cannot turn asylum seekers back from the mediterranean dangerous libyan territory that first hearing them the human rights community cheer. I was not one of those who cheered in my scholarship. I predicted that this kind of decision could also generate bad results states determined to enforce their own return back asylum seekers even before the entered the supervision of their own courts. I was regretfully correct in recent years. The italians have relied on living to do their dirty work. So eager are some european governments deduction on human rights obligations if an armed libyan militia ignoring the rampant use of torture. This is also why since january. Twenty fourteen more than thirty. Four thousand migrants died by grounding in the mediterranean and since covid nineteen again the militarized border into. Mentoring has come in some ways. Even more extreme but has the militarized quarter caused deaths by drowning.

Dictator Bin Mediterranean Ben Ali Tunisia Athens ALI Greece European Court Of Human Rights Europe
What the Authoritarian Crackdown on Social Media Means for Global Activism

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:55 min | 6 d ago

What the Authoritarian Crackdown on Social Media Means for Global Activism

"Been more than a decade. Since the start of the revolution that came to be known as the arab spring protesters across the middle east challenged and in some cases overthrew authoritarian governments. Social media played a central role in helping activists organize and build support now. Autocratic leaders around the world have been stifling dissent on these platforms or banning them altogether russia china india and nigeria are some recent examples. It made us wonder. Could social media play the same role today. Phillip howard is a professor of sociology information and international affairs at oxford. When the arab spring happened the newness of social media platforms of the newness of twitter and facebook s really gave those tools edge for activists. The dictators went there. The police weren't on social media much. It was mostly a tool for young people and those revolutions were perhaps unusual in that they were led by young people and they were sparked off in tunisia and in egypt by stories photos videos of young people being beaten up. These things went viral at a time. When state agencies didn't have a response strategy so the fact that they were new was quite important and now a decade later governments have figured this out definitely governments employ hundreds if not thousands of people to monitor social media they have campaign teams and pr agencies. That help maintain sort of an image on social media. They do much more active tracking. Who's saying what in fact several governments use social media as an intelligence tool to figure out who's meeting who and who knows which opposition leaders are our networking each other. It's very much a tool for social control has as much as it is for for social protests these days

Phillip Howard Middle East Nigeria Russia Oxford India China Tunisia Twitter Facebook Egypt
The Complicated Relationship Between Blackness and Veganism

Food Heaven Podcast

02:06 min | 6 d ago

The Complicated Relationship Between Blackness and Veganism

"One thing that we have not talked about on this podcast. I don't think is the idea of kind of some people within the black and brown community Who who wanna kind of push for this concept of like vegan eating d. Call your diet Which i understand. Inter i i understand decolonize but i feel like there's a lot of that is misinformed and the language can often be you know. Stop eating meat for black liberation and also lose weight in the process. Can we talk about that just like. How is that unhelpful. Oh my god. So many layers right So it's it's it's a lot to unpack. Yeah see because this is so hard to articulate Just like just like you know to be up front. I feel like anyone who might sympathize with the idea that like the the solution like the first of all. You can't decolonize your diet you know like. That's not a thing like that's not would decolonization means Decolonization is not a metaphor. If anybody needs a reference for that. I can send them a very good article that everybody claims to have read but nobody seems to have read. What article way mom. What article because in the show notes. Also can you just give a brief synopsis of how you cannot recall niger. So decolonization is not a metaphor. That's literally the name okay of the article and it's from eve talk and k wayne yang. We often used the word decolonized to mean that. Like were gonna. We're gonna apply social justice lens to something when that's not really what that means. Decolonization means that. We're giving land back to native peoples like that's that is the definition or it.

Wayne Yang Niger
ACLU Asks Judge to Block Arkansas Trans Youth Treatment Ban

BBC World Service

00:35 sec | 6 d ago

ACLU Asks Judge to Block Arkansas Trans Youth Treatment Ban

"Union is asking a federal judge to block Arkansas's new ban on gender confirming treatments for transgender youth pending the outcome of a lawsuit. The new law also prohibits doctors from referring miners to other providers for treatment. Governor is a Hutchinson's veto of the ban in April was overridden following pleas from pediatrician, social workers and parents concern about the risk of depression and suicide. The artist Arkansas Legislature overrode the veto of the ban in April. The ban is set to take effect at the end of July.

Arkansas Hutchinson Arkansas Legislature Depression
Under-Representation in Robotics and AI Is Solvable

Solvable

01:38 min | 6 d ago

Under-Representation in Robotics and AI Is Solvable

"So when i was a kid me and my sister got left at home. A lot during the summers which meant that. We watched a lot of reruns on television and one of the things that we watched. All the time was the biotic woman. And i heard that that was a favorite of yours as well Although i will tell you the bionic woman. When i was young was current. I'm sure you must have saw the reruns just just But yeah that was. That was my favorite. And i think i was always into anything that was science fiction. Everything from you know. Battle star galactica star chas the original. Yeah the original. Not the ones that they make over and over and over again thank then it was all of it was like new. It was like fascinating so the bionic woman. Was this. show where this. This woman was horribly mangled in like this horrific car accident accident. She would have died right and instead the doctors took her and rebuilt her basically added the banning parts and she would go around saving the world which was was. It was awesome but she was humid. She had a personality. That was the nice thing about that. Just like she wasn't exactly a robot she was a robot it was actually. If you think about it there was only a few scifi shows that showed women in a positive superhero light one was wonder woman and was rounding radnich women

