Why Is Watergate So Misunderstood? Lord Conrad Black Explains

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Lord black have to discuss. The first things first in the break, you mentioned the reputation of The Washington Post. You've written a work on Nixon, could you just give us your historic understanding of the reporting of Watergate and why so many people misunderstand what they actually wrote and why the conventional wisdom on that reportage is so wrong. Of course, complicated subject, but to be fair, but if the contents at a great deal, there has never been one shred of probative evidence that a serious court in a dispassionate atmosphere would accept as conclusive. That mister Nixon himself committed any crimes. He certainly didn't know anything about the break in of the Watergate. First entry before it happened and was horrified when it didn't happen. And that his people at anything to do with it. And the so called cover up consisted of his admittedly not telling the truth to the public several times. That is true. But the presidents do that to me sometimes. And he wasn't under oath and it wasn't a crime. He squandered a lot of political capital as he himself admitted that it wasn't a crime. And the case against Congress essentially on the theory that money was advanced by the Republican National Committee with his approval, the pay for the legal bills of attendance in the Watergate affair. And he did do that. But he didn't do it. And he did authorize him, but not under any basis of altered testing, not to get them to tell anything other than the truth. He was paying the money to them. So that they would have the legal fees paid, be able to take care of their families while the trials went on. And wouldn't be absolute sitting decks were prosecutors saying, all right, we'll do a plea bargain. We'll let you up lightly, but you denounce the people above you and take it straight up to the Oval Office door, which is the way the prosecutors work, particularly in the District of Columbia, which is, you know, that was a 90% democratic voting electoral

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