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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

A couple of weeks of eighty degree weather, and suddenly we go to six months of hundred degree weather. So if you are looking at stuck with cata plant in the wrong place, or you know, when I planted this the tree it's next to wasn't very big. And suddenly the tree has gotten big. And now the plant doesn't get enough sun. That's a common situation that happens in our landscape. Maybe you've got a plant where it's doing really, well, you still get to see it because of its location. It's behind something or you were hoping to be able to look out the window and see the beauty of that plan. This is probably a good time to do your transplant. It's early in the year. The temperatures are good. The soils are relatively soft to be doing the work. It's easiest star new. It'll be easy on the plant. So if you're asking if you're having to move something now would be a good time. A couple of tricks for you that can make a big difference to help with the success of moving. The plant is the more of the roots that you can pick up and move the better. When you purchase a tree or large shrub, and it comes in a container at a nursery. You look take that container off. And you look at the roots. They've been cut because otherwise it would never fit in that pot that you purchased it in. When you transplant plant, you're going to cut some of the routes where the plant is growing, you're going to take it out. You're gonna put in a new hole so it immediately needs to replace the roots that have been removed. That's not a big deal. The plant will do it. But it needs those fruits to recover to maintain the growth that it has above the ground the amount of roots in the ground dictate how much grows above the ground. So when I cut those routes, I suddenly limited the available food to the plant in. If I have made a really small root ball. I can only move a few routes, but I got a really big plant on top. You may see the plant die back a little bit. It may shed some leaves you can help by trimming it back. Transplant it trim. It back a little bit take some of the stress off if you'd like, but the more route you can move when you transplant the plant them more likely the plant is going to be successful. The only problem with this equation. Is that a cubic foot dirt on average cubic foot, which is like one big bag of compost or soil that you might buy someplace and weighs about seventy pounds. Give or take so to move a plant the more have to move the heavier. It's going to be the harder. It's gonna be. So we tried to find that balance. Their plant gets too big. You're talking about needing heavy equipment to move it. Now, if you happen have Abaco, or you know, Bob cat, that's not a big deal. But most of us don't keep one of those in our driveway. So it's a good time to transplant, but think of that balance think about maybe that plants too big move, or I'm going to have to hire somebody to do it because I don't have the ability or the tools to move. Maybe you just plan new plans dead. That's okay. It's okay. To cut stuff back. It's okay to cut it down. It's okay to pull it out. If you're going to put a different plan to enter move to a different location. Go ahead. It's all right. The cut down a tree. It's okay. To tear out a shrub. It really is don't feel guilty about it. But if it's small enough, and you have the ability and you want to transplant here's a couple of tricks. Go around the plant. A month in advance. You know, you're gonna move this rosebush, for example, you got a new location for well about a month before you're ready to move it. Go around at the drip line with the shooter shovel one of those long skinny shovels drive. The shovel into the ground as deep as you can right at the route line. Pick the shovel up move over a little bit. You know, leave a little bit of a gap drive. The shoveled through what you're doing is. You're kind of perforating around the soil, and you're cutting some of those routes early on before you move the plant. In that next month period of time that plant is going to try to repair the roots that you cut it's going to create a lot of really fine roots to replace the ones that have been damaged. When you're ready to move the plant that one month later, you can get in there and dig up the whole thing, and what you have is a bunch of routes that are already starting to grow new routes for you. You have the new location. You have the hole already dug in the new location the right size. Right dep-. You lift out your rose, shrub, whatever you're moving. You put it in that whole you immediately back fill it with the local soil, not with real rich soil with full compos, you go ahead and back fill it with the soil. It already was growing in and that plant will have the best success. It should start new routes easily for you should be ready to go a good drenching with seaweed solution. Maybe I do that once a month for the next six months will help encourage those roots to grow and as always. Apply. A Michael Rizal fungi whether you sprinkle it in the hole before you put the plant in some of the granular forms or you use the liquid and you add it to the drench. It is one of them products. That is going to help increase the root growth. It's proven effective way to get really good root mass on a plant in the better the roots, the healthier the above ground part, the bigger the above ground part will be so if you've got that plant the wrong plays. It got big on you, whatever you really want to keep it. Now's a good time to transplant it. That's an easy way to transplant and guarantee its success. Folks, we're coming up on the news break at the bottom of the hour. This is gardening naturally. Give me a call.