Lindholm, Jay Phillips, Nippon Foundation discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Lindholm and on this show. We explore things you tell us you want to know more about you. Send us questions. And it's the job of me and melody debt to search out answers. Today we're going to explore a part of the world that not much is known about in fact you could be one of the people who helps us understand and learn more about this very important and very very large part of the earth as you grow. Older one of the reasons not much is known about this. Vast part of our planet is because it's really hard to explore their. You need a lot of special equipment and technology and it all needs to be waterproof. Have you guessed what i'm talking about yet. It's the ocean specifically the bottom of the ocean. The sea floor. The land underneath the ocean is as varied an interesting as the terrain up on dry land with mountains and canyons plains and forests. That's right forests. There are kelp forests where the kelp a type of seaweed is as much as one hundred fifty feet tall. So today we're going to explore what's known about the bottom of the ocean and we're going to pay special attention to what's not yet known with two people whose job it is to discover more other one jay phillips on the director of the nippon foundation jebco seabed twenty thirty project very long name. We normally call it seabed. Twenty thirty for short. My name is vicky farini. I am a senior research scientist at columbia university. And i lead one of the regional centers for the seabed twenty thirty project and what is seabed. Twenty thirty seebeck. Twenty thirty is a global. Collaboration designed to map our sea bed or ocean floor by the year. Twenty thirty the project got started because as jamie mcmichael phillips told me. We really don't know much about what it looks like on the bottom of the ocean hardly anything. The ocean size is about three hundred and sixty two million square kilometers and to date we have mapped nearly twenty percent of the world's ocean.

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