Russell Westbrook, Eric Deggans, Michelle Martin discussed on All Things Considered

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From NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin. Tomorrow marks the 1/100 anniversary of the beginning of the Tulsa Race massacre, one of this country's worst recorded incidents of racial violence. Starting on May 31st 1921 and armed white mob aided by complicity or complacent officials killed as many as 300 men, women and Children in the area known as Black Wall Street. Burning it to the ground. Numerous events are taking place this long weekend to mark the centennial, although disputes rose when particularly high profile event was canceled, reportedly in a disagreement over compensation for three elderly survivors who are supposed to take part. But other events are proceeding and there are lots of opportunities to learn more about this traumatic but consequential moment, including numerous TV projects. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has picked three documentaries, which he says you should not miss. For a long time that Tulsa race massacre was the attack America forgot and obliterated Tulsa, Oklahoma's prosperous black own Greenwood district, also known as Black Wall Street. The riots by white moms was hushed up by local officials and overlooked in history books. But that is changing as several TV outlets mark the centennial with documentaries on the massacre and its aftermath. It's an effort educate Americans on a horrendous attack, which burned down over 1200 homes and killed between 103 100 people. Among the best and most cinematic of these efforts is the history Channel film Tulsa Burning that 1921 Race Massacre Co directed by Emmy winner Stanley Nelson and executive produced by MBA star Russell Westbrook. This film opens with Reverend Robert Turner, pastor of Historic Burn in a M E Church who regularly visits Tulsa City Hall with a Bible in a bullhorn, reminding residents of the atrocity You are standing in a crime scene. Reverend Turner Pastors, the church where black people hid in the basement to avoid white moms 100 years ago. He now supports efforts to excavate a.

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