Bias can have a large impact on health

Second Opinion
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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Twenty years ago official reports documented the many ways in which health is impacted did by our genes and our behaviors but also by external social determinants. Some of these like race economic factors and insurance coverage may seem obvious but other external social factors like transportation education housing and food security. Thirty also play an important role. This is Dr Michael Wilks. With a second opinion about twenty years ago official reports documented the many many ways in which health is impacted by our genes and our behaviors but also by external social determinants. Some of these. He's like race. Economic Factors and insurance coverage may seem obvious but other external social factors like transportation education education housing and food security also play an important role in how healthy we are. Bias is another factor that contributes to disparities in care but is often ignored particularly with regard to marginalized communities including racial minorities. LGBTQ he cute communities those who are beasts or disabled and many more since the report was written twenty years ago not much has changed with regarding differences in the health among marginalized groups obamacare certainly helped improve access and health equity for nearly fifteen and million people but disparities in life expectancy infant death rates. Malnutrition diabetes and many other markers just have not changed much. Some of these social issues are hard to change. But one factor that is not if given sufficient attention is implicit bias by healthcare workers. Implicit bias sees are those opinions and assumptions that we all have that affect our behaviors and beliefs toward others unconsciously and without our awareness. Even when you look at the highest highest income and highest education levels and you compare the health of blacks and whites blacks have worse outcomes in fact. Hi income educated. Black women have worse health outcomes than even poorly educated poor white women as I have mentioned in past reports. Blacks also get treated less aggressively for documented pain in our offer fewer treatment and options when they have a serious disease. Healthcare teams are composed of human beings who hold biases and prejudices. Joss lost like everybody else. In the general population but healthcare workers are unique in their positions of authority and control over our lives lives. Rudeness and mistreatment in the healthcare system is a common experience for blacks and Latino patients and are black and Latino medical students didn't and nursing students all have their own stories about staff and patients who regularly mistake them for people working in facilities food service or janitorial services. There is the distrust that grew out of historical racism such as the to Ski Gi experiments whereby by hundreds of black men were denied treatment for syphilis in order to observe what the CDC called the natural history of the disease so now a generation or two later how do people begin to trust the CDC and doctors who are the ones that enrolled enrolled them in ethically bankrupt studies so it turns out that some of these social determinants of health are nut so external but are actually usually internal to the healthcare system. Implicit bias is hidden subconscious and unintended to the offender but it is very real and very explicit to the offended. It is often easier to get food to a neighborhood or change our approach approach to say health insurance then it is to acknowledge and address our biases as an article in the Journal. Health Affairs recently pointed out. Attitudes can be changed but only when they are acknowledged an owned the process of making us all aware of our biases needs to be a part hard core education but there is no better place to start then in the healthcare system where people are vulnerable and dependent on

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