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Burst Details

Hal Ashby, Bob Jones, Editor discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

That is one of the the most, the strongest in like most distinctive debut features from from that period. You mentioned that he was an editor for a lot of years really could have made that his his bread and butter heavy, not gun into directing. And I'm curious, you mentioned Bob Jones. What was it like to be an editor for Hal Ashby? Bob was his own. Like as an editor was a was a diff-. I mean, you know, Ashby had worked with other people previously as editors Jones cut the last detail he took over from somebody else. On that film where. Which had been going that well in post and and the, the cruelty that Bob has has was he was just he was really fast, but also just brilliant. And I think that he was the first person that that Ashby truly trusted as an editor so that he could kinda step back. But because if you look at both the landlord and a how to Maud, those are two films that that Ashby was very, very involved as director editor. He's credited on either film, you know, but they're both very consciously edited films there. There's there's a lot of cuts. They're the editing you might say is stylized. Whereas in the last detail, it's it doesn't sort of telegraph it. So it's not so consciously edited at, I think it was something where he could relax a little bit on the phone feels more relaxed. Bob Jones Cutler filming, kind of intuitively, whereas through, it's a ton of very conscious that is in. In the landlord and and held a Morton in terms of the way that scenes are intercut, where they go from one to another. There's those jokes, there's interplay between this scenes and sequences in the last detail, it's just is a sort of flows a lot more and feels like more of a natural narrative progression end that was the star of Ashby being able to be a less physical presence in in be in the editing room. He would go off and do other things and in a way his, some of the difficulties that he had in in the eighties was when Jones woods had had become a writer and and he had edges, he could depend on less in the editing room and he, he had to become more involved in that and and you know he was trying to at that time he was trying to give. Sorry, he's trying to give young editors a break and was sort of handing over the reins to people who had a lot of potential, but not necessarily a lot of experience and. His films suffered as a result of that, he would try always take things on himself, but he was dealing with the law projects, and you know, sometimes the material was with this note that great to start with, you know, the, you have a foam way look into get out, which I, I'm, I'm a big champion of the ritual released version of that foam is was kinda compromise. It was they had fifteen minutes chopped out of it against Ashby's wishes, but the the, the, the Ashby of that which which released on DVD like nine years ago, I think that really is as a special film, but his films, you know, when when people weren't cutting them appropriately in evidently did suffer. Great. A great deal. I was also curious about eight million ways to die. Did that ever get a release where it was more close to his vision? It didn't, unfortunately for the reason the that it was taken away from him before he, he caught a frame of it. He had a very clear sense of what he was going to do. But as soon as production. Ended on that. That film he was he was relieved of his duties, and so you know, it's, I think it's a film where you see flashes here and there of his work, but it's it. It's so integral to turn Ashby film that he is in some way, a presence in the editing room, but that his intentions are are manifest onscreen. Whereas, you know, the, the music was different..