Dinesh Reflects on the Teachings of Thomas Sowell

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

I talked a day or two ago about Thomas soul and it's for me it sort of refreshing to do this in contrast with critical race theory. And of course, there's a new book out on Seoul. It's called maverick a biography of Thomas sol, it's written by The Wall Street Journal writer, a Jason Riley, and I've kind of been making my way through the book. But as I do, it also flashes my mind back to my friendship with Seoul over the years. And the way that he has been a mentor to me. Years ago, when I published my book at the end of racism, this, by the way, is my most scholarly book. If you haven't read it, it's. A giant book, several hundred pages, 2000 footnotes. And the book was a little controversial because it talked about the reason why you have group differences in academic achievement and economic performance. It attributed those differences not to race, not to biology, but the culture. Even so, Glenn Lowry, prominent black scholar who was at that time affiliated with the American enterprise institute, another guy named bob Woodson resigned from AEI, they sort of, they broke with AEI and it was a supposedly all over my horrible book, and at that time I was, you know, this was only my second book. I was a young scholar, so it was kind of a problematic for me to have these luminaries distancing themselves from AEI was causing problems for AEI, but to my defense rushed the greatest black living scholar in the country, Thomas soul, who basically said that he had read the book extremely carefully, and it was the best book on race relations written since Gunnar modals classic work in American dilemma, published several decades earlier. Over the years, I got to know soul and his wife quite well, his wife is also an economist. And I thought interesting as I would talk to them about racial discrimination and they would go, you know, dinesh when people think of race discrimination cases. They think of the sort of classic civil rights situation going back to the 50s and 60s a black guy and a white guy apply for a job, the black guy is better qualified the white guy gets the job. Hey, that's racial discrimination. And they go out of a hundred cases dinesh today, only one or two I like that. The vast majority of cases have nothing to do with that at all. They are all based upon statistical issues of underrepresentation. So a black eye applies to our job. He's actually not qualified. He doesn't get the job. But then he sues and he claims that blacks are underrepresented this corporation and because blacks are, let's say, 12% of the surrounding population in San Jose, but he wasn't hired at this Silicon Valley company. They're obviously racist. They need to implement affirmative action policies, so both soul and his wife said that is actually the normative. That's the normal case that is now fought out in

Coming up next