Shima Baradaran Baughman of the University of Utah on the Police Myth

The Academic Minute

01:41 min | 6 d ago

Shima Baradaran Baughman of the University of Utah on the Police Myth

"The movement for black lives as forces societal reckoning about the relationship between police and disaffected communities and has given tracks into removing police funding nationwide. The literature is focused on critiquing the mistrust of police among communities of color due to abuse and marginalization with remedies including police training to encourage treating people with dignity policing literature fails to fully address a core 'cause police mistrust for people of color in the poor to address. The symptoms of policing failure requires consideration of the purpose of function police. Indeed a core problem is a misunderstanding of policing. That i call the police. The police myth is a twofold belief that our primary function of police crime control and that police all crimes. Regularity reliance on the police. Smith may provide societal comfort but as made it difficult to address basic policing failure without understanding. What police actually do and their relationship with crime is impossible to reimagine policing the police crime in large part contribute to the distrust between police and community color creating a cycle where people refused to report to police and police fail to solve crimes. American policing costs hundred fifteen billion per year. It is worth evaluating. This number in terms of the public service received as solving serious crimes only constitutes a tiny fraction of police function. my research demonstrates that police only solve serious felony crimes about twenty percent of the time while the police defunding movement is gaining support. Critics claim that is highly impractical and that reducing policing would increase crime but if police are neither allocating a large portion of their time to addressing crime nor solving most major crimes would defunding police actually increase crime. If this is the moment to consider police reform a meaningful dismantling of the police myth could be part of the solution

Smith
What Does Bill 96 Mean for Quebec?

The Big Story

01:18 min | Last week

What Does Bill 96 Mean for Quebec?

"Jordan rawlings. this is the big story to lead. Ramona's is a montreal based journalist also opinion columnist for cult montreal where she looked at the good the bad and the ugly of bill ninety-six tula. Hey how are you jordan. I'm doing well. Thank you for taking the time. I wanna ask you maybe just to start For those of us outside of quebec can you give us some context for the ever evolving Language legislation this is. There's a lot of historical connotations here. Right oh god where to begin will basically bill ninety. Six is is an upgraded. Its what is supposed to be an upgrade to Kickbacks language law otherwise known as bill went to one you know which just celebrated fifty one years. I think of existence Which aimed to establish french as the common long language in quebec and fifty plus years later the current government The the cue has basically decided because of issues with french because of the constant kind of fragility of the language and they feel that French is eroding vay needed to upgrade they needed to strengthen that legislation that piece of legislation. So here we are now with bill ninety six

Jordan Rawlings Bill Ninety Montreal Ramona Quebec Jordan Bill
How to Empower People to Solve Their Own Legal Problems

TED Talks Daily

02:11 min | Last week

How to Empower People to Solve Their Own Legal Problems

"Start by telling you a story about danielle. When she was a senior in college. Danielle's dad passed away which left her mom with no way to support herself so danielle had to drop out of college and pick up. Three jobs is a barista a bar. Tender nicole washer altogether three jobs pay danielle twenty three thousand dollars per year which wasn't a whole lot but allowed her to feed her mom and keep a roof over their head and for danielle. That was enough but early one morning when danielle was driving home from one of her jobs. A deer in front of her car. She swerved off the road and crashed into a bar. And then y'all doesn't remember exactly what happened next but when she woke up in hospital a few hours later a doctor told her that she had damaged her brain stem and c one vertebrae now. The good news is that danielle was gonna leave the hospital alive. The bad news is that danielle had fifty five thousand dollars in medical bills now. Did y'all tried so hard for the next two years to try and pay back that debt but it was impossible. It was impossible for danielle to pay back fifty five thousand dollars in medical bills. Earning just twenty three thousand dollars per year. She felt trapped. One freak accident put danielle on the verge of homelessness hunger poverty. And when you're in daniel shoes bankruptcy is a lifeline. It's a powerful legal tool that allows you to relieve your debt and reenter the economy medical emergency job loss divorce. These are financial shocks. That could happen to any of us and when you're living paycheck to paycheck and don't have a whole lot of savings like so. Many americans. a financial shock can ruin your life. Bankruptcy gives you a second chance. Then you'll want to go find a bankruptcy lawyer. She like so many others filing for bankruptcy learned that it was going to cost her fifteen hundred dollars. She can have that kind of money. I mean what a cruel irony in america it costs you fifteen hundred dollars to tell the court that you have no money when you walk into a court everyone from the judge clerk the form themselves will tell you to go find a lawyer no matter how little money you have

Danielle Nicole Washer Daniel America
Sex Trafficking in America

Safety Chick Rules

01:57 min | Last week

Sex Trafficking in America

"So seth. I've been was it a couple a couple of days ago. I was reading the news. And i came across this story. That was horrifying. You know the and i'm going to read a little bit of the article to you. But what do you think what. What's your perception of sex trafficking and human trafficking. Like how big of a problem do you think that is here in the united states just curious because i know you because because it's been recently i think you're gonna touch on. It's been in the news recently so and also knowing paul viola. Our friend and colleague working with you to i know that it's it's a serious issue. But and i know that the majority of people ask anyone they think it's a third world country issue and not not a united states. Exactly right i mean. I really do feel when i'm out there talking to people when i bring up sex trafficking. It's it conjures up You know third world countries or other countries or you know what's been in the news maybe You know Nail salons and massage parlors. And things like that which is very real and it is very prevalent here in the united states. But i want to read you. And yes i know glasses. Give me any crap This this article sex trafficking stats okay. Sex trafficking continues to plague our society. Nowadays investigators are seeing more activity can get this homeland. Security says trafficking numbers have gone up during the pandemic predators are doing everything they can draw their victims draw in their victims and the number one source of contact is social media.

