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The Process is About Discovering Together with Author and Playwright Kimberly Davis Blasso

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Castagna. That and today my guests but nearly twenty five years as a stage director playwright and producer her first book irreverently titled. I'M A little brain dead. Chronicle chronicles her medical adventures after stroke. She is a finalist for the readers. Favorites awards for Humor and nominated for an Indie Book of the year. Award for humor as well. She recently released her latest book birth and other surprises and she is currently writing a y adventure series. Welcome Kimberly Davis boss. Oh Hi Christina. Thank you happy to be here. Oh thank you for coming all the way out here. And congratulations on your latest book. Release thank you very exciting and I have to say thank you to my uterus as well for you to like that dedication. I just absolutely I was like. Oh you're such a mom that is yes after. Pushing uterus is an unsung hero. And it's an organ that does not get a lot of attention and I just thought you know if you're gonNA write a book about birth. Why not start with a dedication that really says thank you thank you uterus? Where life began life all started and began and all the things that gives us. Yeah I was just laughing and I say thank you to think. That's part of my practice like I say thank you to my home. Thank you to my car and I was like. I haven't thanked my uterus. Yeah I was thinking about it and you know. A lot of people. Dedicate their books at their kids. And and I thought why can't choose between my two children so I just sort of thought this would cover it just in general way. That's a good way it so you're the you're the mom of a teenager and a school age kid and I'm the mom of teenagers to and what I love about your writing is that you really embrace chaos and messy nece. I absolutely love that and I feel like you're definitely a playful parent. I hope so I mean I I. I've kind of for me if if I was the kind person where everything had to be. Clean all the time. I think I would be a disaster. I'd be a wreck. 'cause I just. I have never achieved that kind of level of Newton organized. At least it's a little better now that my kids are older But Yeah I've definitely had to embrace the chaos. Yeah the whole my kids growing up. My house was like hardly ever clean especially when I was writing and I had a deadline only God no. Yeah yeah that's yeah that's the trick but what I love is that it doesn't only just embrace messy nece. It kind of puts. It shines a light on like mom. Shame or guilt. Oh I hope it does. I mean 'cause I wouldn't want you know we're doing our best right. Roll donor bass world'll dealing with these little humans who have their own opinions about everything as they should their little humans. Right and so yeah. I mean you're dealing with this entire other other person so You know you can. You can do your best and I'm not really sure what shame accomplishes I don't think it accomplishes anything. I don't think it really helps the person like if you genuinely trying to help a person I don't think shaming them is helpful right. Yeah and I think like What you said earlier is that we expect motherhood to like the school owing wonderful like we're in tune with our children and everything is just like it's wonderful unmemorable. I honestly think it's just noise and my face and something stuck to me and just slide this time it is. I mean I think there are beautiful moments and I believe me. I am as happy everyone. That women are getting their due in terms of. Let's honor women in the amazing thing that motherhood is but I Become concerned when it becomes this end there for us to even more perfect experience and you have to experience it in this perfect way That that kind of makes me think no. I think we're getting off getting off track a little bit right because it's because what if you're not achieving that perfection every day and if you are while more power to. Ya 'cause I certainly never once had a perfect. I get to the end of the day when my kids were little and put them to bed and think and talk about this in the first book even a little bit. I am going to be a better mom tomorrow like that. Is My my mantra? Why because I really sucked today like I really did so tomorrow. I'm going to. I'm going to be a better Bob. You know and they you know because there's no perfect so yeah and I think that day at a time attitude is what we need to get through. You don't know what's coming at you. I'm sure your kids are creatives as well like maybe if they've watched you be one my daughter very much My daughter is a writer and My daughter is a writer. And she's a very prolific She won't even think about publishing anything right now because she doesn't think any of it. Is You know ready. But yeah she writes. She writes a lot. So that's that's pretty cool. My son is I'm not sure my son's eight so we're not sure what he's what he's yeah that they can video games and you know he's figuring out but firma young age. She wrote what she used to come with me. When I was producing theatre she would come with me. to the theater. And you know I would find her in the lobby like directing actors and you know making up scenes and doing her thing so yeah from a pretty early age. She's been pretty creative. So I'm interested. You're playwright before and I've actually had I think we've had three playwrights on the show and it's a very It seems like it's it's still it's reviving almost because I feel people want a sense of community. So how has that? How did you go from play writing to writing Memoir So it was a very distinct moment for me in the past prior to two thousand fourteen whenever I was expressing myself wrestling with a problem figuring something out always. The format was a play. You know that's how I saw The characters dealt with whatever I was doing and and then in two thousand fourteen I had a stroke and Unlike most greatest journaling always taking notes you know and what came out of that was a book and it was very