Movie Review: “Green Book”

The Filmcast
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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Which I said, let's see I'm looking up here. I said I watched green book, and it was about a white racist who teaches a black guy how to be more black and how we'd all be better off racists in the victims of racism, just got along. Better your enjoyment of the film will likely depend on your receptiveness that message. And I literally thought I think I'm only my leagues agitating. When I literally thought I was just stating the text of the film like that. That is what I thought the movie was trying to. Say a lot of people were like criticizing me being like, you know. That's super harsh. Dave. And I'm like that is what the movie is like it's Viggo Mortensen plays a racist. There. Mercia Lally plays a black pianist going through Jim crow, south touring and and being subject to racism and the to kind of teach each other. Better understanding if humanity, and I think Mark Harris did a great job of running down like what's wrong with movies like green book, which they feel like they are out of I dunno late eighties early nineties. Right. This kind of by this. This type driving. Exactly, right. The like driving miss daisy. Both sides have something to contribute to the conversation. Like, oh, like like, look at how much we all have to learn from each other. You know, like. I'm sure I can imagine somebody who was big in Hollywood in that period. Looks at this way. Now now, the white guys driving him that's the movie, I know. And so it's not I mean, it's certainly I can understand why people find it to be an offensive film. And in fact, the the relatives of Dr Don Shirley have since come out and publicly denounced the movie, they have said like this movie contained they called it. A symphony of lies is what they said face like everything about the movie is that it is a gross misrepresentation of their relationship because like a big part of the movies about Dr Don, Shirley, the pianist and how he's like so disconnected with his family. And and he doesn't like he feels like a like an outsider to his own race. And it's it's Viggo Mortensen 's mildly racist character that helps them to reconnect with his like, it's all this stuff and his. The real life on Shirley families like well that never happened. None of that was true. But at least it was a symphony of lives. That's correct. The poster will say a symphony. No, I don't I don't know if they're gonna use that poco, Jeff. But in any case, I mean, yeah, it's so it's not even really that accurate and the story as it just it just feels like it's from a different era. Feels like we don't really need this kind of story anymore. We have other choices today about you know, how we've you these types. I mean. Yeah. There's there's a more diverse slate of filmmakers behind the camera. These days that can tell stories like this and from a different and more interesting perspective. So poignant views like, you know, more nuance point of us. I will say when I first saw the trailer for this. And I was like oh, my Herschel eilly. That's so that's interesting. This looks cool Vigo Mortenson and then Peter Farrelly. And I remember we talked about project greenlight a couple years ago. I will never forget how Peter fairly treated producer EFI Brown. And like, you know, she's a really well known and very prolific. Black producer. Yeah. And she's made a lot of stuff and Peter fairly would not show her any any instance of like respect or like there's just like a like subtle racism going on there.

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