Cody Jones, Alexis and Afghanistan discussed on This is War

This is War
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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Push through obstacles or at least figure them out. But for Cody, there was more to it than that. There was the added challenge of being a new father that required a whole different approach to life. The marines had found them in apartment where the little family could stay temporarily while Cody got settled into his new leg and continued rehabilitation. That way the family was able to bond in private rather than in the shared house where many other of the marine couples. Lived. And then things really took a turn for the worse that night. She woke me up at like two thirty three o'clock and she's like, eight. Can you feed him on tired? I was like, yeah, I got him. So I made his bottle and everything. And then I brought it back to the room and I laid down in the bed and was feeding him, and I fell asleep feeding him. And it was about five thirty six o'clock. Were I woke up and I was going, oh, she it's his next feeding and he's not crying thought he was in is the best and that and then I woke up, looked over saw he was in my arms and he wasn't breathing. And it was at that moment that I sort of doing CPR or like the children's on the video you had to watch before we got discharged with him. And then I woke up my wife and they call nine one one. He's not breathing pre. Sure. He might have passed oil ready the next few hours. As horrible as Cody ever had experienced beyond losing their baby and already unimaginable experience codeine Alexis endured questions from the police about his behavior since losing his leg questions about whether he suffered from PTSD and requests to go through the sequence of events. Just one more time. Cody says that in retrospect he understands that the police were following their own procedures in protocols, but in the moment it was really hard to take. Then again, there is no danger to you. That makes any sense at all. No inconvenience, like police questioning or even an amputation that matters compared with your child's life. No is pretty close. I mean, once we lost him everything I went through just seem like a paper cut and was absolutely nothing because the the worst day of my life and the worst film of my life was that morning when I woke up to find he'd passed away. Once I woke up that morning, I found that Aden pass away those the worst moment in my life. I mean par to they. I was over everything with my Li, like, I mean, I had some moments in a few days before afterwards or is like, fuck, okay. Now, missing a league, what do I do? But it wasn't that bad, but it was at that moment that I woke up and he was gone those. This is nothing. I just lost my first born son that hit me hoarder than anything in Afghanistan or with losing my leg when he was in Afghanistan. His faith in his training and his belief that bearing his burdens as an example to other marines allowed Cody to serve in a way that made him proud to have been a marine at home. He had his own faith in God to lean upon and the hope that if he focused on being an example and striving to show the tragedy can be overcome, he might actually overcome it. I know several guys turned out goal and I know I could easily turned to a bottle to self medicating, but instead I just I didn't see a point for me. It was okay. It doesn't solve anything. There's nothing anyone can do. And this moment, all I can do is just move forward and keep living my life and do what I want to do and set an example of hell. Hell you can move forward even at the worst times in your life. Looking back now, I'm thankful in a way that I got blown up in Afghanistan where I'm at now, because I would have never even had those six weeks to hold him to spend those moments with my wife of waking up in the middle of the night and changing diapers because I at least had those six weeks to whole tame and spend that time with him and have those memories with my wife and no one. Nothing never take those away from me today. Codeine, Alexis and their three. Sons live in Texas where Cody works with his grandfather, fixing tractors, he recently took in another marine buddy who is having a hard time because even though he is in combat ready in the end, being a marine is about so much more than combat for Cody Jones service means just that living up to your own standards and then working hard to be an example to others for sure, and his sons, of course, but most of all for himself so that when he looks back on what he's done, what he has gained in what he has lost, he will respect the man. He was and hopefully revere the man that he will become. Next

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