Brentwood, Simpson, F. Lee Bailey discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Well, I answered the phone. And you know, in my book, we talked about murder and Brentwood. I said that I would knowing everything that happened, I would answer it. You still would answer it again. I would. You wouldn't answer it again. I mean, in reflection over the last 15 years, I will tell you. Wish you hadn't picked up that phone. Nobody was worth it. Really? Nobody was worth it. Yeah. Because how has the notoriety from this trial, really affected your life? I'm not the kind of person that wants to do this. Sit on The Oprah show. Your show is pretty good, but okay. You know what I mean? I mean, I don't like to I don't like to recognition, I'd rather be behind the scenes doing something that interests me, very, very much. And that changed completely. I was completely incapable. Let's just imagine that nothing negative ever happened in this. It would have completely ruined my career anyway. Just all the notoriety. Well, when everything was fine, I'd try to go out into the field and work on other murder cases and all the suspects want to talk about the Simpson case. I mean, that's pretty debilitating when you can't be taken serious in that regard. So. Well, as we just saw 13 years ago, you came on the show. And at the time, you admitted that you had made a mistake, and apologized for it. When I was discussing this with the producers, I said, you know, we have all made mistakes in our life. At some point, that perhaps changed the course of our lives. In retrospect, if you had said, because I think a lot of people who have used the N word in their life and that does not mean you are racist because you use the N word. So if you had said at the time, yes, I have used the word. I don't recall using the word, you know, in the recent past, but yes, I have used the word in the past. Do you think that it would have been turned into the racial issue? I think with a reputable attorney. Yeah. I think it was possible. With F. Lee Bailey, he was a bulldog. And all he wanted was a pound of flesh. Now.

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