Southeast Louisiana, Mississippi, Louisiana discussed on Tommy Tucker, WWL First News

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Have a good day, You bets extreme voice of the saints. We take a break. We come back, We'll talk to Mike Cooper ST. Tammany Parish president about An update in ST Tammany Parish as it relates to storm preparations matter of fact, the latest on Tropical Storm Sally right now, with Dave Cohen and WWL First news. From our Jefferson Financial Federal Credit Union studios offering great rates on truck loans. It's WWL First news at 7 30. Good morning. Here's the latest from your official weather Station. WWL. We could start feeling some initial impact today from Tropical Storm Sally Mix of sonic Clouds breezy hotted here with a 60% chance of showers and thunderstorms today could season brief heavy rain and there's rain bands with gusty winds. Grand, say 15 to 25 MPH maybe gusting higher in there's rain bands with highs in the upper eighties. Your local weather expert WWL TV meteorologist Dave knows Bomb, however, says with the Eastern shift in the track over the last several forecast from the National Hurricane Center, it's looking more like the worst of the storm is currently forecast to bay over Mississippi and Alabama. Not Louisiana Continue to watch Tropical Storm Sally Very closely is inspected become a hurricane later today, make landfall late tonight. Early Tuesday morning may be briefly touched in southeast Louisiana coast. But now the models have been shifted a little more to the East, making landfall. They're riding along the Mississippi coast, close to Bay ST Louis to the Mississippi Louisiana border. There is a likely category. 1 80 close to being Category two Hurricane Heavy rain storm surge as well. Assume when will be the big issues will be dealing with us? We headed to tonight and throughout the day on Tuesday, any shift to the West could mean dramatically worse conditions for southeast Louisiana, so leaders are calling on everyone to keep their guard up. We have every reason to believe that this storm represents a very significant threat to the people of Southeast Louisiana. Governor Edwards says. The slow movement of the storm heightens the dangers, the slower it moves. The longer the winds generate the storm surge and the Lumber. The rain bands have to just drop torrential amounts of rain in the area. Edward says he's already been in contact with President Trump concerning the storm. I'm Kevin Barnhardt state climatologist Berry, Kym says, even if Louisiana does not take a directed and that forecast track holds for the storm to hit Mississippi Parts of Southeast Louisiana facing East would still see significant storm surge flooding Parish Plaquemines Parish in ST Tammany and, of course, coastal Mississippi. They're the ones that are going to bear the brunt of the search. The National Hurricane Center is calling for up to 11 FT of surge on Eastern facing shores. That's why there's a mandatory evacuation in Orleans and plaque amends outside of the levee protection..

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