Paul Viola United States Seth
The Real-Life Superheroes Helping Syrian Refugees

TED Talks Daily

01:54 min | Last week

The Real-Life Superheroes Helping Syrian Refugees

"A. Let me tell you a different story my story. I'm a filmmaker and reveal g from a small village in northern syria in our village growing up there was no stable supply. We spend most of our nights are on gas lanterns and build stories about syrian mythological super beings that protected. The vulnerable was a boy who loved stories of superheroes but later on these stories shifted to tells of heroes that my family has to face and are the assad dictatorship. One of my uncles was killed under torture. My father had to burn his books before they were even published in order to protect us from the reaching. He burned his dreams along with his books. These stories must not be forgotten. My parents insisted the stories stopped being a best time. It's became a form of resistance. I studied filmmaking focused on the commentaries commentary. Filmmaking became my way of resistance. I commend stories of syrian hobos. Assad regime and an elephant when the revision started. I was arrested tortured and sexually assaulted when i was released. I left syria a west traumatized and tried to end my life. My wife stood by me and held me hang onto life but as a result i stopped making films

Syria Assad
Why Hiring Canadians With Disabilities Is a Competitive Advantage

The Big Story

01:54 min | Last week

Why Hiring Canadians With Disabilities Is a Competitive Advantage

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Katie lafferty as a producer on employable maecenas season. Four of which launches today wednesday. June ninth at eight pm eastern on tv. Hey katie hi there. Thanks for joining us. Why don't you start on. Because i am kind of ashamed to admit. I didn't know the show existed until i learned about season four and and i've watched a couple episodes now and it's really insightful. And i just i guess. I'm glad that it's a hit now. But i want to know where the idea came from at the beginning and what you guys were trying to achieve absolutely so. I think it was fine years ago that we started in development on this series. And it's actually a bbc format series that we brought over to canada with a m. I and so you know. I think the main focus of the series Were were following people with disabilities and neurological conditions. Who are trying to enter the workforce all of our job seekers have unique talent and abilities but have had a really hard time getting their foot in the door and so the real purpose of this series is to educate employers in the general public on. What is a very untapped job market of of people who could bring so much to the workforce can you give me some examples of how Underappreciated and underemployed employed people who are neuro divergent or people with disabilities are absolutely. I mean i think. I noticed it the most when i started casting for this show. It was one of those situations where i thought okay. Let's let's see if we can pass this show. who knows. It's a really really interesting and important concept but are we going to be able to find job seekers who really fit the description

Jordan Heath Rawlings Katie Lafferty Katie BBC Canada
Kimberly Crinshaw on Intersectionality

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

02:04 min | Last week

Kimberly Crinshaw on Intersectionality

"I'm just going to dive right in with how intersection analogy can help us understand why we're not done now. There's a lot of nonsense circulating around about what intersection analogy is particularly from. Its critics. they say it's a religion is an identity politics on steroids. My new favorite. It's an assault on straight white men. You know what i think about that now. All of these ideas about what intersection now. The is completely off. The mark when intersection alley is is a prism. It's a framework. It's a template for seeing and telling different kinds of stories about what happens in our workplaces what happens in society and to whom it happens now. Some part of why. We're not done is predicated on what we haven't been able to see what what's not remembered. The stories that are not told so intersection training wheels to get us to where we need to go. It's glasses high index glasses to help a see the things we need to see now in all honesty when i fashioned the term some thirty years ago i thought of it as remedial education for judges who didn't get to see didn't seem to understand what was happening to black women. They didn't seem to understand that. Black women can experienced race discrimination in a different way than black men do or they didn't understand black women can experience gender discrimination in a different way than white women did image. A graph reach story was a person who understood that problem claiming that she experienced discrimination as a black woman but earlier and the court seem to agree the since the employer hired black people and they hired women even though the black people that they hired were all men and the women they hired. We're all white. That couldn't prove discrimination.

Trudeaus Liberals Promised to End the Blood Ban

The Big Story

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Trudeaus Liberals Promised to End the Blood Ban

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Justin length is an investigative reporter. The canadian journalist who has been covering the blood banned for how long now just Like six years. Maybe longer many many enough years too many years i think. Why don't we just start at the beginning For people who heard this of like a talking point in a political fight over the last decade or so. How old is the blood band. And where did it come from right so you you go back about four decades in and you've fair confronted with the really disquieting reality of the blood of the tainted blood scandal right. You had cases the hundreds of cases across the country Where folks received blood transfusions that were not adequately screened that ultimately led to sero conversion for hiv that ultimately impacted them With other new hepatitis diseases as well as other infectious diseases And it was a national scandal. It was absolutely shattered. People's illusions about the blood system a better health system right it. It it fundamentally you know weakened trust in a meal what governments ought to be doing to ensure the health and safety of people who rely on government services so you go back to that point and you realize the sort of risks inherent in what protecting the blood supply you know actually means and unfortunately from that you know there was a good thing came from that. Which was we actually had a conversation about what Ensuring safety of the blood supply actually means but on the flip side you also started to see This really sort of reactionary and knee-jerk blame placed on the queer community in canada. Who of course have historically faced higher hiv rates of that other

Jordan Heath Rawlings Justin Length Hepatitis Diseases Canada
Essential Questions to Ask Your Future Self

TED Talks Daily

02:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Essential Questions to Ask Your Future Self

"We need to talk about the empathy gap so the empathy gap is why we sometimes hate on people on the other end of the political spectrum. Or it's five. Maybe we shrug our shoulders. The problems of those who look different or live different or love different than we do. It's why we almost certainly aren't doing enough to protect our kids and grandkids from climate change. Its can just be difficult sometimes to care about people that we don't know or to do right by people who don't even exist yet. But what if. I told you that that same empathy gap can also get in the way of us doing right by ourselves in our twenties and beyond and before i go on let me say that everything about to talk about also applies to all of us out there who are well beyond twenties but for a little bit of background in twenty thirteen. I gave a talk about. Why are twenty matter. So it's about almost ten years later. I'm still a clinical psychologist. Who specializes in twentysomethings. But these days the twentysomethings i ac- they know their twenties matters so they want to get there from right. They wanna move to the right city. They wanted to take the right job. They wanna find the right partner. They wanna have the right answers well. The bad news is there are no right answers. There are no right answers for where you should live or where you should work or how you should settle down. These are what are called large world problems because there are just too many unknowns now app no algorithm know. Any of them can ever solve these problems. Or answer these questions for you but the good news is because there are no right answers. There are no wrong answers. There are only your answers. So you're twenties or a great time to listen to be honest with yourself. There a great time to have a conversation with your future. Self so philosopher. Derek parfitt said we neglect our future selves because of some sort of failure of belief or imagination.

