Galloway, Frederick Douglass, National Equal Rights League discussed on The Larry Elder Show

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

That fallen soldiers. Galloway poses a slave, man, could you imagine that? Can you imagine that? You're a freed man. But you want to fight in this war, you want to help free people that look like you. So Galloway pose as a slave to gather in tolerant intelligence from confederate troops. He set up a spy network in parts of the south. Again, an encourage thousands of enslaved men who had sought protection to take up arms. That is so fascinating. So fascinating. He never learned to read, but used his powerful oratory and organized skills to fight for black people's rights and citizens, Galloway was part of a delegation of 5 southern black leaders to The White House to demand that Lincoln support black civil rights. He organized state and local chapters of the national equal rights league and in September of 1865, he helped to lead a freed people's convention. In 1868, he became one of the first black men elected to the North Carolina legislature and fighting violent voter suppression by the KKK, the Democrat KKK. That was, you guys might not know that, but Democrats formed the KKK in order to fight against black and white Republicans alike. Terrorize them. Galloway, who faced numerous assassination threats, always had pistols at his waist. And led an armed black militia in Wilmington to counter the continent intimidation. He and two other black men won election as state senators while 18 black men became representatives and the North Carolina General Assembly of 1868 to 1869. During his tenure, Galloway voted for the 14th and Fifteenth Amendment. Man, granting granting citizenship and suffrage rights to black man. So that so that we could vote. Absolutely amazing. Now there's Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass, he was the pushing for black recruitment and obviously we've heard of Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass, but we had not heard of these other gentlemen. And this is just important good stuff here. By the time the Civil War began in 1861, Frederick Douglass was one of the most famous black men in the U.S., a prominent voice for freedom, human rights and social reform and exceptional order and writer of whose autobiography autobiographies that detailed his slavery and escape became best sellers at the time unbelievable. Douglass was a national abolitionist who leader who for some 20 years had the ear of the country's leaders. Early in the Civil War, Douglas clashed with Abraham Lincoln president Abraham Lincoln. For not allowing formerly enslaved people to enlist, Lincoln had been reluctant to arm black men and allow them to serve in the union military forces in part due to racism and also for fear that outrage border states would join the secession. Ensuring the unions lost. And listen, guys, we have to look at this stuff in the context of history, right? They had to win this war. The union had to win this war. But as union defeats mounted and manpower dwindle, black men formed units of their own in the south in 1862 an official call to arms to black man came in early 1863. Douglas with other prominent abolitionists helped recruit black soldiers for the union. He traveled thousands of miles to recruitment meetings, lauding the benefits of service and ending many of his speeches by leading the audience in quote, John Brown's body, close quote. That was a popular Union Army song. He published frequently on the topic and his newspaper Douglas monthly. Wow, with articles and broadsides like, quote, men of color, two arms, close quote, and quote, why should a color man enlist close quote? Two of his sons, Charles and Lewis, were among the first to enlist in the famed 54th Massachusetts infantry regiment. Never heard of it. This is so frustrating. The second African American battalion that saw extensive service in the war commanded by white officers, a third son, Frederick junior, was recruited for the regiment like his father for Douglas wearing a uniform of a soldier carried great symbolism of a man's worthiness for freedom and a full slate of civil rights quote an eagle on his button and a musket on his shoulder and his bullets in his pocket. Douglas said, also, he said, quote, there is no power on earth, which can deny that he has earned the right of citizenship and the United States close.

Coming up next