International Women's Day

For International Women's Day this year we've put together a playlist of inspirational, enlightening and insightful bursts of audio: From trailblazing women who challenged and changed stereotypes, to world-renowned authors on feminism today and the importance of taking a little time for yourself.

Author Isabel Allende: 'I write about women because I know them so well'

Latina to Latina

02:35 min | 2 months ago

Author Isabel Allende: 'I write about women because I know them so well'

"I write about women because i know them so well. I've been working with women and four women or my lads and surrounded by strong extraordinary women at the people who are really help me in life who have pushed me forward of all. The women don't see men i can mention. Is my grandfather my stepfather. Who became my best friend and my son who is my the pillar of my life but even the husbands have been great to have husbands but But they have not helped me in the in. My journey have been going to a certain extent. You know. I think it is easy to underestimate the primacy of the relationships we have with other women Wants to present women as rivals that we will do anything to get a man even sleep without best friends. Are our sisters motioned or something. That might happen once in a while. And it's a good novel but he real-life women have solidarity. We meant head which i have not been able to do anything in my life without first of all the housekeeper set. Hit me with my children. That i could get out there and have three out there. Because he sanctity women were at home taking care of my children instead of taking care of children that to begin with then my mother in law lived next door when my children were little an adopted grandmother but live with us and then later in my life of course journalists that taught the craft of writing my agent katamon sales who believed in my book. Those other women on today that i have a foundation who inspires my folks women become of the foundation these venerable at risk women who have gone through hell some of them have lost everything including that children and they get back feet and they fight back and they are able not only to hate others with compassion and generosity back to have some kind of joy they can cook insane a dance sometimes so those women's by constant

NBC's Kristen Welker on Improving Equity in the Newsroom

Skimm'd from The Couch

03:30 min | 2 months ago

NBC's Kristen Welker on Improving Equity in the Newsroom

"Brought up something at that. Leads me to buy next topic. Which is diversity in newsrooms and you talked about one thing. That certainly affects that. Which is it pay journalism. It's rough for a long time. You know we. I definitely experienced for for many years but throughout your career. you know. you've been focused on improving newsroom diversity. And we've got a question from one of our each cure. Stacey her question is how does race inform the way you approach your work and i would also just follow up in and out onto say what do you wanna see. More of in order to improve equity in newsrooms. Well first of all. I think about andrea mitchell when you ask this question one of my mentors and what the newsroom looked like when she was here and how far we've come and i talked to her about this all the time. We have come so far from when you know she was. Maybe only one of two women in the dc bureau and now it is such an incredibly diverse place to work when you compare it to where she started our white house. Unit is mostly women. And that's something that were so incredibly proud of. We have a diversity in terms of race as well throughout all of mbc. And i think that. That's something that our president cesar conde has really put a focus on which makes me really proud to work at nbc. To answer the first part of your question though. Like how do i see myself. And how does race play a role in my journalism. I think that first of all. I mean i am a black woman. So i bring that sense and sensibility. That everything that i do. When i walk into work my goal is the same every day which is to make sure that i'm getting information and asking questions on behalf of the american people to give a voice to people who don't have a microphone who aren't sitting in the front row of the briefing room and so my goal doesn't change. I think that it's probably informed. In some instances by who i am how i grew up in the fact that i'm a black woman so for example and i go back to the talk question that i asked during the debate. A lot of people have asked me about that. How did you come up with that. Why did you ask that honestly. That question just came out of me got assigned the debate and then a couple of days later. I sat down and wrote that question. I read it to my husband. And i read it to my debate team with with whom i worked and you know we worked through it. We went through some different versions at some points. We even tossed it out by the way and i. It was really important to me to ask that question. So i was glad that i did. And i give that just as an example of one of the ways in which anyone could have asked that question. It was important for me to that question. I thought because a it was just within me. It was something that i really felt needed to be asked and i wanted to address the issue of race and equity really from like a different standpoint from the standpoint of the fact that so many families across the country see this moment as a moment of crisis and so. That's why i asked that question in that way. And and i do think that having a diversity of perspectives makes journalism

Cesar Conde Andrea Mitchell Stacey MBC White House DC NBC
Carve Out Some YOU Time