Derek Parfitt
Race and Research: The Gaps in Health

After The Fact

01:32 min | 2 weeks ago

Race and Research: The Gaps in Health

"Matters because we have really good evidence that when you have diverse groups of people working on various problems you end up with better answers more creativity more innovation so it's really important to us to make sure that the workforce that is trying to solve the nation's health problems is a truly diverse workforce. So how did the national institutes of health begin to even discuss. This problem would begin to work on this problem. Is this a recent thing or is there have been a recognition. Maybe overtime about the need for this. So the national institutes of health has focused on issues with regards to diversity for a while now their policies in place to assure that there's diversity of participants in various clinical studies in twenty lovin When donna ginther and colleagues did an analysis of the success rates of various groups that are usually underrepresented in science getting grants from h. What's called or one equivalent grants. They found that the various groups tended not to have the same success rate as non hispanic whites and in fact when you controlled for all sorts of factors english as a first language education. An institution a person can from that. There was a persistent disparity in receipt of these are one equivalent grants for african americans and blacks

National Institutes Of Health Donna Ginther
Ben Burgis on His Book 'Canceling Comedians While the World Burns

Blocked and Reported

02:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Ben Burgis on His Book 'Canceling Comedians While the World Burns

"Then i know. I know that we could because of your burning hatred of bernie sanders. We could talk about this for hours. But instead you have a new book out. Called cancelling comedians while the world burns a critique of the contemporary left. The only reason. I could come up with that. You would critique the left is that you are a reactionary. Is this true now. More or less i think. Yeah that's that's my main criticism of the left in the in the book That they advocate things that That i don't want you know that that i would that i would prefer we continue to have private health care. And you know that the united states continue to fight wars all around the world and so on and And my by criticism. The left is that their way to effective. Read about so this goals as we've seen so i mean i did feel slightly attacked by your book because if people laughed stopped paying attention and obsessing over dumb bullshit online that would really hurt blocking reporter. Did you consider that at all. No no i didn't. I guess should actually be like one of those health care. Plans that includes like transition job retraining for people who worked for private insurance trainers to become like coal miners in west. Virginia that's right. Well it's a really good book and obviously tied into a lot of teams. We talk about on this show to me. One of the most important themes is this idea of like a leftism or the left as like a mass movement versus clubhouse when you mean when you talk about people seem to treat it as a clubhouse so in thinking about a lot of the different pathologies the left that i'm criticizing in the book which you know which would certainly includes an extreme eagerness to For for people to denounce each other over trivial differences like certain kinds of strange performative radicalism.

Bernie Sanders United States Virginia
Who Judges the Judges?

TED Talks Daily

01:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Who Judges the Judges?

"Your room you don't want to be in something bad has happened. There's a stranger in a suit with your future in their hands. A judge four years ago. That judge was me the people looking up at me then had no choice but to trust me but what had i done to deserve it. Ustralia judicial system operates under a shroud of mistake. Which fans off. Tough questions like this but you will have the right to ask how people like me. Prepare for the job of judging and you may not feel comfortable with the answers. The system needs to change to set the scene first. Let's think about public confidence judges in australia and not elected yet. The power they wield is immense openly. We trust the system because we believe that judges generally get it right if we lose that belief. We risk unbalancing the whole constitution. But we live in a time when blind faith and elites is eroding fast judges are increasingly vulnerable to the why question. Why do you deserve the power we have given you. And so they should be sickened. It's fundamental that judges have to be seen as independent doing their jobs without fear or favor to avoid any pressure from the government of the day judges have higher salaries which can never be cash and they can't be fired for what they say or do and lace. They obviously corrupt ahmed.

Australia
Where Is the 'Me Too' Movement for Mothers?

Woman's Hour

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Where Is the 'Me Too' Movement for Mothers?

"The metoo. For mother's eliot glazer author of motherhood a manifesto shines me now with progress ago author of motherhood on the choices of being a woman eliane. If i start with you morning morning at you write about adrian richards. Distinguishing between motherhood is an experience and motherhood as an institution. I thought we could start it. Can you explain what what you're saying with that and what we need to understand. Yes this is from her. Nineteen seventy six but go woman born in. It was pretty important distinction. She said that mother doesn't isn't institution is how it's Managed by society in the ways in which society makes motherhood harder than it needs to be as an experience. And i think that that that still the case. If in fact motherhood is anything even harder now than it was in seventy so until about all the different ways in which women are policed in pregnancy that choices not respects in childbirth Isolated off to birth than how often forced to give up around When it's impossible to reconcile motherhood with say. I think it's important to separate out the experience. Any institution because that enables mothers to challenge the conditions of doing without that being read as criticism of their children or an erasing of the joyful aspects of being a mother not appreciating. How lucky you are to be a mother and in that really. I think silences mothers complaints but if they can say look. I love being a mother at least most of the time. But that set. Somehow motherhood is managed by society. enables women. She make the complaints challenge. The conditions in which motherhood is organized.

Eliot Glazer Eliane Adrian Richards
Social Isolation Is a Solvable Problem for People With Disabilities

Solvable

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Social Isolation Is a Solvable Problem for People With Disabilities

"My mom found an atari really really poor My mom money. She had bought me a used. Atari hurry from one of those used electronic stores and we ended up playing like burger master. Something you like. Put a burger together. When you're talking about burger type. I remember it now but it was. It wasn't adorable piece of machinery at the time. Nintendo was already out. We couldn't afford one of those She was just really thrilled. That i was able to operate the controller at all the earliest. When i played with super mario one and duck of course and then i had super mario three. But i never got super mario to. It's always bothered me. I played all of those although we have to touch on the fact that we shot ducks snowing. Dog often up in the middle your screen. And he's like my dad. We get angry. It'd be like why is that talk like right next to the tv. Tried to shoot the so to be clear. No dogs were harmed in the making of duck video game. not that i know of a outlet. You were diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy. Can you tell me a little bit about how it impacted you in gaming so spinal. Muscular atrophy is a sister disease to a less. So if you saw stephen hawkins' have you know anybody who is afflicted with a less than you kind of have an idea what i'm going through in my life. So essentially my muscles are getting weaker and weaker as time goes on where ellis is much quicker in its development. Sf can last for your entire lifetime. So you could live an entire seventy eighty ninety years And it might never take your life or you might only live for a couple of months past when i was born. I wasn't able to crawl like a child is supposed to x. amount of milestones. My mom's thirty noticing that was using my arms to pull myself around. My lower legs weren't pushing. They should've been

Mario Atari Stephen Hawkins Nintendo Spinal Muscular Atrophy Ellis
White Women, Listen Up!

