Sustainability

Go green with the latest in sustainability news.

Why Beef Isn’t The Enemy

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:00 min | 17 hrs ago

Why Beef Isn’t The Enemy

"I want to sort of elephant room. Which is the conversation about meat. Itself is a good for you. Is it bad for. You is bad for the planet is a good for the planet is bad for the animals. Is it okay to eat animals. Because the conversation it's really emerging in many many circles is that we should become vegan or to save our health and save the planet. And you put up a very different conversation about this How how do we become to understand. That beef is the enemy and and why why is why is it not absolutely i mean. There's a series of cultural conversations. That happened after the industrialization of beef production that shifted the arctic millennials reviewed beef. You know the narrative. Well i'll repeat it. The broad brushstrokes. That story after the second world war we had a major consolidation agriculture many of the ammunition factories converted to fertilizer factories. Which made we had basically a vast infrastructure loot fertilizer factories. That were ready to go. We started to make fertilizer much much cheaper. We had a bigger industrialisation of agriculture. At the same time we had a different approach towards food security is what we call them today but the government after the second world war and around that time was very concerned about america autonomy understandably and invested in systems that ensure that we had enough corn wheat rice soy those key crops and a few others cotton sorghum tobacco that we had those introduced in volume sufficient to feed the american public in the us. The conflans those two things is an overabundance of food crops starting in the fifties that we began to understandably redivert to be feed developed. The world service's in too much food so we feed. It does something else right and the thing is to mark. It's a bunch of rational things that we did right. We are like okay. I don't wanna have another. You know victory gardens and terrifying end of the world scenario. Understand right we have all these huge factories that we need to do something else with understand. These are all rational economic. It was good. It was good intentions with bad consequences and longer term consequences. You know these are sort of short term pivots responses. I think sometimes. And i do agree with some of the broader kind of conspiracies time around big ag but the way that it's been built up i think was a normal reaction to a bunch of social and economic forces and so we ended up with though is by the fifties we were realizing we could get fatter. Beef faster feeding it. Human food right and then about ten years later diet for small planet planet was one of the first book said that hit around those but then by ten years later people started to say but wait a second. This is devastating for the environment. Right because we're basically producing resource intensive crops that are maladaptive for beef diet right And are also bad for the planet being produced at the scale for this usage and effectively we created a very unsustainable beef supply system so the way that it happened is that we pivoted how we produce beef from a natural regenerate traditional system to the modern industrial farm. Yeah and then we started to understand. I'd say they the the response to that was for many people will. We're going to be vegan now the response but just like oh my god. Look what's happening. These factory farms and then of course literature came out. That meat is bad for you as got saturated fat. We shouldn't be eating. It causes heart disease right. Yes yes. And i think a lot of they you know they the conversation around beef and how bad it is a lot of it. I agree with directionally in that confinement. Beef is really bad.

Arctic United States Heart Disease Right
Water Justice - Actress Gloria Reuben, Waterkeepers Alliance

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

09:00 min | Last week

Water Justice - Actress Gloria Reuben, Waterkeepers Alliance

"I'd like you to meet gloria reuben. Who was a trustee of the waterkeeper alliance from two thousand seven to two thousand ten and served as an advisor to former vice president. Al gore's environmental organization called the climate reality project and on other natural resources groups as well you will also likely recognize her from her appearances in television series like er and marvel's tv cloak and dagger among others as well as in movies like lincoln and a reasonable doubt. Welcome to green captions radio glorious. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for letting me join you. Joe. oh no problem. It's my pleasure my pleasure so let's start with. What condition is our water supply and today as president biden starts his first term as president. What is the water supply. He is inheriting well. I think we would all agree over these last four years the previous president did pretty much anything that he could to eviscerate our clean out air clean water regulations so it is very exciting last night to to witness our new president president. But i didn't as he signed the papers to rejoin the paris climate agreement and to roll back some of the deregulations that the former president clearly. There's a lot of work to be done but that once. We have obviously a leader in place president in place who believes in science and who listens to scientists and who believes in climate change and listens to the scientists gusta climate change and who obviously is a great advocate for the wellbeing of all americans of all peoples that is definitely a hopeful sign the destruction that happened in the last four years previous to President by being sworn in cannot be changed overnight but Reliance as very proud very excited to be on the front lines of this. Very important fight to have drinkable swimming. Fissionable waters for americans and for people around the globe. As you said. I mean it's extraordinary when you can get two point. Five million miles of waterways being protected from from our local over three hundred and fifty plus waterkeeper groups around globe. That's a huge thing. It's a lot of miles. So i'm really excited to join forces again rejoined forces again with this extra organization and in a leadership role so is the did the rollbacks that the trump administration did did they actually result in more water pollution. I mean we obviously have the flint michigan situation but that was not trump. That was the governor in michigan. Right when you talk about pollution in the waterways that goes very much to industries like fossil fuel industries of course like factory farming like businesses corporations. That are allowed to just kind of dump their way store there By rhonette of of making things of manufacturing into the waterways when there's no regulation The clearly people can just do what they want at their own. Well not have to pay any consequences you know it all comes down to first thing which is reenacting these laws again. Going back in place and then enforce laws are terrific things to have. But if they're not enforced than what's also it's important to remember that one of the things that president biden as well last night was to cancel the keystone pipeline. Which has as many of us know has been an ongoing issue for years now. And if i think about it the former president were elected. That very well may have happened. Now i've been to alberto into the athabasca river. I've seen the destruction that's happened with trying to suck out oil from sand. It's not an easy process. Takes more gallons of water from the athabasca river to make one barrel of oil and that is destruction destroy not just obviously the environment but the first nations people that have lived on that land for generations. So it's a it's a trickle down effect if you will of Polluters of Whether they be industries or or again corporations or even individuals whether or not brought to justice when when when there's no law to protect people that lived in that area then it's a free fall and You know. I was a newly appointed just over two months ago so the lot to catch up on. It's a lot of information that i'm soaking up. And we can't wait to be able to fly again safely obviously in good all corners of the world to to meet in person a lavar extraordinary water keepers are clean water warriors. I want i'm sure i'm sure. So does the waterkeeper alliance have a checklist of things that they want. The biden administration. To do i mean are there. Water infrastructure investments Besides putting back in place the clean water act. i mean. We hope that's happening soon. But maybe you're disappointed. It didn't happen right away. What kinds of investments and specifics are you looking for from president biden. Yes well. I think you know as you mentioned. Clean water act course. Everything can happen in one night. So we're confident that that will be reassigned. Only shocks right. I know but go back to the industry. Portion coal ash coal pollution cola. Hashes is definitely something that needs to be addressed in taken care of again. The factory farming issue is a huge thing. Learn in this country. North carolina again. I've been to north carolina. I've seen those ways. They call the ponds or lagoons. They tried to make these names. Sound like it's a recreational place yet now. These are ponds at are made of animal. Waste that seat into the waterway. So that's definitely something that needs to be handled in terrific water keepers in that region. An area that are that are winning lawsuits against not of these factory farms. I think that You know the overall climate issues that Is a abroad umbrella. You'll and plastics. We we all know again. You know plastics Issue jim global issue for sure so clean water act coal cocoa factory farming. These i think are are three very big tangible things that that can be addressed. Well we can he can pass. He can propose legislation that punishes. And as you say enforcement is critical these industrial polluters. It's you know taking a page out of the erin brockovich book relay right but these things also and i totally support on plastic pollution. To get me started on that one will be here for hours but a lot of these things require congressional approval and even though the democrats biden's party control both the house and the senate it's by d. Tiny itsy-bitsy margin right. So how do you. And i know that president by misspeaking bipartisanship since the very first days of his campaign and did so in his inaugural address etcetera but washington is still gridlock. So what's your outlook for whether for example getting factory farming in any kind of legislation. You know control of it. Is that realistic. Yes i think so for. Sure i mean again. These things take time an in carolina. I just wanted to north carolina. Just specifically in that region aren't bringing they aren't litigating certain cases in terms of factory farming. When it comes to the government The legislation in two to be passed in congress isn't going to be tricky but i am the only way to stay in this to even to say yes to this to stay because this is a long term long time mission is to is to keep positive and to just keep on doing. The things that we know will work again. The positive aspects are yes. We do have a house in the senate. So that's a hopeful thing at you know. We don't know what the future will hold of course but for right now we have the majority so that means that and again you know. We have leaders in place who do not deny the truce and they don't make falsities in order to remain in power. There are those who do that. But you know our president and vice president

President Biden Gloria Reuben Waterkeeper Alliance Athabasca River Michigan Al Gore Biden Administration Lincoln JOE Paris Swimming Jim Global Democrats Biden's Party Cola North Carolina Erin Brockovich Senate
[TEST] COVID recovery should include climate solutions, researcher says