Becoming The InfluentialMe

02:10 min | 2 months ago

Carve Out Some YOU Time

"Important thing you can do for yourself is to carve out some time just for you and it's that time when you're supposed to be working and you cheat and you start googling things. I'm not talking about that time. I'm talking about carving out a genuine time saying thirty minutes. That is going to be time for me to have a cup of tea and journal not at night. I mean during the day why because we used to have time for our thoughts. When you're walking into the office when you do you know when you were you know. Having a lunch break you could take a stroll but now that time is sort of just gone because now your lunch break you to make sure people have and maybe homeschooling as well and you know all of these different things so finding that thirty minutes minutes even to spend time with yourself. Maybe it's first thing in the morning when you're against super energized to really spend time on you now i can tell you what to fill that time with if it was up to me. I'd be like yeah. Plan your goals. Make sure you're connecting with people. That can really help you. Create the right but that time is your time if you just want to sit that and breathe in and out and do nothing. It's completely up to you but the most important thing is in order for you to feel energized daily. You need that time. One of the this comes from something that i learned from dance dance talks about how our free time arrest time. Everybody always treats it like it's a reward. You once i do. Will this hard work then. I can rest. But dan says actually. It's the rest time that allows you to do your work so once you've rested then you can do great work not once done great work then. I can messed because that's just sort of shattered. But if you look at it at refueling energizing rejuvenating yourself just by carving out that time feed my only advice in terms of you time is. Don't use it to take information like news or something. Negative really use. It took for something that will give you energy. Even if it's the watching something funny so you can laugh for what something that gives you positive energy and leaves you feeling alive. Maybe don's and just really do something for you in that

DAN DON
Writer Aliette de Bodard Discusses Matriarchies in Fiction

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

03:28 min | 2 months ago

Writer Aliette de Bodard Discusses Matriarchies in Fiction

"The world as we know it is ruled by men but when it comes to fiction writers can choose what power structure they create and how they depicted despite the free rein this allows authors most recently replicate the patriarchy win authors. Do step outside the familiar. Societal structures and present us with matriarchies. What do we see. Aristotle condemned societies. The place women in paula knowing then is gonna caucases for threatening masculine supremacy since then. Men have often used representations of matriarchies as a way to demonstrate that women are incapable of or should not be trusted with holding power thankfully. The tide is turning early. Feminist speculative fiction writers like joanna russ explored all female worlds and pave the way for modern writers to explore more diverse power structures in action as something more than just projected male anxiety one. Such writer is elliott to bought out who. We are very pleased to welcome in joining us. In a discussion of matriarchies in speculative fiction. Thank you so much for joining us elliott. would you like to introduce yourself to ellis. Yes thank you so much for having me here. my name is edzard. I'm an award-winning writer. Of fantasy. and science fiction Most known for the universities which is a vietnamese inflicted space opera and my latest book is fire heart tiger which is a suffolk romantic. Fantasy said i guess you could call it too much rocky awesome and that is exactly why you are here to talk about matriarchies tonight. So first of all. I'll matriarchies only of used to us. As a way to deconstruct all paradise the patriarchy there other things right and they are They have historically existed Day are also very There's been a lot of investment in mostly trying to hide that they've existed or make it so that they were those terrible the stoke in places. Because you know god forbid that women ever been charged with anything But you can trust for instance The vietnamese society before the arrival of the chinese who who subsequently colonized vietnam was very probably some kind of much marcle and or much linear and you could see it in. You can't see anymore in the recorded history but you can see it in the fairy tales and the miss that our cost down where it's very clear. The women hold the power and that lineages passed through the mother instead of being passed through. The father is actually very interesting to look at the texts and go. You get those kinds of archaeological remains within the tax off the dragon. The dragon prince who marries the queen of the mountain. But she's the queen he's just the prince a to me. That's kind of really fascinating to see how it's been thoroughly arrays. Because the received wisdom was that those things just couldn't possibly exist.