Immigrantly

01:41 min | 3 weeks ago

White Women, Listen Up!

"I am thrilled to have you on again side. I know it's been a minute. And as much as the world has gone through the wringer and shifted these last few months. I'm sure you've experienced a lot of changes as well. I believe it was early. March when you and i spoke rate And at the time. We had regina as well. And i remember being so impressed with your radical honesty how you would unafraid to call out racism and also admitted to the nuances. It plays at the person level. So today what i want to do is i want you to build on the conversation further. And maybe we go in uncharted directions. Sure and i'm going to put on the spot now and snippet from your last episode. Take listen when. I ran for congress. The a pat the asian american. You know hack in. Dc has a big gala every spring and they invited all the asian americans for office and they're like eight of us running for congress at the time except for me. They didn't invite me. Do you know who invited me. And i went and they all died. Andrew yang invited me to go as his date so andrew and they all were like holy fuck. She came like and i was told by more than one person. There that they feel like my platform is too radical and alienating and do you know why it's because i had black lives matter on my website and i was told specifically to take that down because it's too alienating to a lot of asian people

Regina Congress Andrew Yang Andrew
Climate Change Will Displace Millions. Here's How We Prepare

TED Talks Daily

01:47 min | 3 weeks ago

Climate Change Will Displace Millions. Here's How We Prepare

"It was about two years after hurricane. Katrina that i. I saw the louisiana flood maps. These flood maps are used to show land loss in the past and land loss. That is to come on this particular day at a community meeting. These maps were used to explain. How a thirty foot tidal surge that accompanied hurricane katrina could flood communities like mine and south louisiana and communities across the mississippi and alabama coast. It turns out that the land we were losing was our buffer from the c. I volunteered to interact with the graphics on the wall and in an instant my life change for the second time in two years. The graphic showed massive land loss in south louisiana and in encroaching see but more specifically the graphics showed the disappearance of my community and many other communities before the end of the century. I wasn't alone at the front of the room. I was standing there with other members of south louisiana's communities black native poor. We thought we were just bound by temporary disaster recovery but we found that we were now bound by the impossible task of ensuring that our communities would not be erased by sea level rise due to climate change. Friends neighbors family my community. I just assumed it would always be their land trees marsh by us. I just assumed that it would be there. As it had been for thousands of years i was wrong

South Louisiana Alabama Coast Katrina Hurricane Hurricane Katrina Louisiana Mississippi
Why and How Are Lawbreaking Gun Dealers Being Protected?

Red, Blue, and Brady

02:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Why and How Are Lawbreaking Gun Dealers Being Protected?

"So let's jump right in. Josh and. Chris can have you to introduce yourselves. Sure hi everyone. My name's josh. Scharf legal counsel and director of programs. Here at brady i lead are combating. Crime guns initiatives. I i've been on a couple previous episodes but it's nice to reintroduce myself to everyone. Yes and now you're proud owner of peleton which means you're up there with christian in terms of guests. I am proud owner of a peleton. But i wouldn't exactly call myself very good at it yet. You'll you'll get there. You'll get there. I thought at least like six brady people on the podcast. talk about peleton's is just. I want you in the club to josh. That's and chris. How about yourself. You don't have to share what workout equipment zone. But if he would introduce yourself to everyone. I have a ceo in my house named sophia brown. My daughter your insisted several months ago that we purchased peleton and so yes. I have joined the club to. She's much more likely be found on the peleton than i am late I can understand the addiction for sure. And i'm chris. Brown president brady. I think i'd love to just start if we can at at school house rock level. Here you know what. What role does the atf. Actually play in terms of having oversight in the gun industry. You know why. What is that even look like gang. The eighth yeah has jurisdiction to insects gun dealers across the country. Josh talk about the numbers of those dealers but we have tens of thousands of guns gun dealers across the country. Who are some are small operations what we call mom and pop operations and some have retail operations. That are very very marging. Part of what they do is they sell. Consumer goods in some of those goods include guns vast array of different kinds of operations and atf. Is the agency charged with inspecting those

Peleton Josh Scharf Sophia Brown Brown President Brady Chris ATF
Why Online Conspiracies Arent Just an QAnon Problem

The Big Story

01:52 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Online Conspiracies Arent Just an QAnon Problem

"Why don't you start for those of us who didn't watch the infamous jeopardy episodes By setting the scene Who is kelly donohue and what was kind of happening leading up to the moment that we're gonna start with You know. I never talked to kelly. He's a he's a state employee in massachusetts. I think were on bank regulation and visually. He's a big balding white dude with a wearing a red tie and blue blazer in you know he was sort of on a bit of a role on jeopardy. He had one in fact three in a row which is pretty good. And i think with you know. Set to take home ballpark hundred thousand dollars. And in. after he won the first time on the second show he puts when they announced that he has already won one. He holds up a finger for once in the second time. On the beginning of the third show they not suggests already won twice. He holds up two fingers and then on the fourth show after his won three times. They nazis one three times in the up three fingers and what happened right away. Well he helped the fingers in kind of a weird way. He folded in his index finger in his thumb. Any kind of held them across his chest and a handful of people. A couple dozen people on twitter said that's weird. That's some kind of secret you know. White supremacist hand gesture. Or is that cunanan sign or what is that. It was a weird way of holding his hand and jeopardy contestants who are very earnest and very focused on jeopardy have their own private admission only facebook group only for contestants which is like a pretty cool honored to be part of. I think if you've been on the show and in that group people started messaging the moderators like. We've got to do something about this. But they kept it all just in messages to the moderators. Because there's an iron clad rule that you don't post about that night's episode until eleven because you don't want to spoil it for the west coast

