Jerry Levine, Dan Vela, Tipton discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

And I was going to bet on them and just try to have about 15 tickets. And of course, being a gambler at that time in your young Cavaliers had a horse in that I thought was an easy winner. His name was Carney's point. And I decided that some of my money on carnage points and my yeah, if I recall correctly, he got beat and I only ended up with three tickets on secretary, but that was all right three was enough. But it was a great experience. Yeah. Yeah, I can imagine. But just to be so close to him, didn't you even witness a young lady pulling a piece of hair out of secretariat? Well, that's a long time ago, but I do recall that. I was in the paddock. I was grilling a horse named fave count. It was one of I was very young. And so I was grooving this horse and I was working for Jerry Levine. He got a more experienced room to take the horse to the paddock. So I was walking around on the other side. And I remember turning and watching their secretary in front of me and they said he reaches up and just kind of turned one of his hair from his tail into her finger and just kind of give it a little Paul and he didn't even yeah, I didn't move an inch in L and of course she got something to remember for the rest of her life I guess. But I remember seeing that and it was quite I was impressed with how come he was in the paddock. He not much bothered him. Yeah, people will do just about anything for a souvenir like that, especially from a great horse, like secretariat visiting with trainer Dan vela here on trainer talk presented by facing tipton if you're just tuning in, Dan has been doing this since 1972, so a 50 year career and he has so many wonderful stories. Real quick before we move on, Dan, I want to pass this along a bit of housekeeping here for our listeners. This show, of course, presented by our friends at phasic tipton, facing tipping getting ready to host their winter mix sale in Lexington, Kentucky, which is supposed to start next Monday. We are under a ice storm advisory here in the bluegrass. So because of that phasic has decided to push the sale back one day. So the sale instead of being Monday and Tuesday next week, it will now be Wednesday Tuesday and Wednesday. February 8th and 9th to allow everybody to get in here safely and I think a wonderful move by facing tipton. Let's talk a little bit more about your relationship with Frank stronach in the horses that you had the chance to be around with him. What do you remember about the first time he met Frank and how that relationship came to be with you training for him? Well, I had I had it started a gentleman that worked for him. His name was Don Amos. And I had trained a little bit for I was just getting going and I had training to horse that dawn had sold at auction. And I got to know dawn, he would come by the barn. So yeah, I called him up one day, and I said, general Don, I'd love to get to meet Frank, strong. And I'd love to, you know, I mean, you got to be aggressive sometimes. You got to sell yourself. And Dons got me an interview with Frank and that's where it all started. We sat down and talked and we kind of hit it off right away. My father had been a machinist. He was there was a connection there. We talked a little bit about that. Frank was a machinist when he started out and yeah, next thing I know I had four horses in the barn and had some great success with a couple of them and it moved up from there. Which are some of the horses that you're never going to forget when you think back on your career, Dan, whether they were a dean of spring's horses or horses that were owned by other people that you were around, but some of the horses, when you say, boy, I've been doing this 50 years. I'm never going to forget this horse, or these horses. Yeah. One of my first jobs, I trained for Steve stab. He had affiliate names, agriculture. She was not a very big silly, not imposing. But might have been the fastest horse. I was ever around. We took her to I was training kind of in tandem with another trainer at the time, and for her staff role. And we took her to Europe and she got beat ahead and Frito obeyed a long shot. She was an absolute rocket. So I'll never forget her. You know, probably the best horse I was ever around. Well, not probably. He was ghost sapper was, you know, I mean, if you categorize horses allowance horses, their stay courses, there's grade one horses. There's classic horses. Then there's that category that's kind of mysterious almost. And I called them freaks. They're just rigs. They do things that your whole life, you watch horses and they can't do them. Secretary, it was that way. And I go shopper was much the same. I mean, you could watch him and some of his races and he would, you know, he'd run three quarters of a mile in sprint time. And then just keep on going. And horses shouldn't be able to do those things. And he could. I had the pleasure of breaking him as a baby and getting him ready. And send him out to Bobby frankel and it was kind of he was a bit of a lazy horse, so it took a while for him to really clue in, but of course, Bobby was one of the greatest of all times. And we would chat about him and stuff like that, very interesting, but if I'm not mistaken, first start of his life, I think he run one of the best buyers for a first time starter still ever. And ghost rapper was he was a top end horse that you only see a couple in your lifetime..

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