Joanna Russ Edzard Elliott Paula Vietnamese Society Ellis Suffolk Vietnam
Rachelle Strawther, Director of Leadership & Training at Gonzaga, on the Importance of Her 'Love Posse'

Taking Her Lead

04:21 min | 2 months ago

Rachelle Strawther, Director of Leadership & Training at Gonzaga, on the Importance of Her 'Love Posse'

"Really excited to share part to with your shell. Strother director of leadership training and development of gonzaga university on taking her lead in the school leadership studies we staff members refer to ourselves as a love posse. There's a funny story about how that happened. Which i won't go into but it came from a realization that what has made us such a strong team over the years we've had people you know Leave the university or come in and join the team. What has made as a strong team is that we truly care for each other and that means that we are willing to speak our truth when we need to and were willing to support each other when people need that support that is what has made us this this love posse and i think that that speaks volumes. In general about how the power of women can create connection and community women at their best. We've community they think they we've togetherness and we have to be able to leverage that and we have to be able to see that opportunity at our worse we can become competitive at our worst we can see each other as Being in the way or as people like you know sometimes women have this mentality of while. There's there's so few spots. And and if she takes this one than i have my own chance and so there can be a competitive spirit to and we have to be very watchful that but at our best women can. We've this sense of connection. I had seen eight. No at were were caregivers. Were nurturers and you can see got in around. The world look at female leaders and the way that they are taking steps to think about the climate change the environment. I love looking at female leaders and around the world and responses to covid nineteen. I talk about strong. Powerful female leadership like for example for the prime minister of new zealand. How that's incredible leadership. The way that she advocates for culture in their their country that takes care of one another. It's been really beautiful to say and so we can do that. Were the effectively but we have to support each other in that role. We have to see each other as it is and his women who can bring each other up and notice competitors not as competitors and that can be hard to do but it's it's important for us to do that so i see it as something that we can leverage just briefly Just wanted to go just a little deeper in your perception. How do women bring about that connection in that nurturing in the collaboration are there particular actions or attitudes or perspectives. If you look at the world around us and and history civilizations you see examples of women coming together to raise children women collectively bringing up their children together is it's it's all over history and we still see this in indigenous communities. That is something that we can can learn from. And i see that spirit in my own group of friends amongst women who simply by reaching out to each other like during kovic. We've had ongoing chats our text messages with women who throughout the day. We'll say hey. I want to pass this along. My gosh you have to see this mean things that will bring giggles. Make us smile but also give us a moment of support and strength when we need it. It's a powerful the touch points that women have with each other to know. I think this is what someone may need at this moment and In our if. I look at our staff team. You know the love posse is called it or we call it. We do things like read books together yesterday. One of our team members said hey can we explore this new book. Let's can we read the new. Jim crow over christmas break and talk about in january. Those kinds of things that we do together because we know that we are better when we learn and grow together.

Strother Gonzaga University New Zealand Jim Crow
How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:55 min | 2 months ago

How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

"Ellen louise. Curtis was born on november fifteenth. Eighteen twenty four in schuylerville new york to henry de curtis electra. Able she was the second of eight children was a farmer and the owner of a men's hat factory family lived a comfortable life made more lively each summer by dramatic influxes of tourists. Each year notable members of society would make their way to nearby. Toga springs ellen. Later wrote that the visitors turned typically dull surroundings into places that present the spectacle of a grand reunion of wealth fashion and beauty out of doors from a young age. Ellen was interested in fashion. after graduating from school. Ellen's father helped her harness her interest into a career via women's shop of her own. The millenary shop was quite successful and after a year. Ellen moved the shop to troy new york. And then to brooklyn in eighteen. Fifty-eight ellen married william jennings demorest a thirty six year old widower with two children. The couple would also have two children of their own a son in eighteen fifty nine and a daughter in eighteen sixty five. The family moved to philadelphia where they ran an emporium. It was there that ellen's career really took off as the story goes ellen and her sister kate or working on a system of dress making when they saw their african american made cutting address pattern out of brown paper ellen was inspired by the idea to create tissue paper patterns of fashionable garments for the home sewer some historians refute that the idea originated with ellen and her maid and instead suggest it was i had by a man who had become ellen's rival ellen's family moved back to new york and began manufacturing patterns. They also opened a women's store on broadway in the fall of eighteen. Sixty ellen and her husband became selling paper patterns and publishing quarterly. Catalog called mirror of ellen. Higher journalist and women's rights advocate jane cunningham croly to work for the publication. The magazine was filled with sewing tips and tricks pictures of accessories. Sheet music poetry and fiction. Each issue included a tissue paper pattern and sewing instructions. The magazine was well timed and circulation. Grew quickly a sewing. Machines were then becoming commonplace in middle class homes the magazine also featured contributors including writers julia. Wardhaugh louisa may alcott and robert louis. Stevenson ellen frequently made strong statements in the magazine and support of women in the workplace. She also took firm stance on domestic abuse prison reform and mental health treatment among other topics as the cadillac business. Thrived ellen and williams brick and mortar store on broadway. Grew to ellen and her sister. Kate adapted foreign styles into patterns and made samples for the store. The store is fashion. Openings became major social events ellen. And william store was also notable for the couple's hiring practices. They hired african. Americans at the store on equal terms as white employees long before integrated workplaces were a norm in eighteen. Seventy six ellen became a founding member of cirrhosis. the first professional women's club in the united states throughout that decade while most businesses were failing ellen and her family continued to do well according to historians up to three million patterns. Were mailed each year but ellen success didn't last forever in the eighteen eighties. Ellen's empire began to decline ellen and william had failed to patent their paper patterns a competitor ebeneezer butterick had done so successfully at first butterick stuck to men's and children's ware but by eighteen sixty seven he'd expanded to women's patterns to ebenezer butterick company remains the center of the paper pattern industry today in eighteen. Eighty five william demerist retired to devote himself to the temperance movement. that year. He ran for lieutenant governor of new york. On the prohibition ticket a decade later in eighteen ninety five he died that same year allen suffered a stroke and was left bedridden. She moved into the hotel renaissance new york where she died of a cerebral hemorrhage on august tenth. Nine eight she was seventy three years old ellen. Louise demerist took her love of fashion and made it accessible. To the everyday woman in revolutionizing the fashion industry she also committed herself to the betterment of opportunities for both white and black women though she failed to patent patterns. Her impact is still apparent today.

