Roger Stillwell, Jim Otto, Stanford discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

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Gary Kabali with us here on sports by line alluded to it before the break, but he co produced a documentary film on professional football. And I don't know whether you can still find it today. Disposable heroes that was honored by several film societies. Is it still around someplace Gary, you can find it? Yeah. You can Google it disposable heroes documentary. And a couple of places that are selling it. And there's a couple of links we can go and just watching online and what was the thought process behind doing that? Well, I wanna credit Bob more the great Stanford tight end who later played many years in the NFL for the raiders, he was actually the first player drafted the expansion draft by the Bay Buccaneers. But when I go back a long way, and he was going to law school, Stanford and got his degree. And then he he went to work for the NFL players association and he kept seeing these players in the trouble. They were having just into life after football. He saw some of them, you know, their marriage is go down the tubes. Others couldn't walk. This were so despondent that they committed suicide. And so we got the other one eighty care. I think there's a heck of a movie here documentary, and I won't bore you with how long it took us to get the thing funded and, and produce it probably took about five years, but we struggled, but we finally got it done. Bob did most of the heavy lifting. But you look at that film today and it and it goes in all of the things I just mentioned. But there is very little mention of concussions in very little mention that it was all about missing the camaraderie, and it was about never having that rush in that thrill playing in this being the locker room with all those guys and we talked about injuries, but it was mostly knees shoulders, and things like that. I think one player Jim Otto in, in the movie mentioned he'd had about fifteen concussions, but that was the only time concussions were mentioned. Another guy that was featured movie. Interesting enough was J Simpson. So he looked back on that now. And I think we, we had we had the germs of something that became much deeper more serious, one of the things I remember. About the documentary is the I guess he was in his room. It was kind of a darkened room on talking about Jim on the hall of Famer. And he talked about how long it took him to get out of bed, and he then listed all the different surgeries and the problems and injuries that he had, it was so powerful think the two most powerful for me in the movie were that were were the scene with, with auto, not only about the dark room watching him put his pants on it took him five minutes to get dressed go to his pants on in yet. He's one of lucky ones he still really, really sharp. He's got successful business at a great frame of mind. But he's got used physical problems result. It was planning Roger Stillwell. We talked about Stanford lot today, but it Roger was all American with Chicago with Stanford was the early first-round pick of the Chicago Bears had a great first couple of seasons. And then he had a horrible knee injury. I mean one of the worst knee injuries you've ever seen and never played again in he their seat. In the movie when he's crying. He's talking about how he misses football. He's tried to adapt. And it was it was really powerful here. Maybe you can help me here because I've asked this question before athletes that is the fact that in talking to athletes over my career. I have never had one. Tell me that no matter how they feel today. It wasn't worth it. And I'm just wondering what was the mindset that allow these guys to go out and do that knowing what could happen, especially today, when there's more information out there, but even back when you did this film about those athletes. One wasn't that allow them to do this to themselves with? That's a great question and a great point in your right? I've had the same conversation with dozens of the hundreds of athletes, guys, you can hardly walk in in. Would you do it again? Absolutely. Absolutely..

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