distinctly book. And I'm not entirely sure why that story needed to be told as a book I suspect part of it at the time was that I didn't want to see my story. Onstage ahead just lived it and I didn't WanNa see it. I don't know hundred percent that's true because I didn't really sit down with myself and like other conversation wise. This plague really. Oh I don't know shut up and right that's it. Yeah that'd be much the writers brain right there. Just get it done. So yes. That story needed to be told as a book And maybe because I don't know because it's so complex because there were so many you know even framed it in a way where you're saying medical adventures like the whole thing is it's very tragic or you know having a stroke. I can imagine I survived by the way. That's the spoiler. So yeah well. It could have been tragic. It could have been shown frame. It has an advantage but I have the best possible scenario. I mean if you if you have a stroke and you end up with kind of recovery that I did. You've done really really well. I mean I can't pretend for a minute that I didn't have the best the best possible scenario because I got help so quickly. They were able to help me had the kind of stroke that they could help. Like I was very lucky. In the way things lined up Actually referred to that as the. It's the look east as my life because the way things lined up And how they turned out that you couldn't ask for better so yeah and The the thing is that you not only made it an adventure. You made it really funny. Oh I hope so. I hope you can laugh or you can cry right But I do remember. I was taking notes in the hospital. Actually had my laptop in the hospital with me and hospitals are absurd places. Oh they're great. I have so many scenes in house. They're hilarious. It's a very weird. And just the whole setup. I was very young when I had my struggles. Forty four although I have learned and I'M GONNA I'm GonNa give you this piece of little fact. Is that one out of four stroke. Patients are under fifty. So that's just something that's near right. I never knew I never knew I had no idea Some forty four and They actually had on a cardiology ward. You know which is the patients are much older so it's younger person on this car. It was just Yeah it was ripe with many many situations that that definitely needed a little absurd touch to them. It didn't take much. I don't think to make it hilarious because it is ridiculous they wake you up to give a sleeping pill right. That's that's the old joke But yeah I mean it was. You know they don't let you walk anywhere they don't let you you know it's a strange strange situation as a grownup to be in a place where you are not in control. The doctors and nurses all speak a language. That you don't understand right yeah acronyms. It's like this magical place with all of the acronyms And everything runs in really weird time. There's a lot of like hurry up and wait in a hospital. Yeah a lot of hurry up and wait as a playwright. You probably know that. Like working in production. Hurry hurry up and wait. Yeah and it was A. It's like being at a really really bad hotel really poorly arranged hotel where they like stick needles in. You know bad spa like the worst spa in the world. Like you can sleep all you want but you gotta be poked in Prong. The bad food pillow feels like a brick and although I do know that before procedures they give you a warm blanket. That was like the best thing. Oh that's heated blanket. I don't know who I talk about it. I don't know who figured that out but that was perfect because they need a calm you down and what all of this that you wrote even though you made it really funny. It actually gave you some credibility to do some speaking on stroke awareness. I've been really And I think it's the combination of my background is. Obviously I'm pretty comfortable in front of a group and the American Heart Association. The American Stroke Association Have asked me and to and I've spoken to different. Groups have spoken at different charity events because They wanted to share my story. You know I mean some of the medicines that I received or a direct result of the kind of research that those organizations are doing now so this is a really direct line between what the what they're doing what I experienced and I'm I'm happy to help you know if my story if telling. My story helps them raise funds so that the next person get saved or or just raises awareness. You know when people talk about stroke they expect. They expect an older person right. I mean I did always you know. And so So Yeah I've been. I've been very fortunate to be asked to kind of help. Pay It forward a little bit. What has anybody you know has has have you seen like a someone come up to you and say thank you like has had well. I've had Two people that I know of that that credit my story was saving their life. Which is stonning you know and people talk about you. Know people ask you What are your what are your rider? Goals like what are you. Mustn't award this happened. I mean I'm never going to top that I had done a done. A talk out in. Where was I lucked percent? I think and Gentleman came to my talk and I remember him because he chatted with me afterwards and and he was an older gentleman and he he emailed me and said. Oh and reading your book. I'm enjoying it. Thank you so much. And then kind in from him for a while and he got back in touch and he said Hey. I just wanted to let you know. I'm fine but three weeks ago. I had a stroke. I recognize my symptoms because of your story in our conversation et CETERA. So I got help right away and I'm fine. Wow Yeah and that's happened more than once which is incredible Which is why my you know. I. We'll talk to anyone anywhere about you. Know I talked to parent groups. I talked to all kinds of people you know because if I can if I can help. People Understand Just you know the symptoms. What to look for this can have anyone. If you have a brain it can break like we should all know about this. You bruins pretty important. Oh Yeah Yeah..

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