Ellen Ellen Louise Schuylerville Henry De Curtis Electra Toga Springs William Jennings Demorest New York Jane Cunningham Croly Wardhaugh Louisa Robert Louis Stevenson Ellen The Magazine Curtis Williams Brick William Store Brooklyn Alcott Kate Philadelphia
Can Claressa Shields Make Women's Boxing Must-See TV?

ESPN Daily

03:30 min | 2 months ago

Can Claressa Shields Make Women's Boxing Must-See TV?

"Michael thanks so much for joining me again man. Yeah it's great to be back again twice in a little over a month of pretty honored at this point. Michael rothstein covers boxing for espn and is behind the scenes. Look at clarisa. Shield is journey to. This moment is out now on. Espn dot com. Well michael we are honored to have you back on the show as well because you have this piece. You just reported on clarisa shields. Who is the biggest star in women's boxing. Maybe ever and her event coming up tomorrow night. it's being called superwomen. Some are also calling it. Her story play on history. But i need you to explain to me. What exactly it is that makes all of this so historic well. It's a couple of things. Pablo i is. This clarisa shields is the headliner on a pay per view card and there hasn't been a women's fight. Headlining a paper view card. In twenty years. We're talking last time it happened. Was layla alley and jackie. Frazier light and I don't think anyone listening to this. Podcast probably would remember watching that fight because it's been that long but they went one step further and not only. Is it her headlining. This is a car completely full of women's fights there's four fights on the card and this is going to be friday in her hometown of flint michigan in front of a little under. Maybe two hundred fans because that's what michigan is allowing at this point in this audience is going to have to come through paper view and this is again for classes. Shields and for promoter mostly because this hasn't been done before so there's no metrics on this there is no read on buys would be good or bad all of this is her taking a big bet on herself and who should be fighting. She's fighting marie eve to care who is also undefeated and they feel like. It's going to be one of the best fight in women's boxing this year and probably the best fight. They could have made for clarisa shields. And that's one of the challenges. Foreclosure shields right is. She is so good that it's tough to find opponents that are worthy of are very similar in some ways to. What can alvarez going through on the men's side if you watch that fight on saturday night because they are most just dominant so there are a lot of ingredients their them going to bite into but first off. When was the last time we even saw clarisa shields in the ring so the last time we saw her was january twenty twenty and that was against ivana hobbies in and she won a unanimous decision. Not twin make story the fastest fighter men or female to win titles in three divisions and choruses shields is plan was to fight for times last year. This fight against murray you care was initially scheduled for may ninth covid and did that so then almost immediately once boxing started to maybe possibly come back her and her team wanted to be one of the first fighters back. They went to their partner at the time showtime and they said hey we would like to be on an early card but it just never happened. She had dates in september. She had dates in october. Then she was told. Hey you're not gonna fight on showtime at all in two thousand and twenty.

