NPR, North Carolina, U. S. Supreme Court discussed on Morning Edition

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Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly along the Gulf coast of Louisiana structural damage, power outages and at least one death are reported from Hurricane Zeta. The U. S. Supreme Court is rejecting an effort to block North Carolina's absentee ballot extension. It means mail in ballots with the proper postmark can be counted up to nine days after November, 3rd. Rusty Jacobs with North Carolina Public radio has more state law already allowed for counting absentee ballots postmarked by but received up to three days after election Day. But the governor appointed Democratic Majority State Elections board agreed to extend the deadline by six days to November 12th, part of a legal settlement in state court, with advocacy groups that suit to his absentee ballot rules amid the covered 19 pandemic. GOP state lawmakers went to the U. S. Supreme Court for an emergency stay of the extension after being rejected by a federal appeals court. They accused Democratic appointees of trying to circumvent state law and rig the elections. Five justices declined to intervene in the case. Three justices dissented for NPR news. I'm Rusty Jacobs in Durham, North Carolina. Separately, the court rejected an effort to block Pennsylvania's extended ballot deadline just to say me Cockney Barrett did not take part in either decision. This is NPR news. Florida will be the focus today when President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden hold campaign events in Tampa. The president will also be in North Carolina, with November 3rd now fine days away. Too conservative political operatives or charged with telecommunications fraud and bribery in Ohio, Jacob Wool and Jack Burkman are accused of organizing thousands of robo calls that falsely warned of the dangers of mail in voting. Abigail Sinskey, with member station W. K R, says the tour facing similar charges in Michigan, the two originally made robocalls to around 12,000 voters in Detroit, falsely claiming voter information would be stored in a public database used by police to track down old warrants and passed on to debt collectors. It's estimated around 85,000 calls were made nationally to voters in late August, mostly to urban areas in states like New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Illinois. Now a judge has ordered wool and Berkman to set the record straight with a new robo call. The message must say the original calls contained false information intended to intimidate voters. And must be made by 5 P.m. eastern time Thursday for NPR news in Abigail Sanski IN Lansing. French police say a suspect with a knife killed three people today at a church in Nice. The country's prime minister says France is being.

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