Cancer, Dr Folkman, Monica Burton Yolly discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

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So as as she was saying, I think that after time people can quit look over their shoulder every day. I get up and wondering if the is looming for them again and move on. I mean, that's what makes me so happy about the show about Sharon's experience because she was told by physicians don't have any children and after a while five and she said, none cared. I'm gonna have my kids normal life, Monica mcnealy. How I mean, how many immunotherapy is are are out there right now. Well, we have fifteen cancer indication. Fifty indications. So fifteen specific cancer conditions that are now approved have drugs approved by the US FDA for treatment using him, you know therapies. But what's another fascinating thing about our field is there are literally thousands last count about two thousand different new immunotherapy drugs agents approaches that are currently undergoing clinical testing. So the field is just been blown wide open by by the proof of principle that untangling this biology can have a true transformative effect on patients lives, and I just took a single landslide two thousand currently in development or clinical trial, different agents from hitting different tart, different components of the immune system are all undergoing. Nicole testing across the world. And when's the last time cancer research has seen that kind of explosion in potential therapies? Oh, I don't think ever. I mean, this is really this is really a completely new era. And you know, we really have to knowledge that why are we here? We're here because there's been a tremendous investment on the part of our government on the part of of of industry in understanding tumor biology in a very deep level. And that understanding is leading to so many different possibilities for for treatment of cancer. I wonder if I, I, I wanna just inject a little bit of not skepticism, but perhaps a little caution here because and please correct me if I'm wrong because I remember a while ago maybe a generation ago, there was a lot of excitement, for example, around Judah Folkman research and NGO Genesis and cancers thinking like if we, if we sort of figured out a way to block the blood flow to tumors at that would be a way to. To really get rid of any and all cancers in the body. Very exciting line of research perhaps didn't yield the kind of treatments that we're seeing. Now with immunotherapy should we so should we continue to have some some measure of a grain of salt or skepticism, even around this moment of great excitement of jail Magnette couldn't have possibly picked a better example. You know, we didn't plan this, but you know, one of the things I'm sure Dr Alison can will chime in here too, is that that work that Dr Folkman did to look at the blood vessels is now being combined with the drugs that Dr Allison's group has developed with with came out of his work and the combination of targeting the blood vessel together with targeting the tea with activating the taking the brakes off the t. cell is producing even better responses in some tumors. So at that nothing goes wasted. That's that's correct corrected the one of the things that we're realizing that. Is coming coming. True is that does that just immunotherapy can be combined with not only other therapies but with conventional therapies chemotherapy. And as you said end you enter Genesis therapies in virtually anything that kills tumor cells can be used to prime immune response. So that's why they're so many combinations out there. So many that we've, we've got a really, you know, have have data before deciding to do a combination in any kind of scale or else would you know we're going to be going down a lot of false leads. All right. Well, you know, we've had a lot of callers who want to join us because obviously cancer is a huge issue that does have an impact on so many people's lives. You're listening to our to Jim Allison. He was awarded the two, the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize in physiology or medicine for his work in cancer immunotherapy, he shares that a word of the tussock Honjo of Kyoto University, and you're also hearing from Monica Burton Yolly. She's president of the American society for Clinical Oncology. Chief of the division of surgical oncology at danafarber, Brigham and women's hospital cancer center. So we've got a couple of the top researchers in cancer with us this hour..

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