Ramones, Todd Rundgren, Lindsay Anderson discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

That was funny. So it was basically Joe's broad structure and a lot of their jokes in now, and so worked out great, you know, and a lot of stuff and it was. That's how they got that job. And as mutants, they were not so good. Rogers still thought it was going to be about this go because disco was hot. You had hot, and I had the really explain to them that you just don't blow up high school better was disco was not rebellious music exact. It's also interesting how you settled on the Ramones because a couple of other bands were actually under consideration. Yeah, and yeah, she trick with the ones that you know closest we, I went to Todd Rundgren. Interesting. And he was really smart and he read the script. He says, the problem is guys. I think this is a serious movie like Lindsay Anderson's if well, which was a huge influence on rock and roll high school. And so you know props to what a compliment? Yes, and he didn't want to for the comedy, you know? And so I had a meeting Warner Brothers and names were coming up and somebody said, you guys know sire records. Do you have a lot of sire records? You know, I have taught. Talking heads and all that. They said, well, how the Ramones and it was like a moment in that room haven't got silent. I thought that's a really funny idea. I I same as second verse same as the first road verse different from the first. I mean, these guys are funny and we went and met with their management, and I told him the whole story, the movie and put in Ramon stones in those places. And it was Danny fields and was Seymour Stein's, wife, Linda, and they were post smoking joints. I was telling the story and laughing and stuff. And then I said, at the end, the Ramones outside high school, and as they play the theme song to the movie, the highschool blows up behind them and they both had we're in, we're in. And didn't you or are the people you worked with their wants make a movie where you said it was basically like the plot in real life, how you made the movie, like the plot of the producers? Oh, no, that's. That's what happened. Razi he? Yeah, that'd be always stocked. Yeah. When I want to get crazy, which was supposed to be for me about my life at the Fillmore east and the Daniel stern character is you was yeah, and I couldn't get it sold that we went to this company and they said that if I made it more like airplane and it, which was a big, hit airplane in rock and roll theater they would make, you know. And so we changed the script and I did that, and that's the movie that's out there. And then they decided that it was didn't have a great preview and people are confused. Why? All these different bands playing and it was too. It was too much like a rock critics movie and was also very, very broad and now and fast paced than you wanted to make it. Yeah. Yeah, yeah. But it was funny. It's like fifteen hundred of fifteen hundred punch lines of maybe only seven hundred jokes. So. And they decided that they could make more money by losing money. So they were, they'd be always. So basically what they did was they sold off all their shares to some kind of tax shelter group, and then they put the movie out there and made sure that whatever the EDS the paper said, they didn't open on that day. And now they have the ads b a week off. They've never show what the critics, but they'd invite critics and now and basically did everything possible to defeat the moving. It was very, very disheartening and that's how it came out and made no money. And they made a lot of money. And I met the guys in charge of the tax shelter group, and I told him what happened and he figured it out, but that's the movie that led me to television. So that was my next step. Not movie. I've just before we get ahead and I want to ask. Other things about get crazy, Gilman Gilbert, love the Bialy stocking thing..

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