Climate Connections

01:29 min | 18 hrs ago

[TEST] COVID recovery should include climate solutions, researcher says

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections. The covid nineteen pandemic has changed the world and the work of rebuilding will take more than a vaccine. There's going to have to be an economic recovery from covert you know. There's been a worldwide economic recession. That's robert dubrow of the yale center. Climate change and health. He says his country's rebuild they have an opportunity to accelerate the transition to clean renewable energy. And that would help solve another public health crisis. Climate change warmer temperatures will increase deadly heat waves food. Shortages natural disasters and disease and burning fossil fuels creates toxic. Air pollution that harms people's lungs and can cause heart disease apart from the climate change benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions really tremendous public health benefits. That are more immediate so do bro recommends that has countries past their covid recovery packages. They prioritize climate solutions such as clean energy and green transit. We could make a tremendous kind of down payment on the transition that we need to renewable energy if we're going to avoid catastrophic climate change and therefore catastrophic public health consequences climate connections is produced by the for environmental communication to hear more stories like this visit climate connections dot org.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Robert Dubrow Yale Center Heart Disease
[TEST] Charles Blow on His Black Manifesto of Great Migration Back to the South

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

05:19 min | 3 d ago

[TEST] Charles Blow on His Black Manifesto of Great Migration Back to the South

"Tuned into black on the air with lou. Thanks for tuning in you. Guys are really appreciated Wanna thank everybody For listening have a really Interesting show today charles. Blow the new york times. Columnists book called the devil. You know black. Power manifesto where he Proposes something very interesting in it Based on the great migration conforto conversation with charles sees. He's a very interesting guy. Had him on the nightly show years ago and He's very has some very interesting ideas. So we're gonna get into that a lot about black culture in that sort of thing. What's happening right now. So i won't talk about that in my Into now because we're going to cover a lot of that. But i do want to talk about some of those issues coming up. Not just for stream on you know. This is back in the air. But there's a lot of issues out there. And i believe there's a lot of i'll call it. This isn't a good phrase. But i'll call it mission confusion and the reason why i'm saying that i think there's a lot of A lot of things the black community. And i know i'm over generalizing here so i apologize for that that i think i need in order to accomplish a lot of different goals in there. They're not necessarily connected and one of the things. I'll be covering a coming up in the future not today but i want to put this on your mind. So you know i'm going to be talking about this is i. I think there are two things going on out there that are sometimes in conflict with each other. When it comes to the back community. And i will call them racial justice of versus racial grievance. Okay so i want to put that out there to you. And i'm not gonna. I know i'm teasing right now. Not gonna go into detail right now. 'cause actually have a good top charles bo coming up in and we'll talk about some of that but i want to put that out there. These are two kind of separate issues you know. One just is kind of based on laws and transforming the way that institutions are structured in and grievance which is for me kinda base more in opinions in people's feelings and up things like that. But i'm i'll go into more detail about that later. Little bit different But both very interesting both very wrote both very important. You know they're just. They're not always in cooperation with each other is one of the issues. And i think there's not always clarity around that so because i don't have a lot of time today I wanted to just say give a shoutout to The people who are on the ground helping everybody in texas right now that is gone through took time with the weather. not helped anybody did crews going to cancun which is kind of a funny story this week. But what's not funny is what's happening so many people are you know just without food and you know they're in situations they'd have faced before you know. A lot of the countries used to this type of weather but there are places that aren't used to. I'm one of those kind of places if we had that type of thing here in southern california. It'd be a mess as well but there are a lot of organizations out there that are doing some really good work. Give a shout out to my niece. Vanessa vanessa wilmore. Who is doing some of that. Work yourself with the feed. The people dallas which is a great organization and they give food directly to people They they i know they collect money but more than money. They collect resources that they can give directly to people that needed. 'cause sometimes money is great. You know you need money for things but sometimes people just need water. You know like right now you know or you know food to feed the kids right now you know and so Those grassroots organizations like that that are ended on the ground and there's a lot of them. I just mentioned hers. Because she's my niece and she's doing. I'm really proud of her. She's doing good job down there but there there are other organizations like that. I encourage you to look line if you can help. That's great you know All the support is really welcome. And finally you know i. I sent him keeping unsure because they don't have the time to. I do want to thank everybody. That was so kind. Oh let them. Before i get into that. let me just mention. I have a series on netflix. Right now command. And i didn't get a chance to talk about last week because A segment something else but Amend is the story of the fourteenth amendment and it's a documentary six part docu series that i did with will smith and the documentary group in man. It took it took a while to put this thing together and it wasn't easy but we're really proud of it now. Hope you guys get to see its educational inspirational. It's informative eye opening. it was eye opening for me. It was real really good experience to learn some of the nuances of one of our most important constitutional amendments with just the fourteenth amendment. Lot of good stuff in there. I encourage you guys. Please watch him in You can watch with your family. You know it's not one division but since detaining one division that is taken up by kids level division. I think he's gonna go to but

Charles Bo Charles LOU Vanessa Vanessa Wilmore New York Times Confusion Southern California Texas Dallas Netflix Smith
What Could Dethrone Solar in Home Energy?

The Interchange

07:56 min | 2 weeks ago

What Could Dethrone Solar in Home Energy?

"Given that is obviously easier is less complex and forward to get an induction stove or whatever than it is to get sore roof. Why did solar scale. I like why was solar the right anchor product for you know the last decade i think a lot of the technologies surrounding at vacation and of course home batteries and vs wouldn't quite mature. Sorta as you as you to call has been worked on since the eighties in the two thousand and it became much more affordable for it to be distributed solution as opposed to being centralized solution from cost effectiveness standpoint and again they were Market forces like the d. incentives like incentives Investment tax credits for solar. That made it much more affordable and that drove the the adoption of solar as. We look ahead though. I think solar will continue to grow but i think these other products and other offerings will have a much higher growth rate relative disorder so okay so let's characterize where we're at today so we've got now. What two million residential solar rooftops in the us. Roughly speaking. i think more than that now. So we've hit a a decent share of the population. But obviously there's still. I mean we're nowhere near penetrating. The entire you know readily accessible single family would south or west facing unobstructed rooftop park. It's there's still growth to be had there But it has scaled as you said the attach rate for batteries has gone up a lot in certain geographies particularly so you and i are both in in california in the bay area. And you know here. The attachment rate for so for storage which means basically the percentage of new solar customers that are also putting in a batteries white like upwards of a third at this point i think in the bay area might even be higher because of proactive power. Shut off so that's coming up but you know off of a very small base still. It's still relatively small market for essential batteries. And then there's a- you know where the growth is sort of in the us anyway. The growth is always right around the corner we haven't quite hit that inflection point yet but it appears that it's coming and then there's all this other electrical stuff in the home the electrification of heat and cooking and all that kind of stuff I know that a big part of your thesis at span is that you can bring all of those components together via the home electrical panel. But i wonder do you think that those things will be sold together at any point or is it always going to be a bunch of disparate purchases that then need some unifying piece of technology to tie them all. Together i think increasingly very successful solar installations sort of financing companies are looking to move to a model where they want to deliver energy service and want to offer products that go beyond just sort of It's it's a. It's a natural extension of where they are today to try to offer. Ev charging products. It's a natural extension of where the obviously offer storage. Which as you mentioned has We're seeing in california fairly high tax rates. The reason i believe the electrical panel will be sort of central to the adoption of all of these types of technologies is because seventy percent of homes in the us have electrical panels that are either outdated and therefore art of code or under capacity right. There are one hundred one hundred twenty five amps range and as you think about the computer adoption of these different types of technologies they will inevitably need to be upgraded or replaced in order for them to support the homes to support these technologies. And i think the companies that are already offering sorta are really well poised to be able to bundle these together and offer to customers both because they're either already into million homes and they can go back to these customers and offer them out on porn addicts or there are a large number of homes that they are yet to provide solutions to that may not be well suited for solar but can be well suited for other products like batteries and charging everything that happening. This is one of these things always. It seems so obvious. And yet i feel like i haven't actually seen anybody do it at scale like i've any solar installers gone back to their existing customer. You have a twenty year relationship with those customers. If you're signing up early sir doing the maintenance on the solar so you obviously should be able to go back and sell them on and ev a charger. Or whatever i like. I don't see it happening is is it happening. It is beginning to happen. And i think perhaps we are closer to the customer. Then investors are and what we're seeing is a lot of these companies are seeing that over the course of the next three to five years. They're going to have to differentiate what they offered to customers the only indications of that our companies offering not just storage kazillion see but storage with economic benefit like virtual part plants. Right so that's an expansion of not just offering solar harbor solution would ppa's or loans leases or just storage as a as a cost if you will where in most markets in the us especially. There's no payback for storage. But they're trying to find ways to wrap that with offerings like bush apartments and i think we'll continue to see that evolve into products that are very naturally closely tied to solar and storage. Because when you go to install these products you are. You're typically doing a fair amount of electrical work and onsite work and there's an easy opportunity to offer the customer a final dollar charter if you will and i think that is beginning to happen as we speak. It'll be goaded by customer demand. But also i think will be made made easier by energy services that'll be offered by income and solar companies but increasing utility companies as well. Yeah it's interesting. I think the dream is this energy as a service model where somebody can offer me. All of the things that i need for my home energy needs or degree in my home or whatever the reality i think for a lot of customers true for me how to speak for myself is that i'm just on a different buying cycle for different things like i want solar when i need to replace my roof. I want an v charger. When i need to replace my car I want and induction stove. When i when it's time for me to like my old stow so i'm just on this journey. That is not. That's more sequential than it is simultaneous. But i do ultimately want all those things. I want all those things to be talking to each other or at least talking to some third thing which i know is is your bread and butter because ultimately i want all of the components of my energy usage matter g generation my energy storage in my home to be optimized such that. I'm saving as much money as possible. Or perhaps if i were a slightly better person it would be so that i've minimising impact on greenhouse gas emissions but nonetheless. They need to be interoperable. But i don't think they need to be purchased simultaneously. You're absolutely right. And some homes have solar fewer fewer homes storage. I think even for your home's electric vehicle charging today but practically every home has an electrical panel by building a twenty first century version electrical panel what we are enabling is a longitudinal relationship with the homeowner. That of course of the next twenty or thirty years that our panelists embedded in your home. We're able to present data and able to present a direct or able to present both the the data as the ease of installation as you choose to decide solar a year from now as you choose decide. Ev charging a couple of years from now and choose to electrify your appliances five years as opposed to each of these instances being a fairly independent event that either costs a lot of money. And therefore you choose not to do it or a requires a fair amount of convincing in the absence of data if you will.

