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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Very very excited about this conversation and to be able to bring you three bass women together are here in DC. Thank you for applying to my email and wanting to be on the podcast so we will get started first with your name your organization annexation. And you're all relatively new and your roles. So why is the favourite part of your new job so my name is Vet Simpson. Listen I'm the CEO of democracy. For America I love the fact that there is a network of amazing black women. Who are doing this work that I get to be sisters with and collaborate with and commiserate with I was pleasantly surprised at the number of black and Brown women who are in the movement space who are are growing into leading organizations like this and I can tell you that the sisterhood has been one hundred percent real and I love that and that was a pleasant surprise? You not particularly 'cause I'm the first woman to lead my organization and the first woman of Color Just the sisterhood has been amazing. And the way I've been welcomed into the community has been fantastic west. We Love you you I'm Rhonda emptying. I'm the executive director at move on happy to be here. I've been in this role since October of this year or of twenty one thousand nine hundred my favorite part of being executive director move on I can make all the decisions but to be honest. I mean I mean. I've been a chief of staff a chief of program a deputy director. I've I've been a practitioner in the work in campaigns and elections and organizing rising and leadership development for a long time. I've had a lot of opinions. I pushed a lot of e D's and and presidents A to approve proposals. I've put before them and in organized to get the support in either in Labor or in advocacy because the organizations to do certain things and I've never had the decision making power until at this level and I like being able to make the decisions and make the decisions based on years of experience in what I know is important in order to lead in the organizing world in organizing space that we that we are. You're in and I'll tell you like the amount of decisions I make on a day to day basis as executive director has probably quadrupled and at some points talking with credit earlier. It's exhausting like really gotta decide something thing in our budget. That's around ten thousand dollars next to a question around. How do we drive the next version of our impeachment campaigning and what does the strategy and our posture austere in that moment? So the level of decision making the mounted decision making them points is exhausting. But it's also exhilarating and I love it. She likes to make decisions. I don't So I'm Karenni Williams. I am the executive director at repower and I have been in the role for about five months ONS and so Since the summer and I'd see the thing I love about Job So far the most is I get to work for an organization that smaller in scale jail than other organizations that I've worked for before and in those organizations I've always felt like it's so hard to bring about change because you have such bureaucracies that you you have to go through and levels of bureaucracy and now I am in charge at a pretty small small small organization comparatively what I've been in before and now I can actually move and change quickly at a quicker pace so really loved about my job. I was also telling Rana the thing I love the most as we have our mission. Shen envision is around censoring people of Color and women of color specifically in the work. And it's not tagline that actually shows up in the work we do every every day and that's really powerful and that's the thing I enjoy the most is that we are being about what we say about and it's not just about you know no it looks good on paper actually shows up in the work every day and that's incredibly enjoying for me a satisfying for me. I think we can all agree. We love when organizations actually really live their values and not just state their values and listening to three of you. Talk actually got a little emotional because this is the first time I would have ever been able to put together even a panel discussion like this of women of color leading these progressive organizations and so so many of the discussions we've had this season the BG honestly last year. Five years ten years ago they did not exist. I and I think it's important for us to talk about the fact that everyone does start somewhere and for the majority of us as black and Brown women it is at the local level Wa ball. So how did you start at the local level. What brought you into politics? I'll go for me actually when I thought about it's It was policy making the actually drew. Man's politics I really enjoyed thinking about how we can actually affect you a change through policymaking and politics is a is a tool and it's a path to doing that Politics affects our daily lives every single day. And so for me it was I was drawn drawn into. Wow I can actually engage in a process that actually give about go about making change so policy was actually what drew me to politics takes at the local level and at the local level you can also feel the impact of changes that you can make at the federal level with a little harder. Because you know it's everywhere but in in your in your locality and your mayor's race in the City Council race in your school board in your small community. Politics actually matters every single day and the decisions about these policymakers make actually affects you at who picks up the trash all the you know the rules and regulations that folks don't think about that is decided by politicians nations right. So that's what really drew me into politics. The local level is really around my love for policy and policy changes and I saw that politics was like one of the most direct way that you can actually impact policy so from a very young age I always had a righteousness about me that sometimes times laughable but I think my close friend get you now. Close friends can identify with with that statement. But I always wanted. Did you do something that was about making the world a better place I went in. I went to law school and I was in law school in Portland Oregon and I was on the trajectory to be family law attorney and a bunch of white people. Organize me to come into advocacy and to give up your practice of law and instead engage in political organizing and they did a really good job and I'm really grateful. They completely changed my life and I'm so incredibly happy and it was a moment and I had just graduated law school in Portland Oregon and I thought. Oh there's a state Democratic convention and I WanNa go what is this about. I have an opinion. I WANNA be there so i. He called the demo the State Democratic Party and I said I can't afford this ticket. Who something like five hundred bucks? I had no money at the time I graduated school. I could barely pay monthly bills and I said I WANNA go but I can't afford it. How are you GonNa get me there? And they said call the Oregon bus project and I thought why would I call a bus company but it turns out the Oregon bus project. It's now under a different name. Oregon was a scrappy startup up. Youth organizing project in in Portland. Oregon and at school was to engage young people in politics instead of going join Wall Street. Folks should stay in their communities and work to build a better community for everybody