Clarisa Shields Boxing Michael Rothstein Clarisa Layla Alley Flint Michigan Espn Pablo Frazier Michael Jackie Shields Michigan Marie Alvarez Ivana Murray
The Origins of the Honey Trap

Female Criminals

01:24 min | 2 months ago

The Origins of the Honey Trap

"The term honey trap has a surprisingly apt history. Like the idea of fem fatality itself. It exists somewhere at the border of fact and fiction originally coined by celebrated spy writer john carey in his nineteen seventy six novel tinker tailor soldier spy it moved from fiction to life. The intelligence community started using the term. One of the reasons it made that jump is because it's a succinct metaphor for a real long standing espionage tactic. The spy positions herself as sweet tempting delicious like honey. Her tools are charm sex or the suggestion of sex. And as they say you catch more flies with honey. Honey is also sticky. Once you're caught in it. You're as helpless as a fly to. The tactic is proved effective for many different intelligence agencies. Today even male spies can be found playing these cards but traditionally it was considered a strictly female domain. In fact the only female domain in the world of espionage and on the surface it sure did seem like a lovely gig one overflowing with alcohol sex a good time and targets who had no idea that their momentary pleasure was as dangerous as a knife at the throat.

John Carey
How a big, queer, black woman is redefining "yoga body"

Unladylike

04:46 min | 2 months ago

How a big, queer, black woman is redefining "yoga body"

"Noticed when i post pictures of my yoga practice that the responses i got from people. It wasn't really like that. Many people giving me feedback on my practice. It was mostly people being like. I don't know that people could do yoga. And i would just be like. Why do you think fat people can't do yoga. Fat people do all kinds of stuff all the time and like clearly we have a visibility problem so this is a really fascinating. Turn taking those comments. Which could either understandably caused someone to be like. Fuck you instagram. I'm piecing out But rather see it as an opportunity. And i'm curious why that was for you. Yes if it had just been people saying like wow. I didn't know if that person can do yoga. I like them. Bitch get is because everybody. Does everything concern about that. But on top of that was people being like. I didn't know fat people could do yoga. I'm fat person. Can i do yoga. And so my response to that is hell. Yeah you can do in fact you should and in fact it's not just fat people so that like there'd be so many different kinds of people who will reach out to me be like wow. I didn't know that someone who looks different than what society tells us. They should look like is allowed to do whatever they want. This is inspiring me to do whatever i want and that to me was a motivator to continue to engage with the community and the community. Was i sure. Engaging back justin's instagram accounts started growing photo by photo. She was posting videos of herself. Working through a sequence. He was offering her own advice for complicated poses. And you better believe. She brought her personality along for the ride. This was no like straight laced. Candle lit all white yoga session. No enya playing in the background. She was playing lauren hill in the background and she would encourage her followers to try yoga themselves if they were too nervous and eventually she started getting messages from people asking her to come teach them where they were. They'd be like can you come. Teach me in sweden. can you come to melbourne. Can you come to like venezuela. I'll know dude like literally everywhere. Jesmyn was flattered but she wasn't convinced that the world needed more yoga teachers. It wasn't until after her friends. And even her parents encouraged her to pursue teaching that she gave in and decide to get some training but there is still a problem because caroline becoming a yoga teacher or going through. Why t or yoga teacher training can cost between two and three thousand dollars as a grad school dropout working in a tapas restaurant like gentleman is not making that kind of dough but her parents actually stepped in and helped her which was a financial burden for them but very cool way to support her so she quit day jobs and enrolled going in jesmyn. Figured she'd get this credential hardest poses and that'd be that but about halfway through the through the training we were doing this partner. Yoga exercise and i was paired with someone who is much smaller than i am. She is like five feet tall. I don't know how much you weigh. When you're that you're that she's like that So and then. I'm so we're on opposite sides of the spectrum and as a fat body person i have spent my whole life paranoid about even touching somebody in a way. That could hurt them like. I'm afraid that if i sit too close to someone that i could hurt them like. There's this constant obsessive thought about the weight in needing to apologize for the wait and so the idea of being in this environment where i haven't have to physically put my entire body weight onto this. Very tiny person was horrifying to me. And so i spent like every time that i would even touch her. I would apologize every time. I'd be like oh i'm sorry. Oh i'm sorry. Oh i'm sorry. And after a while she stopped me for hand on my shoulders literally and looked in my eyes and was like you do know. You don't have to apologize for everything right. And i laughed because laughing is one of my defense mechanisms and i was like. Oh yeah sorry I guess i just was apologizing for existing and to hear me say it. She just caught her eyebrows. Me and like went back to the but i was shook i was like. Are you kidding me. i think i don't deserve to exist. i think i'm apologizing for existing. Is that how long have i been thinking that like have been thinking that since birth