United States California Bay Area Bush
The True Cost of Sustainable Skincare with Tata Harper

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

05:48 min | 3 weeks ago

The True Cost of Sustainable Skincare with Tata Harper

"I feel like there's so many misconceptions in the beauty industry really in the luxury industry in general too. But you know Clean beauty is not elevated enough or clean. Beauty doesn't work as well. And i think what's interesting. Is that you kind of saw those challenges. Or you heard those misconceptions and you're like no. I'm gonna change this right like i love that i'm gonna i'm gonna give it a try because enough you know because i think that now what we need is a lot of consumer products that make our life better deal you know not just like superficially better but like really that they They elevate our quality of life. And from that lance. It's what really kept me motivated and really like we spent like five years creating the harper because the formulas didn't exist. No one knew how to use like natural ingredients to preserve or to a mall. Sify or to again or to stabilize those were not like raw materials were used just for like marketing and And there was not a lot of science around like the formulation aspect of natural skincare and took a really long time to make them happen and also formulate from a different point of view because a lot of natural skinner was always formulated with this idea of minimalism and and a lot of like the first gen natural products. They were created a lot. I by the low hus movement remember that movement that lifestyle movement that is being natural so the fact that the product was natural was actually more important than the even that the product worked ben and data no for skin care. Because you only buy skin care too because it works right exactly. Why you don't like by this moisturizer to save the planet like you buy this moisture is great moisturizer and then you have your charities and other things to do other things but But yeah no i was. I was really challenging. It was almost like with the creation of our company. We talent almost every aspect of being a maker of skin-care not only from the ingredients and the formulas but also by having our farm like what you were saying before the farm has been such a special place for us because a lot of skin care is outsource. The majority of the companies are outsource. They outsource almost every piece of their of their Of their business to third parties whether it's the formulation to labs that a lot of times abusing tons of basis and just you know the smell or the color or the incentive vitamin seen our. We're going to add. Hulo renege on jason or you know things like that but you find a lot of companies that have very unique products and formulas that are really unique so for us it was always very clear that we needed to have our own our end and our own formulation Our own chemists and our own lab so that we can really formulate products from scratch like we like doing and that every ingredient has a purpose and also every single one of our formulas doesn't rely on just one ingredient like we're not like on one ingredient type of company where company that by ingredients from all over the world and use them in the you know in different formulas in very high concentrations. So no i mean. I think it makes so much sense. And i love that you guys and your approach is truly like farm to beauty right. I feel like that's such a Sort of a marketing term that you hear thrown around alongside clean beauty etc. But you're literally you know harvesting in growing ingredients on your farm for some of your formulas So can you explain a little bit more about how that process works in terms of You know like organic farming and how you guys are actively working milan. I mean. I think that's fascinating kodaly so just to clarify one thing. We do bring ingredients from all over the world. Sure yeah we bring ingredients from like eighty four different countries. Okay we have like no self and post limit on like we're just gonna talk about vitamins where we are see company we really curate technologies from all over the world whether it's green tag or you know things from tradit- you know from a lot of tradition traditional chinese medicine you're also bringing a lot of and butters from amazon but anyway so we In the farm. There's a couple of things happening so number one. We have a garden where we grow a lot of Not even a lot. We grow specifically five herbs that grow really well in our soil in vermont in our farm which is a clay soil and those are calendar. La barra sweet alfalfa and kolenda and we grow them in our farm in in our organic farm and we make one ingredient that that That we produce at the farm every single month that basically captures all of the oil soluble nutrition from all of those herbs. And the and it's done in a very temperature controlled process that it's very specific and that ingredient that is called our farm beauty complex goes into almost every single one of our formulas but in the farm. We also have a lot of barnes because it was an old dairy farm converted into a skincare farm. Now i love

Sify Lance Skinner Harper BEN Jason Milan Amazon Vermont Barnes
In Situ Community-Based Oak Conservation At The Morton Arboretum

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:20 min | 3 weeks ago

In Situ Community-Based Oak Conservation At The Morton Arboretum

"Suited to do some major impact stuff for a bunch of trees and the main focus of what we were connected over our oaks because the icn just did their assessment or trying to get this out that what is it. Forty one percent of species across the globe are facing extinction or at least of conservation concern. And i just spoke with your colleague dr murphy westwood about a lot of exit. You so taking trees to other places to help conserve them. But you are position in a way that you're doing a lot of the institute the other side of that coin which is also desperately needed. So let's take a closer look at just. What in situ conservation means to you before we look at some of the species. You're working with right. So the global tree conservation program in the morton arboretum. We have a very specific approach to how we try to save threatened tree species. We've i go through prioritizing because unfortunately we cannot save all the sixteen thousand three species on the planet and we wish we could right now but we don't have the money or manpower resources so we need to make some hard choices of what we are going to folks and that is We used a lot the redmi sting which is why you talked about with murphy and the new red list of folks which is one of our target tax on groups was published and my team members did that and so now we have a clear picture of which species need our help the most so then two approaches we can take our well. Try to go and save these species right were they occur and that's go in situ conservation so within their native range but also complement to that. Sometimes we just can't that we were not able to save the species right where they occur. So then we can compliment that with ex situ conservation. Which is what murphy. Also talked a lot about hoochie. You can do see the preservation and you can save species by having specimen symbol. Tammy berea so. My job is to focus on the in situ conservation part so where we do is that we select right now. We have tools as if he projects with two different species off endangered oaks which are coworkers brandy. Gi which is endemic micro endemic old that only occurs in the tip or huckabee -fornia peninsula in the california lack in mexico. Scowls working mogo. Well people those these resorts drink margaritas. And they have no idea that fifty kilometers from there There is these amazing biosphere reserve called sierra laguna forest biosphere reserve. And we've seen that reserve. There is the majority of the distribution of these core brand This is a very dry arid. Ecosystems very scrubby and so these are tree only occurs on by edges obese announced streams. And when you think of a stream or a river you imagine that yes. What but he's he's really funny. I guess share some pictures of you just sad there dry and only when there's hurricanes or weather events then erase a lot there and it feels app and it crashes the mountains a mountain range right there and so all. The rain gets dunked on everything. Floods the roles get destroyed. And then you pass this they rebuild it like with the sand like they have. Ob sands so anyway abc's where these oak grows but the problem is that because it's a very dry ecosystem that is also where the ranchers want to have the ratchets. That's there's water so they put these long hosts. And that's how they watered needle gardens or wetlands. Show there's a conflict between the place where the you know the specific habitat for these species. And where the ranches are and the problem. The ranchers be street because he'd provides shea in

Dr Murphy Westwood ICN Morton Arboretum Murphy Tammy Berea Fornia Peninsula Sierra Laguna Forest Biosphere Mexico California ABC Shea
As mining causes roads to crack and houses to collapse, a Swedish city is moved

