Audioburst Search

Coming up next

Boeing’s Crisis Grows

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal
|
5 months ago

Coronavirus updates: Trump extends social distancing guidelines

AP 24 Hour News
|
5 hrs ago

Singer-songwriter John Prine in critical condition with COVID-19 symptoms

America Tonight with Kate Delaney
|
6 hrs ago

Seattle - Federal Way man fatally shot during dispute over parking, Snohomish sheriff's office says

First Light
|
4 hrs ago

Trump concedes U.S. coronavirus death toll could be 100,000 or more

AP 24 Hour News
|
9 hrs ago

L.A. working to bring homeless indoors with more shelters, hotel rooms amid coronavirus pandemic, Garcetti says

KNX Evening News
|
9 hrs ago

Trump Says U.S. Death Rates Likely To Peak In 2 Weeks

News, Traffic and Weather
|
9 hrs ago

Kudlow Says $2 Trillion Relief Package 'May Not Be Perfect'

News, Traffic and Weather
|
9 hrs ago

'Answering the call' - USNS Comfort sets sail for New York

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney
|
10 hrs ago

Nashville - Country music star Joe Diffie dies of coronavirus at 61

Glenn Beck
|
15 hrs ago

Tornado rips through Arkansas city, injuring 22 people

WTOP 24 Hour News
|
15 hrs ago

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Symbols be a is where we begin the program today the Boeing Company a global aerospace manufacturer as the company itself would surely like to remind you buddy company-owned at the moment for the fatal problems with a single model of a single plane the Boeing seven thirty-seven Max still grounded still driving Boeing's share price lower and the effects of which are still spilling out into Boeing suppliers and customers and the economy as a whole marketplace's Mitchell Hartman gets us going let's start with the airlines it's not like air travelers see a bunch of empty seven thirty seven Max planes grounded on the tarmac but mcadoo unikrishnan at airline weekly says this is affecting the industry free tickets against what they expected to have in their fleets and now for example in American and South West cases they have twenty odd fewer aircraft on that means fewer routes they can serve meaning fewer options and higher ticket prices for flyers Boeing is trying to get regulators to recertify seven thirty-seven Max as safe to fly so airlines will start taking delivery and ordering new planes again. The company hasn't stopped production but it has slowed the assembly lines for more than fifty planes a month to just over forty says analyst Scott Hamilton at the Lee Ham company near Seattle if they further reduced production. Then you're gonNA start seeing some layoffs labor force and administration you may be an engineering although they've got their hands full as it is how about the impact the US growth overall Paul Ashworth at capital Economics says Boeing has slowed its purchases of raw materials and airplane parts which is contributing to the slump in US manufacturing so I mean what's been going on at buying has been factory this has has the strike at General Motors but some analysts still think the company he has a bright future here's Jim Corridor at cf are a research feel looking backwards a lot of blame too it's time to the company if you looking forward Boeing is one who companies in an industry that has seeing very high demand they will be generating profits for a long time he says when Boeing does start selling 737 Max aircraft again they'll be priced cheap to move I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace Boeing's board by the way meeting as we speak in San Antonio Texas today