Montana, South Dakota, State Department discussed on Pacifica Evening News

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Five ridge has been chopping down. Trees. Digging a trench. Pipeline on property that it had no legal rights you. It would be as if I went up to your house and just brought a bulldozer and started talking your property. I mean, it was that brazen in that illegal one of several co owners have undeveloped marshland filed for an injunction in July alleging that the Texas based company was clearing trees and trenching on his property. Without permission energy transfer partners is also behind the hotly contested Dakota Access pipeline. It claims as has the right to use the property through expropriation a court hearing on the expropriation battle is scheduled for the end of no member. Meaning the company will not meet its initial deadline of completing construction by October a collective of activists fighting against the pipeline have created the low allow the water is life floating resistance camp. The Rosebud Sioux tribe and the fort Belknap Indian community have sued the Trump administration in Montana federal court over its decision to grant a permit for the keystone excel pipeline, President Trump overturned President Obama's decision to deny the permit. The Indian tribes say the administration violated a whole host of laws. Victoria, wicks reports. The South Dakota and Montana tribes. They're suing secretary of state, Mike Pompeo and now retired under secretary for political affairs. Thomas, Shannon, junior. The tribes say the Trump administration overturned the Obama administration's denial of the pipeline without establishing a new record of facts supporting the opposite conclusion Natalie Lander has an attorney with the native American rights fund. She says this lawsuit overlaps to others filed in Montana against keystone. Excel when it comes to administrative procedures, but she says the suit specifically addresses the land and treaty rights that tribes have tried to bring to the attention of. The State Department decision about where the pipeline would go or how it will be constructed was made. I. And then later some lip service paid the tribe, but no real consultation with the tribes ever occurred. The complaint points out that the pipeline will cross two sources of water for the mini with Tony rural water system that serves the Rosebud reservation the suit also alleges that the State Department has not analyze the impact of inadequate leak detection practices, the potential hazards to tribal members from oil spills and the effects on the environment and historical sites and artifacts. The proposed K XL pipeline does not cross current reservation land the comes close to Rosebud and runs through a Montana county adjacent to the fort Belknap reservation as well. As crossing ancestral lands in both states. The State Department will now have sixty days to file a response. I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city, South Dakota. On the eve of the global climate action summit in San Francisco this week women leaders from around the country and the world held the climate forum today in San Francisco with the aim of bringing women to the forefront of climate change solutions KPFA's mirror novelty reports. Organizers of today's forum say that one of the untold stories of climate change is that women are impacted first and foremost by climate change, and because of that women's participation in climate solutions is a necessity Osprey or yell lake is the founder of women's earth and climate action network, or we can international and we have studies from all over the world, including the United Nations that really demonstrate that if you're talking about food security food sovereignty water issues change in lifestyle, you have to have women's involvement, and they need to be at the table and leading. And unfortunately, that's not the scenario. We're dealing with right now and as climate change impacts. Are increasing. We really see the need to uplift women's voices. The forum included a strong presence of indigenous woman, they offered testimonies about how oil and gas extraction is affecting their communities. Can do white is the lead organizer with indigenous environmental network. She is a native woman from North Dakota. She says call and fracking has brought unprecedented levels of tensor to her community ten.

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