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People like the holders are returning to their homes define their belongings wrench as I continued to walk in how do you have on books I had on tennis shoes and the water was like so at my utility wrongly will still water up high in there I'm just happy that we was able to get our family out in we're safe like many others the holders are trying to figure out what to do next hundreds of people are still without power in officials say some homes may not be habitable for months Mallory white is with the Mississippi emergency management agency she says it's too early to say how widespread the damage has been any type of way that they need to be affected are there any long term sheltering needs that they have that once we began as the best man we'll be able to get a better scope of how this flood really did impact the Jack the metro area Mississippi governor take Reeves says residents have learned about resiliency from past disasters and says the state is ready to step up to help Katrina told us that our responsibility is to plan for the worst pray for the best and expect somewhere in between back at the holders home any dress propped open the front door to air the place out some of the things I would I would society like my pictures are the most of a mall put him up a lot higher some of the stuff is it will have to go because of this mail now only a few inches of water made it into the house but that's enough to ruin most of their belongings as they walk to their place Mickey holder takes inventory of what's left he says the road to recovery will be long but they'll get by when you got a low wall as family and friends is helping you in the trust in god you feel better about doing it over because it's gonna be it's got to be done more rain is in the forecast for Mississippi and that means the possibility of more misery for those trying to clean up for NPR news I'm Kelly Vance in Jackson Mississippi there's a massive wave of civilians seeking safety in northern Syria up to a million since the start of December we're gonna hear from some of them now they are fleeing an offensive by the government and Russian forces against the last rebel held province it live tent camps in the cold winter have been springing up near the border with Turkey and here's Deborah Amos MBE route reached some of those in the line of fire the messages come late at night when it's dark and it live and the lights are still on the bay route there's a familiar ring not from a cell phone signals too weak but on what sap and internet messaging service hello my name is Mohammed Atta dean token two debemos I live here in northern Syria ellipses to I can see many people fleeing their homes the situation here is really catastrophe hello dean is an English teacher now an aid worker in the largest city in it live province is open is home to some of the displaced accent on supporting three families other than my family so I'm currently able to manage that's it another message comes in from activist Abdel Shafi L. Hando he was living in a village that was suddenly on the front lines the plane is tossed **** tugging dos with many rockets I just tell my daughter and my son in my life enjoy the way home with my little pie I got nothing with me now and I can go I can go back because the is so close regime and Russian airstrikes in the rebel held province has targeted hospitals schools and bakeries and killed more than a thousand civilians in the past two months the U. N. is pleading for a ceasefire the Syrian army advances been so rapid the roads are jammed with cars and trucks says Fawad Sayed oesa he is the founder of violent Assyrian nonprofit aid agency I sell with thousands of families in their car and they trying to find a shelter for their children we were just said more than ten thousand families still under the trees the weather is so bad it's minus five and the night he says the scale of needs is overwhelming his volunteers deliver plastic sheeting for those without tens and serve hot meals in the it live city stadium but he can only feet about twenty percent of the new arrivals we are trying to help all the people in in the streets in the road but there is yes themself families there have built houses with no doors no windows no electricity are filled with families what is the offensive advances panic people are heading north hoping to find a place in camps closer to the Turkish border says Mohammed Ella dean the aid worker they flee with little more than the clothes they have on most people here can't afford ranging get become to take their luggage and furniture with them this is why they are leaving everything behind them he says it's now seventy dollars for a fifteen mile trip and and possible some for families will now have to depend on humanitarian aid to survive it's like is your knee to the unknown even aid workers are now displaced Akhmed college a translator for a charitable organization found shelter with his younger siblings in the new ten camp near the Turkish border but it's still not safe he says so we hear voices off air strikes and artillery fires so it might be brothers and a a week and the frightening actually the life is so hard but there is no other choice there is no way that safe to go this is the calculation for those living with this war doctors in the remaining functioning hospitals are making plans to evacuate if the air strikes continue aid workers fear the border roads used to deliver relief supplies will be cut off everyone is trying to buy time to stay alive hoping that someone can deliver a ceasefire Deborah Amos NPR news Beirut this is W. NYC in New York good morning I'm Richard hake.