Jesmyn Lauren Hill Enya Justin Venezuela Sweden Melbourne Caroline
The Diversification of Obstetrics and Gynecology with Dr. Heather Irobunda

Hysteria

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

The Diversification of Obstetrics and Gynecology with Dr. Heather Irobunda

"Are you seeing more people of color and more people of culturally diverse backgrounds engaging in the field. Obgyn i actually do. I do think it's moving way more for it. Because you actually be a male dominated fields like obgyn's you guys like all men and then it's moved into that direction and now we're more of a female driven fields which you would expect so because most people who are female have vaginas rain so that's why super exciting bat. We're moving in that direction. And there's an. It's one of the most diverse of sub specialties. In medicine so super exciting. I'm super happy. That is moving this direction because we need it so

Obgyn
Self-Love Coach Kimberley Cook Helps Survivors Become Thrivers

Your Life Program

05:44 min | 2 months ago

Self-Love Coach Kimberley Cook Helps Survivors Become Thrivers

"I have a very special guest who's had Very traumatic life. She was raised with forty years of emotional abuse from a narcissistic mother but through her heart. Perseverance and determination. She's found her way back to a fulfilling life today. Joining me on. My show is a very special self love coach. Kimberly cook who has used the skills of resilience emotional intelligence in self awareness to create a twenty four seven support system and step by step process to help survivors become thrive hours. Kimberly join us on the show. Today you're welcome. It's great to be here. You're here all the way from australia. From adelaide yes yes. I am so welcome. Welcome welcome I wanted to ask you if you wouldn't mind for the audience telling us about yourself and your story in how you became the self love coach in how you have the self love project. How did that all begin. I'm will growing up I didn't realize. I had a narcissistic mother because it didn't know what the word was you know growing up a was just emotionally demented by her Throughout my life. Until i was thirty six she sort of set me up to file in law. If i didn't i didn't have boundaries You know she didn't teach them to me. She made me live by them. But not allowed me to have my own voice and and stuff like that and You know a be thirty six years old and i. I just couldn't take it anymore. She had completely try to control. My life You basically fell in love with my husband tried to do my children and Just took them and just cut off contact with my hometown. Family which then led to me for many many years after that to Leaving out a self abuse. Because i didn't know what was wrong with me. What i deviated to learn a lot about nazism. And and then i just went through the process of Of healing myself at the tolerant knowing what to do and Dimona ten forty nine was not living on this anymore and i it would break my heart to see people suffer through united just being bullied or getting into a relationship that they could get out of. That was unhappy and many many people live with you know without so flow because we were talking back. Then you know you've got to do things for others and put others before you can so clogged was really thing. It was locked tough and often Not i believe that anymore and so flood is very confusing to people. That aren't really what it is. They should be doing To release their trauma and emotional baggage. Because it's very heavy. Yes very very heavy. So let's let's back up just a moment for the audience who might not really understand but because your years of figuring it out you now know what is a north narcissist pathological narcissist. What are some the traits that if someone is in a relationship that's abusive or heart and they don't know what Had noticed the signs explain. What narcissist is well. You know it someone huge encroaches your boundaries or. Do things for them that you don't want to do and they have no consideration. And but it's a continual thing it's Something that although law though tell you a blatant lachey face and then although tell you something and you don't hang on a minute and then you feed that back to them and the dow you know they'll be lucky. That's not what i said. Or that's not what i did or and so then you just become long magor mart laar crazy. Did i just make that open. You know and then when this happens all the time you know you really end up questioning very own self. you're your you're your mentality and There's a different level of narcissism having as a parrot because they're the people that bring you into the world you know other is someone who gave birth to you so you would think i'd be the one to protect julian Not you an and teach you to be strong and You know my mom didn't do any of that and make bad choices and then not pick narcissistic men. So i want gain on. I couldn't have a voice and was A choice alcoholics And things like that and so the stock who just sort of went on and you know when when when someone is emotionally abusing you and putting down and Barking orders it. You and stuff like that. What happens is you. You didn't turn laws and so you instantly emotionally abusing yourself

Kimberly Cook Dimona Kimberly Adelaide Australia Julian