Malik Willis, Josh Allen, Josh discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show
|

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Same as a big recruit. So at that time, during draft training, but a 5 years ago, Josh got to see the gap, right? But he had an internal belief that when he when he got all those resources that he would be there. So when he had a belief, too, he had a bunch of talent, right? He can run fast, he can jump high, he can throw it a mile. I didn't teach Josh Allen how to throw it hard, right? So he had and also Josh is a guy that if you explain it to as soon as he understands it, he is now he owns the information, right? Some guys you got to continue to remind them over and over again, that teach them that new thing and they got to hit it a bunch of times. Josh is incredibly inquisitive. He understands it. And he picks things up really quickly. So I can keep going on that. So he had a list of things that he had. And then he needed resources. He needed to be put in a position, we could proper base and movement and how you use the ground. He needed to learn that and then he needed a bunch of reps at it and then he needed a place that would draft him that would continue down that path, which is what Ken Dorsey, the quarterback coach at the time, now The O.C. Brian devil, then OC now head coach of the Giants, right? The people around him help facilitate that. And so he needed these additional resources from a mechanics standpoint from how to learn it from a system. And then talent. I mean, his rookie year, you know who his number one receiver was in Buffalo? There's a trivia question for you. Kelvin Benjamin. So he needed a resources, okay? So I just think it starts with Brandon bean and Terry and kimba gula, but they said, you know what? We're all in and what he has and then we're all in on putting these resources around him the correct ones. And so what should have happened in 6 or 7 years happened in three? And that's it. And so when I look at a Malik Willis or any of these guys who have a ton of tools, they have, they have tools, they need resources. Malik Willis, whether he's a bust or a boom or whatever the opposite of a bus is or a superstar. I think it's not going to come down to him. It's actually going to come down to who takes him and what resources they put around him. Going back to my point of more bus in the league happened because teams fail in the ability to develop around them more than that player was a bus. I guess you could say like Lamar and Baltimore, right? Like what a stroke that was for him, even though it was, it was a long night for him to be drafted 32nd overall. But for him to wind up in that spot, they changed their offensive eventually. And now they're trying to pay him. But that seems to be, what do you have? What do you need? And they gave him what he needed in that regard. A 100%. I think we try and create a model, the fans and media trying to create a model around the prototypical quarterback, which is just dumb nowadays because there's all sorts of ways to do it. This position has never been more equal opportunity. We got 5 ten guys getting drafted Heisman and breeze and Russell. We got lefties. We've had two quarterbacks from North Dakota state taken in the top three picks in the last 6 years. I mean, it's wide open. And so they're no longer like 6 foot four from one of these 5 schools. Like I used to be in the 90s, right? So nowadays, it's wide open. So we can't have a model for a type of quarterback. The model is, how do we take a quarterback what he has and are we as an organization? In a position to immediately give this guy each resource. Identify what the resource is and whether that's what we do here at this place or not, we put those resources around him. I think Lamar Jackson is a perfect example of an organization who said, here's what this guy has. Here's what this guy needs and boom. Every single person from the quarterback coach to the office of coordinator to getting Mark Andrews who played in a spread system with a runaround quarterbacks to like every single piece, they're still Baltimore and they still get after the quarterback and they still do all that stuff. But boom, they immediately build around them. Kansas City is an example. Buffalo is an example. Jared Goff, what didn't end up being the guy, but the way that they brought in Sean mcvay and built around Jared, those couple of years. Like, that was a spot. So there's a handful of teams that are doing a fantastic job of doing this. And so now that there's these open spots with these young guys, what's Seattle going to do? What is in Carolina? What are these other places going to do if they take a quarterback to build around this young guy? Last one for you, Jordan. I love this conversation. You just make me smarter, and I just love getting right into it here. But last one for you here. So again, we've just discussed Josh Allen, who you've had for years. And the jump that he's made from year one, two, three, we just saw an incredible jump from another one of your guys, Joe burrow. What does a jump from year two to year three look like for him? Do you think? Jordan? Well, I think what I look at and what I think my role with some of the when guys reach the success that Josh and Joe have had is we're not really working on fundamentals anymore. They essentially own their stroke. They own they make zero about they know why and fix it. I don't know what I do is I help guys get the self correction. The next phase is and I'm not going to teach Joe how to win. That's why I'm asking this question, Jordan is because what an incredible leap from a guy coming out from a blown out knee, right? So what. We just discussed, what does somebody need? What do they have? What do they need? He needed protection. It seems like they've hit the heck out of that in free agency. Now comes a draft. What do you think will look like for Joe burrow? Well this year. I think with Joe, the way that I, the way that I approach these guys is efficiency. And so when I look at Joe week one to Joe, call it the AFC championship game. Right. As the amount of plays where he's has efficient movements versus inefficient movements. And so now I can talk for 20 minutes around what my definition of an inefficient movement is. But really how we put force into the ground to create leverage to move our hips to the next spot. And so in the AFC championship game, Joe had three plays that I thought were inefficient movements. One was a pick..

Coming up next