Kelly Donohue Cunanan Kelly Massachusetts Twitter Facebook West Coast
Netanyahu's war on Hamas [TEST]

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

04:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Netanyahu's war on Hamas [TEST]

"Hello and welcome to the may twenty twenty one podcast from the moment diplomatic. My name's joel. Miller and my guest. This month is shall end. Download a jerusalem based journalist. Who for five decades has been covering israel on the wider middle east. Charles's many publications include a biography of Jamea and most recently a book reflecting on his years as jerusalem correspondent and this month's edition of the paper he's written about the rise and rise of the israeli right. He argues that. The israeli left has consistently failed to understand the uncompromising nature of netanyahu's project despite growing evidence when i called charles in jerusalem a few days after a ceasefire between israel and hamas was announced. I began by asking him what had struck him passionately in the past two weeks. To tell you the truth sweat Rarely surprised me was getting phone. Calls from people in france including jewelries. Think what happened. Everything was quiet for years now. Suddenly everything blows up lays now a new war and what happened with palestinian. Ever seen what quiet. Nothing quite. The fire was ready to burn all the elements where here to have an explosion of violence. No basic problem was his. Netanyahu will for ten years had as his policies to make military agreement cease-fires under the conditions that he would let Qatar bring shoot cases of cash. Do gaza do finances hamas and on the other side in the west bank. No political agreement. Everything is stuck and Settlements are growing within sixty percent of the west bank so everything was just growing growing growing until it grew up so in a sense. You're saying it wasn't a surprise. Did it feel like a repetition or does it feel different this time. Listen i was expecting at some point in time this would happen. I was surprised with the rapidity with which It it became a full scale war between the gaza and israel. This when we're very fast. So this should worry. I believe the policy makers in israel ended order abroad. It dallas sense of deja. Netanyahu has been prime minister since two thousand nine and so i know you've studied the israeli right as part of part of your long career as a journalist. Is it possible to say what netanyahu's endgame is is that clear. Yes preventing the creation of a palestinian State Wrong side israel and to stay in power so vilo survival political survival netanyahu and his old firmly believe the only he has the ability to protect and save the jewish people in israel and abroad so he staying power is of the utmost importance. This is why also he believes and these fighting role judiciary processes that brings him to court for corruption. And so. how do you read. Netanyahu's personal position. Today after the last the events of the last ten days given what you've said about the legal charges that he's facing and the fact that he hasn't been able to form a government for the fourth time. First of all the round of violence between israel and hamas for the cinci came back to power in two thousand nine. Netanyahu has very coaches now to get into full-scale war nut with his better in journals. Not with us is about self Of violence in for example. The two thousand fourteen. This happened without the netanyahu.

Israel Jamea Netanyahu Jerusalem Hamas Charles West Bank Gaza Joel Middle East Miller Qatar France Dallas
What Farmers Need to Be Modern, Climate-Friendly and Profitable

TED Talks Daily

02:07 min | 3 weeks ago

What Farmers Need to Be Modern, Climate-Friendly and Profitable

"With me today. Is beth ford. The ceo of land-o-lakes a farming cooperative that works across the united states and in dozens of countries around the world. And she's gonna share with us her vision about how to create a better future for farmers. That's both environmentally and economically sustainable. Hi thank you so much for being here face for the invitation. I'm looking forward to the conversation. Let's first talk about the broadband issue. At how big of a problem is this. And how does it affect the farming community. Both as as you said as families and as businesses so the estimates have been that eighteen million americans lack broadband access. Fourteen million are in rural america. Now having said that the broadband. I'm trying to remember what the name of the organization is did a study and they actually say the numbers more like forty two million and the reason is the is inaccurate. So what could happen is let's have a seven eleven and a town in that has wifi or broadband access because they laid a line it would show up on the map though that largely has broadbent and it does not in so it's a significant issue. Think about the education of your children. I know you have three. I have three and they're you know many of them were doing remote schooling will. What's happening on the farm. This is legitimately. what's occurring. Is that the teacher from the town. Is driving paper homework out to the farms to give them the homework so that they can continue to go to school and and that's just one example of many and so this is a major challenge because if we don't have basic wiring we can say we. We need like a nineteen thirties rural electric initiative where we go across the country. And we make this. This should be a right. This should be something that is a basic like mail delivery electrcity. This should not be Just for those who have and the scale of it is estimated to be eighty to one hundred billion dollars to close this gap but the challenge of that is that You get the funding and then how is it implemented

Beth Ford America
A Terrifying Medical Mystery in New Brunswick

The Big Story

01:58 min | 3 weeks ago

A Terrifying Medical Mystery in New Brunswick

"This is the big story. Amanda coletta covers canada for the washington. Post hey amanda hi jordan. Can you begin by telling me about allier. Moreau and what he does share so dr ali muraro is an urologist hospital in moncton new brunswick and he is now sort of the lead person who is treating people in this cluster And also sort of leading the investigation into what is causing it when you say cluster. Maybe back up a bit and tell us what's happening out there. What are they looking at. So officials in new brunswick and federal officials have identified. What is being called the new brunswick cluster of neurological syndrome of unknown cause These are cases of a sort of mysterious neurological syndrome. And we can discuss sort of the symptoms shortly But the cases are mostly in the moncton area in the acadian peninsula. Though officials have identified to the public which specific towns are areas have cases so far there are forty eight cases under investigation. Six people have died though there still some testing being done to determine sort of definitively whether this mysterious syndrome was the cause of those stats. The youngest person in the cluster is eighteen. The oldest is eighty-five. The cases are split evenly between men and women. This subjects for most of the people in the cluster started in two thousand eighteen. Two thousand nineteen and two thousand twenty but at least one case was identified sort of Retrospectively last year and that person sort of had symptoms while before that so. What

Neurological Syndrome New Brunswick Amanda Coletta Amanda Hi Jordan Dr Ali Muraro Moncton Moreau Acadian Peninsula Washington Canada
The Power of Justice Centered Parenting With Rachel Alva

