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Vacuuming potato-size nodules of valuable metals in the deep sea, and an expedition to an asteroid 290 million kilometers away

Science Magazine Podcast
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1 year ago

Pollution from pot plants, and how our bodies perceive processed foods

Science Magazine Podcast
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1 year ago

Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones

Science Magazine Podcast
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11 months ago

A new species of ancient human and real-time evolutionary changes in flowering plants

Science Magazine Podcast
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1 year ago

Odd new particles may be tunneling through the planet, and how the flu operates differently in big and small towns

Science Magazine Podcast
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1 year ago

Possible potato improvements, and a pill that gives you a jab in the gut

Science Magazine Podcast
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1 year ago

How far out we can predict the weather, and an ocean robot that monitors food webs

Science Magazine Podcast
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1 year ago

How dental plaque reveals the history of dairy farming, and how our neighbors view food waste

Science Magazine Podcast
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1 year ago

Ancient artifacts on the beaches of Northern Europe, and how we remember music

Science Magazine Podcast
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2 weeks ago

What we can learn from a cluster of people with an inherited intellectual disability, and questioning how sustainable green lawns are in dry places

Science Magazine Podcast
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1 year ago

Probing the secrets of the feline mind and how Uber and Lyft may be making traffic worse

Science Magazine Podcast
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11 months ago
Science Magazine Podcast

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Pirate’s gold may not be that far off, as there are valuable metals embedded in potato-size nodules thousands of meters down in the depths of the ocean. Host Meagan Cantwell talks with Staff Writer Paul Voosen about the first deep-sea test of a bus-size machine designed to scoop up these nodules, and its potential impact on the surrounding ecosystem. In an expedition well above sea level, the Hayabusa2 spacecraft touched down on the asteroid Ryugu last month. And although the craft won’t return to Earth until 2020, researchers have learned a lot about Ryugu in the meantime. Meagan speaks with Seiji Sugita, a professor at the University of Tokyo and principal investigator of the Optical Navigation Camera of Hayabusa 2, about Ryugu’s parent body, and how this study can better inform future asteroid missions. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency; Music: Jeffrey Cook]