The Science Show

05:10 min | 3 weeks ago

As mining causes roads to crack and houses to collapse, a Swedish city is moved

"Thirty years ago a mining town in sweden looked like running out of jobs. The question what could they do to reinvent their industry so they asked a very clever scientist. She answered build a space station and they did. The town was killing and by the way it's within the arctic circle now the space station up and running and doing fine. The next challenge is moving the whole city. And that's what the sign show is about today. And how you move buildings and thousands of people and do so in the lapland. Guide is an homes who lives in sweden and once reported for sbs and there are many stakeholders involved in extraordinary project of moving the city of corona the iron ore mine elke ab municipality the government the politicians the urban planners the architects and other experts and not least the people and all their say but there is one major participant. That is absolutely instrumental in making. The kid and i moved project at all possible. And that's the royal institute of technology in store co. and that's where you come in professor cars. Yes i've been a professor at the institute for a very long time and by chance i met the mail you care not in two thousand twelve and we started discussing urban planning and then i suddenly got an invitation to move to cure now to take responsibility for making a plan for the new. The city had to be relocated due to the fact that the iron or production demanded removal of the city. How did it all start them. Start with the mayor and what she saw as urgent was to make a plan that met the expectations of the residents. Because when you are forcing people to leave their homes they expect something. Really good as a replacements. You said you have to work taking something very attractive and so you are in a very short period of time because we are in russia time wise and then what happened. I'm urban planning urban planner. All my life doing theoretical work in this was. I just couldn't say no to so i immediately pack my bags and move here now. Yes but how did you decide that that was necessary. Did you decide that. He wasn't enough sitting in your office. No no theoretical stuff. No now the challenge to do this all in practice and doing it in reality of course demands are in place to meet was so important to meet with all these stakeholders not least to meet and socialize with the residents of care in order to really make sure that would i create in. My plan was something that met their expectations about the out for me on the new city. How was it to move from a capital in sweden. And your job to small town above the arctic circle t different worlds different two different worlds. I mean the first thing was that whether is so different. So i came up. I was met by snow. Snow snow and darkness. This was the winter and it was freezing cold. And he's a little town very few restaurants very few cultural activities. How did that feel. It felt strange but immediately realized that in order to make this feasible and enjoying myself. I need to socialize with people and people took me for snow. Mobile rides to out fishing of walking in the mountains and became a part of cultural life in catering. I gather that you quiet. Almost rock star status after a while now and not drugstore status but became very familiar. Face here's the guy who is removing the with any animosity from people. in general. the first reaction was here. Comes this guy from stockholm. He's going to make our planet size that he's awesome academic with provides Even more skepticism. But as i met with people is behind our dialogues about new city and they saw plans for the new city merging. They became more and more positive positive. So walking from the office to my home recalls a twenty minute walk. I could very often meet with. Oh the new seat the town square. We saw the town square. It looks so nice or people say oh wonderful that you're rains parking for snow as we need that

Sweden Royal Institute Of Technology Lapland SBS Corona Russia Stockholm New City
A Safety Net for America

Important, Not Important

08:20 min | 3 weeks ago

A Safety Net for America

"There's a popular martin. Luther king junior quote that lays bare the false promise of the american dream. He said it's all right to tell a man to lift himself up by his bootstraps. But it is cruel just to say to a bootlace man the oughta lift himself up by his own bootstraps now because it was martin luther king junior's birthday recently because we the people seem to have finally elected policymakers who care that are growing inequality is quite literally killing. Many of us thought it prudent to talk about safety nets for boot lewis americans. A safety net traditionally provides a margin of protection against the fluctuations of everyday life the highs and lows it allows for room for error. It helps you endure and designed purposely. It lets you succeed. Safety nets come in a variety of literal and figurative flavors artist. We're talking about actual rope. You can fly higher knowing you won't die if you slip. If you're an investor. A percentage of capital that remains fluid in cash or bonds. So you can make other bets on crazy biotech companies. Or i guess game stop is what we're doing this week if you're doomsday prepar. Who's pretty convinced. It's the end times but safety net might be an underground bunker in your backyard packed with ken. Paris and dynamite. They'll safety nets are complicated. Systemic concept but the first principles are easy to understand if millions of americans are hungry without water without health insurance and healthcare without childcare without wages. Whatever we're doing is working and because we live in a interconnected society not a spaceship made for one. The unequal distribution of safety nets actually affects everyone as america continues along in a quote unquote k shaped recovery or enormous wealth gap continues to grow. Thus many americans haven't had to think about a proper. Can i buy food this week. Safety net for some time now while others are further away from one than ever before white people are for the most part born with a safety net. The color of their skin. This simple unearned. Genetic inheritance provides a set of boots enabling most white people to simultaneously feel protected from sudden life changes and to take risks and embrace opportunities all relative but why people like me and stuff away a bunch of cash and then take advantage of opportunities like nonexistent interest rates and skyrocketing market values to remortgage houses and by tesla or bitcoin because the goal is growth through compounding interest. Not figuring out how to pick up free school lunches during your twelve hour onsite during a pandemic in a world that is more volatile than ever with list of externalities that includes invisible novel viruses in your living room and workplace and actual oceans. Making their way into your kitchen. It's more important than ever that we think through what it means for everyone to have a safety net as morgan hausa. We'll tell you a functionable. Reliable margin of safety means not having to sell your stocks and interrupt compounding interest when shit hits the fan and compound interest is incredible. It's everywhere for example. The ice age didn't happen because it suddenly got super cold outside. It happened because the summers were gradually and consistently more tepid. And the ice just eventually didn't melt but compound interest goes both ways. I mean look at the climate crisis or the continued state of black housing landownership food. College debt and education positive compound interest means not having to choose between food and rent. You don't even have to think about that when you don't have to worry about and food you can do so much more. It means building an infrastructure and culture of wellness and prevention. Not just going to the emergency room with no idea why your chest hurts because and this is vital to understand. It's not usually the suddenly sick person paying that bill. Ambulance rides and emergency room. Visits that are unable to be paid for by. The patient are often paid for by the hospital with something called charity. Care and that's subsidized by state grants basically your tax dollars of course sixty percent of the time. That sick person isn't white and this is the system. We've designed person doesn't have a safety net. A safety net means paying wages that allow for less congested three generation living conditions that viruses can't thrive in that allow for healthy plant based foods and building a strong microbiome that allow for not living next to fucking fossil fuel facilities and uncapped wells. So kids can grow and learn and breathe and you'd be amazed at what kids can do when they can grow and learn and breathe. I means paid sick. Leave for the days. You just can't do it whether you're suffering physically or mentally so you can do your best work on the other days. A safety net is paid parental leave for welcoming child into your family. It's childcare once you go back to work in preschool. After that for your mental health for your performance at work for your child's future it means giving every american child a few thousand bucks every year starting at birth to be spent indoor invested however. The parents see fit for food now and for turning on that fiscal compound interest for the rest of their lives. We can do better. We can make sure people land on their feet and that the entire society benefits society that decides that safety net's of every kind should be universal. We'll find her citizens able to reach further and faster and will suffer for less when faced with a pandemic. your challenge is to consider the safety nets available to you today and to manifest ways. You can extend those to your business in your community to lift all boats a bunch of guys longtime ago said the life liberty and the pursuit of happiness are unalienable. But i'll tell you this. Hungry person has no liberty no freedom no safety net to millions of americans have no liberty to speak of martin. Luther king talked about that in washington to paraphrase here. He said ever since the founding fathers of our nation dreamed this dream. America has been something of a schizophrenic personality on the one hand we have proudly professed the noble principles of democracy life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. But on the other hand. We have sadly practiced the very antithesis of those principles. Now more than ever before. America is challenged to realize it's noble dream for the sheep of the world. Today does not permit us the luxury of an anemic democracy. Our hours late and the clock of destiny is ticking out. We can't expect people to solve existential crises like climate change and they can keep their water turned on. So i asked today look to your own safety nets and find ways to extend them to your neighbors

Luther King Morgan Hausa Bitcoin Martin Tesla KEN Paris America Washington
New Evidence Shows Fertile Soil Gone From Midwestern Farms

Environment: NPR

02:40 min | 15 hrs ago

New Evidence Shows Fertile Soil Gone From Midwestern Farms

"Farming has destroyed a lot of the rich soil of america's midwestern prairie. Some scientists have come up with an estimate of how much soil and it is staggering. Here's npr's dan charles. If you fly over the midwest in spring and look down at the bare ground you can see slight differences in color. There's a lot of dark earth. What people call topsoil scientists. Evan thaler a phd student at the university of massachusetts. Amherst call it the a horizon black organic rich soil. That's really good for growing crops. And it's a storehouse of carbon in the form of living microorganisms and decaying plant roots. When settlers first arrived in the mid west it was everywhere in the roots in the prego down. Six to eight feet sometimes creating this really deep dark soils but plowing destroyed. A lot of releasing huge amounts of carbon dioxide contributing to climate change erosion also carried it away and now you'll also see areas that are a different color light. Brown thaler started comparing that color as seen from satellites with direct to soil measurements. And he found that the light brown soil had so little organic material. You really couldn't call it. A horizon soil that topsoil layer was gone consistently on particular parts of the landscape. The a horizon is almost always gone on hilltops finishes most of it just gradually fell down. The hillside as farmers tilled the soil year after year so he estimated topsoil loss across much of the other midwest based on. How much crop land is located on these erosion prone hills and just published the result in the journal peony s. He says a third of all the cropland in this whole area has completely lost. Its layer of topsoil that's way more than official estimates from the department of agriculture. I think the usda is dramatically underestimating. The amount of oss some soil scientists in the midwest are not convinced this method. They say relies on a lot of assumptions. But they agree. That soil loss is a big problem. And a case for instance. Who's minnesota's state soil health specialist to me. It's not important whether it's exactly a third. Maybe it's twenty percent. Maybe it's forty percent. There's a lot of topsoil gone from the helps. Farmers know that those eroded hilltops are less productive. She says and many of them are looking for solutions or essentially trying to make up for many years of fairly thoughtless practices. There's no quick fix. She says but there are ways to farm and also rebuild title starting with. Don't keep telling those fields. Maybe even grow grass their harvest. Hey instead of corn. Dan charles npr news.