Beyond Picket Fences

02:13 min | 3 weeks ago

The Power of Justice Centered Parenting With Rachel Alva

"I neo me. I'm andy how are you good. how are you doing. I'm good good good. Well we are very excited to have rachel here today. Hi how are you hi. i'm doing well. Thank you so much for having me. We're so where would you like your story to begin before. I jump into my story. I liked start by sharing. That i'm calling in from the stolen land of the coast salish peoples also known as the pacific northwest. And i say this to thank and honor those who have for thousands of years protected and cared for the land but now sustains me and also to draw attention to the reality that none of us were born into a culture of justice. Sometimes when i share my story there are parts. That might sound like sensational or shocking. But nothing in. My family's history is particularly surprising when you consider that i live in a country that was built on much worse stolen land and the stolen lives of enslaved people and for those most egregious things to have occurred. Violence in harm. Had to be normalized all kinds of ways throughout our culture so my story. I'm going to begin before i was born. There are a lot of people who came before me who shaped my life. But today i want to zoom in on my grandma audrey So audrey was sixteen in the early nineteen sixties. When she got pregnant she married my grandpa. Jimmy who was twenty six at the time. She gave birth to my uncle and then a year later when she was only seventeen. Gave birth to my dad. And i don't know what happened with audrey jimmy or where he was when one night. She went out partying with friends. She left her toddlers at home with her. Mom migrate grandma to babysit and she didn't come home right away when she was expected. how long her mom waited for her to come home but her mom called child protective services and they removed the boys and from what i can tell place them with a family for adoption right away

Pacific Northwest Rachel Andy Audrey Jimmy Audrey Jimmy
Cultural Asymmetry in Music Technology

Solvable

01:40 min | 3 weeks ago

Cultural Asymmetry in Music Technology

"Cultural asymmetry is the fact that music technologies and the way that music is presented and represented tends to lean towards a western conception of what music is rather than be something that is balanced where all musical cultures are on an equal footing in an equally respectful. Way tell me a little bit about your earliest music memories. My earliest musical memory is learning to play the violin in damascus. At seven or eight years old at the time and then we moved to london. I was nine. And then i didn't really have any connection with might arab identity per se or at least the connections were were tenuous at the time but why did notice. Was that the band. Killing joke. released an album in the mid nineties pandemonium on which a very famous lebanese violinist. His name is abu dhabi delile. He played and Particularly there's a track called communion that sound of this freebie heavy industrial music with this violin. This beautiful live on time arabic violin to go over at Really really really got me. It just hit a place in my spirit that i wasn't really aware

Damascus Abu Dhabi Delile London
Top Googled Questions for Christianity: Part Two [TEST]

Lightning Bolts and Leather Jackets

01:42 min | Last month

Top Googled Questions for Christianity: Part Two [TEST]

"What's up everybody. Welcome to lightning bolts and other jackets where we take our concerns and questions about christianity and figure out a kick in the teeth. I'm victories asano your host here. We go. has it gone fan. This is lightning bolts and leather jackets. And we are on part. Two of top googled questions for christianity. If you haven't heard the first episode you can go ahead and go back if you'd like that was more of an introductory episode where we talk about why. We're talking about this. Because when i googled like why does christian or why do christians and if i got a lot of like weird slash interesting top gould questions in my like autofill. I thought they were great questions attack on labels leather jackets. Because that's what we do. Is we take questions. That are weird or hard or people. Don't want to answer. Maybe don't think about answering and we address them so last week was. Why do christians celebrate easter and today is why just christian music all sound the same. I mean i feel like. I could ask that question about any genre like rap or country or pop or whatever but we're going to break this down anyway really quick if you're only listening to one genre or just christian radio that's probably why you think it all sounds the same part of it is like you know different tastes for different people. I mean hymns can be trash to you just like metal cores trashed your grandma. So so keep that in. Mind to be tackled this question. You know not everybody's gonna like your genre of music but that doesn't mean that genre music doesn't have christian artists that are available so we're gonna talk about all this red

