General Electric, Ella Fitzgerald, Wisconsin discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange
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I will say I mean, obviously was already bought in on this. We've talked about it before on this podcast and energy impact partners. As you mentioned have has a number of investments that are at least partially a play around this. But here's my most recent anecdote for why this is absolutely taking off. I went back to I'm from Wisconsin. And I went back to -sconsin for for thanksgiving where my mother who's retired in her seventies. Definitely not a techno file like, you know, it was a couple years ago when she was still using a non-smart phone to text and couldn't find the space bar 'cause kids will know this. But it used to be you'd have to use the zero for the space bar when you're texting, and you know, a c- would be hitting the number one three times. Anyway, she's she's not attack defile, but I ride home for thanksgiving and thirty minutes after I get there. My. Mom, just says into the air, Alexa, play Ella Fitzgerald. And it turns out that she has like three Amazon echos kind of spread throughout the house connected to a speaker system and a music, I guess a boombox of sorts that still has a tape player in it. So like, she's somehow managed to bridge the old world and whoa. In a way that is just really intriguing to me damn. Well, what's interesting about that is that it does appeal for the non technical and people who get them usually get a bunch of them after they've had one. And that's why so many have been sold. So we'll probably reach fifty million households in the next few years. But we're seeing tens of millions sold every year because a lot of households are buying multiple. Yeah. It's crazy. How fast is this is going absolutely insane. I mean, I if you are an energy company, not thinking about voice, in some way, or an let's put it this way and energy company that interfaces with the consumer. If you're not thinking about your voice strategy in some way. Then there's a problem. If actually if you're just a consumer facing company in general, regardless of energy, and you're not thinking about a voice strategy like how are people going to navigate the internet voice? How are people gonna find you how you're gonna present your brand? What does it sound like, then you're? Doing something wrong. And I think everybody needs to be considering how these devices are going to impact the way consumers interact with them. Okay. Then the energy tech the energy sector or the person that had the biggest setback of the year will once again, I decided to choose a company rather than a technology or person. And I I choose General Electric. Oh, man. And that's my choice. Well, good thing. I got to go first. Ok well, you give your argument 'cause mine's a little broader. But I want to hear your argument at my mine is not a broader specific to General Electric, which is you know, General Electric in the year two thousand was for a time the most valuable company in the world as measured by market cap. It was about a six hundred billion dollar company at that point. Now, it's worth about a tenth of that like sixty seven billion dollars last. I looked it's just been an absolute, and, you know, not. Setting aside, its value, right? Like, General Electric was viewed for a very long time as the iconic American company and not only just the iconic American company, but like the most innovative large American company, and of course, the reputation has totally changed and the company is going through a real existential crisis. And you know, they're a bunch of things that led up to that. So I think there's been a narrative that that is specific to our sector that they didn't pick up on the renewables trend fast enough, and certainly there's a part of that they made this big acquisition of 'Alstom. They spent seventeen billion dollars on awesome. This French energy technology company in two thousand fourteen two thousand fifteen that was a big additional bet on on gas generation largely that has was right at a time when guess generation demand has been sort of flattening and part of that is due to renewables part of that is due to officiency..

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