Dan Charles Evan Thaler Midwest Brown Thaler University Of Massachusetts NPR Amherst America Department Of Agriculture Usda Minnesota Npr News
COVID recovery should include climate solutions, researcher says

Climate Connections

01:27 min | 18 hrs ago

COVID recovery should include climate solutions, researcher says

"Org. dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections. The covid nineteen pandemic has changed the world and the work of rebuilding will take more than a vaccine. There's going to have to be an economic recovery from covert you know. There's been a worldwide economic recession. That's robert dubrow of the yale center. Climate change and health. He says his country's rebuild they have an opportunity to accelerate the transition to clean renewable energy. And that would help solve another public health crisis. Climate change warmer temperatures will increase deadly heat waves food. Shortages natural disasters and disease and burning fossil fuels creates toxic. Air pollution that harms people's lungs and can cause heart disease apart from the climate change benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions really tremendous public health benefits. That are more immediate so do bro recommends that has countries past their covid recovery packages. They prioritize climate solutions such as clean energy and green transit. We could make a tremendous kind of down payment on the transition that we need to renewable energy if we're going to avoid catastrophic climate change and therefore catastrophic public health consequences climate connections is produced by the for environmental communication to hear more stories like this visit climate connections dot

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Robert Dubrow Yale Center Heart Disease
Cities' Goal To Lower Climate Emissions Could Be Blocked By Gas Utilities

Environment: NPR

05:13 min | 1 d ago

Cities' Goal To Lower Climate Emissions Could Be Blocked By Gas Utilities

"In the struggle to slow down climate change. Bitter fight has erupted over natural gas about half of all. Americans use that fossil fuel to heat their homes but cities with ambitious climate. Goals are adopting rules. That forced some developers build without it to go all electric instead. Npr's dan charles has the second part of an npr investigation into how the gas industry is fighting back. Flagstaff arizona is a town with a lot of environmentalists. The city's director of sustainability nicole. Upolu says last year the city council passed a climate emergency declaration which sets the flagstaff community on a path toward reaching carbon neutrality by the year. Twenty thirty and has been working on a for one of the city's biggest sources of heat trapping gases. The fuel used to heat buildings including your own home. I have a gas furnace and a gas stove for years. The industry sold gas as a relatively clean fuel but now energy experts like michael gartner at the consulting group are am. I say it's time has passed because burning gas releases carbon dioxide. And if you look at what's required to avoid the worst effects of climate change it becomes very clear very quickly that at twenty fifty. We can't have any of that. Gas at all environmentalists like ali hundred mahia cunningham at the natural resources defense council are pushing an alternative electrification because electric heating can be totally clean. That electricity comes from solar and wind. And hydro we have the technology. It's really one of the more cost effective least regrets strategies. We have available in california. Dozens of communities are now forcing builders to go all electric their not allowing gas hookups from most new buildings and about a year ago. Nicole antonoff opelousas. Flagstaff was thinking of doing the same thing that was one of our strategies. Could we say no new. No natural gas in new construction at exactly the same time the the gas industry was preparing a counterattack at a meeting of the american guests. Association's executive committee in december two thousand nineteen the group ceo. karen harbored. Call these moves by cities a challenge for the industry and environmental group. The climate investigation center obtained a document describing this meeting and it describes a new industry initiative to fight those municipal ordinances half a dozen gas companies were involved among them. Southwest gas the biggest gas provider in arizona. In of two thousand and twenty a senior member of the arizona. Legislature who'd received political contributions from southwest gas introduced a bill that made it illegal for cities to limit gas hookups. Republicans lined up to support it. Here's representative mark. Finchem from tucson. We've been able to observe what happens in cities like berkeley california. The take these radical steps to tell people. This is what you will use whether you like it or not. The bill sailed through the legislature and was signed within a month after that. The gas industry expanded their campaign. Here's one of the top lobbyists for the american gas association. George low on a conference call with industry colleagues in november. We've run pro gas choice legislation. Arizona tennessee louisiana those states. Now you can't deny someone natural gas service at their home. We're looking about fifteen or twenty different states to run this that in this year. Bills that block cities from restricting or discouraging. The use of natural gas have since been introduced in a dozen state legislatures including florida georgia. Utah kansas jasmine. Moore's the sustainability director for lawrence kansas which has set a goal of one hundred percent renewable energy. It really seems like it's intended to slow down our progress more and officials in other cities. Say it's not exactly clear what the proposed laws will allow cities to do so the getting creative recruiting allies for electrification city. That includes a construction company. This is our like six all electric apartment building that we've done tyler hala with wiedeman corporation showing off a six story structure framed but not yet finished its intended for affordable housing so it had to be built affordably to holland says his company. Did its first all electric building because an environmentally-minded developer force them to they thought it would cost a lot extra turns out cheaper. You eliminate do and gas taps you eliminate running all those gas lines through your building instead of a gas furnace in each unit releasing exhaust into the air. There's an electric heat pump on the wall super efficient heating and cooling. When electricity comes from renewables. It'll be great for the climate. In the meantime it makes the city's air cleaner. We just want everybody to do it. I mean it's it's everybody's air that we're all breathing makes my mountain bike ride that much easier. His companies now sharing its blueprints and budgets with other builders if the city government can't drive electrification. Maybe those numbers will do the job. Dan charles npr news.

Dan Charles Upolu Michael Gartner Flagstaff Mahia Cunningham Arizona Nicole Antonoff Industry And Environmental Gro Climate Investigation Center Finchem Natural Resources Defense Coun NPR Opelousas City Council California ALI Lawrence Kansas American Gas Association
His business is building ice castles. Will that get harder in a warming world?

Climate Connections

01:28 min | 1 d ago

His business is building ice castles. Will that get harder in a warming world?

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections in the movie frozen queen elsa magically creates a palace maid of sparkling ice for brent christianson making an ice palace is harder but the results are still enchanting. We tried to create. What feels like a other worldly experience. Christensen is the founder of ice castles. His company builds elaborate structures that tower up to forty feet high. They start by making thousands of icicles. Which the fuse together. And then spray repeatedly with water so given a month of good cold weather we can create some pretty massive structures. Low temperatures are good for building but visitors dislike extreme cold so the company's sites in utah. Colorado new hampshire and wisconsin are in areas that often hover near thirty two degrees some years. It's really cold some years. It's not and we just gotta hold our breath and work with what we have last year. The wisconsin locations opening was delayed because the ice was melting and climate. Change is bringing more warm days. Long-term definitely if i were to pass this down generation generation. We'd be moving further north. I'm sure but for now. Christianson is coping with the uncertainty and this year his team was able to build. Ice castles fit for queen elsa herself climate connections is produced by the for environmental communication to hear more stories like this visit. Climate connections dot org.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Elsa Magically Brent Christianson Ice Palace Christensen Wisconsin New Hampshire Utah Colorado Christianson Queen Elsa
As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business