Gould
A highlight from What your money habits reveal about you | Robert A. Belle

TED Talks Daily

08:19 min | 21 hrs ago

A highlight from What your money habits reveal about you | Robert A. Belle

"Hey it's least hugh you're listening to. Ted talks daily. How could the way we spend our money. Tell us a lot about our lives. And perhaps our weakness in his talk from the ted global ideas search 2021 accountant. Robert bell looks beyond numbers to reveal the story behind our expenses. What the data shows us can be surprisingly valuable. Today's episode is sponsored by monday. Dot com the challenges that teams face nowadays at work are constantly changing. And that's why monday dot com work. Os is the go-to solution for more than one hundred thousand organizations already. It's a flexible and easy to use platform for any kind of team. It adapts perfectly to the way you work freeing you to focus on the big picture. Monday dot com connects with the tools. Your team already works with it. Automates routine follow ups. And makes you wonder how you manage without it to start your free two week trial. You can go to monday. Dot com. that's m. o. N. d. a. y. Dot com support for ted talks daily comes from. Ibm tailor-made or one-size-fits-all with a hybrid. You don't have to choose. That's why insurers are going hybrid with ibm with watson on a hybrid cloud they can use help predict client needs and get the data. They need to quickly design coverage for each one businesses that want personalization and speed or going with a smarter hybrid cloud using the technology and expertise of ibm. The world is going hybrid with ibm visit. Ibm dot com slash hybrid cloud. I'm going to content with the numbers problem. I mean i'm good with numbers and using them to report what's happening but i'm also concerned with the full story behind those numbers. The part that gets lost in translation the pot. That numbers can't tell the story that goes deeper than mere strategies for saving and earning money and without that story. I don't think i'm doing my job. Well that's why. I've dedicated my career to figure out how my work as an accountant can tell stories about people stories that will ultimately help them improve their lives. Let me explain. It all started when someone told me obsessed with chocolate. And i was like what no not then i wondered. Could i be in. Denial about my own obsession. Was i actually spending a lot of money chocolate but line to it. Well he was a chance for me to test this theory using my accountant lance off. I went truck in mice mundane on chocolate and there it was. I love for chocolate. I was spending about fifty dollars a month on chocolate. Especially in months. When i was overstressed and months when i was overjoyed analyzing might cleanses helped me to understand that i had emotional pattern. Where when i'm struggling or celebrating. I binged on chocolate and struggled with my weight for very long time and i was convinced that my diet was not the problem. I was convinced that it was my lack of effort in excise and certainly not chocolate truck in my spending on chocolate helped me realize that i was afraid of facing myself in the mirror literally and figuratively and i lack the courage to deal with the real problem my diet so i continued to exercise but devoted less time to it and instead shifted my focus and energy towards developing a more healthful diet that year a lost fifty pounds. Our relationship with money represents our relationship with life. The accounting of my own chocolate behavior told me the story of my own denial. I realize that. Perhaps i could also help my clients see what they over looking in their own lives and help them realize their own emotional patterns through their truckin and spending of the expenses so i started to pay close attention to the story behind my clients expenses. That may be hit into them. One of my clients are critical. Canada's was convinced that her personal budget was reasonable and expenses. Justifiable should struggled to build up her savings and i noticed that she had minimal records of her expenses. I suggested to her. Lack of savings could be due to more than just a gap in her financial knowledge and offered to help identify the problem. I encouraged her to stop tracking and charting expenses. After few months have financial records revealed that most of our spending was on expensive clothing and shoes as we sat together. She was genuinely surprised to see. Just how much of a budget was going towards fashion. She remarked will. These purchases honestly. I guess i didn't realize that. She analyzed further and realize that she was buying clothes in an attempt to impress and appear successful to her friends and also when her confidence was low by includes temporarily boosted it. She told me that buying clothing was her attempt to finding meaning in life and feeling valued she site and she's set a goal for herself and her finances six months later she called me to tell me she had saved a bunch of money by reducing spending on shopping and instead choosing to exercise when she felt the urge to shop. She's much happier around her friends. Three years later. Homeownership is on the horizon sometimes. Chattan expenses may not reveal something specific as chocolate addiction or shopping problem but what it reveals can be just as valuable a marketing strategies and upcoming musician needed help with taxes. When i met with her i immediately took note of the fear in her face as she looked through her records and expenses. I checked in with her and she expressed to me that some things in her life didn't quite seem to workout including her relationships. She was afraid of facing how much money she was about to lose. After taxes as we continue talking about our finances she started to notice a connection between a fear of losing money and our failing losing relationships. She went on to tell me that she was afraid of commitment to anyone because she didn't want to get hurt. She expressed that she had not been close to anyone in over seven years because she feared failure. And maybe she might have an avoidance strategy around both have money and her relationships. It's been six years. Since i. I help our cia finances and still consistently keeping up with her spreadsheet ashiq confronted her personal accounted and grew her savings in advance of each tax season. She developed less fear of loss and grew more open to relationships. She tells me that she even had the courage to walk away from a relationship when it's not serving her she recently told me my spreadsheet is basically a story of my life progression and i can see it through the numbers. I believe we can all do this. Type of audit of our own financial behavior and that we can learn surprising things about ourselves through truckin and chat expenses. Here's how number one take a look at your bank statement for the last six months and categorize the expenses by type for more holistic view for example you're spending on shopping versus transport versus entertainment number

IBM Robert Bell Hugh TED Watson Chattan Canada Ashiq CIA
A highlight from Race and Research: Higher Education and Diversity

After The Fact

03:36 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Race and Research: Higher Education and Diversity

"Welcome to after the fact for the pew charitable trusts on dan. Luke this season we've been discussing race and research in this episode. We're going to look at race. And researchers how diverse the scientific community is and what the education system is doing to nurture a new generation of researchers of color are data point for this episode shows the concern according to the pew research center people of color make up thirty. Three percent of the stem workforce many leaders in the field. Say this has to begin to change. Not just because of equity concerns at a time when forty percent of the population identifies as a race or ethnic group other than white but because data shows that more diverse research workforce's lead to better and more useful scientific findings. One institution in particular has become a leader in developing diverse students. The university of maryland. baltimore county. It's a state school in the suburbs of baltimore with about eleven thousand undergraduates more than twenty five hundred graduate students. So there's an international attention for how it engages with students was effective results. I always loved math. Everyone who knows me knows. I get goosebumps doing mathematics. And while the name dr belsky might suggest a certain picture for those who would no. I am african american and grew up in birmingham freeman rebel. Ski has been you president for thirty years. We'll talk with him and you nbc's vice provost and dean katherine cole about how to create a more inclusive and supportive educational environment for all students. Something they say is helping to create a more diverse stem workforce and how their strategies can be duplicated at other schools so today something a little different. A conversation with two guests freeman. Broschi has been the president of the university of maryland baltimore county for nearly three decades. Now i think are also joined by the school's vice provost katherine cole. Before we begin. How about you both introduce yourself and tell us a bit about your background. And what led you into higher education chemical. Let's start with you. I was born in tulsa oklahoma. We didn't stay there very long. we move to the main line of philadelphia and raised there by went to college at the university of delaware and i in biology. They went to the university of maryland. School of medicine. Department of pathology and got a phd in pathology did cancer. Research went to the national cancer institute of the nih and then back to the university of maryland department of pathology as a faculty member. I left the university of maryland after about four or five years and move to University of south florida in tampa and that was the first time i really had an administrative role. I realize the amount of impact that i had on students in a very positive way by changing policy by using those skills that i had as a scientist to problem solve and eventually returned back to maryland At unbc as the vice provost dean but it was really the impact that i could have. That was so important to me and really what was the driver for me to maintain and move into higher and higher administrative roles and freeman. I was always interested in the question. How do i get more kids to be interested in math to love math because most americans don't smile when you say math and so all of

University Of Maryland Baltimore County Dr Belsky Dean Katherine Cole Pew Research Center Broschi Katherine Cole Luke DAN Department Of Pathology Baltimore National Cancer Institute Of T University Of Maryland Departm NBC Birmingham Freeman University Of Delaware Tulsa