For Chinese New Yorkers, Talking About Hong Kong's Protests Is Complicated

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Hundreds of thousands of protesters rallied in Hong Kong over the weekend and one of the largest marches in weeks to pressure the government to loosen restrictions on democracy the continuing protests have been complicating the relationships of Chinese New Yorkers WMI sees Katherine Fung says those who express their own opinions at rallies are online facing some kind of backlash of their own when Hong Kong started protesting their government we each had wanted to do something to support them she's lived in New York for more than twenty years but she was born and raised in Hong Kong and she says it's like her second home so on her day off she went to a rally in Manhattan's Chinatown but just want to be part of a and they smoke in you know Hong Kong we stand with you something like that she was shocked when people posted pictures of her at the event and we chat it's a popular Chinese social media apps the negative comments just kept coming they said I separate the community chan works as a liaison between Chinese New Yorkers and the city council part of her job is going to events hosted by local Chinese community groups but lately she hasn't been getting as many invitations is really hurting you know those people are used to be my friend we kind of your work in the community as well it's one example of how tensions over Hong Kong are affecting New York city's Chinese communities Justin you as the president of the Chinese chamber of commerce of New York he says the protests are polarizing some people believe the demonstration the Hong Kong our people's right but the other people think a law and order is above everything he's not surprised people are on opposite sides because Chinese immigrants are diverse coming from mainland China and Taiwan and other places that means lots of different opinions about China's sovereignty but there is also disagreement among people from Hong Kong Katie Wong grew up in Hong Kong and came here after college she manages a group on what's up for her former classmates who live New York she says protesters are breaking the law there is rules and I've pulls the what collisions an ordinance about all these rules and then people yell at me whenever she posed her views she got shut down people are killed you can not state this in this group so how do people deal with these differences one created a separate group for her former classmates discussed anything but politics Justin you says many people are reacting in a similar way some don't talk about Hong Kong in public and if they're with friends and family will change the subject to avoid arguing that is it doesn't mean you have to give up your opinions but family harmony coming into harmony they are the top priority for us and you size because many Chinese immigrants in New York City have other problems they should unite despite their differences we have jails issues in China right now we have special high school you shoe was short of housing let us solve our problems in New York City first but Sanders says when it comes to Hong Kong she just can't relate to other trainees new Yorkers I want to be a Chinese that in

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