Environment: NPR

04:18 min | 2 d ago

As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business

"Industry toward electric and others a similar push around buildings. Another big source of heat trapping gases natural gas utilities. Worry that electrifying. Homes and offices may jeopardize the gas industries future. Npr's jeff brady has the first part of an investigation into how the industry is fighting back in recent years natural gas. Got a bit of a halo. It helped reduce carbon emissions as gas fired power plants replace dirtier coal ones. But that's no longer good enough. As more cities. Businesses and now the biden administration seek to completely zero out greenhouse gas emissions including from buildings if the goal is to reduce emissions. Were all in if the goal is to put us out of business not so much. Karen harbored heads. The american gas association the main trade group for gas utilities that serve tens of millions of homes and businesses. These days members spend a lot of time touting the cleaner alternatives they're developing so called renewable natural gas and hydrogen but to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Scientists say quicker action is needed. Most researchers like aaron mayfield at princeton university have concluded that switching away from gas to electricity is the most efficient way to eliminate carbon emissions from most buildings by twenty fifty. We cannot continue using natural gas or things like heating in cooking because it's not consistent with reaching a net zero goal president biden's ambitious climate plan includes incentives to switch from to electric furnaces and appliances. That was a concern at an industry conference just after the november election. Npr obtained a recording. Aga vice president sue forrester said. The plan would mean nothing less than eliminating natural gas. Our goal is to reframe the debate around natural gas into really show value proposition of natural gas and our energy infrastructure. And how we're going to be key to a clean energy future. Even before biden was elected the industry saw the electrification push coming. It doubled down on its cooking with gas campaign that included young social media influencers. Hey guys. I remember kelly from cook with amber. The first thing we gotta do is heat up our pants. I'm going to turn our so on about. Some of the industry's other efforts are more aggressive but less public. Its lobbying to pass state laws barring local governments from restricting gas use in new buildings this after more than forty california communities band new gas hookups or restricted gas use in order to meet their climate goals. Npr reviewed internal aga documents obtained through public records request by the climate investigation center. They show that these state laws became a priority for the gas association at least as far back as december twenty nineteen so far. Four states have passed these so-called preemption bills and eleven more money republican led states are considering them again. Karen harbored coordinating these efforts. We are not state lobbyists We concentrate our activities certainly at the federal level. The distinction is important much of. Aj's budget comes from ratepayers through. Its member utilities. That means you as a ratepayer could be funding this work even if you don't agree with it in california. The country's largest gas utility socal gas faces possible fines for allegedly using rate payer money to oppose municipal electrification efforts allegations. The company denies it's clear from internal communication that the aga is at least serving as a clearinghouse for the utilities and local gas associations promoting preemption bills around the country. Robert brule is visiting professor at brown university who researches campaigns like this there are textbooks and this is a textbook example of this kind of information and influence campaign operation. That campaign is framed in customer choice terms that people should be able to choose what kind of energy they use in their homes. Brule says the risk is that it will help. Stall climate action. Further

Jeff Brady Biden Administration Aaron Mayfield Aga Vice President Sue Forrest American Gas Association Biden NPR Karen Princeton University Climate Investigation Center Gas Association Amber Kelly California AJ Robert Brule Brown University Brule
Massive Oil Spill In Israel Has Hit 100 Miles Of Coastline

Environment: NPR

02:20 min | 2 d ago

Massive Oil Spill In Israel Has Hit 100 Miles Of Coastline

"Israeli officials say they're facing the big ecological disaster in the country's history an oil spill in the mediterranean sea damaged about ninety percent of israeli beaches. Npr's daniel estrin reports from the site of cleanup smell. The are here. I'm on. Paul mclean beach. I just passed some ruins from hundreds of years ago in early muslim fortress down here on the beach. the seashells are just caked. Shiny black tar. There are dozens of volunteers helping with the cleanup. This is a group of people who have been out of work because of the corona virus. They used to help clean up here and then on the other side of the beach. I saw a group of soldiers and just volunteers from the public like mary. Sue sanski was so frustrated sad and a bit angry because of what happened the blues. These big pollution of somebody who's recklessly caused a lot of them inch. I don't know how we can deal with collecting all this moly. You can see small pieces of dr. It's p. with israel's national parks authority says ninety two percent of israel's beaches have suffered some form of damage from a beach close to the gaza strip all the way up to israel's northern border with lebanon officials still don't know the extent of the damage in the sea and they worry about the small bits of toxic tar in the sands that could eventually seep into israel's groundwater the easy example is when you think soup instead of salt you're putting aside if you're poisoning of their colovic system. All their torches fishes biology system indices damaged profound utah. The dead covered officials say satellite images suggest ship spilled oil beyond israel's territorial waters a couple of weeks ago israeli and european authorities are investigating. What happened and every day. Hundreds of volunteers are coming to israel. Speeches to pick out little pieces of tar from the sands cleanup effort. That could likely take years daniel estrin. Npr news poll beach. This message comes from npr sponsor capital one welcome to banking reimagined capital. One checking and savings accounts have no fees or minimum and top-rated banking app. That lets you manage your money anytime. Anywhere capital one. Na member fdic.

Daniel Estrin Paul Mclean Beach Israel Sue Sanski National Parks Authority Mediterranean Sea NPR Gaza Strip Mary Lebanon Npr News Utah Fdic
Climate-friendly jobs for unemployed oil and gas workers

Climate Connections

01:28 min | 2 d ago

Climate-friendly jobs for unemployed oil and gas workers

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections. An oil or gas well can keep releasing pollution long after its retired from use. When an oil and gas company walks away from a well that had been producing and does not plug it. In those can impose heavy environmental and climate costs. That's jason bard off director of the center on global energy policy at columbia university. He co authored. A recent report on inactive unplugged wells. The can leak methane which is a potent greenhouse gas into the air as well as other harmful air pollutants according to the epa. There are more than two million unplugged inactive wells in the united states board off says that together they emit as much carbon pollution as two million passenger vehicles per year. President biden has pledged to a program to plug many of these inactive. Wells boorda says this approach could create employment for oil and gas workers who lost jobs during the coronavirus pandemic. many workers have lost their jobs and are struggling and if they have a skill set that can be used to help the environment by plugging these wells. That can be dual. You're putting people back to work in a period of high unemployment until the economy is back on its feet and you're providing an environmental benefit. Climate connections is produced by the for environmental communication to hear more stories like this visit. Climate connections dot org.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Jason Bard Center On Global Energy Policy President Biden Wells Boorda Columbia University EPA United States
'Ropeless' Lobster Fishing Could Save The Whales. Could It Kill The Industry?

Environment: NPR

03:15 min | 3 d ago

'Ropeless' Lobster Fishing Could Save The Whales. Could It Kill The Industry?

"And the lobster industry from member station w. c. a. i. eve zubkov reports after three decades of fishing for lobsters in cape cod bay. Rob martin knows his boat. The resolve inside and out only forty feet. It was big when i got up and now it seems small. It's a cold morning and we're heading out to check on his traps which he dropped on the sea floor about a half mile cape cod canal. Like lobstermen here have done. For hundreds of years martin used to check his traps by looking for bullies that are connected by ropes to the traps but now his are gone and he's about to test a rope lewis fishing system to go. Martin opens up app on his phone and sends an acoustic signal to his lobster traps. Fifty feet underwater release success. Okay somewhere down below an air tank inside. A traffic is inflating a balloon. And then the moment we've been waiting for even gets this land loving radio reporter pretty excited along bright orange balloon pops up out of the water. It looks like one of those blow up tubes. That bob's around outside of car dealership by using this technology martin has eliminated the need for vertical ropes. And the danger. That right whale diving for food might get tangled in rope. Scientists say percents of north atlantic. Right whales bear scars from entanglement in the deadly maze created of lobstermen rope and other fishing lines. They encounter on their migration routes because of these dangers to the nearly three hundred and seventy right whales in existence authorities have instituted seasonal fishing closures in waters off new england. Many lobstermen prefer the closures to the technological leap. They would have to make to adopt rope. Pless fishing the technology is like the model chief today and people expect us to be the chest flip tomorrow. This is beth cassani. Executive director of the massachusetts lobster means association. She also says the cost is prohibitive. Rope lescure could cost a single fishermen up to seventy thousand dollars and she says it may be unsafe because without bleeds on the surface fishing boats the dragnets along the floor can get caught on lobstermen traps. We need a scale scientific unbiased feasability study on the whole thing. Despite these challenges lobstermen rob martin wants to keep carrying out his federally funded tests for the northeast fisheries science center in woods hole massachusetts after all. He's catching lobsters. And martin says he understands the stakes. If right whales keep dying current rates the species could reach a point in the next twenty years beyond which it can't recover and lakers shut down the entire lobster. Fishery in order to save the critically endangered whales lobstermen could face their own kind of extinction for npr news.

