Jerry Mannering, Jerry Mandarin, Jerry Mander discussed on All Things Considered

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The pandemic. We could not sustain long. I mean, it's a miracle. We've gotten this far as far as other people are going out of business Centre small like us. Along with my ironing board solution. Shuler Grace say they hope to survive the coming weeks by relying more on mail order deliveries. Loyal customers across the country. For NPR news. I'm Saul Gonzalez and Paso Robles, California With everything that's been happening this year. It might be easy to forget. The 2020 is also a sense this year. That's important politically because census data determine, among other things, how congressional district are redrawn. A new documentary looks at how the process known as Jerry Mannering has been used to redraw congressional districts in a way that effectively disenfranchises certain voters in key states like Wisconsin and Michigan. The film is called Slay the Dragon, and we spoke to its directors Chris Torrance and Bear Goodman. Endurance told me that while Jerry Mannering is a centuries old practice the way it's been carried out recently has changed. What's happened is that although Democrats and Republicans used to do it in equal measure In the last census. In 2010. We had something very different on it was one party hadn't be the Republicans that instituted a policy they called Project Red map. Which was basically as its host, turning the map read on there really supercharge this old process and decided to use it as a national strategy to just not only take power but hold it for 10 years. On DATs what they did. It was very cost effective, very cheap gave him a huge amount of power in Congress on DH in state capitals on is really upended politics in the US. It's one of the reasons why we're so polarized, I think, and I want to go into more detail about that eventually, but to give our listeners a sense of just how contorted some of these District's Khun B. There's a scene in your film, where there's a group meeting where someone has visual AIDS showing Jerry Mander district's They look like puzzle pieces. One could be shaped like a dragon. Others have names like mustache and praying Mantis. You know, kind of silly kind of funny, But what are the real world consequences of these intentionally contorted shapes of voting districts? Sure, this is Erik. The goal of drawing his district's the way they do is to disenfranchise or diminished the power of one party's voters versus another. And they do this by either packing them, corralling them into one small district and therefore diminishing their power everywhere else or spreading them out. But in either case, the point is to effectively Disenfranchise that party's votes, and so it might look humorous. It might be kind of whimsical, in one sense, but it's devastating in terms of democracy. You know, as old as Jerry Mandarin is your film shows how it has gotten much more sophisticated, dude. Ultramodern data gathering. Here's a clip from author David Daily on how gerrymandering has evolved technologically gerrymandering.

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