Will Consumers Embrace a Fake Influencer?

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By now, you may have become familiar with influencers on social media. These tend to be online celebrities who built a reputation for their knowledge and expertise on a particular topic companies love influencers because their brand ambassadors who can encourage their followers to buy products through their postings followers. Love influencers for many reasons among them that they come across as real people, which brings us to Michaela Sousa. She's an influence her who happens to be fake, a computer generated influence, or who has taken social media celebrity to a new realm Michaela has also attracted investor interest in the start up that created her joining us via Skype from San Francisco to explain all this is Wall Street Journal reporter Eurico yori first of all tell us who came up with the idea of Michaela Souso who's also known as Lil Michaela. Well, there's a startup in Los Angeles called brewed that came up with the Kayla. It was co founded by a guy named Trevor MC federal who has a background in music. He was a songwriter and DJ. He wrote songs for people like Katy Perry and kisha. So this kind of parlays from his musical interests and wanting to create something and he created little Michaela. She seems to have taken off. And I think from there he sees potential in creating a sort of cast around Michaela cast of characters of other CGI influencers where they have interweaving storylines and Luma Killa was launched on Instagram in two thousand sixteen right? When was she reveal to be fake, she launched on Instagram in two thousand sixteen and she was only revealed to be a CGI influence or in April people did have their curiosities about her and there were questions raised. So I think that kind of added pressure to them staging her coming out as a CGI character who many followers on Instagram does Michaela have at this point right now, one point five million inner postings, your what sort of products has Michaela promoted us as she has promoted shampoos. She has more. Recently showed up in a worldwide hug campaign to celebrate their fortieth anniversary, and they put her on billboards magazines. I think she was in some of their in store displays as far as on Instagram. A she's done collaborations with high end fashion brands, particularly around the fashion week season. We'll of shelf-life to Makila and other CGI's have at this point. Oh, they seen as novelties or something more around whom storylines can be developed and products can be promoted while it depends on who you talk to. I talked to a bunch of people who are on the existing human influence or space, and they have big doubts about whether or not she can last this period of oh, she's fake. She not fake, and they're just real believers in the fact that what makes influencers different from other celebrities is that they are just like us. They have problems with their hair products in there are helping us figure out how to best dialer hair or do Frank pranks that make us laugh and and things like that. There have really just ordinary people who. Who take video blogging to a new level, whereas michaela's not humans. So she can't really feel the burdens of being human which I think is some of the authentic connection.

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