Eve Zubkov Rob Martin Cape Cod Bay Cape Cod Canal Martin Pless Beth Cassani Massachusetts Lobster Means As Rope Lescure North Atlantic BOB New England Northeast Fisheries Science Ce Woods Hole Massachusetts
Ropeless Lobster Fishing Is Good News For Endangered Whales

Environment: NPR

03:18 min | 5 d ago

Ropeless Lobster Fishing Is Good News For Endangered Whales

"And the lobster industry from member station w. c. a. i. eve zubkov reports after three decades of fishing for lobsters in cape cod bay. Rob martin knows his boat. The resolve inside and out only forty feet. It was big when i got up and now it seems small. It's a cold morning and we're heading out to check on his traps which he dropped on the sea floor about a half mile. The cape cod canal. Like lobstermen here have done. For hundreds of years martin used to check his traps by looking for bullies that are connected by ropes to the traps but now his are gone and he's about to test a rope lewis fishing system to go. Martin opens up app on his phone and sends an acoustic signal to his lobster traps. Fifty feet underwater release success. Okay somewhere down below an air tank inside. A traffic is inflating a balloon. And then the moment we've been waiting for even gets this land loving radio reporter pretty excited along bright orange balloon pops up out of the water. It looks like one of those blow up tubes. That bob's around outside of car dealership by using this technology martin has eliminated the need for vertical ropes. And the danger. That right whale diving for food might get tangled in rope. Scientists say percent of north atlantic right. Whales bear scars from entanglement in the deadly maze created of lobstermen rope and other fishing lines. They encounter on their migration routes because of these dangers to the nearly three hundred and seventy right whales in existence authorities have instituted seasonal fishing closures in waters off new england. Many lobstermen prefer the closures to the technological leap. They would have to make to adopt rope pless fishing. The technology is like the model chief today and people expect us to be the chest flip tomorrow. This is beth cassani. Executive director of the massachusetts lobster means association. She also says the cost is prohibitive rope. Lescure could cost a single fishermen up to seventy thousand dollars and she says it may be unsafe because without bleeds on the surface fishing boats the dragnets along the sea floor can get caught on lobstermen traps. We need a large scale scientific unbiased feasability study on the whole thing. Despite these challenges lobstermen rob martin wants to keep carrying out his federally funded tests for the northeast fisheries science center in woods hole massachusetts after all. He's catching lobsters. And martin says he understands the stakes. If right whales keep dying current rates the species could reach a point in the next twenty years beyond which it can't recover and lakers shut down the entire lobster. Fishery in order to save the critically endangered wales lobstermen could face their own kind of extinction for npr news. I'm zuck off on cape cod.

Eve Zubkov Rob Martin Cape Cod Bay Cape Cod Canal Martin Beth Cassani Massachusetts Lobster Means As Lescure North Atlantic BOB New England Northeast Fisheries Science Ce Woods Hole Massachusetts Lakers
Leadership academy to teach Phoenix residents how to reduce urban heat

Climate Connections

00:47 sec | 5 d ago

Leadership academy to teach Phoenix residents how to reduce urban heat

"More child poverty and they have the lowest percentage of tree canopy cover planting trees and vegetation can reduce the heat but bermudez says residents are often unaware of these solutions or how to advocate for them so this spring the nature conservancy is helping launch an online urban heat leadership academy the classes will be taught in both english and spanish participants will learn about strategies for community organizing and reducing urban heat things like advocacy facilitation communication storytelling. The goal is to prepare people to launch tree plantings and other green projects in their own communities so their neighborhood stay cooler as the climate warms. Climate connections is produced by the center for environmental communication to hear

Bermudez Center For Environmental Commu
How we can climate-proof the power grid

Climate Cast

04:10 min | 6 d ago

How we can climate-proof the power grid

"That's former texas congressman. Beto aerobic on msnbc talking about the texas power grids failure during this week's extreme cold wave. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. Hutler today on climate cast. How do we climate proof our energy infrastructure going forward. This week's blackouts are just the latest example of how vulnerable are grits are two more extreme climate change driven weather events. She nazi is an assistant. Professor at purdue university school of industrial engineering hierachy welcome to climate. Cast thank you so much for having me. Start at this with compassion. Millions of our fellow americans without power heat water food even gas in subfreezing temperatures with that in mind. We much colder winters here. In minnesota than texas and our power grid is very reliable here in the winter. Why did the energy infrastructure in texas fail so tragically this week so it's not so much about the absolute values of the temperature. Right it's more about your region has been historically you still is just the fact that the temperatures really caught them by surprise. But i wouldn't say that. This story is unique to tax us. Well so on that point. Extreme cold isn't the only weather events challenging our grids. What other ways does climate change impact power so if you look on the power outage data collected by the department of energy but you can easily see First of all severe weather and climate events have been the major culprits for the large-scale sustain. Outages if you look at the data from early two thousands you see that there's actually been a three fold increase in the frequency and intensity of major power outages and exactly to your point. You know these extreme events can range from cold snaps to heat waves two hurricanes the wildfires. I mean there's no shortage of unfortunately You know natural disasters that hit our greg. So what are the best practices in hardening electric grids to climate change and extreme weather events. So there is really a number of different solutions. one micro-credits grids. They've been shown to have a positive impact on the overall resilience of the region during disasters Peres undergrounding some of the key. Assets and leveraging the techniques that we've already developed for other for seeing you know the impact on not only demand or physical infrastructure but also supply capacity prior to the onset of events roshii for people who aren't familiar. What are the benefits of micro grids so for example right now. What we're seeing in texas They're not able to balance the note right. So with micro grid not only it can alleviate note from the overall grid and allow the busing to happen a little bit more easily but also can sort of provides energy to stop off the customers trying to get to the source of what happened in texas and why it doesn't happen in other places right. Some people trying to falsely blame frozen wind turbines for power loss in texas but natural gas coal nuclear infrastructure accounted for eighty seven percent of the loss of generating capacity there. This week renewables just about thirteen percent is overall the shift to renewable also improving resilience. Absolutely there is plenty of evidence adds diversity and moving more towards renewables and distributed resources. Just improve the overall resilience not to mention the sustainability outcomes. Right while i'm grateful to everyone who plans and delivers energy to our homes than this week. So a big. Thank you to everybody who does that. She nateghi assistant professor at purdue university school of engineering. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast. Today thank you so much for having me. I really enjoyed speaking with you today. That's climate cast. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton.

Texas Paul Hutton Purdue University School Of In Msnbc NPR Department Of Energy Minnesota Peres Greg Purdue University School Of En
How Much Is The Weather In Texas Due To Climate Change?

Environment: NPR

04:43 min | 6 d ago

How Much Is The Weather In Texas Due To Climate Change?

"For People watching this week's weather include marshall shepherd who was director of the atmospheric studies program at the university of georgia professor shepherd. Welcome back to the program. Thank you for having me. I just want to start with the obvious. We have really really cold weather in a region does not normally expect it. Can we connect that to climate change. Yeah that question always gets asked. But i always start the answer. That question with a reminder that it is winter and it is february and get cold outbreaks naturally This is a case. Where that word. The polar vortex has resurfaced typically. It's sort of keeping that cold air up in the arctic but occasionally it can be breached or weakened you get these disruptions in the polar vortex and then you can get this cold dense air news down into the lower forty eight. That's what we're seeing there. There is some evidence in the science literature that these disruptions will happen more frequently and so that we may see more of these types of events. But it'd be sort of scientifically-responsible to link this specific event to climate change. But we know that there may be a connection Going forward with these types of events. Appreciate the frankness there. There has been some research suggesting that arctic warming is weakening the jet stream which might change the kinds of air that come down to the united states. Does that seem to be happening. Yeah that's that's what. I was the looting to with this disruption of the polar vortex. There's something called arctic amplification whereby the arctic regions warming a bit more intense than we are down in the lower forty eight and there are signs. The papers that suggests that that causes a much wavier jet stream pattern with more high amplitude ways if you think back to high school physics so we get these really cold events but we also get these really warm events during the warm season as well so this isn't an unprecedented coal. We've seen it before. But as my colleague judah cohen has often talked about these things that used to happen less than frequent less frequently. But it seems that they're happening yearly. Now which is something. We're keeping an eye on. Seems to be happening more frequently and i just want to underline another thing blindingly obvious but sometimes when it's super cold you get. I internet troll. Maybe even the former president saying something about everybody says it's global warming look how cold it is Climate change means extreme weather right. Not just warm weather. Well i i often say whether as your mood in climate is your personality. Your mood today doesn't tell me anything about your overall personality. And nor does a day of cold weather or hot weather for that matter or a week of it. So that's a very sort of poor that we do get off and on twitter and in various places when i see someone saying that. It clearly sort of illustrates that that person doesn't understand perhaps the difference between weather and climate and the other thing i would say is because our winters have been so warm as our climate changes when we do get extreme cold weather at feels that much worse because we don't experience their extreme cold as much as we used to. So suppose somebody an official from texas called you up and ask for advice and said you know we're upgrading the infrastructure we're rebuilding the infrastructure. We don't want an experience like this week to happen again. And of course because we're doing infrastructure we wanna think twenty years ahead thirty years ahead fifty years ahead. What kind of advice would you give texas atmospheric scientists. I really don't think as much about the resiliency an infrastructure. But what. I would say this first of all. Let's kill the sort of misinformation out their own renewable energy and wind farms. Because it's clear that that's not the sole issue here. Wind farms operated much colder and icier places. The deck is in fact. I'm reading that. It was a combination of various things involving natural gas. When and resilient planning. So what i would say is that we need to move from being a reactive society on these extreme compound weather events to more proactive. What i often say these days is hope or waiting and seeing is no longer acceptable acceptable weather. Risk mitigation plan. Our weather models are good enough that we can plan ahead ten days ahead months ahead and so i would. I would ask these power companies to build in more resiliency in the short term and long term because we can pretty much tell you what's going to happen now. From a weather perspective texas did have some advance warning in one question is why they were not able to take advantage of it. And i'm just going to note. Also we are reporting elsewhere in today's program. Just what you said. The texas has had problems with every kind of energy source in this cold weather. James marshall shepherd of the atmospheric science program at the university of georgia. Thanks so much. Thank you

Arctic Marshall Shepherd Professor Shepherd Judah Cohen University Of Georgia Texas United States Twitter James Marshall
Arkansas school district goes solar, boosts teacher pay

Climate Connections

01:22 min | Last week

Arkansas school district goes solar, boosts teacher pay

"The i'm dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections in batesville. Arkansas teachers are getting raises. Thanks in part to solar power meghan renaissance communications coordinator for the batesville school district. She says that four years ago teachers salaries were below average for the state and lower than other districts in the county in order to attract and retain our staff. We wanted to increase the pay so the district started looking for ways to cut costs at the time. It was spending more than half a million dollars a year. On utilities to reduce energy costs the district installed thousands of led lights replaced windows. Donate fach units sealed leaks and improve building. Insulation handed installed almost fifteen hundred solar panels that now generate about half the district's electric. We're the first school district in the state of arkansas to invest in solar panels together the solar power and energy efficiency. Improvements are saving the district more than three hundred thousand dollars a year along with other cost cutting measures and state funding. Those savings have helped raised teacher pay across the district and that is going to continue to go into our teacher salaries. That's the whole goal. We want to be the best in the area for teachers because that means that our kids are getting the best Climate connections is produced by

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Batesville School District Batesville Meghan Arkansas
Forest Thinning To Reduce Wildfire Risk Gives Opportunity To New Startups

Environment: NPR

03:35 min | Last week

Forest Thinning To Reduce Wildfire Risk Gives Opportunity To New Startups

"As the risk of wildfire grows scientists say the us needs to aggressively thin out overgrown forests. That's expensive and it can create massive piles of worthless brush and branches san brash colorado public radio reports some businesses. See a new market. If there's a piece of wood out there james gaspard will probably take it to waste. Would dead trees char trees gaspard owns bio char now in berthod colorado. At the company's main location we watched cranes load beetle logs into a shredder. Conveyor belt then spits the chunks into rusty metal counts. Killed is taking eleven cubic yards of shredded trees and we're converting it into carbon in a vacuum environment. The burning process creates something called bio char a carbon rich charcoal that helps soil retain water and nutrients. Gaspard says colorado's legal cannabis. Industry loves stuff for its plants. But lately fires have come up with all sorts of other uses. Animal feed cat litter even. So we're gonna market for the stuff that had no market many foresters c. entrepreneurs light gas barred as essential to confronting a new era of massive wildfires tomb raider works with the colorado state forest service. He says millions of acres across the state need treatment. But it'd be expensive just to treat ten percent of our landscape. It's the most pro to fire. Occurrence costs four billion dollars and that's just in colorado tens of millions more acres need work across the west. According to federal estimates reader says the traditional timber industry often isn't interested in helping pay for those projects because they don't produce the best would it's typically coming from these really dense areas of forest so they typically very small bent stam's crooked basically not a form of the log that's conducive to processing into a solid product but some companies aren't deterred by those quirks golden west pine mills in all colorado. Andy sized trees from a fire mitigation project. These boards will become the backing for taxidermied animal heads inside his shop. Hines has bigger ambitions. I guess you might say we're all the magic happens in here. Hines is at work on an assembly line to woodside gluing narrow pieces into broader panels the areas that we log just give so many small diameter trees and people still want wide material. The federal government has grants to help companies develop these sorts alternative wood. Products hines has applied for one past recipients. Have won money to turn wood into biofuel. Burn it for electricity. Even make it into beams. Strong enough for skyscrapers. The list is fascinating but experts warn. Western forest need more than scrap wood startups. We also have to recognize that. There's a need for public investment. This is courtney schultz a four scientist at colorado state university. When it comes to fuel reduction she says the challenge is often just capacity. Neither the forest service nor the timber industry has enough resources. We need to start thinking about wood products as a co benefit. That will work in some places but it's not going to be answered or problems in other words. Private companies can't fix western forests on their own. She's glad some members of congress want to spend billions to make communities and woodland's more fire resistant npr news. I'm sam brash

Colorado San Brash James Gaspard Berthod Colorado State Forest Service Gaspard Hines Stam United States Courtney Schultz Andy Federal Government Colorado State University Congress NPR
Northwest Natural Gas Company's Plan For A Carbon Neutral Gas System

Environment: NPR

03:23 min | Last week

Northwest Natural Gas Company's Plan For A Carbon Neutral Gas System

"Fossil fuel companies are facing an existential threat governments and businesses promising to zero carbon emissions to fight climate change. In fact president biden wants to do that for the entire. Us economy by the middle of this century so a growing number of gas companies have their own plans to decarbonise. Here's cassandra profeta of oregon public broadcasting. Darren arnold lights the burners on a natural gas stove at a testing facility near portland oregon. He's using a new lower carbon gas mixture for northwest natural gas utility that serves nearly eight hundred thousand customers burner. We're looking for an ice blue flame. Mice little peaks on the tips of the plan. It works just like a regular guest of and that's a key part of his company's plan to build a carbon neutral gas system by twenty fifty km hiding is the senior vice president of operations for north west natural. She says her company's pipelines vast network of them don't have to deliver fossil fuels. Let's use them differently. Let's think about the gas grid as we think about the electric grid and just change with going through those pipes. She says northwest natural could continue fueling home furnaces and industrial plants with renewable natural gas. Here's how it work i. They'd capture the methane. That's being emitted from rotting food. How manure and sewage treatment plants and put that gas into the company's pipelines hiding says burning that is a way of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and providing a very similar climate benefit to wind and solar the supply of waste methane is limited though so the company would then mix that lower carbon gas with hydrogen gas. Which has no carbon emissions hiding says her company could even make its own. Hydrogen gas northwest naturals talking with an electric utility about building production. Plant it would use renewable electricity to make hydrogen gas by splitting the hydrogen from the oxygen and water think about the natural gas distribution storage system as a massive battery for wind and solar energy. The rest of the world is kind of already on this and in the us. Were a little bit behind. Evan ramsey works with nonprofit bonneville environmental foundation to increase renewable energy. he says making hydrogen would be a great way to use the extra wind solar and hydropower that we can't easily store. The european union is already offering incentives for companies to do just that a hydrogen pretty well suited to solve a lot of problems at once and really be this june afire between renewable energy and our society's energy needs sadat with the environmental group earthjustice says renewable gas simply can't replace all the natural gas using today. You don't even have enough of this gas to make more than a dent in the overall gas demand. There's also a limit to how much hydrogen you can use and metal pipes without causing damage. He says and a lot of waste. Methane isn't renewable in the same way as when in solar the sun hostage shine in the wind has to blow but we don't have to raise animals on factory farms that create these lagoons of manure that generate this amount of methane. Scott says we'll have to use way less gas to completely get rid of carbon. Emissions group is pushing cities to outright ban natural gas hookups.

President Biden Cassandra Profeta Darren Arnold Oregon Evan Ramsey Bonneville Environmental Found North West Portland United States European Union Scott
Flooding problems at D.C. landmarks likely to worsen

Climate Connections

01:28 min | Last week

Flooding problems at D.C. landmarks likely to worsen

"I'm dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections. George washington lived much of his life near the potomac river from his birthplace in colonial beach. Virginia to his estate mount vernon andy chose where. Along the river's banks. The young nation would build its capital city but as the climate warms this historic river poses a flooding risk to nearby landmarks. Steve walls is director of environmental programs. At the metropolitan washington council of governments has increasingly intense rainstorms upstream can caused the river to overflow and when a hurricane hits the eastern seaboard. Then we have the risk of coastal flooding from storm surges. Coming up the river as the river narrows the water level skate. Even higher in our region than in some of the coastal regions along the atlantic. Even without extreme weather sea levels are rising and pushing the river closer to flood. Stage wall says that parts of the national mall the old town neighborhood in alexandria virginia and the george washington memorial parkway already have flooding problems. And they're likely to get worse. So there's a broad range of infrastructure and other treasures here in the washington region that can be at risk Climate connections is produced by the center for environmental communication to hear more stories like this visit. Climate action's dot org.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Vernon Andy Steve Walls Metropolitan Washington Counci Colonial Beach Potomac River George Washington Eastern Seaboard Virginia George Washington Memorial Par Atlantic Alexandria Center For Environmental Commu Washington